Author Topic: Bank transfers $120k into couples bank account in error  (Read 22529 times)

ducky19

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Re: Bank transfers $120k into couples bank account in error
« Reply #200 on: December 16, 2019, 11:53:59 AM »
Then there's the woman who realized it had to be a mistake and contacted the bank:

https://myfox8.com/2019/12/13/woman-finds-37-million-in-her-bank-account-after-clerical-error/

You know, like any rational, responsible adult would do.

Bloop Bloop

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Re: Bank transfers $120k into couples bank account in error
« Reply #201 on: December 16, 2019, 12:30:06 PM »
Then there's the woman who realized it had to be a mistake and contacted the bank:

https://myfox8.com/2019/12/13/woman-finds-37-million-in-her-bank-account-after-clerical-error/

You know, like any rational, responsible adult would do.

This woman just had the education and privilege to be able to make the right choices. (Sarcasm)

Davnasty

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Re: Bank transfers $120k into couples bank account in error
« Reply #202 on: December 16, 2019, 01:50:21 PM »
Then there's the woman who realized it had to be a mistake and contacted the bank:

https://myfox8.com/2019/12/13/woman-finds-37-million-in-her-bank-account-after-clerical-error/

You know, like any rational, responsible adult would do.

This sounds like a snarky* response to some debate within this thread that would disagree but I don't actually think anyone disagrees with this. Of course that's the rational and responsible thing to do.

The other side of the argument wasn't that their actions were correct, rather that being irrational and irresponsible isn't the same as setting out with a plan to steal $120k. Treating this couple as if they were criminals who actively stole the money probably isn't going to get the best results for the couple, the bank, or society.

*apologies if I misread

Bloop Bloop

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Re: Bank transfers $120k into couples bank account in error
« Reply #203 on: December 16, 2019, 01:57:38 PM »
"rather that being irrational and irresponsible isn't the same as setting out with a plan to steal $120k."

I would agree with this, but this also applies to most non-physical theft. The accountant who funnels money out of her boss's business usually starts off with the intent to just "see if it'll work", then it spirals out of control, often abetted by gambling losses and other dumb choices.

It might go to moral culpability (although I think it only offers a very slight diminution) but it doesn't change the nature of the eventual loss that has to be sucked up by the innocent victim.

GuitarStv

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Re: Bank transfers $120k into couples bank account in error
« Reply #204 on: December 16, 2019, 04:49:01 PM »
"rather that being irrational and irresponsible isn't the same as setting out with a plan to steal $120k."

I would agree with this, but this also applies to most non-physical theft. The accountant who funnels money out of her boss's business usually starts off with the intent to just "see if it'll work", then it spirals out of control, often abetted by gambling losses and other dumb choices.

It might go to moral culpability (although I think it only offers a very slight diminution) but it doesn't change the nature of the eventual loss that has to be sucked up by the innocent victim.

In your example, the boss being stolen from has done nothing wrong.  The person doing the stealing initiates the whole situation.  That's very different from a bank that gives their money to someone else through incompetence . . . in the latter, the bank has not been tricked or duped in any way.

joleran

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Re: Bank transfers $120k into couples bank account in error
« Reply #205 on: December 16, 2019, 04:51:01 PM »
I would have a lot of fun with the $37 million.  Go into the branch and ask them if they could check my balance to see if my bonus had come in, for example.   There's a lot of entertainment to be had with that without spending a dime.

Bloop Bloop

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Re: Bank transfers $120k into couples bank account in error
« Reply #206 on: December 16, 2019, 05:17:49 PM »
"rather that being irrational and irresponsible isn't the same as setting out with a plan to steal $120k."

I would agree with this, but this also applies to most non-physical theft. The accountant who funnels money out of her boss's business usually starts off with the intent to just "see if it'll work", then it spirals out of control, often abetted by gambling losses and other dumb choices.

It might go to moral culpability (although I think it only offers a very slight diminution) but it doesn't change the nature of the eventual loss that has to be sucked up by the innocent victim.

In your example, the boss being stolen from has done nothing wrong.  The person doing the stealing initiates the whole situation.  That's very different from a bank that gives their money to someone else through incompetence . . . in the latter, the bank has not been tricked or duped in any way.

This is victim blaming.

GuitarStv

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Re: Bank transfers $120k into couples bank account in error
« Reply #207 on: December 16, 2019, 06:02:53 PM »
"rather that being irrational and irresponsible isn't the same as setting out with a plan to steal $120k."

I would agree with this, but this also applies to most non-physical theft. The accountant who funnels money out of her boss's business usually starts off with the intent to just "see if it'll work", then it spirals out of control, often abetted by gambling losses and other dumb choices.

It might go to moral culpability (although I think it only offers a very slight diminution) but it doesn't change the nature of the eventual loss that has to be sucked up by the innocent victim.

In your example, the boss being stolen from has done nothing wrong.  The person doing the stealing initiates the whole situation.  That's very different from a bank that gives their money to someone else through incompetence . . . in the latter, the bank has not been tricked or duped in any way.

This is victim blaming.

You started it.  :P