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Around the Internet => Antimustachian Wall of Shame and Comedy => Topic started by: nobody123 on May 31, 2016, 10:11:01 AM

Title: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: nobody123 on May 31, 2016, 10:11:01 AM
So I was in a sporting goods store this weekend.  In the cooler aisle, I saw a sign by the Yeti coolers advertising a credit card with 0% financing so you could buy said $400 cooler and pay it off over 6 months or so.  I was shocked for about 3 seconds, wondering who on earth would open up a line of credit to buy a $400 cooler.  Then I remembered that the sign is only there because lots of stupid folks would take advantage of that offer.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: VaCPA on May 31, 2016, 01:43:52 PM
Maybe they're hoping to get some young people to sign up who don't have a credit card yet. Could be a decent spot to place a credit card offer.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Chris22 on May 31, 2016, 01:49:47 PM
Those coolers apparently are a huge status symbol amongst the hunting and fishing outdoorsy set down south.  Don't get it myself, my $30 Coleman does just fine keeping my beer cold, and more importantly, it has wheels. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: eljefe-speaks on May 31, 2016, 02:34:08 PM
As far as I can tell it's mostly the college kids. Yetis are somehow a status symbol akin to expensive sunglasses or trucks. I find it a totally bewildering phenomenon, but that's sociology at work I guess.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: eljefe-speaks on May 31, 2016, 02:41:54 PM
FYI, from Wikipedia, LOL!:

"Brothers Roy and Ryan Seiders founded the company in 2006, pioneering the luxury cooler market, and convincing customers to purchase a cooler costing several hundred dollars vs. the typical $40"

Luxury cooler!? Like I said - just bewildering. It's one of the most un-mastachian things I can possibly think of. Gets my gears turning trying to figure out what else I can find to simply charge 10 times the pricing, call it luxury, and make a mint.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: VaCPA on May 31, 2016, 02:59:57 PM
FYI, from Wikipedia, LOL!:

"Brothers Roy and Ryan Seiders founded the company in 2006, pioneering the luxury cooler market, and convincing customers to purchase a cooler costing several hundred dollars vs. the typical $40"

Luxury cooler!? Like I said - just bewildering. It's one of the most un-mastachian things I can possibly think of. Gets my gears turning trying to figure out what else I can find to simply charge 10 times the pricing, call it luxury, and make a mint.

Isn't anything with the word "luxury" basically a complete blatant violation of the MMM handbook?
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: v8rx7guy on May 31, 2016, 03:08:08 PM
Yeti coolers are definitely a status symbol for country folk... they've even made their way into a very popular country song, "Buy me a boat"
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Rural on May 31, 2016, 03:09:36 PM
People even pay a considerable premium for clothing advertising Yeti.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: fattest_foot on May 31, 2016, 03:11:18 PM
I didn't realize there were coolers.

I know last year the company had some big hoopla because one of their coffee mugs was (allegedly) in a car fire and survived with ice intact. My in-laws ate it up and now both own one.

I'm assuming the coolers probably make the same claim?
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: CmFtns on May 31, 2016, 03:37:09 PM
Yeti stuff is nice but I think their stuff is just ridiculously stupidly priced and I hate the image they give off... I use their mug for coffee ever day but this is only because for some reason people think it's a good idea to buy and give away $35 cups as promotional items... WTF

I debate even using it because I am exactly the opposite kind of person that would ever own a yeti but all my other cups are terrible so...


My brother is all about the costa sunglasses and had a yeti cooler/cups/clothing and fancy cowboy boots to compliment his wannabe country lifestyle... Drives me crazy
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FIREby35 on May 31, 2016, 08:26:53 PM
OMG. I literally had no idea that was a thing and I am truly shocked. I watched. 1 minute promo for a $300 (!!!!) cooler with all this ridiculous stuff (apparently bear proof, wtf?!). The video ends "Great for 18 of your favorite drinks." Seriously, $300 for a cooler that holds an 18 of Busch Light😂
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: libertarian4321 on May 31, 2016, 09:58:59 PM
OMG. I literally had no idea that was a thing and I am truly shocked. I watched. 1 minute promo for a $300 (!!!!) cooler with all this ridiculous stuff (apparently bear proof, wtf?!). The video ends "Great for 18 of your favorite drinks." Seriously, $300 for a cooler that holds an 18 of Busch Light😂

I'd never heard of them either.  My old Coleman (spent maybe $20 on it in the mid '90s?) seems to work just fine.

Marketing folks never fail to find another way to separate the rich broke-ass "wanna bes" from their money...
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mpg350 on May 31, 2016, 10:49:21 PM
The stupidity of people and how they deal with money never ceases to amaze me.

Checked website they had a freaking tub for sale for over $200 you gotta to be freaking kidding me.

Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Ethernet on May 31, 2016, 11:37:50 PM
Yeti is all the brand name. I used to work in a hardware store with a lot of downtime. We did some "Ice melt" testing with their cups. The first generation of knock offs was only a few hours short of the Yeti cups insulation.

But, the price was a $5 cup (which was also colored and much better looking IMO) vs the $45 Yeti cup that was still cheaper than what amazon was selling them at.

I'm sure the newer knock offs are starting to up their game too. Consumers.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FINate on June 01, 2016, 12:03:43 AM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category. There are legitimate places and situations where these are necessary and in the big scheme of things a $300 cooler that lasts a lifetime is not a big deal.

On the other hand, these are overkill for the vast majority of people hauling them to their lakeside campsites with 4x4s over gravel roads. My guess is that 99.9% of the people with Yetis don't even bother padlocking them, which makes the bear protection approximately nil. Have to hand it to the Yeti marketing folks for somehow getting people to overspend 4-5x, though.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: winkeyman on June 01, 2016, 06:28:56 AM
Yeti coolers are another one of those items that serve a real purpose for some people who need them, but have become a status symbol for people who don't need them.

Who needs them? FINate made a good point regarding bear resistance. In my line of work though, they are a godsend for many people in the oil field. If you are pipeline welder who spends days at a time in the middle of nowhere in the summer in the desert, having a cooler that can keep food and drinks cold for a week is a blessing.

Yeti coolers are an example of combining a good product with great marketing to vastly expand your product base. Another favorite example of mine are Doggles. Dog-goggles were invented to protect the eyes of dogs with eye issues, as well as working dogs and military dogs in the desert. The fact that they are able to make a small fortune selling them to people to "accessorize" their dogs is icing on the cake.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: nobody123 on June 01, 2016, 06:46:19 AM
When I mentioned the promo to my neighbor (an avid hunter and camper) his face lit up and said they "are freaking awesome.  They will keep a bag of ice cold for like 7 days."  I asked him how many times he camps without access to ice for 7 days.  Then I asked him how many bags of ice he could by for $350.

I'm sure, like almost anything, there's an applicable use for a high-end cooler (like the oil field in the middle of nowhere example).  I'm just more surprised that someone would open up a credit card for the sole purpose of financing a $400 purchase of a luxury item.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: bloomability on June 01, 2016, 07:29:07 AM
Walmart sells the same cups for $8/20oz, $10/30oz. Ozark Trail.

Yeti used to be very popular in my neck of the woods, but people are upset that the company was bought out and moved production to China. Now the popular item is Orca.

The cup crazes are so fascinating - nalgene -> camelback -> yeti -> tin camping mugs -> the re-emergence of camping thermoses 

What will be next?!
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mak1277 on June 01, 2016, 08:19:59 AM
When I mentioned the promo to my neighbor (an avid hunter and camper) his face lit up and said they "are freaking awesome.  They will keep a bag of ice cold for like 7 days."  I asked him how many times he camps without access to ice for 7 days.  Then I asked him how many bags of ice he could by for $350.

I'm sure, like almost anything, there's an applicable use for a high-end cooler (like the oil field in the middle of nowhere example).  I'm just more surprised that someone would open up a credit card for the sole purpose of financing a $400 purchase of a luxury item.

I think there are a fair amount of hunters who do spend several days out in the backcountry (or even at their cabins) without access to ice.  And when you have to cool off a deer or elk that you killed, it's crucial to have ice available at the end of your hunt.

Does the normal everyday person need a yeti cooler?  Of course not.  But comparing them to a $30 Coleman cooler is way off base.

Here's a good article (on a great blog) discussing the topic:

http://stalkingtheseam.com/2015/09/30/do-you-really-need-a-yeti/
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Chris22 on June 01, 2016, 08:34:12 AM
But comparing them to a $30 Coleman cooler is way off base.


It is and it isn't.  It's off base if you NEED the additional capability a Yeti offers.  It is undeniably better at some things.  But it isn't off base if you're not using the Yeti's capacity, and only using it for things like day trips where a Coleman is perfectly adequate.  It's like saying a Ferrari and a Honda are incomparable; yeah, if you're using the Ferrari to its capability they are, but if you are just driving each to work and back, is one really better than the other?
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FINate on June 01, 2016, 09:39:41 AM
When I mentioned the promo to my neighbor (an avid hunter and camper) his face lit up and said they "are freaking awesome.  They will keep a bag of ice cold for like 7 days."  I asked him how many times he camps without access to ice for 7 days.  Then I asked him how many bags of ice he could by for $350.

Many people, myself included, camp where the nearest ice is a multiple hour drive away. Basically camping along forest service roads in the middle of nowhere. I don't own a Yeti and when I do trips like this it is typically for just a few days so a standard cooler works just fine. However, if I ever started doing longer trips the gas/time savings would quickly justify the increased cost.

I'm sure, like almost anything, there's an applicable use for a high-end cooler (like the oil field in the middle of nowhere example).  I'm just more surprised that someone would open up a credit card for the sole purpose of financing a $400 purchase of a luxury item.

Agreed, this is absurd. Though, truth be told, I'm not surprised that people do this.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: shotgunwilly on June 01, 2016, 09:56:09 AM
Somewhat of a status symbol...

But compared to other coolers, they are absolutely incredible.  It all seems like hoopla and "it's just a cooler" until you witness the damn thing keep ice for an eternity.  And the stainless Yeti rambler cups which i thought were for sure just a fad since Yeti became popular... Well I've witnessed the thing hold iced tea left in my truck in 95 degree Texas heat for an entire weekend, and come back and it still have ice in it.

Although I do not own a Yeti product. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: shotgunwilly on June 01, 2016, 10:15:17 AM
The cup crazes are so fascinating - nalgene -> camelback -> yeti -> tin camping mugs -> the re-emergence of camping thermoses 

What will be next?!

Copper mugs for moscow mules.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mak1277 on June 01, 2016, 01:25:43 PM
And the stainless Yeti rambler cups which i thought were for sure just a fad since Yeti became popular... Well I've witnessed the thing hold iced tea left in my truck in 95 degree Texas heat for an entire weekend, and come back and it still have ice in it.

Although I do not own a Yeti product.

I do own a yeti rambler cup, and it far outperforms any insulated mug I've ever had before. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Villanelle on June 01, 2016, 01:52:26 PM

Copper mugs for moscow mules.

Stuff like that is why we all "need" giant homes as well.  We need a special cup for one very specific drink (and probably not a drink that is consumed with much frequency in most homes) and we need a place to store those mugs, which will likely be somewhere near all of the super specific kitchen gadgets people own, when in most cases something they already have (like a knife) would work just as well.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mak1277 on June 01, 2016, 02:59:05 PM

Copper mugs for moscow mules.

Stuff like that is why we all "need" giant homes as well.  We need a special cup for one very specific drink (and probably not a drink that is consumed with much frequency in most homes) and we need a place to store those mugs, which will likely be somewhere near all of the super specific kitchen gadgets people own, when in most cases something they already have (like a knife) would work just as well.

I call BS...there's NO WAY you could use a knife to drink a moscow mule.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Mr. Green on June 01, 2016, 03:23:17 PM
And the stainless Yeti rambler cups which i thought were for sure just a fad since Yeti became popular... Well I've witnessed the thing hold iced tea left in my truck in 95 degree Texas heat for an entire weekend, and come back and it still have ice in it.
That's seriously impressive!
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: steviesterno on June 02, 2016, 09:40:19 AM
I got one of their mugs, and I have to say it's helped me save money. I used to never make coffee at home, because it was cold by the time I got to work 30 minutes later (don't like chugging coffee while driving). But I can brew at home, take it to work, and it will still burn my tongue at lunch.


also, I got one for the wife (for her birthday). She's the one up all night taking care of the baby, and if she can have a big glass of freezing water without wandering down the stairs, it's worth it to her (and me!).

They are a great product with a crazy cult following. I'm fine with the off brand, but I will be replacing all my summer cups with versions of these. There's something really worth while about an ice cold drink in the Texas heat that makes life just a bit better. Used to be Tervis, but Yeti ice will last for days.

I don't see a need for the cooler, but I don't spend a lot of time overlanding. Those that do, this works like a fridge. Personally, I would buy a travel fridge since they are about the same price, but again not a need for me.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: CmFtns on June 02, 2016, 10:42:32 AM
I got one of their mugs, and I have to say it's helped me save money. I used to never make coffee at home, because it was cold by the time I got to work 30 minutes later (don't like chugging coffee while driving). But I can brew at home, take it to work, and it will still burn my tongue at lunch.

Okay I feel like people exaggerate here...

I got to work at 8:20am and right now it is 12:40 and I have drank about 2/3 from my 20oz mug since this morning... And right now it is ever so slightly warm... Maybe this is true if you fill it to the brim with boiling water and never take a sip before lunch but in practical use this cup is not a miracle worker... It is just kinda sorta twice as good for 5-10 times the cost...

Before I would just use the microwave at 10am instead to bump up my crappy mug another 50 degrees. I don't care what people say but this cup is not worth the cost. I enjoy quality products at a fair price premium but come on guys this is a freaking $30-40 cup.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Making Cookies on June 02, 2016, 10:11:26 PM
I got one of their mugs, and I have to say it's helped me save money. I used to never make coffee at home, because it was cold by the time I got to work 30 minutes later (don't like chugging coffee while driving). But I can brew at home, take it to work, and it will still burn my tongue at lunch.

Okay I feel like people exaggerate here...

I got to work at 8:20am and right now it is 12:40 and I have drank about 2/3 from my 20oz mug since this morning... And right now it is ever so slightly warm... Maybe this is true if you fill it to the brim with boiling water and never take a sip before lunch but in practical use this cup is not a miracle worker... It is just kinda sorta twice as good for 5-10 times the cost...

Before I would just use the microwave at 10am instead to bump up my crappy mug another 50 degrees. I don't care what people say but this cup is not worth the cost. I enjoy quality products at a fair price premium but come on guys this is a freaking $30-40 cup.

For the record our Thermos brand coffee cups can do this much. Luke warm after waiting from 7AM to about noon in a ~70 degree room.

We just bought our second pair. Both the originals and the new ones are keepers for us simply b/c they don't leak. Previous alternatives (usually cheap) leaked if tipped over.

Only problem is that the paint (powdercoating) flakes off after a year or so of being run through the dishwasher five days a week. Wife carries the new cups to work. I carry the worn cups b/c appreances are not nearly as important in my department.

Under the paint is a nice stainless steel finish so be patient long enough and that ugly cup will be presentable again.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: eljefe-speaks on June 03, 2016, 12:14:34 PM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category.

Never done the outdoorsy stuff out west (except for skiing). I though one was supposed to suspend edibles from a tree to bear-proof it? Also, one can't really backpack with a heavy cooler, right? So I would assume if you have a heavy cooler, you have a car nearby. Is a heavy Yeti cooler locked in a car better than a Styrofoam cooler locked in a car? One other thing - if a grizzly gets my cooler - I am NOT, in a million years, going sit around and wait for him to finish, then go get my scratched-to-hell-but-miraculously-intact cooler back. I am going first piss down my leg, then take off my shirt (a guy's subconsciously programmed reaction to adrenaline and fear), then run like an m effer and never come back.

(I am really curious about these things, not just trying to be a dick.)
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Uturn on June 03, 2016, 12:29:20 PM
The organization that I do volunteer work for gave each of us a Yeti 20oz cup.  I love this thing.  I make client visits all over town and it is great to be able to get back into my car and have ice water waiting for me.  That being said, it I lost possession of it, there is no way that I would pay that kind of money to replace it.  There has to be a comparable product for at least half the money. 

I've never used their cooler, but I can say the Coleman Xtreme cooler does not live up to the advertisement. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mak1277 on June 03, 2016, 12:32:54 PM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category.

Never done the outdoorsy stuff out west (except for skiing). I though one was supposed to suspend edibles from a tree to bear-proof it? Also, one can't really backpack with a heavy cooler, right? So I would assume if you have a heavy cooler, you have a car nearby. Is a heavy Yeti cooler locked in a car better than a Styrofoam cooler locked in a car? One other thing - if a grizzly gets my cooler - I am NOT, in a million years, going sit around and wait for him to finish, then go get my scratched-to-hell-but-miraculously-intact cooler back. I am going first piss down my leg, then take off my shirt (a guy's subconsciously programmed reaction to adrenaline and fear), then run like an m effer and never come back.

(I am really curious about these things, not just trying to be a dick.)

A lot of places out west require specific bear-proof receptacles for food storage.  No, you wouldn't use a yeti if you were backpacking, but you would have to carry a bear can (as opposed to just hanging your food).  But if you're in a base camp for hunting, this is definitely a good (if expensive) option.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: CmFtns on June 03, 2016, 12:41:21 PM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category.

Never done the outdoorsy stuff out west (except for skiing). I though one was supposed to suspend edibles from a tree to bear-proof it? Also, one can't really backpack with a heavy cooler, right? So I would assume if you have a heavy cooler, you have a car nearby. Is a heavy Yeti cooler locked in a car better than a Styrofoam cooler locked in a car? One other thing - if a grizzly gets my cooler - I am NOT, in a million years, going sit around and wait for him to finish, then go get my scratched-to-hell-but-miraculously-intact cooler back. I am going first piss down my leg, then take off my shirt (a guy's subconsciously programmed reaction to adrenaline and fear), then run like an m effer and never come back.

(I am really curious about these things, not just trying to be a dick.)

Yesterday while at work I went to the bathroom and while I was away a BEAR had showed up at my cubicle and eaten my yeti rambler... Well obviously I followed the bear around for a few hours and eventually the cup made it through his system and after I washed it off in the drinking fountain I noticed there was not even a scratch on the cup... and the coffee was even HOTTER than it was before the bear ate it.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: RWD on June 03, 2016, 12:53:41 PM
I saw a Jeep with a Yeti cooler bumper sticker yesterday. I wouldn't have even noticed it if it wasn't for this thread...
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FINate on June 03, 2016, 04:35:49 PM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category.

Never done the outdoorsy stuff out west (except for skiing). I though one was supposed to suspend edibles from a tree to bear-proof it? Also, one can't really backpack with a heavy cooler, right? So I would assume if you have a heavy cooler, you have a car nearby. Is a heavy Yeti cooler locked in a car better than a Styrofoam cooler locked in a car? One other thing - if a grizzly gets my cooler - I am NOT, in a million years, going sit around and wait for him to finish, then go get my scratched-to-hell-but-miraculously-intact cooler back. I am going first piss down my leg, then take off my shirt (a guy's subconsciously programmed reaction to adrenaline and fear), then run like an m effer and never come back.

(I am really curious about these things, not just trying to be a dick.)

A lot of places out west require specific bear-proof receptacles for food storage.  No, you wouldn't use a yeti if you were backpacking, but you would have to carry a bear can (as opposed to just hanging your food).  But if you're in a base camp for hunting, this is definitely a good (if expensive) option.

A bear can easily rip a car open like a tin can, so storing food in your car in areas with a large bear populations is a bit risky. Better to store something like a Yeti outside and let the bear bat it around until they get tired of it.

My guess as to why hunters use these: Hunting in the West is a very active sport, typically requiring one to cover lots of off-trail mountainous terrain, and the best times to hunt are at first and last light. This means most hunters start hiking in the dark (anytime between 2-4am) to get to a good vantage point before sunrise, and then are out all day and hike back at night. It's not uncommon to bivouac for a night. So they keep a base camp to restock/refresh as needed, but are otherwise mostly out in the bush. Having a bear resistant cooler that apparently does a good job keeping ice for a long time (from what I've heard) makes sense.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: No Name Guy on June 03, 2016, 11:41:00 PM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category.

Never done the outdoorsy stuff out west (except for skiing). I though one was supposed to suspend edibles from a tree to bear-proof it? Also, one can't really backpack with a heavy cooler, right? So I would assume if you have a heavy cooler, you have a car nearby. Is a heavy Yeti cooler locked in a car better than a Styrofoam cooler locked in a car? One other thing - if a grizzly gets my cooler - I am NOT, in a million years, going sit around and wait for him to finish, then go get my scratched-to-hell-but-miraculously-intact cooler back. I am going first piss down my leg, then take off my shirt (a guy's subconsciously programmed reaction to adrenaline and fear), then run like an m effer and never come back.

(I am really curious about these things, not just trying to be a dick.)

Yeah, there are places on the Pacific Crest Trail where bear resistant food storage is mandatory.  Hikers carry cans (e.g. Bear Vault,  Bearakade, etc).  A bear resistant cooler would be a horse packed item in the back country.

I do volunteer trail work here in Washington.  Black bears here are not like the Yosemite ones - here, they're afraid of people (since people = shot bear in the fall).  In the parks...well, different story, and the Yosemite bears have a long history of getting food from people so the mother Yogi's teach the little ones.  As others have stated, they'll rip a car open to get the food.  Hiker friend of mine had her pack stolen from literally 3 feet away from her by a bear - it scooped out the contents with one swipe of a paw and, lucky for her, went after her trash bag.  As it walked away with that, she grabbed up everything else, stuffed it back into the pack and took off.

Anyways....as to the cooler aspects of this product...I call bullshit.  My camp cook kept food for 12 chilled for 8 days in the back country on a trail project last year.....with a plain Jane pair of Coleman coolers.  That was being horse packed in hours into the Wilderness where getting more chill isn't going to happen.  It's about keeping the cooler in the shade and closed, and a bit of dry ice to start things off.  She packed "chill" food in one, nothing but solidly frozen in the other with a few blocks of dry ice grabbed on the way to meet the horse packers.  The frozen cooler was opened once a day to move the next day's meal into the "chill" cooler to thaw, in the process keeping the "chill" cooler chilled. 

YMMV. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: ShoulderThingThatGoesUp on June 06, 2016, 11:15:14 AM
I haven't watched Shark Tank in a long time, but I remember a product that was just a cooler with an LED strip inside that turned on when you opened in. Daymond John's response was "I know a guy in the hood who will go camping with you every time just to hold a flashlight up to your cooler for that money."
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Fishindude on June 06, 2016, 12:30:02 PM
Guilty here.   I own a Yeti.
Had enough Cabelas credit card points and a gift certificate so I bought one with no money out of pocket.  No way I would walk in a store and pay $350 cash for one.

I like soft side coolers for in the boat, but every one I've ever purchased eventually leaks, so thought I'd try a Yeti.   This thing is really heavy duty and I anticipate it will last a long time, so in that regard it was a pretty good purchase.   I don't really think it holds ice much longer than a regular cheap plastic Coleman cooler, so no significant gains there.

Oh yea .... and it's cool too.   Can't put a value on that :)
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: snogirl on June 14, 2016, 09:38:45 AM
Wal Mart sells Ozark Trail knock off yet tumblers and coolers at a fraction of the cost of Yeti.
If you peruse youtube or expedition forums (guilty) there are several comparison test of the Ozark Trail brands vs Yeti.
The results will surprise you.
I have purchase a 20 oz tumbler for $7.74 just to see. 
Yes it does keep my ice water freakin cold and doesn't sweat in 85 degree temps.
The ice even stayed pretty good leaving it in my car while at work (just wanted to see).
So I feel my $8 bucks was well spent and it looks EXACTLY like a YETI.
Seriously people are buying these at Walmart in cases reselling on Ebay making huge $$$.
I have been trying to get a cooler for a stay up at camp off the grid and will save a lot on ice if the testers are correct.
My Wal Mart hasn't had them in stock though. 
My two cents.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FIREby35 on June 14, 2016, 07:40:19 PM
I went and looked at the Yeti website and laughed my a$$ off at thei product and prices. I even showed it to a couple friends. Now ALL the ads on my browser are for Yeti....
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: hucktard on June 14, 2016, 08:55:27 PM
These coolers and others like them are actually much better than standard coolers. They are made out of rotomolded plastic that is super durable, they last for years and hold ice forever. They make sense if you are spending long periods of time in the back country. I used to be a whitewater rafting guide and these are the types of coolers we would take on multi day trips. If you ever take a trip down the Grand Canyon, you will see these coolers. So they aren't just a stupid luxury product. They have a legitimate use. A normal cooler would last a professional outfitter a couple of months before falling apart. That being said, they are a stupid purchase for 95% of people. Just like a jacked up jeep is stupid for most people, and 90% of people never even take them off-roading. Since I do a far bit of rafting I needed a good cooler, so I bought a high quality used one for $100, because fuck spending $500 on a cooler.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: elaine amj on June 14, 2016, 09:56:07 PM

I've never used their cooler, but I can say the Coleman Xtreme cooler does not live up to the advertisement.

If I recall correctly, the Xtreme promises to last for 5 days. I mostly do 3-4 day camping trips. At the end, I still have blocks of ice in my Xtreme. And that's opening it multiple times a day. Granted, I use frozen water bottles as ice packs (they last MUCH longer than ice cubes  AND we can drink the water after it melts). Very pleased Xtreme owner :)

And speaking of useless camping gear - I got a Coleman tent with a hinged door last year. Never thought I'd say this - but it is super high on my list of priorities in a tent now. It's that awesome :)



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: nobody123 on June 15, 2016, 10:21:49 AM
Ha, just heard a radio ad for the local Kia dealer.  Free Yeti cooler (ARV $299) with the purchase of any new Kia!
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: horsepoor on June 15, 2016, 09:36:11 PM
Yeti coolers are another one of those items that serve a real purpose for some people who need them, but have become a status symbol for people who don't need them.

Who needs them? FINate made a good point regarding bear resistance. In my line of work though, they are a godsend for many people in the oil field. If you are pipeline welder who spends days at a time in the middle of nowhere in the summer in the desert, having a cooler that can keep food and drinks cold for a week is a blessing.

Yeti coolers are an example of combining a good product with great marketing to vastly expand your product base. Another favorite example of mine are Doggles. Dog-goggles were invented to protect the eyes of dogs with eye issues, as well as working dogs and military dogs in the desert. The fact that they are able to make a small fortune selling them to people to "accessorize" their dogs is icing on the cake.

Yep.  I'd never heard of them until a co-worker talked about the ones she and her husband have.  They were mostly used by river guides, and she said they were giving ice out of their coolers to people who had Colemans and Igloos after being on the boat in Hell's Canyon in the summer for several days.  I kind of bought into it and picked up the similar Pelican cooler when CostCo had it for $250, but after looking at it sitting in the house for a few days, I decided it was way overkill, and returned it.  It wasn't even the biggest one, but I knew I'd never be able to move it on my own when loaded because the walls are so thick, and the cooler itself is so heavy.  Went back to my Coleman that it totally fine for ~3 days or so.

Most casual campers and tail gaiters have absolutely no reason to buy one, and they're totally bulky and inconvenient for those purposes.

Saw someone at the airport the other day with a Yeti insulated cooler bag thing; came home and looked it up online $350!  For a glorified picnic basket!
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Fishindude on June 16, 2016, 05:09:41 AM
Don't be misled about the ice holding capability of those Yeti coolers.  It's not all that much better than a normal cheap Coleman cooler.
Take either one out in the sun all day, opening it frequently to get drinks and your ice is going to be melted.   The Yeti might get you a few more hours.

For ice to last a long time in a cooler:
Use blocks or frozen milk jugs vs bag ice.
Have the cooler somewhat cool to start with.
Start with prechilled drinks or products, rather than warm stuff.
Keep it in the shade.
Don't open it any more than you need to, and close it quickly.
Cover with a blanket or tarp for additional insulation.

I've kept block ice all week on hunting trips, in normal cheap coleman coolers following the above instructions.


Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: MoneyCat on June 16, 2016, 05:31:49 AM
I had to look this up because I didn't even know what a Yeti cooler was. Must be a newer thing, because I used to live in the country and I had never heard of it. Ever since I moved to New Jersey, I haven't kept up to date on that kind of stuff. I own three cheap plastic coolers which were all gifts to me and I pretty much only use them for bringing food to the beach with me. They work just fine with ice packs from my freezer. Luxury is a weakness.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Goldielocks on June 16, 2016, 08:36:01 AM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category.

Never done the outdoorsy stuff out west (except for skiing). I though one was supposed to suspend edibles from a tree to bear-proof it? Also, one can't really backpack with a heavy cooler, right? So I would assume if you have a heavy cooler, you have a car nearby. Is a heavy Yeti cooler locked in a car better than a Styrofoam cooler locked in a car? One other thing - if a grizzly gets my cooler - I am NOT, in a million years, going sit around and wait for him to finish, then go get my scratched-to-hell-but-miraculously-intact cooler back. I am going first piss down my leg, then take off my shirt (a guy's subconsciously programmed reaction to adrenaline and fear), then run like an m effer and never come back.

(I am really curious about these things, not just trying to be a dick.)

A lot of places out west require specific bear-proof receptacles for food storage.  No, you wouldn't use a yeti if you were backpacking, but you would have to carry a bear can (as opposed to just hanging your food).  But if you're in a base camp for hunting, this is definitely a good (if expensive) option.

I don't know....   If you have a motorized vehicle to transport the cooler, I have seen many people also with generators, and the primary competition for the YETI in this instance is a ($200-600) cooler that plugs in... or an xtreme cooler ($90+) with dry ice (a common alternative). The yeti has very small capacity due to insulation, but the plug in one is not bear proof..

Maybe for a very niche market (base camp hunting, desert camping without a generator where your homemade dry ice cooler is not cutting it, or you don't mind paying double for a smaller capacity)

For comparison, the bear vaults you backpack with are $50 to $100 (ursack bag).. so bear protection does charge a premium.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FINate on June 16, 2016, 09:37:04 AM
I don't know....   If you have a motorized vehicle to transport the cooler, I have seen many people also with generators, and the primary competition for the YETI in this instance is a ($200-600) cooler that plugs in... or an xtreme cooler ($90+) with dry ice (a common alternative). The yeti has very small capacity due to insulation, but the plug in one is not bear proof..

Maybe for a very niche market (base camp hunting, desert camping without a generator where your homemade dry ice cooler is not cutting it, or you don't mind paying double for a smaller capacity)

For comparison, the bear vaults you backpack with are $50 to $100 (ursack bag).. so bear protection does charge a premium.

Agree, it's a niche market, or should be. My point was that there are certain cases where they make sense. For everyone else they are a waste of money.

I do have a couple of bear vaults (the hard plastic kind) for backpacking which are bulky and heavy, though required in certain areas. My preference is to hang bear bag (https://www.nps.gov/seki/planyourvisit/bearhang.htm) where allowed, which is minimal but somewhat of a pain. I will have to look into the ursack, so thanks for the link.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mak1277 on June 16, 2016, 11:28:35 AM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category.

Never done the outdoorsy stuff out west (except for skiing). I though one was supposed to suspend edibles from a tree to bear-proof it? Also, one can't really backpack with a heavy cooler, right? So I would assume if you have a heavy cooler, you have a car nearby. Is a heavy Yeti cooler locked in a car better than a Styrofoam cooler locked in a car? One other thing - if a grizzly gets my cooler - I am NOT, in a million years, going sit around and wait for him to finish, then go get my scratched-to-hell-but-miraculously-intact cooler back. I am going first piss down my leg, then take off my shirt (a guy's subconsciously programmed reaction to adrenaline and fear), then run like an m effer and never come back.

(I am really curious about these things, not just trying to be a dick.)

A lot of places out west require specific bear-proof receptacles for food storage.  No, you wouldn't use a yeti if you were backpacking, but you would have to carry a bear can (as opposed to just hanging your food).  But if you're in a base camp for hunting, this is definitely a good (if expensive) option.

I don't know....   If you have a motorized vehicle to transport the cooler, I have seen many people also with generators, and the primary competition for the YETI in this instance is a ($200-600) cooler that plugs in... or an xtreme cooler ($90+) with dry ice (a common alternative). The yeti has very small capacity due to insulation, but the plug in one is not bear proof..

Maybe for a very niche market (base camp hunting, desert camping without a generator where your homemade dry ice cooler is not cutting it, or you don't mind paying double for a smaller capacity)

For comparison, the bear vaults you backpack with are $50 to $100 (ursack bag).. so bear protection does charge a premium.

I could be working with outdated information, but I don't believe the Ursack (which is a soft-sided kevlar bag) is approved for use in places like Yosemite or other areas where a bear canister (hard plastic, difficult to open) is required. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Chris22 on June 16, 2016, 11:50:10 AM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category.

Never done the outdoorsy stuff out west (except for skiing). I though one was supposed to suspend edibles from a tree to bear-proof it? Also, one can't really backpack with a heavy cooler, right? So I would assume if you have a heavy cooler, you have a car nearby. Is a heavy Yeti cooler locked in a car better than a Styrofoam cooler locked in a car? One other thing - if a grizzly gets my cooler - I am NOT, in a million years, going sit around and wait for him to finish, then go get my scratched-to-hell-but-miraculously-intact cooler back. I am going first piss down my leg, then take off my shirt (a guy's subconsciously programmed reaction to adrenaline and fear), then run like an m effer and never come back.

(I am really curious about these things, not just trying to be a dick.)

A lot of places out west require specific bear-proof receptacles for food storage.  No, you wouldn't use a yeti if you were backpacking, but you would have to carry a bear can (as opposed to just hanging your food).  But if you're in a base camp for hunting, this is definitely a good (if expensive) option.

I don't know....   If you have a motorized vehicle to transport the cooler, I have seen many people also with generators, and the primary competition for the YETI in this instance is a ($200-600) cooler that plugs in... or an xtreme cooler ($90+) with dry ice (a common alternative). The yeti has very small capacity due to insulation, but the plug in one is not bear proof..

Maybe for a very niche market (base camp hunting, desert camping without a generator where your homemade dry ice cooler is not cutting it, or you don't mind paying double for a smaller capacity)

For comparison, the bear vaults you backpack with are $50 to $100 (ursack bag).. so bear protection does charge a premium.

I'm in no way suggesting a Yeti is good for everyone, but when the next best alternative is a generator + fridge (plus the gas to run it) it does sort of amuse to me hear people HERE of all places suggest the generator is better.  I've got gas in my veins, and even I don't want to listen to the drone of a generator and refuel it frequently when in the great outdoors. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: ChairmanKaga on June 16, 2016, 01:30:57 PM
Yeah, if you're REALLY outdoors oriented, they have a use. One of my best friends and his dad take monthly float trips and their Yeti cooler is sort of a multi-purpise cooler, bear box, and flotation storage for valuables like phones and keys. Could you spend less for more or less the same functionality? Yes. But the dang thing keeps food in the safe zone for 48 hours or more with nothing more than a few pounds of ice, AND it'll never leak.
On the other hand, my wife says among teachers the tumbler are as much a status symbol as a BMW.
And no, you would not use a generator. Never. Not even at deer camp.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Chris22 on June 16, 2016, 01:54:27 PM
On the other hand, my wife says among teachers the tumbler are as much a status symbol as a BMW.

In fairness, a $40 dumb tumbler you use every day is a less stupid purchase than a $350 cooler you use a few times a year.  And, if that $40 tumbler keeps you bringing coffee from home instead of a $5 SBUX run, it pays for itself in less than 2 work weeks.  Should it be a $12 or $5 tumbler?  Probably, but it's a much lesser scale of stupidity. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FINate on June 16, 2016, 01:55:14 PM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category.

Never done the outdoorsy stuff out west (except for skiing). I though one was supposed to suspend edibles from a tree to bear-proof it? Also, one can't really backpack with a heavy cooler, right? So I would assume if you have a heavy cooler, you have a car nearby. Is a heavy Yeti cooler locked in a car better than a Styrofoam cooler locked in a car? One other thing - if a grizzly gets my cooler - I am NOT, in a million years, going sit around and wait for him to finish, then go get my scratched-to-hell-but-miraculously-intact cooler back. I am going first piss down my leg, then take off my shirt (a guy's subconsciously programmed reaction to adrenaline and fear), then run like an m effer and never come back.

(I am really curious about these things, not just trying to be a dick.)

A lot of places out west require specific bear-proof receptacles for food storage.  No, you wouldn't use a yeti if you were backpacking, but you would have to carry a bear can (as opposed to just hanging your food).  But if you're in a base camp for hunting, this is definitely a good (if expensive) option.

I don't know....   If you have a motorized vehicle to transport the cooler, I have seen many people also with generators, and the primary competition for the YETI in this instance is a ($200-600) cooler that plugs in... or an xtreme cooler ($90+) with dry ice (a common alternative). The yeti has very small capacity due to insulation, but the plug in one is not bear proof..

Maybe for a very niche market (base camp hunting, desert camping without a generator where your homemade dry ice cooler is not cutting it, or you don't mind paying double for a smaller capacity)

For comparison, the bear vaults you backpack with are $50 to $100 (ursack bag).. so bear protection does charge a premium.

I could be working with outdated information, but I don't believe the Ursack (which is a soft-sided kevlar bag) is approved for use in places like Yosemite or other areas where a bear canister (hard plastic, difficult to open) is required.

You are correct, I just looked it up. Guess I will keep my old plastic canisters for now.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FINate on June 16, 2016, 02:01:03 PM
In fairness, a $40 dumb tumbler you use every day is a less stupid purchase than a $350 cooler you use a few times a year.  And, if that $40 tumbler keeps you bringing coffee from home instead of a $5 SBUX run, it pays for itself in less than 2 work weeks.  Should it be a $12 or $5 tumbler?  Probably, but it's a much lesser scale of stupidity.

I don't understand this. If you have a legitimate need for bear protection/better insulation/better durability then it makes senses to buy it once for a lifetime of use. Even if you use it just a couple times a year, let's say for a week at a time, that doesn't seem stupid to me.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Chris22 on June 16, 2016, 02:07:33 PM
In fairness, a $40 dumb tumbler you use every day is a less stupid purchase than a $350 cooler you use a few times a year.  And, if that $40 tumbler keeps you bringing coffee from home instead of a $5 SBUX run, it pays for itself in less than 2 work weeks.  Should it be a $12 or $5 tumbler?  Probably, but it's a much lesser scale of stupidity.

I don't understand this. If you have a legitimate need for bear protection/better insulation/better durability then it makes senses to buy it once for a lifetime of use. Even if you use it just a couple times a year, let's say for a week at a time, that doesn't seem stupid to me.

Sorry, I meant "status use" as in "I use my cooler to go tailgating or camping overnight or or or" any other situation where a $20 Coleman would have worked just fine.  Correct, if you need the capabilities of a Yeti, it's not a stupid purchase.  I just meant the average person uses a cooler a few times a year, so a $350 status cooler is doubly dumb versus a $40 status tumbler given A) price difference and B) how often it's used.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: ChairmanKaga on June 17, 2016, 11:33:37 AM
Buying products that have no legitimate application to our lives other than to demonstrate how much money we are willing to spend is sort of the official pastime of Western Civilization, isn't it?

A Yeti cooler, a Corvette Z06, pick your poison.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: BTH7117 on June 17, 2016, 03:54:44 PM
OMG. I literally had no idea that was a thing and I am truly shocked. I watched. 1 minute promo for a $300 (!!!!) cooler with all this ridiculous stuff (apparently bear proof, wtf?!). The video ends "Great for 18 of your favorite drinks." Seriously, $300 for a cooler that holds an 18 of Busch Light😂

Haha. I did the same thing. I called my wife over to see the video. I'm in shock such a thing exists.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Goldielocks on June 17, 2016, 08:12:12 PM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category.

Never done the outdoorsy stuff out west (except for skiing). I though one was supposed to suspend edibles from a tree to bear-proof it? Also, one can't really backpack with a heavy cooler, right? So I would assume if you have a heavy cooler, you have a car nearby. Is a heavy Yeti cooler locked in a car better than a Styrofoam cooler locked in a car? One other thing - if a grizzly gets my cooler - I am NOT, in a million years, going sit around and wait for him to finish, then go get my scratched-to-hell-but-miraculously-intact cooler back. I am going first piss down my leg, then take off my shirt (a guy's subconsciously programmed reaction to adrenaline and fear), then run like an m effer and never come back.

(I am really curious about these things, not just trying to be a dick.)

A lot of places out west require specific bear-proof receptacles for food storage.  No, you wouldn't use a yeti if you were backpacking, but you would have to carry a bear can (as opposed to just hanging your food).  But if you're in a base camp for hunting, this is definitely a good (if expensive) option.

I don't know....   If you have a motorized vehicle to transport the cooler, I have seen many people also with generators, and the primary competition for the YETI in this instance is a ($200-600) cooler that plugs in... or an xtreme cooler ($90+) with dry ice (a common alternative). The yeti has very small capacity due to insulation, but the plug in one is not bear proof..

Maybe for a very niche market (base camp hunting, desert camping without a generator where your homemade dry ice cooler is not cutting it, or you don't mind paying double for a smaller capacity)

For comparison, the bear vaults you backpack with are $50 to $100 (ursack bag).. so bear protection does charge a premium.

I could be working with outdated information, but I don't believe the Ursack (which is a soft-sided kevlar bag) is approved for use in places like Yosemite or other areas where a bear canister (hard plastic, difficult to open) is required.

That's right,  there are several parks, particularly those without a lot of trees on the hikes, where you need a bear canister.  I am not intending to visit any of them.  I like trees, and our more popular parks here have bear boxes if there is a concern large enough for a rule that is checked.  I like the idea bag because you can hang it, and other critters can't get in, and it is lighter / easier to pack.

The canisters don't let the bear grind your food to mush, *good* but I bet they can take it far, far away from you. (not ties to a tree if there are no trees?)

I want one. but I don't  want to pay for one.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: bacchi on June 17, 2016, 10:15:40 PM
The canisters don't let the bear grind your food to mush, *good* but I bet they can take it far, far away from you. (not ties to a tree if there are no trees?)

I want one. but I don't  want to pay for one.

I've always rented them from the backcountry office. If I spent more time in bear country, as opposed to desert country, I'd consider buying one.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: MoneyCat on June 18, 2016, 11:56:45 AM
I told my friends that YETI coolers were stupid and they fell all over themselves saying how useful they really are. I have a Coleman cooler that I got as a free gift for opening a no fee checking account fifteen years ago (back when no fee checking accounts still existed) and it's still going strong. I can think of nearly no good reason to ever, ever, EVER purchase a $300 cooler.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: JLee on June 18, 2016, 02:30:09 PM
Yeti is one of many bear resistant coolers and are about average in price for this category.

Never done the outdoorsy stuff out west (except for skiing). I though one was supposed to suspend edibles from a tree to bear-proof it? Also, one can't really backpack with a heavy cooler, right? So I would assume if you have a heavy cooler, you have a car nearby. Is a heavy Yeti cooler locked in a car better than a Styrofoam cooler locked in a car? One other thing - if a grizzly gets my cooler - I am NOT, in a million years, going sit around and wait for him to finish, then go get my scratched-to-hell-but-miraculously-intact cooler back. I am going first piss down my leg, then take off my shirt (a guy's subconsciously programmed reaction to adrenaline and fear), then run like an m effer and never come back.

(I am really curious about these things, not just trying to be a dick.)

A lot of places out west require specific bear-proof receptacles for food storage.  No, you wouldn't use a yeti if you were backpacking, but you would have to carry a bear can (as opposed to just hanging your food).  But if you're in a base camp for hunting, this is definitely a good (if expensive) option.

I don't know....   If you have a motorized vehicle to transport the cooler, I have seen many people also with generators, and the primary competition for the YETI in this instance is a ($200-600) cooler that plugs in... or an xtreme cooler ($90+) with dry ice (a common alternative). The yeti has very small capacity due to insulation, but the plug in one is not bear proof..

Maybe for a very niche market (base camp hunting, desert camping without a generator where your homemade dry ice cooler is not cutting it, or you don't mind paying double for a smaller capacity)

For comparison, the bear vaults you backpack with are $50 to $100 (ursack bag).. so bear protection does charge a premium.

I'm in no way suggesting a Yeti is good for everyone, but when the next best alternative is a generator + fridge (plus the gas to run it) it does sort of amuse to me hear people HERE of all places suggest the generator is better.  I've got gas in my veins, and even I don't want to listen to the drone of a generator and refuel it frequently when in the great outdoors.

I had an Edgestar 63qt fridge/freezer in my offroad truck (http://i.imgur.com/b4zGUEh.jpg).  It'd happily run on 12v all night.  With ~100w of solar and a second battery, you could run one indefinitely as long as the weather cooperated.  For $212 shipped (scratch & dent from openboxdirect), I don't think there's a better option.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Physicsteacher on June 18, 2016, 06:28:41 PM
On the other hand, my wife says among teachers the tumbler are as much a status symbol as a BMW.

After reading this thread, I was amused when an email to attendees of summer professional development included the line, "There will be coffee and water all day so you may want to bring your own cups/Yetis so that you can fill as needed and then tea in the afternoon." The fad hasn't hit my district yet, but many of the teachers from the rich districts did indeed bring Yeti cups. I looked around, and they all had the Yeti logo so they weren't the Wal-Mart equivalents.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Chris22 on June 18, 2016, 07:39:52 PM
Well, I joined the bandwagon. I was gifted an Amazon gift card for a specific purchase, and had $30 leftover. So I ordered a $30 30oz Yeti Rambler Tumbler. We'll see if it's any good :-D
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Clean Shaven on June 18, 2016, 08:41:51 PM
I've bought two of the 30 oz Ozark Trail version of the Yeti rambler. $9.74 apiece. They keep ice a long time. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: horsepoor on June 18, 2016, 09:24:55 PM
On the other hand, my wife says among teachers the tumbler are as much a status symbol as a BMW.

After reading this thread, I was amused when an email to attendees of summer professional development included the line, "There will be coffee and water all day so you may want to bring your own cups/Yetis so that you can fill as needed and then tea in the afternoon." The fad hasn't hit my district yet, but many of the teachers from the rich districts did indeed bring Yeti cups. I looked around, and they all had the Yeti logo so they weren't the Wal-Mart equivalents.

Dang, no love for the Hydroflask?  Sometimes I check out the Yeti cups at the feed store, but they're SOOO pricey and don't seem as versatile as a wide mouth hydroflask, which is watertight and had interchangeable lids.  There are some good knockoffs now too, for about $10 at Ross.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Uturn on June 19, 2016, 06:46:28 AM
I have a hydroflask that is wonderful.  It goes with me on the bicycle, motorcycle, and rounds of disc golf.  But I prefer the Yeti cup in the car and sitting around campfires.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: seathink on June 21, 2016, 05:38:31 PM
I don't know....   If you have a motorized vehicle to transport the cooler, I have seen many people also with generators, and the primary competition for the YETI in this instance is a ($200-600) cooler that plugs in... or an xtreme cooler ($90+) with dry ice (a common alternative). The yeti has very small capacity due to insulation, but the plug in one is not bear proof..

Maybe for a very niche market (base camp hunting, desert camping without a generator where your homemade dry ice cooler is not cutting it, or you don't mind paying double for a smaller capacity)

For comparison, the bear vaults you backpack with are $50 to $100 (ursack bag).. so bear protection does charge a premium.

Agree, it's a niche market, or should be. My point was that there are certain cases where they make sense. For everyone else they are a waste of money.

I do have a couple of bear vaults (the hard plastic kind) for backpacking which are bulky and heavy, though required in certain areas. My preference is to hang bear bag (https://www.nps.gov/seki/planyourvisit/bearhang.htm) where allowed, which is minimal but somewhat of a pain. I will have to look into the ursack, so thanks for the link.

The canisters don't let the bear grind your food to mush, *good* but I bet they can take it far, far away from you. (not ties to a tree if there are no trees?)

I want one. but I don't  want to pay for one.

I've always rented them from the backcountry office. If I spent more time in bear country, as opposed to desert country, I'd consider buying one.


Yosemite (the definition of bear country!) requires an $8 deposit for the canister that is refunded back to you when you come back in. They also have bear boxes at every trail-head. <3
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FINate on June 26, 2016, 03:47:25 PM
Yosemite (the definition of bear country!) requires an $8 deposit for the canister that is refunded back to you when you come back in. They also have bear boxes at every trail-head. <3

I mostly stick to the National Forests North and South of YNP, which is also bear country though they aren't as bold there, maybe because bears are hunted in these areas? I love Yosemite, especially the backcountry, just find it to be overrun.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: MayDay on June 27, 2016, 12:29:18 PM
I don't own any yeti products.

Last summer we took our cheapo Coleman cooler camping with my brother's yeti. The yeti needed ice half as often. We were in Yellowstone so bear boxes/cans required, or you could leave stuff in your car. My brother didn't even have a freaking lock so we couldn't leave the yeti at the campsite! Argh!

We might buy one someday if we do longer/more serious camping in bear areas. Necessary? Obviously not. But we've destroyed 2 or 3 cheapo coolers in 11 years of marriage so I can partially justify it if they truly last 20+ years.

Final comment: I'm a big tea drinker, and only good tea (none of that Lipton shit). I have several extremely excellent vacuum insulated travel mugs that don't leak, and two insulated regular mugs for home. Once you go insulated, you don't go back. I bring my insulated mug everywhere. It's some other brand but cost almost as much as the yeti ones.  I don't buy stuff at Walmart, so for a semiethical purchase, the price of yetis are not that higher than other non-walmart options I have seen.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Chris22 on June 27, 2016, 12:45:13 PM
FWIW, I went to a party this weekend, and put my 1y/o Coleman cooler (with wheels) next to my FIL's 10+y/o Coleman.  Both had ice and canned/bottled drinks.  The next morning (~20 hours later) the new Coleman had ~80% of the ice intact, the old one was ~30%. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: seathink on June 27, 2016, 12:46:27 PM


I mostly stick to the National Forests North and South of YNP, which is also bear country though they aren't as bold there, maybe because bears are hunted in these areas? I love Yosemite, especially the backcountry, just find it to be overrun.

True. It's definitely jarring to go from off-trail to Glacier Point/the Valley Floor.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Making Cookies on June 28, 2016, 11:42:55 AM
FWIW, I went to a party this weekend, and put my 1y/o Coleman cooler (with wheels) next to my FIL's 10+y/o Coleman.  Both had ice and canned/bottled drinks.  The next morning (~20 hours later) the new Coleman had ~80% of the ice intact, the old one was ~30%.

Clearly your ice was colder than your FiL's ice. I hate it when people buy cheap ice. I order mine directly from the south pole by air mail... The stuff from the northern glaciers just don't hold up... ;)
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Chris22 on June 28, 2016, 12:11:15 PM
FWIW, I went to a party this weekend, and put my 1y/o Coleman cooler (with wheels) next to my FIL's 10+y/o Coleman.  Both had ice and canned/bottled drinks.  The next morning (~20 hours later) the new Coleman had ~80% of the ice intact, the old one was ~30%.

Clearly your ice was colder than your FiL's ice. I hate it when people buy cheap ice. I order mine directly from the south pole by air mail... The stuff from the northern glaciers just don't hold up... ;)

LOL

For those who don't get sarcasm, it was the same ice from the same place ;)
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: jinga nation on June 28, 2016, 02:39:24 PM
FWIW, I went to a party this weekend, and put my 1y/o Coleman cooler (with wheels) next to my FIL's 10+y/o Coleman.  Both had ice and canned/bottled drinks.  The next morning (~20 hours later) the new Coleman had ~80% of the ice intact, the old one was ~30%.

Clearly your ice was colder than your FiL's ice. I hate it when people buy cheap ice. I order mine directly from the south pole by air mail... The stuff from the northern glaciers just don't hold up... ;)
I buy Polar brand ice... I'm trying to keep it generic and avoid a North vs South ice war.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Making Cookies on June 29, 2016, 10:15:15 AM
Just you wait until they come out with hybrid ice in a few years... Pop Science promises a revolution in portable refrigeration... ;)
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Physicsteacher on June 29, 2016, 06:19:51 PM
I'm attending an education conference this week, and they are giving away Yeti mugs as door prizes. It turns out the fad has hit my district after all, as evidenced by my principal showing me a cell phone picture of the Yeti mug his wife had engraved for him. He did not bring his Yeti, however, and proceeded to drink bottled water while trying to figure out how to use Twitter, as tweeting about the conference is required to enter to win another Yeti mug. I somehow managed to survive drinking lukewarm tap water from a Nalgene bottle that I got for free at a conference eight years ago.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FIRE me on July 04, 2016, 06:31:31 PM
OMG. I literally had no idea that was a thing and I am truly shocked. I watched. 1 minute promo for a $300 (!!!!) cooler with all this ridiculous stuff (apparently bear proof, wtf?!). The video ends "Great for 18 of your favorite drinks." Seriously, $300 for a cooler that holds an 18 of Busch Light😂

I'd never heard of them either.  My old Coleman (spent maybe $20 on it in the mid '90s?) seems to work just fine.

Marketing folks never fail to find another way to separate the rich broke-ass "wanna bes" from their money...

I first heard of them two weeks ago. A coworker bragged several times to me about how long the ice in his cup lasted, out on the hot production floor. I asked how much he paid for his 20 ounce cup. $40, but it was worth it.

$40 for one cup, not even a set. I just smiled and kept on drinking tap water out of my reused apple juice bottle. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Chris22 on July 14, 2016, 06:45:25 AM
For the record, my Yeti rambler arrived last night.  It kept ice overnight, which is pretty cool.  My usual habit was to use some of the 3-4 plastic 32oz mugs leftover from my college days, fill them with ice, and drink water from them all evening.  Water would be no longer cold after 2-3 hours.  Holding ice from ~6pm to 6am is pretty cool.  Worth $30?  Probably not.  Worth the $free I paid?  Sure!
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: snogirl on July 14, 2016, 07:27:59 AM
For the record, my Yeti rambler arrived last night.  It kept ice overnight, which is pretty cool.  My usual habit was to use some of the 3-4 plastic 32oz mugs leftover from my college days, fill them with ice, and drink water from them all evening.  Water would be no longer cold after 2-3 hours.  Holding ice from ~6pm to 6am is pretty cool.  Worth $30?  Probably not.  Worth the $free I paid?  Sure!
Awesome!
I have the yeti knock off from WalMart 30 oz was 9 bucks and change 20 oz 7.74. Holds ice like a champ & no sweating.. I liked it so much I went back and bought some for gifts.

Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Kaydedid on August 02, 2016, 11:00:48 AM
Still use the insulated mug from the hospital when I had the kid.  Never had a sweat - proof cup before, so it feels pretty swanky!

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Chris22 on August 02, 2016, 11:05:01 AM
Oddly, a second Yeti tumbler appeared out of the blue in the mail yesterday.  No packing slip, and it was dropshipped from China with Chinese label.  So, no way to send it back.  After I make sure my card wasn't double-charged, this one will go to my wife or someone else in the family who wants it.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: JLee on August 02, 2016, 01:01:17 PM
For the record, my Yeti rambler arrived last night.  It kept ice overnight, which is pretty cool.  My usual habit was to use some of the 3-4 plastic 32oz mugs leftover from my college days, fill them with ice, and drink water from them all evening.  Water would be no longer cold after 2-3 hours.  Holding ice from ~6pm to 6am is pretty cool.  Worth $30?  Probably not.  Worth the $free I paid?  Sure!
Awesome!
I have the yeti knock off from WalMart 30 oz was 9 bucks and change 20 oz 7.74. Holds ice like a champ & no sweating.. I liked it so much I went back and bought some for gifts.

Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk

The WalMart ones work just as well, too - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfOPdAQQvLU
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Digital Dogma on August 02, 2016, 02:35:30 PM
I just purchased a 100 quart cooler on Amazon for 70 bucks and this thread was foremost in my mind when I spotted a "luxury cooler" selling for hundreds of dollars, only 6 left!

I'll be using it soon to store smoked meat when I do my traditional once-yearly smokeout, I'll have about 25lbs of bacon, 10-15lbs of pulled pork, a 10lb ham, a brisket (if I can find a good high quality one), and ribs! Should just about fill that thing up with a little room to spare for a beer or two.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Making Cookies on August 03, 2016, 07:52:17 AM
For the record, my Yeti rambler arrived last night.  It kept ice overnight, which is pretty cool.  My usual habit was to use some of the 3-4 plastic 32oz mugs leftover from my college days, fill them with ice, and drink water from them all evening.  Water would be no longer cold after 2-3 hours.  Holding ice from ~6pm to 6am is pretty cool.  Worth $30?  Probably not.  Worth the $free I paid?  Sure!

My water needs to be refilled every ~30 mins b/c I drink it all. ;)

For that reason I get by with a big plastic cup from a decade ago that was left at my house by my MiL.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mm1970 on August 03, 2016, 10:02:29 AM
FWIW, I went to a party this weekend, and put my 1y/o Coleman cooler (with wheels) next to my FIL's 10+y/o Coleman.  Both had ice and canned/bottled drinks.  The next morning (~20 hours later) the new Coleman had ~80% of the ice intact, the old one was ~30%.
We noticed this last year or two years ago when we bought a new cooler.  It kept things colder for much longer, and took longer for the ice to melt.

I can see the Yeti desire.  We don't need one - but when we camp, we tend to camp in the desert (Joshua Tree NP).  Except for the one time we camped in Feb (holy cow it was below freezing), it's hot.  It gets up to 80-90 during the day in the spring, no matter when you go really.  So the ice melts.  (I also have a thermoelectric cooler, recommended by MMM himself, and it is not at all useful in the desert). 

There's not a lot of shade in JTNP.  Luckily, we are never more than a 45 minute drive from more ice.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: gggggg on August 04, 2016, 06:16:00 PM
We are in a yeti bubble. The pop is impending. Just poking fun, sort of.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Goldielocks on August 05, 2016, 12:01:19 AM
Just sold my Igloo Marine cooler on Craigslist for $80.  I can't believe people pay so much for the Yetis that have the benefit of an additional 4-5 days of ice (12 days instead of 7), bear proof.  In return, they are very expensive, and big on the outside, and small on the inside (due to all that insulation).  They must weigh a lot too.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: fredbear on September 05, 2016, 08:29:23 PM
We use Yetis rafting the Grand Canyon in midsummer.  You have to follow cooler management techniques - try to start with some dry ice, use large ice blocks or frozen gallon jugs, keep them in the shade, cover them with burlap that you keep wet, keep a layer of wet lifejackets over the top, open only once a day in the evening to remove the next day's food - but you have ice on the 12th day of 105 - 113F.   It may be possible to break one, but I don't know anyone who has done it.  I've also used it to bring out oryx meat taken in midsummer.  The only thing that performed comparably was Korean War surplus blood coolers, which I have not seen available in almost 40 years, and which were even larger and more ungainly. 

I admit these are specialized uses.  Yetis are worth it to those who practice the activities.  As long as they exist, I will buy nothing else for what I need them.  But practically speaking, I won't need to buy again in this lifetime. 
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: pdxmonkey on September 05, 2016, 09:52:31 PM
FWIW, I went to a party this weekend, and put my 1y/o Coleman cooler (with wheels) next to my FIL's 10+y/o Coleman.  Both had ice and canned/bottled drinks.  The next morning (~20 hours later) the new Coleman had ~80% of the ice intact, the old one was ~30%.

Clearly your ice was colder than your FiL's ice. I hate it when people buy cheap ice. I order mine directly from the south pole by air mail... The stuff from the northern glaciers just don't hold up... ;)
I buy Polar brand ice... I'm trying to keep it generic and avoid a North vs South ice war.
if you want colder ice put salt in the water before you freeze it.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: pdxmonkey on September 05, 2016, 10:06:30 PM
Final comment: I'm a big tea drinker, and only good tea (none of that Lipton shit). I have several extremely excellent vacuum insulated travel mugs that don't leak, and two insulated regular mugs for home. Once you go insulated, you don't go back. I bring my insulated mug everywhere. It's some other brand but cost almost as much as the yeti ones.  I don't buy stuff at Walmart, so for a semiethical purchase, the price of yetis are not that higher than other non-walmart options I have seen.
I bought a tea tumbler by Planetary Design yesterday. It's double wall and the infuser has a plunger that seals off the tea when you push it down so your tea doesn't oversteep. Apparently these things usually go for $32 for a 16 oz cup. I got one for 12.50 on clearance which seemed reasonable enough for a double wall tumbler with fancy tea features. I haven't tried it yet because I haven't washed it yet, but it looks very promising.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: v8rx7guy on September 05, 2016, 10:43:34 PM
The company my MIL works for gave out YETI laser etched tumblers to their employees.  She didnt want it and asked if I did... so I said yes.  I bring it to wok every day and it certainly keeps my ice water cold.  I like it but would not pay $30+ for it
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mtn on January 03, 2017, 09:34:46 AM
Bumping this thread up. My MIL and FIL got me a Yeti for Christmas--the smallest hardsided one they have. I think it retails for $250.

I'd wanted a Yeti or similar for a while because I like overbuilt things that are really a "buy it once" type of thing, but never was willing to pay for it. I'd been searching Craigslist but it kept coming up empty (and I wasn't searching too hard since I didn't need one, just wanted it).

After using it twice, Holy Cow. You know the difference in using a really cheap ratchet and a really nice one, or maybe a dull kitchen knife and a $200 one? That is kind of the difference in this and my old Marine Igloo. The Igloo works just fine for what I need a cooler for. It keeps beverages and food cold for a day or two, which is all I need a cooler for. But the handle is broken, the hinge is going, and ice does melt faster. After 5 years, it is about worn out and needs to be replaced.

The Yeti? Everything just feels better. The handle won't break. The hinge would probably withstand a nuclear blast. The only thing I see wearing out is the latches, but I don't see that happening for 20 years, and then they can be replaced. My Igloo? It is 5 years old and only had light use. It is ready for a replacement--the sides are cracked a little, it doesn't hold ice the same as it used to (a bag a day is necessary, block ice gets me a little bit longer but not much). Will I ever get to the value of the Yeti? Probably in about 30 years. But I won't have to replace the damn Yeti in that time. It is just better. I put cold beer in the warm cooler to take to my parents, just because I wanted to show it off. The beer had just been in the fridge. I left 2 bottles of beer in the cooler for 3 days when I remembered they were in there (the cooler had been in my basement for those 3 days) and they WERE STILL COLD. Not just pulled out of the fridge cold, but still a "cold beer". No ice. No ice packs. Just 2 cold beers.

I never thought I needed a cooler like this, I just wanted one. Now, I kind of "need" one. I'm on the search for another, a bigger one--I figure that I can use 3 more: One for Dad's boat (Great Lakes salmon fishing), One for Dad's vacation home (it would be awesome to load it with beer and ice ONCE for the week), and a big one for me at home--in addition to my small one. I figure that that "big one for home" would cover the 2-3 weeks a year that we think "man, we need to get a fridge in the basement/garage"

Luxury? Yeah. Faceslap worthy? Probably. I don't foresee taking it into bear country, although I have been camping/canoeing in bear country (albeit without a cooler). Dads vacation home is technically in Bear Country, although its extremely unlikely that they'd ever find his place. I just never expected to get it and think "yeah, this cooler is totally worth the $250", even though I really was getting by fine with my Igloo.

I am now searching craigslist every day for Yeti/RTIC/Ozark Trail/Igloo Sportsman*/Pelican/Orca/etc. For anyone looking for new, it seems like the Cabela's brand or Igloo Sportsman* is the best deal if you care about made in USA, and the RTIC or Ozark Trail is the best if you don't. I do think there is a Yeti tax on the name for being a status symbol that isn't necessary to pay for.

*Note: Igloo makes a version called the Igloo Sportsman. When I refer to my Igloo, it is not a sportsman--just a normal marine cooler.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FINate on January 03, 2017, 10:26:51 AM
RTIC coolers are of equal quality but half the price. Normally you'd have to wait 3-6 months to receive your order because they manufacture them in batches, however, at the moment they are on sale and shipping next day - guessing they produced extra for Christmas and are clearing them out?
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: ginastarke on January 03, 2017, 01:39:51 PM
Hydroflask fanatic here too, It goes everywhere with me on the bicycle. (For anyone that needs to know, TwoFish makes bottle cages for the wider bottles like the 40) Since I'll have it for life presuming I can continue to buy lids when they break, I don't see an issue with a $40 price tag.

A great knock-off available on Amazon is Liquid Savvy. Their bottles come with 3 lids that also work on Hydroflask bottles, and are sometimes on promotion for around $10.

Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: BeerBeard on January 05, 2017, 10:55:21 AM
I can't believe it hasn't been mentioned yet, but Yeti is simply a branding company. They pay Asian manufacturing companies to create a product that was invented by someone else, rotational molded coolers are not a new technology.

Also the Walmart tumblers are not knock-offs, Walmart pays the same manufactures for the exact same product; YETI has no patents.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mtn on January 05, 2017, 11:05:51 AM
I can't believe it hasn't been mentioned yet, but Yeti is simply a branding company. They pay Asian manufacturing companies to create a product that was invented by someone else, rotational molded coolers are not a new technology.

Also the Walmart tumblers are not knock-offs, Walmart pays the same manufactures for the exact same product; YETI has no patents.

Uhh... This is mostly wrong.

1: Yeah, big in branding. That is true. But they are not "simply" a branding company.
2: They designed and made their own coolers. Some are still made in USA. Their hardsided coolers are all made in USA (Roadie) or USA and the Philipenes (Tundra). If you want to make sure yours was made in the USA, call them and request it specifically. And FWIW, they're made in Wisconsin and Iowa.
3: Rotomolded coolers are not new, no, but Yeti took them big-time. And yes, they do have patents: http://yeti.com/patents


Can't speak on the tumblers.

As someone who tries very hard to buy things made in USA, I've done quite a bit of research on this.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Cowardly Toaster on January 05, 2017, 11:19:10 AM
Outdoors stuff is like a lot of other markets. People want to upgrade to the absolute biggest professional thing, often while the real pros are making do with a lot less.

In the PNW for instance, people are constantly upgrading their top of the line REI purchased Patagonia and Mountain Hardware clothes, even though many of those lines began as equipment for the most extreme adventures. Also, a lot of that stuff lasts half a life time, we still use REI brand stuff from  30 years ago.But people want the "extreme" image, so they buy new stuff.

Hunting is the same way. So is cooking (I theorize that someone's cooking skills are often inversely proportional to the amount of high end cooking equipment they have. I can whip up almost anything delicious you would ever want with a cutting board, deep cast iron skillet, a butcher knife and a spatula)

So Yeti coolers are probably appropriate for the fishing charter guide who makes his money with his boat in Key West, but most other folks are going to fine with a Coleman.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Just Joe on January 05, 2017, 02:30:47 PM
Just you wait until they come out with hybrid ice in a few years... Pop Science promises a revolution in portable refrigeration... ;)

My son has some of that. Little plastic ice cubes that have a gel inside. (sarcasm: really has it, doesn't work that well, was a gift, looks like dirty ice).

I expect Yeti to be much discounted in a few years. I'll pick one up then maybe. The world is full of well built, nice stuff. I seldom need that level of quality but I'll pay for it when I do.

Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Cowardly Toaster on January 05, 2017, 03:24:20 PM
Just was at the sporting goods store. There are giant Yeti coolers that cost $800. $800 for a cooler. Let that sink in.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: Rural on January 05, 2017, 08:14:50 PM
Just was at the sporting goods store. There are giant Yeti coolers that cost $800. $800 for a cooler. Let that sink in.


There's a car in my driveway now that cost that. Runs and everything.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mtn on January 05, 2017, 11:00:56 PM
Just was at the sporting goods store. There are giant Yeti coolers that cost $800. $800 for a cooler. Let that sink in.


There's a car in my driveway now that cost that. Runs and everything.

Mine too! Well, the car was $700. The battery to make it run was $130.

The other day I realized that between my hockey skates, yeti, and golf putter which were all in my trunk, the contents of my car were worth more than the car itself. That didn't even get into my shoes, or the rest of my golf clubs or hockey equipment!
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: FINate on July 06, 2017, 09:59:29 AM
Just finished a road trip through the desert US South West during a heat wave and this thread came to mind.

We sold our travel trailer (expensive to maintain/store, pain to tow) and bought good tent camping gear. As part of this we got a rotomolded cooler from RTIC - the same as a Yeti at a fraction of the price (the 65 on sale after Christmas for $170, vs $400 for the Yeti equivalent). Was HOT on our trip, often above 110F (43C) and reaching to 120F (49C) in some places.

We acclimated pretty quickly to the point that anything under 110 felt comfortable. Was glad to have spent a bit more on a well insulated cooler. We still had to put ice in it every 3-4 days, but food near the top of the cooler stayed quite cool whereas in past I experienced food spoilage near the top of cheaper coolers. It quite literally saved our bacon (and everything else in the cooler) when we ran low on ice in rural Utah and could not find any open stores selling ice while traveling on a Sunday.

I also have a new appreciation for insulated tumblers. My water heater thermostat is set at 120, which means water in my trusty old Nalgene bottle would very quickly increase to the temperature of hot tap water. Amazed how quickly ice water in an uninsulated cup would heat up. I still think spending $30 or $40 on a cup is dumb, and wasn't going to spend $$$ just to maintain cold drinks on a road trip, but understand why there's a market for such products in these areas.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mtn on July 06, 2017, 11:03:23 AM
Seven months of ownership into my Yeti. Still a big fan.

I wish I had returned it and upgraded to a larger one when I bought it though.

Some real world tests: I had both the small 20 quart Yeti and my FIL's 35-40 quart Coleman in use this weekend--both were holding beer and pop only, other than for 4 hours when they were holding some frozen food. All the frozen food remained frozen, as expected with just about any cooler.

The Yeti kept the ice longer, but for real world practicality they both were perfectly fine for a long weekend. I replaced the ice in both one time--keep in mind that neither were kept in the shade, and bother were opened frequently. The big differences that I noticed in the Yeti and the "normal" Coleman:
 - Yeti was too small, really. I'd have liked a larger version.
 - Yeti is quite heavy. Not an issue for me. 
 - Coleman did just fine, but it leaks a little bit, and you have to be careful opening it or the hinges would break after a few years.

Also, everyone here should look up SHITI coolers. Good stuff.
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: apricity22 on July 06, 2017, 06:25:56 PM
Seven months of ownership into my Yeti. Still a big fan.

There are definitely some Mustachian uses for this product and it is very high quality. I don't personally own one but my Dad and his wife do and they love it. They use it because their vacations consist of 1 week to 2 week long road trips with stops at campgrounds and/or various friends or relatives houses. They load up the Yeti with fresh food and they don't eat out on said road trips.

One time they brought a Yeti cooler home of inexpensive fresh seafood that they bought directly off the dock from fishermen in Oregon. For them, that cooler has definitely paid for itself. They live in the Southwest and it's impressive how long that thing can hold ice!
Title: Re: Credit Card for a Yeti cooler
Post by: mtn on July 06, 2017, 09:40:36 PM
Seven months of ownership into my Yeti. Still a big fan.

There are definitely some Mustachian uses for this product and it is very high quality. I don't personally own one but my Dad and his wife do and they love it. They use it because their vacations consist of 1 week to 2 week long road trips with stops at campgrounds and/or various friends or relatives houses. They load up the Yeti with fresh food and they don't eat out on said road trips.

One time they brought a Yeti cooler home of inexpensive fresh seafood that they bought directly off the dock from fishermen in Oregon. For them, that cooler has definitely paid for itself. They live in the Southwest and it's impressive how long that thing can hold ice!

Your parent sound like they really are. Mine was a gift, and to be quite honest I'm not getting my in-laws money out of it. A $5 foam cooler would work nearly as well as this for what I use it for. The big thing is the "buy it for life" value for me.