Author Topic: Big rigs at the high school  (Read 15922 times)

Fishinshawn

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Big rigs at the high school
« on: May 06, 2016, 04:20:40 PM »
  So every morning I walk my child to school, it is only about 1.5 miles and he is a good bike rider for a kindergartener. His school is just across the street from our small community's high school. Every morning I see monumental traffic backups as parents and students fight there way to school, I had never really noticed this until last year when I started reading the MMM blog. I started paying attention and there were just tons of lifted up 3/4 ton trucks with huge tires, newer sports cars all with v-8 engines and all carrying 1 or maybe 2 people.  I'm lucky enough to get 2 weekdays off per week, so today when I was picking up son we went through just one of the high schools parking lots, there are 2 others:1 for teachers, and another large one for students.

Today for whatever reason I saw these giant trucks and SUV's and at first giggled:


Then I began to think a little more seriously about the legacy that we are leaving with our children. By giving them these big fancy vehicles, are we giving them a sense of entitlement, that they deserve to be able to drive giant wasteful machines? That contributing to the pollution of the environment, gas bills, and vehicle payments are all something that is no big deal? Granted it is only one picture but look in the background there is some sort of brand new dodge sports care, jeeps, the trucks and SUV's, I can only imagine that the vast majority of those vehicles are still owned by the bank...Thats not what I want to teach my child, I want to teach him about fiscal responsibility and environmental responsibilities, but Im worried that my influence will diminish substantially when he reaches high school and is influenced by this extreme consumerism...

bobechs

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2016, 04:31:49 PM »
Well, I think you are right.  That your influence won't be very much stronger than the ambient culture of middle class America, that is.  And ironically, just being more emphatic in your views is likely to have an inverse effect on your child accepting them when those rebellious hormones start percolating in adolescence.

So, I don't know what to advise you.  But you are right.

GetItRight

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2016, 09:38:38 AM »
It's their money, they deserve to be able to spend it as they see fit. Like it or not, it's still a relatively free society we live in.

Also, for what it's worth that truck likely gets north of 20 MPG, possibly closer to 30 than 20. In my vehicle comparisons of ROI on various cost for MPG I'be found around 30 MPG is the point of significantly diminishing returns.

paddedhat

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2016, 12:17:01 PM »
Where I live in rural America, a lot of the kids tooling around in big trucks, and to a lesser extent, fancy cars, are the same kids that are out there busting their asses to pay for the things. It's nothing to find kids at our local school that are in the barn for a few hours before school, and working the farm all day, every weekend. Or kids that put thirty hours a week in, at the family business, since it's expected, and i's the ticket to the vehicle they want.

Might not be the optimal choice, but it's their right to chose whatever they want, and most of these kids are quite desirable when they hit the adult labor market. I supervised large construction projects for a while, and dealt with lots of young new hires. I'll take a country kid with an obsession for big stupid diesel pick-ups over one who never worked while in school, and couldn't change a tire without an I-phone and a AAA membership.

clarkevii

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2016, 01:09:13 PM »
It's their money, they deserve to be able to spend it as they see fit. Like it or not, it's still a relatively free society we live in.

Also, for what it's worth that truck likely gets north of 20 MPG, possibly closer to 30 than 20. In my vehicle comparisons of ROI on various cost for MPG I'be found around 30 MPG is the point of significantly diminishing returns.

No way that white Dodge Ram 2500 gets close to 30 mpg. I'd say more like 15 mpg.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2016, 05:58:33 PM by clarkevii »

ohana

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2016, 01:38:41 PM »
I teach at an elite liberal arts college.  My students drive brand new BMW SUVs, $60,000 trucks, and fancypants sports cars.  I've been dying to start a blog called "cars my students drive".  Hopefully they land those big time jobs, or inherit from mummy and daddy, otherwise reality won't be pretty.

ltt

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2016, 05:55:50 PM »
I think that if you drive into any school parking lot that is surrounded by any type of agricultural community, you will find this.

Uturn

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2016, 07:01:43 PM »
Also, for what it's worth that truck likely gets north of 20 MPG, possibly closer to 30 than 20.

Really?  Both Dodges in that picture are 2008 models, both 4 door, the white one is 4WD.  I have a 2008 single cab Ram that is lighter than either of these, and mine gets 18mpg at 70mph. 

Rustycage

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2016, 08:49:52 PM »
That white one on the left (Dodge I think) .......... is that roughly the size of a 747?

We don't have many big trucks in Australia

ncornilsen

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2016, 08:50:34 AM »
Also, for what it's worth that truck likely gets north of 20 MPG, possibly closer to 30 than 20.

Really?  Both Dodges in that picture are 2008 models, both 4 door, the white one is 4WD.  I have a 2008 single cab Ram that is lighter than either of these, and mine gets 18mpg at 70mph.

The best fuel efficiency I've seen from a 3/4 or 1 ton diesel is my dad's 2005, bare bones, no AC,  cummins ram with a 6 speed. It got 23 empty on the whole tank going about 4 hours on the freeway. With the trailer and cattle on the way back, it got 18. I can't see one getting of 25 in anything representative of actual driving. Especially with the new diesels, that're subject to much tighter emissions requirements.

Some of the new, lightweight 1/2 ton dodge rams with the 3.0 diesel might break 27 on a consistent basis, but that's a relatively small truck without a significant towing capacity.

GuitarStv

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2016, 09:01:46 AM »
Also, for what it's worth that truck likely gets north of 20 MPG, possibly closer to 30 than 20.

Really?  Both Dodges in that picture are 2008 models, both 4 door, the white one is 4WD.  I have a 2008 single cab Ram that is lighter than either of these, and mine gets 18mpg at 70mph.

The best fuel efficiency I've seen from a 3/4 or 1 ton diesel is my dad's 2005, bare bones, no AC,  cummins ram with a 6 speed. It got 23 empty on the whole tank going about 4 hours on the freeway. With the trailer and cattle on the way back, it got 18. I can't see one getting of 25 in anything representative of actual driving. Especially with the new diesels, that're subject to much tighter emissions requirements.

Some of the new, lightweight 1/2 ton dodge rams with the 3.0 diesel might break 27 on a consistent basis, but that's a relatively small truck without a significant towing capacity.

http://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/sites/rita.dot.gov.bts/files/publications/national_transportation_statistics/html/table_04_23.html

The average for a light duty pickup truck is 21 mpg in the US.  Getting 30 mpg in one would be quite unusual.

patchyfacialhair

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2016, 09:03:16 AM »
I teach at an elite liberal arts college.  My students drive brand new BMW SUVs, $60,000 trucks, and fancypants sports cars.  I've been dying to start a blog called "cars my students drive".  Hopefully they land those big time jobs, or inherit from mummy and daddy, otherwise reality won't be pretty.

I see the same thing at my city's private liberal arts college. Sad thing is that this school regularly shows up on "worst ROI" lists since it costs so much yet employers don't seem to take them seriously. But, mummy and daddy will bail them out...I can assure you of that.

MrsDinero

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2016, 09:05:59 AM »
I know a lot of parents who buy their kids better cars than what they drive.  Their reasoning is they want to make sure their kids are safe.  They equate bigger, expensive with safer.  It is sad because I think they are giving the kids an unrealistic start on what they should be driving in terms of affordability.


NESailor

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2016, 10:06:45 AM »
It's their money, they deserve to be able to spend it as they see fit. Like it or not, it's still a relatively free society we live in.

Also, for what it's worth that truck likely gets north of 20 MPG, possibly closer to 30 than 20. In my vehicle comparisons of ROI on various cost for MPG I'be found around 30 MPG is the point of significantly diminishing returns.

I can't tell if you're trolling this thread or you're actually serious.  If you do any sort of mathematically reasonable ROI calculation you're going to end up with a used compact or sub-compact. It'll get mid 30s in normal mixed driving (and easily 40 if you try) and is going to have a total cost of ownership in year 1 that is equal or less than your ANNUAL total cost of ownership of a new truck or SUV - with the ROI gap growing forever after as long as you own and drive either vehicle.

Unless you need a pickup for hauling & towing all the time...but high school students don't.

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2016, 11:01:56 AM »
It's their money, they deserve to be able to spend it as they see fit. Like it or not, it's still a relatively free society we live in.

Also, for what it's worth that truck likely gets north of 20 MPG, possibly closer to 30 than 20. In my vehicle comparisons of ROI on various cost for MPG I'be found around 30 MPG is the point of significantly diminishing returns.

If you think it is getting closer to 30 than 20, color me shocked- I had no idea.  My Elantra only manages about 28 mpg on my regular commute.  (It can get close to 40 if I stick to long trips on highways.)

Posthumane

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2016, 11:25:03 AM »
I thought that GetItRight might have been talking about the Ford Ranger that's in the foreground, and thoght it might be reasonable that it would get close to 30 mpg, so I looked it up on fuelly.com.

Ford Ranger averages:
2011: 19.6 mpg
2010: 20.7 mpg
2009: 21.0 mpg
2008: 19.2 mpg
2007: 19.4 mpg...
Definitely closer to the 20 mpg mark. Let's see what else is in the picture.
Ford F-250 SD:
2007: 14.0 mpg
2006: 13.9 mpg
2005: 13.6 mpg
2004: 14.0 mpg
2003: 13.7 mpg

Dodge 2500:
2010: 14.3 mpg
2009: 14.3 mpg
2008: 15.4 mpg
2007: 15.7 mpg
2006: 14.9 mpg

I'm guessing at the models/years based on appearance but I think those numbers are representative. Fuelly, for those that haven't used it, is a collection of real-world fuel economy figures as reported by vehicle owners by inputting the distance driven and the amount of gas filled at each fuel up, and the figures are averaged over a period for a however many vehicles they have being reported. I've found it to be fairly accurate for comparison purposes.

ringer707

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2016, 08:37:24 AM »
It is true some of the newer trucks do get better gas mileage. Not 30, but I would expect that Dodge to get 20ish. I had to drive my mom's GMC 3500 diesel dually for 6 weeks and even that got 20. My FIL has a Dodge 3500 diesel dually and that will get about 16 pulling a fully loaded 3 horse trailer. The Dodges in particular have really upped their gas mileage and are much better trucks than they used to be.

But overall, OP, yes, I do totally agree with your point. I'm from the south and while the kids at my high school didn't have trucks as large as this, they were all jacking up their little Ford Rangers as high as they could.

MoneyCat

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #17 on: May 10, 2016, 08:47:16 AM »
Lots of Dads buy their high school aged sons big trucks in the hopes that it will get their kid laid. Frequently, it works. That's pretty much all there is to the phenomenon.

acroy

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2016, 09:00:15 AM »
Rural America drives their tractors to school :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7R7re9jLNE

Overall, First world countries have/are hitting 'Peak Car' and are on the decline. This has been well documented.
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/mt/assets/business/peakcar.png

The young culture is actually less about cars (Remember Beach Boys - 409?)
And more about social media, food, travel etc.

MoneyCat

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #19 on: May 10, 2016, 09:10:51 AM »
Rural America drives their tractors to school :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7R7re9jLNE

Overall, First world countries have/are hitting 'Peak Car' and are on the decline. This has been well documented.
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/mt/assets/business/peakcar.png

The young culture is actually less about cars (Remember Beach Boys - 409?)
And more about social media, food, travel etc.

Rural and suburban Americans will always need cars. The wealthier city people who previously would have bought the $40,000 luxury vehicles, however, are increasingly becoming Bobos -- Bourgeois Bohemians -- which if we are all honest is what most MMM readers also are. Bobos have no need for cars.

clarkfan1979

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #20 on: May 10, 2016, 05:30:55 PM »
Many high school kids can afford these trucks with a part-time job and living at home for free. When they graduate and move out or go to school full-time, many of these trucks will be sold. I think they need to learn the lesson on their own. You can't figure everything out at 16.

tardis

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #21 on: May 10, 2016, 06:20:08 PM »
UBC:  The University of Beautiful Cars (aka. University of British Columbia)

paddedhat

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #22 on: May 10, 2016, 08:49:32 PM »
Lots of Dads buy their high school aged sons big trucks in the hopes that it will get their kid laid. Frequently, it works. That's pretty much all there is to the phenomenon.

Damn, who knew?  At that age, my pick-up was often full of firewood, or being used to haul me to my after school and weekend job. I guess this was a classic case of misusing the tool. Instead of selling firewood, I could of been getting laid.................................  I'm sure the cracked dash, mud and tools on the floor, and the vinyl bench seat were nearly irresistible to the ladies, and there I was, too dumb to even see it. BTW, are you high?

Goldielocks

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #23 on: May 10, 2016, 09:08:28 PM »
My DD just received her learner's permit.   As she was driving to school (me as passenger) as part of learning to drive (she walks otherwise)..   I realized how many parking spaces (empty) there were at the school, and started to count the cars in the student lot....

I bet only 20 or 30 cars were driven by students.   Some would be student owned, and many would be "mom's car".   So many less than when I went to school  (there are approximately 150 kids aged for licenses).

This is either a reflection of the trend to NOT get a DL, or the fact that there is not a lot of extra money in our area for non-essentials.   I know my daughter was surprised to learn that we had saved up post secondary tuition, apparently several of her friends will not receive anything.

This is a very blue collar area (e.g., store managers, fire fighters, teachers, etc), upper middle class if there are two incomes, that sort of area...

Metric Mouse

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #24 on: May 11, 2016, 04:13:11 AM »
Lots of Dads buy their high school aged sons big trucks in the hopes that it will get their kid laid. Frequently, it works. That's pretty much all there is to the phenomenon.

And here I was worried I would have to raise my wombfruit to be funny, intelligent, caring and hardworking individuals. Now I'll just save up for a truck!

I sometimes drove a truck in highschool, but it was older than my dad. Deff. didn't get 30mpg. At the time I was convinced being funny and adventurous and ridiculously good looking is what got me laid, but I may need to reconsider...

talltexan

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #25 on: May 11, 2016, 06:48:43 AM »
Many HS'ers drive trucks because their families already owned the truck for hauling or farm/ranch work, so they didn't actually need to buy another vehicle when son/daughter turned 16, they could just let them drive that.

GuitarStv

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2016, 06:52:20 AM »
Lots of Dads buy their high school aged sons big trucks in the hopes that it will get their kid laid. Frequently, it works. That's pretty much all there is to the phenomenon.

And here I was worried I would have to raise my wombfruit to be funny, intelligent, caring and hardworking individuals. Now I'll just save up for a truck!

I sometimes drove a truck in highschool, but it was older than my dad. Deff. didn't get 30mpg. At the time I was convinced being funny and adventurous and ridiculously good looking is what got me laid, but I may need to reconsider...

I think the ROI would be better simply paying for a hooker.

acroy

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #27 on: May 11, 2016, 06:55:32 AM »
Lots of Dads buy their high school aged sons big trucks in the hopes that it will get their kid laid. Frequently, it works. That's pretty much all there is to the phenomenon.
That is super creepy and I hope incorrect.

Metric Mouse

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2016, 06:56:19 AM »
Lots of Dads buy their high school aged sons big trucks in the hopes that it will get their kid laid. Frequently, it works. That's pretty much all there is to the phenomenon.

And here I was worried I would have to raise my wombfruit to be funny, intelligent, caring and hardworking individuals. Now I'll just save up for a truck!

I sometimes drove a truck in highschool, but it was older than my dad. Deff. didn't get 30mpg. At the time I was convinced being funny and adventurous and ridiculously good looking is what got me laid, but I may need to reconsider...

I think the ROI would be better simply paying for a hooker.

Quite possible. Could be location dependent.  Also a truck is marginally good at other things, so being multi-use certainly would have to be factored in.

Syonyk

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2016, 08:13:45 AM »
Many HS'ers drive trucks because their families already owned the truck for hauling or farm/ranch work, so they didn't actually need to buy another vehicle when son/daughter turned 16, they could just let them drive that.

My wife drove a pickup in HS for that reason. It's what the spare vehicle was. It was older than she was, though. It's still rolling around with a relative.

She grew up in rural farm country.

Chris22

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #30 on: May 11, 2016, 08:38:43 AM »
Two thoughts:

1., A certain segment of high school/college age kids love to work on and modify their vehicles.  Modifying for speed has been all but killed due to huge clampdowns on street racing, etc, so lots of those same people are now jacking up their pickups.  It's all about taking a common, modest vehicle, and trying to make it unique and attention grabbing.  Since HS/college kids often have very little in the way of financial responsibilities, they can afford to divert a silly amount of money into their car.  I had a silly expensive stereo in my college car when I made $10/hr because I had no real bills, versus now where I don't modify my car even though I make far more.

2.  Given that lots of people find it convenient to have a truck for homeowner things, it might not be a bad idea to give/encourage Junior to have a truck since most kids don't drive very far (school is generally in the same town versus a parent who might have a longer commute, etc) and the increase use in gas is negligible, versus the parent commuting in the truck and giving the kid a more efficient compact car.  I'd love to have a truck I could confiscate from my kid 1-2 weekends a month that I didn't have to drive every day.  "Here kid, take my sedan, I need to go get a load of mulch with your truck."

GuitarStv

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #31 on: May 11, 2016, 08:48:26 AM »
Two thoughts:

1., A certain segment of high school/college age kids love to work on and modify their vehicles.  Modifying for speed has been all but killed due to huge clampdowns on street racing, etc, so lots of those same people are now jacking up their pickups.  It's all about taking a common, modest vehicle, and trying to make it unique and attention grabbing.  Since HS/college kids often have very little in the way of financial responsibilities, they can afford to divert a silly amount of money into their car.  I had a silly expensive stereo in my college car when I made $10/hr because I had no real bills, versus now where I don't modify my car even though I make far more.

Your parents paid for your books, food, tuition, and rent?  I didn't have a car in highschool or university because it was understood that money made while working would be put towards those expenses.

Chris22

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #32 on: May 11, 2016, 08:54:27 AM »
Two thoughts:

1., A certain segment of high school/college age kids love to work on and modify their vehicles.  Modifying for speed has been all but killed due to huge clampdowns on street racing, etc, so lots of those same people are now jacking up their pickups.  It's all about taking a common, modest vehicle, and trying to make it unique and attention grabbing.  Since HS/college kids often have very little in the way of financial responsibilities, they can afford to divert a silly amount of money into their car.  I had a silly expensive stereo in my college car when I made $10/hr because I had no real bills, versus now where I don't modify my car even though I make far more.

Your parents paid for your books, food, tuition, and rent?  I didn't have a car in highschool or university because it was understood that money made while working would be put towards those expenses.

I was on a full tuition scholarship in college that also covered books and paid a small stipend.  My parents paid for my room and board.  I was fortunate enough to live in a family that encouraged me to focus on school and only work in the summer for most of my childhood, and those summer wages basically paid for living expenses above and beyond the basic room and board (going out, gas, beer, cell phone, etc). 

I'm a red panda

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #33 on: May 11, 2016, 09:47:16 AM »

Your parents paid for your books, food, tuition, and rent?  I didn't have a car in highschool or university because it was understood that money made while working would be put towards those expenses.

My parents paid for all those things for me in college (well except most of my tuition- since I earned a ton of scholarships.)

The first two years I wasn't allowed to have a job, or else they would stop paying all those things.  "School is your job".  The second two years I they let me- my junior year I worked 3 part time jobs.

The fun thing was my Dad's stocks did well enough that they never spent the savings bonds that had been set aside for a college fund, so I got given those.  Now that I'm in my 30s, they will all mature for the next 15 years or so.  Super to go cash them every few months.

eljefe-speaks

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #34 on: May 11, 2016, 10:57:30 AM »
It's their money, they deserve to be able to spend it as they see fit.

Surely you believe that accountability to society has to be a factor at some point, we can disagree concerning to what degree. According to your statement, I can deduce that you believe people should be free to use their earned income to hire people to torture left-handled, albino midgets for their viewing pleasure. 


MoneyCat

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #35 on: May 11, 2016, 11:01:18 AM »
My first car was a 15 year old Mercury Grand Marquis that I bought for $330 in 1997. It was a real piece of shit. I got absolutely no ass with that car. Those of you who got a free big rig from your parents should thank them for not letting you become an undateable social pariah. (Thank God for college.)

Kitsune

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #36 on: May 12, 2016, 09:54:05 AM »
Where I live in rural America, a lot of the kids tooling around in big trucks, and to a lesser extent, fancy cars, are the same kids that are out there busting their asses to pay for the things. It's nothing to find kids at our local school that are in the barn for a few hours before school, and working the farm all day, every weekend. Or kids that put thirty hours a week in, at the family business, since it's expected, and i's the ticket to the vehicle they want.

Might not be the optimal choice, but it's their right to chose whatever they want, and most of these kids are quite desirable when they hit the adult labor market. I supervised large construction projects for a while, and dealt with lots of young new hires. I'll take a country kid with an obsession for big stupid diesel pick-ups over one who never worked while in school, and couldn't change a tire without an I-phone and a AAA membership.

This matches my experience with rural Quebec (though, granted, most pick-ups I see are somewhat more used-looking than those in the first picture).

Also, the 17 and 18-year-olds I know who drive those are the ones who have side-businesses (if you're working 30+ hour weeks while in high school... dude, kudos) that require cargo space - apprentice plumbers, electricians, machinery workers, farm kids who actually use their trucks to lug farm stuff around, etc. It's REALLY rare to see them used exclusively as a status symbol. Note that the kids I knew who started working in construction at 17 are now the ones making 35+/hour working construction, have nice (well-renovated, 'cause they do it) houses, and are in stable relationships and have kids... at 24, 25 years old.

A city-based 17-year-old and a rural-based 17-year old can be REALLY different. It's like saying someone is 30... in LA, that means start-up jobs, low salary, roommates, dating around. Where I'm at, that's spouse, kids, house, mortgage, etc. And that difference starts young.

Now, if you're in the suburbs, all of what both of us just said is BS.

ncornilsen

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #37 on: May 12, 2016, 10:53:25 AM »
It's their money, they deserve to be able to spend it as they see fit.

Surely you believe that accountability to society has to be a factor at some point, we can disagree concerning to what degree. According to your statement, I can deduce that you believe people should be free to use their earned income to hire people to torture left-handled, albino midgets for their viewing pleasure.

Flippant answer: If the albino midgets were cool with it, perhaps being paid in some way by those who you hire to torture them, then yes, I suppose so.

Surely you don't equate being able to purchase a truck and modify it as you please with toturturing midgets of any kind... right? because if you do, you should maybe check you smug.

bobechs

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #38 on: May 12, 2016, 12:51:09 PM »
Lots of Dads buy their high school aged sons big trucks in the hopes that it will get their kid laid. Frequently, it works. That's pretty much all there is to the phenomenon.

And here I was worried I would have to raise my wombfruit to be funny, intelligent, caring and hardworking individuals. Now I'll just save up for a truck!

I sometimes drove a truck in highschool, but it was older than my dad. Deff. didn't get 30mpg. At the time I was convinced being funny and adventurous and ridiculously good looking is what got me laid, but I may need to reconsider...

I think the ROI would be better simply paying for a hooker.

Quite possible. Could be location dependent.  Also a truck is marginally good at other things, so being multi-use certainly would have to be factored in.

Are you saying you couldn't have the hooker wash & dry a load of clothes and run the dishwasher?

If so, who do hookers get to do these things?

Metric Mouse

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Re: Big rigs at the high school
« Reply #39 on: May 16, 2016, 03:53:00 AM »
Lots of Dads buy their high school aged sons big trucks in the hopes that it will get their kid laid. Frequently, it works. That's pretty much all there is to the phenomenon.

And here I was worried I would have to raise my wombfruit to be funny, intelligent, caring and hardworking individuals. Now I'll just save up for a truck!

I sometimes drove a truck in highschool, but it was older than my dad. Deff. didn't get 30mpg. At the time I was convinced being funny and adventurous and ridiculously good looking is what got me laid, but I may need to reconsider...

I think the ROI would be better simply paying for a hooker.

Quite possible. Could be location dependent.  Also a truck is marginally good at other things, so being multi-use certainly would have to be factored in.

Are you saying you couldn't have the hooker wash & dry a load of clothes and run the dishwasher?

If so, who do hookers get to do these things?

Maybe you've just come up with a new business idea!