Author Topic: another shopaholic story  (Read 10193 times)

meghan88

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slugline

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2016, 01:13:11 PM »
It should be fun to see what happens when this couple hits their first financial setback.

DblEntry

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2016, 01:16:47 PM »
Got to love the Daily Mail comments.

"As Dolly Parton once said...'It costs a lot of money to look this cheap'." :)

Miss Piggy

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2016, 01:19:31 PM »
Looks like shopping isn't her only addiction.

"They met on the Plenty of Fish website six years ago and both claim to have slept with more than 400 people each."

Ew.

RocketSurgeon

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2016, 06:39:08 AM »
That fiancé needs an intervention.

"Danger, Will Robinson!"

Also skeptical about the slept with 400 people thing, at least for him. If he can get women so easily, why is he wasting his time with this clown?

Warlord1986

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2016, 06:46:55 AM »
I clicked that link expecting to laugh, but I honestly just feel so sad. Both of those people need therapy. And Jesus.

vivophoenix

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2016, 07:26:34 AM »
I clicked that link expecting to laugh, but I honestly just feel so sad. Both of those people need therapy. And Jesus.


i agree.

willing reading this, all i could hear was undiagnosed/treated mental illness.

she is using things to fill a void and screaming for help in this entire article.

financialfreedomsloth

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2016, 08:08:23 AM »
Not believing one word of this 'article'
Just these two lines:
She can easily spend £1,000 per shopping trip and will go once a week
Claims she'll only let her fiancé have sex with her if he treats her to gifts.

if this guy needs to spend around 1000 GBP on her to get some loving, then he really can't do math: that amount should get him a very nice young lady looking for a sugardaddy (or even two). If he has any morals over paying for loving, well, he's allready doing that now, better do some comparative shopping and getting a better 'bang' for his 'buck'

jinga nation

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2016, 09:36:58 AM »
That fiancé needs an intervention.

"Danger, Will Robinson!"

Also skeptical about the slept with 400 people thing, at least for him. If he can get women so easily, why is he wasting his time with this clown?
Because she's the whale that swallowed Jonah.

MrsPete

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #9 on: September 28, 2016, 05:44:11 PM »
Several thoughts:

- She says she used to be a "chav".  What's that?
- Wonder how her fiance feels about her public claims of manipulating him with sex.
- Do you think it's hard to eat with those oversized lips?
- She keeps some make-up for display?  Huh?
- Posing with money?  Really?  She must be super impressed by cashiers and bank tellers. 
- Remember Elvira from late-night TV? 
- She describes shopping as "a talent" and also as a "nasty little habit I've picked up". 
- I'd like to think I look better than she does -- on a whole lot less.

meghan88

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2016, 06:40:35 PM »
Several thoughts:

- She says she used to be a "chav".  What's that?
- Wonder how her fiance feels about her public claims of manipulating him with sex.
- Do you think it's hard to eat with those oversized lips?
- She keeps some make-up for display?  Huh?
- Posing with money?  Really?  She must be super impressed by cashiers and bank tellers. 
- Remember Elvira from late-night TV? 
- She describes shopping as "a talent" and also as a "nasty little habit I've picked up". 
- I'd like to think I look better than she does -- on a whole lot less.

1.  The Oxford English Dictionary defines "chav" as an informal British derogatory, meaning "a young lower-class person who displays brash and loutish behaviour and wears real or imitation designer clothes"
2.  He must have low self-esteem, expectations, or both.
3.  Yes - wouldn't want to find out.
4.  Huh indeed.
5.  Might as well kiss it before you part with it.
6.  Yes, and Elvira probably has far more business savvy.
7.  She should decide on one or the other, but not both?
8.  I am sure you do.  Ref. the Dolly Parton quote above from DblEntry:

Got to love the Daily Mail comments.

"As Dolly Parton once said...'It costs a lot of money to look this cheap'." :)

GT

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2016, 07:37:22 PM »
Also, chav = Council House And Violence.

SeaEhm

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #12 on: September 28, 2016, 08:25:33 PM »
he makes $130k and can support that lifestyle?  Something's not adding up.

She seems a bit insecure and needs to do some life reflections. 

I am not one to truly care if people spend money on designer stuff, but to portray it in such a way is a bit much.

She is probably trying to be a bit more outlandish so she can become featured on that site and gain "popularity" but you can tell wit her purse selection that she is pretty much just a "look at me" person.

Probably has family money on both sides...

Hard to tell people they can't afford things when they have family money.

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #13 on: September 29, 2016, 08:35:55 AM »
Hard to tell people they can't afford things when they have family money.

This is why family money seldom survives the third generation, in North America at least.

The first generation earns the money.

The second generation mostly screws up. It benefits from what the first generation earned, but there's a gap between the asset and the knowledge and sacrifice that produced it. They're trained to spend, but not to accrue wealth, earn an income, or manage the wealth in ways that develop an income stream. Unlike old money families, kids in second generation wealthy families aren't taught that they have to do something with their lives. They frequently end up in professions that don't earn much but their standard of living is subsidized by their parents' wealth, EOC style (Stanley & Danko). Accordingly, they pile up debt that doesn't really get discharged until they inherit. That reduces the net family worth. When there's more than one kid, the family fortune is divided. It's generally still possible to be financially independent on the inheritance, but the standard of living has to be scaled down. Unlike in old money families, there's no awareness of how you have to scale your standard of living to the income generated by your assets in order to remain financially independent and to have enough to pass to your own kids. So they gradually spend down the principal, until there's only "enough" to pay for an expensive education, a nice house, and a good launch, but not enough to FIRE the kids. (Side note: the Mustachian FIRE lifestyle and mentality is actually in line with what old money families practice when the 'stache starts to dwindle due to economic changes or too many kids.)

The third generation grows up with a near-total lack of connection between their standard of living and what it takes to achieve it. They imitate their parents' debt accumulation habits and spending habits but never accrue much for themselves. This is where you see most of the trust fund babies.

Every once in a while, you get a second generation that contains at least some people who get the cash flow concept. So they stay wealthy and sometimes even add to the family wealth, and they teach their kids to do the same. The ones that learn become the branches of the families that become "old money", while the branches of the family descended from a second-generation idiot go broke.

MrsPete

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2016, 04:50:13 PM »
Hard to tell people they can't afford things when they have family money.

This is why family money seldom survives the third generation, in North America at least.

The first generation earns the money.

The second generation mostly screws up. It benefits from what the first generation earned, but there's a gap between the asset and the knowledge and sacrifice that produced it. They're trained to spend, but not to accrue wealth, earn an income, or manage the wealth in ways that develop an income stream. Unlike old money families, kids in second generation wealthy families aren't taught that they have to do something with their lives. They frequently end up in professions that don't earn much but their standard of living is subsidized by their parents' wealth, EOC style (Stanley & Danko). Accordingly, they pile up debt that doesn't really get discharged until they inherit. That reduces the net family worth. When there's more than one kid, the family fortune is divided. It's generally still possible to be financially independent on the inheritance, but the standard of living has to be scaled down. Unlike in old money families, there's no awareness of how you have to scale your standard of living to the income generated by your assets in order to remain financially independent and to have enough to pass to your own kids. So they gradually spend down the principal, until there's only "enough" to pay for an expensive education, a nice house, and a good launch, but not enough to FIRE the kids. (Side note: the Mustachian FIRE lifestyle and mentality is actually in line with what old money families practice when the 'stache starts to dwindle due to economic changes or too many kids.)

The third generation grows up with a near-total lack of connection between their standard of living and what it takes to achieve it. They imitate their parents' debt accumulation habits and spending habits but never accrue much for themselves. This is where you see most of the trust fund babies.

Every once in a while, you get a second generation that contains at least some people who get the cash flow concept. So they stay wealthy and sometimes even add to the family wealth, and they teach their kids to do the same. The ones that learn become the branches of the families that become "old money", while the branches of the family descended from a second-generation idiot go broke.
There's a saying for that:  Clogs to clogs in three generations. 

Clogs were the cheapest possible shoes, so the saying means that the family goes from being poor ... to being poor again. 

2Birds1Stone

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2016, 05:02:24 PM »
Wow, just wow.

Fiance sounds like a desperate chubby chaser =D

Spiffsome

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2016, 08:55:40 PM »
This is why family money seldom survives the third generation, in North America at least.

The first generation earns the money.

The second generation mostly screws up. It benefits from what the first generation earned, but there's a gap between the asset and the knowledge and sacrifice that produced it. They're trained to spend, but not to accrue wealth, earn an income, or manage the wealth in ways that develop an income stream. Unlike old money families, kids in second generation wealthy families aren't taught that they have to do something with their lives. They frequently end up in professions that don't earn much but their standard of living is subsidized by their parents' wealth, EOC style (Stanley & Danko). Accordingly, they pile up debt that doesn't really get discharged until they inherit. That reduces the net family worth. When there's more than one kid, the family fortune is divided. It's generally still possible to be financially independent on the inheritance, but the standard of living has to be scaled down. Unlike in old money families, there's no awareness of how you have to scale your standard of living to the income generated by your assets in order to remain financially independent and to have enough to pass to your own kids. So they gradually spend down the principal, until there's only "enough" to pay for an expensive education, a nice house, and a good launch, but not enough to FIRE the kids. (Side note: the Mustachian FIRE lifestyle and mentality is actually in line with what old money families practice when the 'stache starts to dwindle due to economic changes or too many kids.)

The third generation grows up with a near-total lack of connection between their standard of living and what it takes to achieve it. They imitate their parents' debt accumulation habits and spending habits but never accrue much for themselves. This is where you see most of the trust fund babies.

Every once in a while, you get a second generation that contains at least some people who get the cash flow concept. So they stay wealthy and sometimes even add to the family wealth, and they teach their kids to do the same. The ones that learn become the branches of the families that become "old money", while the branches of the family descended from a second-generation idiot go broke.

Well, there's a colossal raft of generalisations. As one of the 'third generation', how about I describe my family?

My grandparents started out dirt-poor. Through a horrifying amount of hard work and good timing with real estate, they retired fairly wealthy. While they were building their pile, my mother and uncle were growing up. Both were raised to work very hard and spend little, with my grandparents casting a jaundiced eye on any spending they deemed unnecessary. Neither of them was subsidised; rather they succeeded to the family business when their parents hit seventy. Third generation? I think my siblings will be fine, not so sure about my cousins.

I'm a great admirer of Stanley & Danko's work, but I disagree with the idea that most first-generation wealthy raise their kids to be shiftless spendthrifts. My grandparents worked too goddamned hard to let their kids piss it away, and they were very vocal about that fact to their kids and their grandkids. I've been hearing this 'three generations' saying, and variants on it, my entire life with the subtext that I had better not screw it up. Why would most families neglect that aspect?

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2016, 12:08:23 AM »
This is why family money seldom survives the third generation, in North America at least.

The first generation earns the money.

The second generation mostly screws up. It benefits from what the first generation earned, but there's a gap between the asset and the knowledge and sacrifice that produced it. They're trained to spend, but not to accrue wealth, earn an income, or manage the wealth in ways that develop an income stream. Unlike old money families, kids in second generation wealthy families aren't taught that they have to do something with their lives. They frequently end up in professions that don't earn much but their standard of living is subsidized by their parents' wealth, EOC style (Stanley & Danko). Accordingly, they pile up debt that doesn't really get discharged until they inherit. That reduces the net family worth. When there's more than one kid, the family fortune is divided. It's generally still possible to be financially independent on the inheritance, but the standard of living has to be scaled down. Unlike in old money families, there's no awareness of how you have to scale your standard of living to the income generated by your assets in order to remain financially independent and to have enough to pass to your own kids. So they gradually spend down the principal, until there's only "enough" to pay for an expensive education, a nice house, and a good launch, but not enough to FIRE the kids. (Side note: the Mustachian FIRE lifestyle and mentality is actually in line with what old money families practice when the 'stache starts to dwindle due to economic changes or too many kids.)

The third generation grows up with a near-total lack of connection between their standard of living and what it takes to achieve it. They imitate their parents' debt accumulation habits and spending habits but never accrue much for themselves. This is where you see most of the trust fund babies.

Every once in a while, you get a second generation that contains at least some people who get the cash flow concept. So they stay wealthy and sometimes even add to the family wealth, and they teach their kids to do the same. The ones that learn become the branches of the families that become "old money", while the branches of the family descended from a second-generation idiot go broke.

Well, there's a colossal raft of generalisations. As one of the 'third generation', how about I describe my family?

My grandparents started out dirt-poor. Through a horrifying amount of hard work and good timing with real estate, they retired fairly wealthy. While they were building their pile, my mother and uncle were growing up. Both were raised to work very hard and spend little, with my grandparents casting a jaundiced eye on any spending they deemed unnecessary. Neither of them was subsidised; rather they succeeded to the family business when their parents hit seventy. Third generation? I think my siblings will be fine, not so sure about my cousins.

I'm a great admirer of Stanley & Danko's work, but I disagree with the idea that most first-generation wealthy raise their kids to be shiftless spendthrifts. My grandparents worked too goddamned hard to let their kids piss it away, and they were very vocal about that fact to their kids and their grandkids. I've been hearing this 'three generations' saying, and variants on it, my entire life with the subtext that I had better not screw it up. Why would most families neglect that aspect?

It's something I keep seeing in person, over and over. There might be some confirmation bias at work. Yet I also notice that dumb luck (in addition to hard work) pays a huge part in first generation wealth. I'm not talking affluence FIRE style, I'm talking about high eight-to-nine-digit wealth in modern dollars.

The vast majority of people who work themselves nearly to death don't get rich doing it, and it's not necessarily because they're bad managers of what they've got: they have skills that aren't well compensated, or they don't buy real estate at the right time, or they live in a city that gets bombed during a war. Maybe they trust the wrong person and their earnings get eaten up by legal or medical expenses. Or perhaps the much-touted young superstar fizzles out. Marcus Dupree could have made a fortune in football, except life happened. That doesn't make him less of a hard worker or less fond of the game. The result is that most hard workers who save their money still don't get far enough ahead to FIRE well enough to provide for future generations.

The upshot of all this is that the first-generation Horatio Alger story isn't necessarily doing things that are that much different from all the other hard workers, except they happen to be well situated in conditions where they can accrue and keep assets instead of having them zeroed out. They aren't necessarily learning investment or wealth-protection skills. Nor do they necessarily take steps to preserve their assets and ensure that an asset base remains for the next generation. Some simply crank out enough kids to guarantee nobody's going to be left with much.

Wealth management skills happen predictably in families if and only if they're deliberately learned and taught.

MrsPete

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #18 on: October 06, 2016, 05:50:52 PM »
This third-generation thing is a pattern, but I don't think it'd be fair to say it's true for most people.  Instead, most people tend to be fairly similar to their parents; that is, they tend to receive about the same amount of education and be fairly similar in income. 

esq

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #19 on: October 06, 2016, 06:45:44 PM »
I loved this little gem:

"I’ve always loved make-up, I went through a phase of depression for ten years, and when I eventually got out of it I had a nervous breakdown. "

Also, I bet she's a stellar mom.

Metric Mouse

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #20 on: October 08, 2016, 11:56:36 PM »
Wow, just wow.

Fiance sounds like a desperate chubby chaser =D

That's pretty damn rude...

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #21 on: October 10, 2016, 09:07:23 AM »
Wow, just wow.

Fiance sounds like a desperate chubby chaser =D

That's pretty damn rude...

And the point of this forum. Cruel mockery is what we do. It's why I hang out here and not as much, say, on the real estate forum.

MandalayVA

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #22 on: October 10, 2016, 10:14:54 AM »
(checks article)

Sorry, kiddo, you're still a chav.  Also 2009 called, it wants its duck face back.

acroy

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2016, 11:21:46 AM »
Sad empty wasted lives...

Metric Mouse

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2016, 11:26:41 AM »
Wow, just wow.

Fiance sounds like a desperate chubby chaser =D

That's pretty damn rude...


And the point of this forum. Cruel mockery is what we do. It's why I hang out here and not as much, say, on the real estate forum.
Some are able to point out financial errors without being asshats.  I suppose if I hold everyone to such high standards, I will be bound for disappointment.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2016, 10:07:42 PM by Metric Mouse »

Spiffy

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #25 on: October 11, 2016, 10:59:12 AM »
 I wonder about the "third generation" wealth thing. My husband and I each have a set of wealthy grandparents, but in very different circumstances. Mine are "poor"  farmer/ranchers with huge land holdings worth several million. My grandmother is thankfully still very spry and healthy at 92, so I don't know how her wealth will be divided between her 4 children. My husbands grandparents came from well to do families and went to college. He came back from WWII, started a contracting/building business and got into real estate and did very well. They were worth several (many?) million when he died. No one talks about money. Grandmother didn't know how to deal with the money and sold most of the real estate so she wouldn't have to deal with it (she took a huge hit in capitol gains tax). My mother in law was given a big chunk of money when my husband was still in high school. She quit her job and has been quietly living on it ever since (about 30 years). Grandmother died about 15 years after grandfather, so she inherited then, too. I don't know how much is left because no one talks about money. I have know idea if my husband will inherit anything. His mother isn't extravagant, but since she has always had enough money, she doesn't always use it wisely. Doesn't bother to get a good deal on anything, has expensive exotic pets, pays for lawn service people, shops at Whole Foods, etc. When she sold her mother's house, it sold in hours because she told us that she didn't want to have to deal with it longer than necessary so made the price very low. Probably lost 80,000 on that. So perhaps the second generation just slowly fritters away the wealth?

Kaydedid

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #26 on: October 11, 2016, 03:54:26 PM »
Shopping every week, spending hours at a time at the spa getting beauty treatments...is it just me, or does this sound really boring?  Imagine all the really fun things she could be doing instead with that much disposable income!

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk


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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #27 on: October 11, 2016, 06:22:34 PM »
I wonder about the "third generation" wealth thing. My husband and I each have a set of wealthy grandparents, but in very different circumstances. Mine are "poor"  farmer/ranchers with huge land holdings worth several million. My grandmother is thankfully still very spry and healthy at 92, so I don't know how her wealth will be divided between her 4 children. My husbands grandparents came from well to do families and went to college. He came back from WWII, started a contracting/building business and got into real estate and did very well. They were worth several (many?) million when he died. No one talks about money. Grandmother didn't know how to deal with the money and sold most of the real estate so she wouldn't have to deal with it (she took a huge hit in capitol gains tax). My mother in law was given a big chunk of money when my husband was still in high school. She quit her job and has been quietly living on it ever since (about 30 years). Grandmother died about 15 years after grandfather, so she inherited then, too. I don't know how much is left because no one talks about money. I have know idea if my husband will inherit anything. His mother isn't extravagant, but since she has always had enough money, she doesn't always use it wisely. Doesn't bother to get a good deal on anything, has expensive exotic pets, pays for lawn service people, shops at Whole Foods, etc. When she sold her mother's house, it sold in hours because she told us that she didn't want to have to deal with it longer than necessary so made the price very low. Probably lost 80,000 on that. So perhaps the second generation just slowly fritters away the wealth?

The boldfaced statement is the key to why and how it happens. Wealth management has to be taught: even people who delegate that duty need to know enough about how their investments work to be sure they aren't being ripped off.

MgoSam

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #28 on: October 11, 2016, 07:46:45 PM »
I wonder about the "third generation" wealth thing. My husband and I each have a set of wealthy grandparents, but in very different circumstances. Mine are "poor"  farmer/ranchers with huge land holdings worth several million. My grandmother is thankfully still very spry and healthy at 92, so I don't know how her wealth will be divided between her 4 children. My husbands grandparents came from well to do families and went to college. He came back from WWII, started a contracting/building business and got into real estate and did very well. They were worth several (many?) million when he died. No one talks about money. Grandmother didn't know how to deal with the money and sold most of the real estate so she wouldn't have to deal with it (she took a huge hit in capitol gains tax). My mother in law was given a big chunk of money when my husband was still in high school. She quit her job and has been quietly living on it ever since (about 30 years). Grandmother died about 15 years after grandfather, so she inherited then, too. I don't know how much is left because no one talks about money. I have know idea if my husband will inherit anything. His mother isn't extravagant, but since she has always had enough money, she doesn't always use it wisely. Doesn't bother to get a good deal on anything, has expensive exotic pets, pays for lawn service people, shops at Whole Foods, etc. When she sold her mother's house, it sold in hours because she told us that she didn't want to have to deal with it longer than necessary so made the price very low. Probably lost 80,000 on that. So perhaps the second generation just slowly fritters away the wealth?

The boldfaced statement is the key to why and how it happens. Wealth management has to be taught: even people who delegate that duty need to know enough about how their investments work to be sure they aren't being ripped off.

The phrase I've heard is "One generation plants the tree, the next enjoys the shades." I've taken it to mean either first-generation immigrants come poor and their children become successful, but another is one generation earns the money and the next spends it.

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #29 on: October 12, 2016, 08:09:34 AM »
I wonder about the "third generation" wealth thing. My husband and I each have a set of wealthy grandparents, but in very different circumstances. Mine are "poor"  farmer/ranchers with huge land holdings worth several million. My grandmother is thankfully still very spry and healthy at 92, so I don't know how her wealth will be divided between her 4 children. My husbands grandparents came from well to do families and went to college. He came back from WWII, started a contracting/building business and got into real estate and did very well. They were worth several (many?) million when he died. No one talks about money. Grandmother didn't know how to deal with the money and sold most of the real estate so she wouldn't have to deal with it (she took a huge hit in capitol gains tax). My mother in law was given a big chunk of money when my husband was still in high school. She quit her job and has been quietly living on it ever since (about 30 years). Grandmother died about 15 years after grandfather, so she inherited then, too. I don't know how much is left because no one talks about money. I have know idea if my husband will inherit anything. His mother isn't extravagant, but since she has always had enough money, she doesn't always use it wisely. Doesn't bother to get a good deal on anything, has expensive exotic pets, pays for lawn service people, shops at Whole Foods, etc. When she sold her mother's house, it sold in hours because she told us that she didn't want to have to deal with it longer than necessary so made the price very low. Probably lost 80,000 on that. So perhaps the second generation just slowly fritters away the wealth?

The boldfaced statement is the key to why and how it happens. Wealth management has to be taught: even people who delegate that duty need to know enough about how their investments work to be sure they aren't being ripped off.

The phrase I've heard is "One generation plants the tree, the next enjoys the shades." I've taken it to mean either first-generation immigrants come poor and their children become successful, but another is one generation earns the money and the next spends it.

That would be more like: "one generation plants the tree, and the next cuts it down."

Kaspian

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #30 on: October 12, 2016, 08:57:45 AM »
"But he added: 'I do spoil her. Will she stop? I think she will slow down.'"

Oh, the bottomless hole in her heart because daddy didn't give enough hugs is going to magically disappear?  I don't think so.  All those photos she took to impress people....  I wish I knew someone who used to be like that and was then "cured", but I don't.  Desperately-craving-attention-seekers don't slow down the showoff parade.  They've already put in far too much work.  And if they have to, well...  That's when the "I'm depresssed, please console and flatter me on Facebook," party ratchets up.  It's really, really sad.  :(

MgoSam

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #31 on: October 12, 2016, 09:16:03 AM »
All those photos she took to impress people

That's the thing that troubles me the most about FB and other social media. I'll see people post things like, "Had to get a cup of coffee," when they are broke, and they'll get a ton of likes and people commenting about how "they deserve it."

I saw someone post a few years ago about quitting his job even though he had no savings, a mortgage, and a child because "God doesn't want us to live in fear (might be off on the wording a bit)," and recently nearly unanimous support. Interestingly, the sole dissenter in praising him was a pastor who cautioned him against doing anything reckless unless he had money saved up.

Enigma

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #32 on: October 12, 2016, 11:07:16 AM »
Okay I read the article and the worst part of the article is it reminds me of people I have known whom do the same thing.

Shopaholics and consumerism is a problem in the US just as much as the UK.
 - Sex being held back for goods (oldest profession is prostitution)
 - working men with trophy wives (common), working women with trophy husbands, or the mixture there within
 - brand named fashion...  I used to get criticized by friends for wearing Aeropostale shirts (Large sale on their website 80% off and $2 shirts)

One of my buddies that hasn't worked since Feb somehow is able to afford this weird shopaholic lifestyle....

Kaspian

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #33 on: October 13, 2016, 08:29:43 AM »
All those photos she took to impress people

That's the thing that troubles me the most about FB and other social media. I'll see people post things like, "Had to get a cup of coffee," when they are broke, and they'll get a ton of likes and people commenting about how "they deserve it."

Yeah, they get an endorphin rush from the attention--that they're doing the right thing, living the dream, that people "like"/"love" them, but the glow is gone by the next morning and they have to start it all over again.  (And often up the ante.) If they don't get that fake love for a post they'll get depressed.  Or they'll get depressed seeing others get attention wanting it to be re-focused back onto themselves.  It's so tragic in many cases, I have at least a dozen friends on the impress/depress ferris wheel, and it's not something fixable.  ...Without maybe 15 years of therapy?  :(

Darryl Musashi

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #34 on: October 13, 2016, 11:01:11 AM »
This is probably a repost, but I found this version of the shopaholic story pretty sad: http://www.gq.com/story/buzz-bissinger-shopaholic-gucci-addiction

pachnik

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #35 on: October 13, 2016, 11:12:21 AM »
I just can't imagine how big their home must be to have storage space for all the clothing, accessories etc.?  Must be huge and filled with all kinds of crap. 

Yeah, I wondered too how it would be to eat with such large, puffy lips. 

Digital Dogma

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Re: another shopaholic story
« Reply #36 on: October 13, 2016, 01:18:59 PM »
This is probably a repost, but I found this version of the shopaholic story pretty sad: http://www.gq.com/story/buzz-bissinger-shopaholic-gucci-addiction
What a boring story, but very much on topic.

Summary: I bought this thing to feel better, then did it again.