Author Topic: Downsize your coffee  (Read 8068 times)

RWD

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Downsize your coffee
« on: October 28, 2017, 08:15:00 AM »
Of course we can't just give up our daily coffee. Just downsize to a cheaper one...

This "retirement tip" was displayed on my 401k web site. I love how it assumes you wouldn't want to give up your daily coffee habit (or at least start brewing at home).

This tip would save money for many, but really sets the bar low. Fortunately some of the other tips displayed on the site are more aggressive (e.g. bring your own lunch to work to save $100/month).

JetBlast

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2017, 09:53:37 AM »
I actually kinda like it. Its a good lesson on the power of small efforts multiplied many times becoming a big deal.

lizzzi

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2017, 10:09:13 AM »
Buy your coffee at Aldi and brew it at home. Good Lord.

Travis

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2017, 11:13:27 AM »
As far as retirement advice goes it doesn't suck. That looks like a good start, especially if someone puts two and two together to see how much more they'd save by just brewing some Folgers at the house.  I have to laugh though that they think people who buy their lunch every day are only spending $100 a month.

Just Joe

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2017, 01:49:51 PM »
Coworker eats out every day. Prices when I have gone along range from $5 to $10 (x30 days per month).

The dollar menu is okay once in a blue moon but daily? Yuck. $10 lunches represent a car payment every month.

I enjoy socializing with my coworkers during lunch but the belly aching about money woes (worn out cars, worn out houses, Janey needs braces) is just silly.

No, thanks - but I think I'll eat my leftovers today.

EarthSurfer

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2017, 02:27:51 PM »
I had to reality check the numbers. I have seen a lot of little "nuggets" like this that are based on unrealistic projections. This particular example is realistic.

$40/m for 40 years compounded at 5% ARR is $41,840. 

First, I think saving $2/work day on coffee would mean you already have a ridiculous habit. We all know "True Mustachians" would brew their own if it is a daily habit for a cost of well under $0.50 / cup.

The 5% return is realistic for the 21st Century to date.

Forty year working career isn't FIRE territory, but it in the time range most people are considering.


RWD

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2017, 03:38:43 PM »
I had to reality check the numbers. I have seen a lot of little "nuggets" like this that are based on unrealistic projections. This particular example is realistic.

$40/m for 40 years compounded at 5% ARR is $41,840.

The assumptions are at the bottom of the image. 7% return, 2.5% inflation, 25 years to retirement. Now that I run the numbers myself I see they are wrong...

$40/month for 25 years at 7% is only $32,632. Assuming they meant after inflation dollars then it would be only $22,243.

Maybe they meant it the other way around? 7% real return PLUS 2.5% inflation? That would mean 9.5% return which works out to $49,189. Still doesn't match their claim...

TheAnonOne

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2017, 10:55:25 AM »
Coffee is basically free at home. We even use expensive "k-cups" and just buy Costco cups for around $0.28 per cup.

Understand, k-cups are one of the priciest ways at home to make coffee and still only costs $16 a month for 2 people to drink a cup every. single. day. (which doesn't happen)

GuitarStv

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2017, 11:03:35 AM »
Ugh.  It's like some people don't even realize that you don't need to consume an addictive stimulant every day to function as a normal human being.

AMandM

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2017, 12:06:43 PM »
Ugh.  It's like some people you don't even realize that you don't some people need to consume an addictive stimulant every day to function as a normal human being.

FTFY ;-)

Travis

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2017, 01:16:15 PM »
Ugh.  It's like some people don't even realize that you don't need to consume an addictive stimulant every day to function as a normal human being.

Starbucks, Green Bean, and Tim Hortons gets so complicated with what is or can be put in their drinks I don't even consider it coffee. It feels more like a non-alcoholic cocktail than a caffeinated beverage.  In our household we put on a pot of regular cheap grounds coffee on Sunday and after it's brewed save it in the fridge.  That pot will last us all week, sometimes longer.  If I'm feeling really adventurous I'll add creamer.

frugledoc

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2017, 01:41:15 PM »
Ugh.  It's like some people don't even realize that you don't need to consume an addictive stimulant every day to function as a normal human being.

it is a very tasty, cheap, healthy stimulant.

lizzzi

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2017, 06:26:52 AM »
I drink a cup of coffee every morning just because I enjoy it. I don't think I'm addicted. Lighten up, people.

JetBlast

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2017, 11:13:52 AM »
As I said, I like the message about small changes adding up, but the assumptions are somewhat suspect. To save $40 a month is $1.29 per coffee if you drink one a day in a 31 day month. The difference between the largest and smallest coffee at Starbucks isnt even close to that. To save that much by downsizing you have to be drinking the fancy lattes or frappuccinos. Youd save more by....drinking coffee.

force majeure

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #14 on: November 04, 2017, 11:40:03 AM »
A guy at work, he gets 2 takeaway coffees per day, and regularly buys lunch - example $9 superfood salad.
He travels 90 minutes each way commuting. I think he is on 25K per annum. The mind boggles.

YoungInvestor

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2017, 06:14:57 AM »
I had to reality check the numbers. I have seen a lot of little "nuggets" like this that are based on unrealistic projections. This particular example is realistic.

$40/m for 40 years compounded at 5% ARR is $41,840.

The assumptions are at the bottom of the image. 7% return, 2.5% inflation, 25 years to retirement. Now that I run the numbers myself I see they are wrong...

$40/month for 25 years at 7% is only $32,632. Assuming they meant after inflation dollars then it would be only $22,243.

Maybe they meant it the other way around? 7% real return PLUS 2.5% inflation? That would mean 9.5% return which works out to $49,189. Still doesn't match their claim...

I'm pretty sure it means that the differential between the medium and large is increasing at 2.5%>

RWD

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #16 on: November 05, 2017, 06:26:43 AM »
I had to reality check the numbers. I have seen a lot of little "nuggets" like this that are based on unrealistic projections. This particular example is realistic.

$40/m for 40 years compounded at 5% ARR is $41,840.

The assumptions are at the bottom of the image. 7% return, 2.5% inflation, 25 years to retirement. Now that I run the numbers myself I see they are wrong...

$40/month for 25 years at 7% is only $32,632. Assuming they meant after inflation dollars then it would be only $22,243.

Maybe they meant it the other way around? 7% real return PLUS 2.5% inflation? That would mean 9.5% return which works out to $49,189. Still doesn't match their claim...

I'm pretty sure it means that the differential between the medium and large is increasing at 2.5%>

Ah, that makes sense. It means each year you invest slightly more due to inflation. I reran the numbers and came up with ~$41,675 using those assumptions, which matches the image much more closely. Or about $22,479 in today's dollars.

Chesleygirl

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2017, 08:35:31 AM »
Ugh.  It's like some people don't even realize that you don't need to consume an addictive stimulant every day to function as a normal human being.

I do. I need it every day to function as a normal human being. It's a legal drug so I'm okay with it.

Chesleygirl

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #18 on: November 05, 2017, 08:45:17 AM »
These financial advice articles seem to assume everyone in America spends $5.00 a day on a coffee drink at Starbuck's. I don't know anyone who does that - every day. They also seem to assume that coffee is the sole source of people's financial struggles.

My husband has never set foot in a coffee shop, but he was spending about $100 a month on lunches out, which was literally, eating into our budget.

Anyway, I mostly drink instant coffee, which is cheap. I'm not going to give it up because other people don't approve of this habit. I might not approve of the fact that they buy mayonnaise to put on their sandwiches. I might be thinking "wow, if you go through ten jars of mayo in year with your mayo addiction, you could invest that money and in ten years be a millionaire. Shame on those mayonnaise addicts and I'm so glad I don't eat that stuff".  Except the problem is, I also eat and drink things I don't literally need. I had a glass of wine last night. I could have drank tap water instead. Shame on me. But the reason I don't, is I feel I'm here to enjoy my life in this world. And I'm sure the same goes for people who purchase condiments to put on their sandwiches. They want to enjoy their food. They know they can eat a sandwich without mayo, but they want to enjoy eating their sandwich.

FIT_Goat

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #19 on: November 05, 2017, 05:33:35 PM »
I should run the numbers, but I think my coffee runs me about $0.60 to $1.00 a day.  That is a whole pot of brewed coffee.  I drink most of it, a couple coworkers grab a cup, here or there.  I should run the actual numbers, but I am not willing to cut back on it and buy the brand that is on sale.  I don't think there's a whole lot of room for savings.

I can't stomach buying coffee when out.  I am not paying a couple dollars for something that costs 10-15 cents, especially since I take my coffee black and unsweetened.

I know a couple teachers who show up with a big starbucks coffee (really it's less like coffee and more like a desert beverage) every single day.  I can't imagine how much that adds up to.

COEE

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #20 on: November 05, 2017, 06:27:07 PM »
I had a starbucks habit one summer.  I learned quickly.  These days I have been brewing my own pot of coffee in a french press every morning.  That's my coffee for the day.  I go through a $10-$12 bag of beans from Sams in about a month.  $120/year for coffee isn't bad I don't think.  Maybe another $5 for the electricity to grind the beans and to warm the water each morning.  That comes out to about $0.34 per day for an entire pot of coffee.  I love the sound and smell of fresh brewed coffee every morning.  I also love the taste from the french press. 

Compare that to the $3.50/day latte that I used to drink.  That's somewhere around $3.16/day savings (less if you consider that I only bought the latte on work days (however, it was probably a mile round trip out of my way, so adding for gas it probably evened out).  Compound that over 40 years!  YIKES!

According to this calculator:  https://financialmentor.com/calculator/compound-interest-calculator - you're looking at somewhere around $200k in investments with 6% growth in 40 years.  All from brewing your coffee at home.

I've recently taken to not drinking alcohol at home for similar reasons.  I was spending about $75 a month on booze.  That's a similar per day cost of the latte.  It significantly harder to kick than the starbucks habit though... and I'm still likely to bring a nice bottle of wine or two to a dinner with good friends.

Helvegen

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #21 on: November 06, 2017, 07:50:28 AM »
My job has machines that literally grinds the beans on demand and brews them. It makes decent and free coffee. But despite that, many people make it a point to go out during their breaks/lunch to Starbucks or some other coffee shop to buy coffee several times a week. Granted, some of them are not even buying coffee per se, more like a vaugely coffee flavored glorified milkshake, but still...

ElleFiji

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #22 on: November 06, 2017, 07:59:02 AM »
It isn't going to fix the whole problem, but it might be a tiny step that doesn't hurt too much. When I talk with friends about paring down, I do talk a lot about finding the level of sacrifice that doesn't hurt too much. And then again about occasionally having the big luxury.

So maybe you go from a daily large tea and getting a frappuccino on the Weekend
To a daily medium tea
To taking your own tea and buying one on Friday
To taking your own tea and buying a large tea twice a month and a frapuccino 4 times a year.

Epor

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #23 on: November 06, 2017, 08:56:00 AM »
My job has machines that literally grinds the beans on demand and brews them. It makes decent and free coffee. But despite that, many people make it a point to go out during their breaks/lunch to Starbucks or some other coffee shop to buy coffee several times a week. Granted, some of them are not even buying coffee per se, more like a vaugely coffee flavored glorified milkshake, but still...

You could be talking about my workplace as well. You would think they are all coffee connoisseurs when talking about how our company provided coffee is no good. Give me a break: after all the add-ons like flavored creams and sugared toppings they probably cannot even taste the coffee.


Chesleygirl

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #24 on: November 06, 2017, 09:16:36 AM »
I can't imagine lecturing my friends or co-workers about their spending habits. Sure, I can watch and silently judge and have my opinions about it. But their money habits are their business. 

MgoSam

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #25 on: November 06, 2017, 10:27:18 AM »
I feel like a lot of people have gotten away from coffee but instead are spending their money on energy drinks. I know a few guys that I thought relied on sleep and natural energy to get through the day because I never see them drinking coffee or tea but I found out that they chug a few Monsters throughout the day. I can't imagine how much that must cost or how bad it is for you.

Travis

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #26 on: November 06, 2017, 04:50:48 PM »
My job has machines that literally grinds the beans on demand and brews them. It makes decent and free coffee. But despite that, many people make it a point to go out during their breaks/lunch to Starbucks or some other coffee shop to buy coffee several times a week. Granted, some of them are not even buying coffee per se, more like a vaugely coffee flavored glorified milkshake, but still...

You could be talking about my workplace as well. You would think they are all coffee connoisseurs when talking about how our company provided coffee is no good. Give me a break: after all the add-ons like flavored creams and sugared toppings they probably cannot even taste the coffee.

Even the bags of brand-name coffee (Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts, Black Rifle, etc) are considerably cheaper than walking down to the corner and buying these "pretentious with extra foam please" syrup concoctions.

saving_dutchman

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #27 on: November 07, 2017, 06:34:41 AM »
Ugh.  It's like some people don't even realize that you don't need to consume an addictive stimulant every day to function as a normal human being.

Starbucks, Green Bean, and Tim Hortons gets so complicated with what is or can be put in their drinks I don't even consider it coffee. It feels more like a non-alcoholic cocktail than a caffeinated beverage.  In our household we put on a pot of regular cheap grounds coffee on Sunday and after it's brewed save it in the fridge.  That pot will last us all week, sometimes longer.  If I'm feeling really adventurous I'll add creamer.

I understand the rants about not paying someone to prepare you a hot drink on a regular basis. But I don't really understand having a pot of cold coffee for the entire week instead of brewing a fresh cup every now and then. Do you reheat the cold coffee or do you drink it cold or are you talking about cold brew?

Cost wise it the difference between 1 or 5 brews is tiny, only thing would be the disposable filters (if you use those).

Travis

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #28 on: November 07, 2017, 09:09:40 AM »
Ugh.  It's like some people don't even realize that you don't need to consume an addictive stimulant every day to function as a normal human being.

Starbucks, Green Bean, and Tim Hortons gets so complicated with what is or can be put in their drinks I don't even consider it coffee. It feels more like a non-alcoholic cocktail than a caffeinated beverage.  In our household we put on a pot of regular cheap grounds coffee on Sunday and after it's brewed save it in the fridge.  That pot will last us all week, sometimes longer.  If I'm feeling really adventurous I'll add creamer.

I understand the rants about not paying someone to prepare you a hot drink on a regular basis. But I don't really understand having a pot of cold coffee for the entire week instead of brewing a fresh cup every now and then. Do you reheat the cold coffee or do you drink it cold or are you talking about cold brew?

Cost wise it the difference between 1 or 5 brews is tiny, only thing would be the disposable filters (if you use those).

The first pour is right out of the pot. The pot goes in the fridge. The next day I pour into a mug and stick it in the microwave.

GuitarStv

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #29 on: November 07, 2017, 09:49:37 AM »
Ugh.  It's like some people don't even realize that you don't need to consume an addictive stimulant every day to function as a normal human being.

Starbucks, Green Bean, and Tim Hortons gets so complicated with what is or can be put in their drinks I don't even consider it coffee. It feels more like a non-alcoholic cocktail than a caffeinated beverage.  In our household we put on a pot of regular cheap grounds coffee on Sunday and after it's brewed save it in the fridge.  That pot will last us all week, sometimes longer.  If I'm feeling really adventurous I'll add creamer.

I understand the rants about not paying someone to prepare you a hot drink on a regular basis. But I don't really understand having a pot of cold coffee for the entire week instead of brewing a fresh cup every now and then. Do you reheat the cold coffee or do you drink it cold or are you talking about cold brew?

Cost wise it the difference between 1 or 5 brews is tiny, only thing would be the disposable filters (if you use those).

The first pour is right out of the pot. The pot goes in the fridge. The next day I pour into a mug and stick it in the microwave.

That's not really coffee any more then . . . it's some sort of hellish fridge abomination.  You sir, are a monster.  :P

Travis

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #30 on: November 07, 2017, 10:04:40 AM »
Ugh.  It's like some people don't even realize that you don't need to consume an addictive stimulant every day to function as a normal human being.

Starbucks, Green Bean, and Tim Hortons gets so complicated with what is or can be put in their drinks I don't even consider it coffee. It feels more like a non-alcoholic cocktail than a caffeinated beverage.  In our household we put on a pot of regular cheap grounds coffee on Sunday and after it's brewed save it in the fridge.  That pot will last us all week, sometimes longer.  If I'm feeling really adventurous I'll add creamer.

I understand the rants about not paying someone to prepare you a hot drink on a regular basis. But I don't really understand having a pot of cold coffee for the entire week instead of brewing a fresh cup every now and then. Do you reheat the cold coffee or do you drink it cold or are you talking about cold brew?

Cost wise it the difference between 1 or 5 brews is tiny, only thing would be the disposable filters (if you use those).

The first pour is right out of the pot. The pot goes in the fridge. The next day I pour into a mug and stick it in the microwave.

That's not really coffee any more then . . . it's some sort of hellish fridge abomination.  You sir, are a monster.  :P

My needs are simple :)  I'm actually a little concerned that I'm drinking two cups a week now.  I can't tell if it's social because my wife brews it and offers it, or if I'm just dragging that much more these days.

saving_dutchman

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #31 on: November 08, 2017, 02:48:47 AM »
Ugh.  It's like some people don't even realize that you don't need to consume an addictive stimulant every day to function as a normal human being.

Starbucks, Green Bean, and Tim Hortons gets so complicated with what is or can be put in their drinks I don't even consider it coffee. It feels more like a non-alcoholic cocktail than a caffeinated beverage.  In our household we put on a pot of regular cheap grounds coffee on Sunday and after it's brewed save it in the fridge.  That pot will last us all week, sometimes longer.  If I'm feeling really adventurous I'll add creamer.

I understand the rants about not paying someone to prepare you a hot drink on a regular basis. But I don't really understand having a pot of cold coffee for the entire week instead of brewing a fresh cup every now and then. Do you reheat the cold coffee or do you drink it cold or are you talking about cold brew?

Cost wise it the difference between 1 or 5 brews is tiny, only thing would be the disposable filters (if you use those).

The first pour is right out of the pot. The pot goes in the fridge. The next day I pour into a mug and stick it in the microwave.

That's not really coffee any more then . . . it's some sort of hellish fridge abomination.  You sir, are a monster.  :P

My needs are simple :)  I'm actually a little concerned that I'm drinking two cups a week now.  I can't tell if it's social because my wife brews it and offers it, or if I'm just dragging that much more these days.

Ive heated coffee up in the microwave in the past, but it does negatively affect the taste in my opinion.
Also if you microwave it long enough to reach boiling it starts tasting burned.

Also from my student days I know that brewed coffee left standing around for too long will grow mold.

Only two cups per week? :O.
One of my FIRE dreams is drinking freshly brewed coffee while wearing a bathrobe and watching other people go to work.

Chesleygirl

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #32 on: November 08, 2017, 08:43:41 AM »

Ive heated coffee up in the microwave in the past, but it does negatively affect the taste in my opinion.
Also if you microwave it long enough to reach boiling it starts tasting burned.

Also from my student days I know that brewed coffee left standing around for too long will grow mold.

Only two cups per week? :O.
One of my FIRE dreams is drinking freshly brewed coffee while wearing a bathrobe and watching other people go to work.

A guy I used to work with, would take the rest of the brewed coffee in the breakroom, home in his thermos and re-heat it for his coffee the next morning at home. That stuff had been on a burner all day and had turned to sludge. Now I'm thinking it had mold in it too, possibly? I'd never drink that old coffee.

He also ate the free popcorn in the breakroom for lunch every day, along with a can of tuna fish. That was his lunch every day. I'm sure he saved a lot of money though.

COEE

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #33 on: November 08, 2017, 12:08:31 PM »
The first pour is right out of the pot. The pot goes in the fridge. The next day I pour into a mug and stick it in the microwave.

I don't even put mine in the fridge overnight.  Just reheat the next morning.  I don't think I'm getting a big dose of penecillin each morning.  And if I am, okay.  I've never had any ill effect.

The french press leaves the oils in the coffee so I can't really taste a difference unless as long as I don't reheat too long.

saving_dutchman

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #34 on: November 08, 2017, 10:42:16 PM »

Ive heated coffee up in the microwave in the past, but it does negatively affect the taste in my opinion.
Also if you microwave it long enough to reach boiling it starts tasting burned.

Also from my student days I know that brewed coffee left standing around for too long will grow mold.

Only two cups per week? :O.
One of my FIRE dreams is drinking freshly brewed coffee while wearing a bathrobe and watching other people go to work.

A guy I used to work with, would take the rest of the brewed coffee in the breakroom, home in his thermos and re-heat it for his coffee the next morning at home. That stuff had been on a burner all day and had turned to sludge. Now I'm thinking it had mold in it too, possibly? I'd never drink that old coffee.

He also ate the free popcorn in the breakroom for lunch every day, along with a can of tuna fish. That was his lunch every day. I'm sure he saved a lot of money though.

Wow, that's ERE territory!

But the mold will not show up in a day. That takes around a week in my experience.

Dicey

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #35 on: November 09, 2017, 07:48:45 AM »
I don't drink coffee, but I make it in quantity for a meeting once a month. Instead of dumping the leftovers, I give them to my 93 year old, completely with-it neighbor. She refrigerates it and keeps heating and drinking it until it's gone. She grew up in Alaska and wastes nothing. Because I know she does this, I've switched to cold brew coffee, which is laughably simple to make, and hopefully less bitter upon reheating.

I sometimes wonder if the go-out-for-coffee multiple times per day people aren't either 1. Smokers or 2. Reformed smokers. In the case of the former, "coffee" is the more acceptable break than "smoke". In the case of the latter, it gives them something to fiddle with instead of a cigarette. In those cases, one could argue that their coffee habit is saving them a ton of money over the exhorbitant cost of cigarettes, particularly if one considers the health costs of smoking.

Sidebar rant(s): k-cups are incredibly wasteful. Sure, you don't waste coffee, but you add so many tiny plastic cups to the landfill! Most commercially produced coffee cups are plastic lined and cannot be recycled. The volume of non-recyclable trash created by a single Starbucks per day is astronomical! Making your coffee at home or work is far more environmentally friendly, which is a nice bonus to the money you're saving.

economista

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #36 on: November 09, 2017, 11:36:47 AM »
I work for a government agency so they aren't allowed to supply us with things like coffee, so people bring in coffee pots to use.  However, it has gotten out of control because people don't seem to share, so the office is over-run with coffee makers.  Yes, brewing your own coffee at work is better than buying coffee at the coffee shop multiple times a day, but how many of these do we need?  I'm also assuming everyone who bought one of these machines also has a similar one at home.  A french press would be cheaper!  Here is a picture of 1 kitchenette in office.  I walked through half of our space yesterday and counted 8 regular coffee makers and 5 keurigs!

Dicey

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #37 on: November 09, 2017, 11:41:04 AM »
OMG! I wonder how many of those regular pots belong to people who "upgraded" to keurig's and couldn't be arsed to remove the old one.

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #38 on: November 09, 2017, 03:09:59 PM »

One of my FIRE dreams is drinking freshly brewed coffee while wearing a bathrobe and watching other people go to work.

Why so fancy?  Who needs a robe when they are already in pajamas?

And yes, sitting there with the after-breakfast coffee (pour-over Melita filter style) while everyone else is at work is just . . . . . . . . . .

saving_dutchman

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #39 on: November 10, 2017, 02:53:45 AM »

One of my FIRE dreams is drinking freshly brewed coffee while wearing a bathrobe and watching other people go to work.

Why so fancy?  Who needs a robe when they are already in pajamas?

And yes, sitting there with the after-breakfast coffee (pour-over Melita filter style) while everyone else is at work is just . . . . . . . . . .

The bathrobe is to keep me warm when I go sweep the driveway after finishing my coffee.
For now (unFIREd) I satisfy this need by leaving work really early on Friday to have a drink with friends sometimes.

ACyclist

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #40 on: November 10, 2017, 09:08:54 AM »
We buy good grounds, but make it at home in a French press.   I stopped buying coffee out, after I joined this forum.  I was already pretty frugal, but everything has gone to the next level now.

Free Spirit

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #41 on: November 10, 2017, 09:15:12 AM »
I work for a government agency so they aren't allowed to supply us with things like coffee, so people bring in coffee pots to use.  However, it has gotten out of control because people don't seem to share, so the office is over-run with coffee makers.  Yes, brewing your own coffee at work is better than buying coffee at the coffee shop multiple times a day, but how many of these do we need?  I'm also assuming everyone who bought one of these machines also has a similar one at home.  A french press would be cheaper!  Here is a picture of 1 kitchenette in office.  I walked through half of our space yesterday and counted 8 regular coffee makers and 5 keurigs!

I'm going to pretend that note above the Keurig is actually for the tiny Mr.Coffee pot in the corner. lol

jinga nation

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #42 on: November 10, 2017, 09:16:01 AM »
We buy good grounds, but make it at home in a French press.   I stopped buying coffee out, after I joined this forum.  I was already pretty frugal, but everything has gone to the next level now.
I was like you. Then I started buying good beans and ground them in small batches in a $20 Krups grinder. The fresher the ground coffee the better the press and pour. Ohh that aroma be mighty bliss!

Helvegen

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #43 on: November 10, 2017, 10:54:30 AM »
My job has machines that literally grinds the beans on demand and brews them. It makes decent and free coffee. But despite that, many people make it a point to go out during their breaks/lunch to Starbucks or some other coffee shop to buy coffee several times a week. Granted, some of them are not even buying coffee per se, more like a vaugely coffee flavored glorified milkshake, but still...

You could be talking about my workplace as well. You would think they are all coffee connoisseurs when talking about how our company provided coffee is no good. Give me a break: after all the add-ons like flavored creams and sugared toppings they probably cannot even taste the coffee.

Even the bags of brand-name coffee (Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts, Black Rifle, etc) are considerably cheaper than walking down to the corner and buying these "pretentious with extra foam please" syrup concoctions.

Have you ever seen how much sugar is crammed into those drinks? A Grande White Chocolate Peppermint Mocha has 69g of sugar in it. That is around 1/3c of pure sugar! Coffee is the third ingredient.

Quote from: Starbucks
Ingredients
Milk, White Chocolate Mocha Sauce [Sugar, Condensed Skim Milk, Coconut Oil, Cocoa Butter, Natural Flavor, Salt, Potassium Sorbate, Monoglycerides], Brewed Espresso, Peppermint Syrup [Sugar, Water, Natural Flavor, Sodium Benzoate, Citric Acid].


Chesleygirl

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #44 on: November 10, 2017, 12:57:23 PM »
I don't order those flavored coffee drinks, like pumpkin spice latte or peppermint mochas. The sugar is too much, even for me who has a sweet tooth. I get espresso.

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #45 on: November 10, 2017, 01:06:24 PM »
I feel like I'm one of the only people in the world that doesn't "need" caffeine. It seems like everyone at my gym and work needs something to get started in the morning. I make myself a mug of tea each day but it's often herbal.

gerardc

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #46 on: November 12, 2017, 09:22:04 PM »
I feel like I'm one of the only people in the world that doesn't "need" caffeine. It seems like everyone at my gym and work needs something to get started in the morning. I make myself a mug of tea each day but it's often herbal.

I don't. If I feel like it, then:


but it's rare. No point in drinking actual coffee, it doesn't even taste good, costs money, takes time, dishes, etc. It's an acquired taste, so just don't acquire it, or if you have it already, dis-acquire it :)

MrsPete

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #47 on: November 15, 2017, 03:59:10 PM »
This is actually a pretty good tip ... for the newly frugal.  It's a small step that someone struggling with how to save money could take: it's actually about consuming less.

It makes more sense than the oft-repeated idea about putting your change into a jar.  That's just keeping your money in a different place instead of consuming less. 

Dicey

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Re: Downsize your coffee
« Reply #48 on: November 16, 2017, 01:52:10 AM »
This is actually a pretty good tip ... for the newly frugal.  It's a small step that someone struggling with how to save money could take: it's actually about consuming less.

It makes more sense than the oft-repeated idea about putting your change into a jar.  That's just keeping your money in a different place instead of consuming less.
OMG, that is so true! I also dislike the advice to save all of your [fill in the denomination]. No, that's just tricking yourself into saving by moving the shell under a different pea. Consuming less is far more effective!