Author Topic: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt  (Read 23991 times)

marty998

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Re: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt
« Reply #100 on: October 31, 2016, 04:16:15 AM »
Yikes, what the fuck. It's really quite shocking how so many people are so clueless about personal finance.

It's because the society rewards that.
Can't speak for the rest of the world, but my home country you could sum up like this:
 People who have no money but spend like crazy in their spending phase: they are spontaneous, energetic, they value the good things in life, they don't concern themselves with frivolous matters, they love to have fun, they love to share their wealth
 People from the first group once their creditors catch up with them: they are victims, the banks, capitalists, lizard people conspired to destroy them and the whole human race.
People who save money in the accumulation phase: they are scrooges, a sad pathetic lonesome bunch, something mothers scare their kids with.
People who save money once they have money : rich assholes who have no compassion for the little man.

And that is everywhere..media, forums, dinner talks...you will hardly ever hear a different view. So of course that the youth has no freakin clue about anything and genuinely believes the two basic premises - you deserve whatever you want and if you can't afford it, it's someone else's fault.

This post eloquently sums up all the frustration I feel.

Thankyou.

Spiffsome

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Re: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt
« Reply #101 on: October 31, 2016, 05:46:34 AM »
There are lots of adult-shaped humans out there who for whatever reason are not and will *never* be adults except in the chronological sense.

What the hell do you do when you have to encounter one of these? I'm in a new job as a lawyer, and some of my clients really need a life coach instead. Do they just wander around forever, or is there some combination of circumstances that could possibly cause them to get their shit together?

Squirrel away

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Re: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt
« Reply #102 on: October 31, 2016, 05:48:18 AM »
Yikes, what the fuck. It's really quite shocking how so many people are so clueless about personal finance.

It's because the society rewards that.
Can't speak for the rest of the world, but my home country you could sum up like this:
 People who have no money but spend like crazy in their spending phase: they are spontaneous, energetic, they value the good things in life, they don't concern themselves with frivolous matters, they love to have fun, they love to share their wealth
 People from the first group once their creditors catch up with them: they are victims, the banks, capitalists, lizard people conspired to destroy them and the whole human race.
People who save money in the accumulation phase: they are scrooges, a sad pathetic lonesome bunch, something mothers scare their kids with.
People who save money once they have money : rich assholes who have no compassion for the little man.

And that is everywhere..media, forums, dinner talks...you will hardly ever hear a different view. So of course that the youth has no freakin clue about anything and genuinely believes the two basic premises - you deserve whatever you want and if you can't afford it, it's someone else's fault.

Lol, very true!

havregryn

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Re: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt
« Reply #103 on: October 31, 2016, 06:05:09 AM »
Been writing with kids in the background so forgot my punchline, anyway, what I wanted to say, all the social perception associated with spending is positive - you are either living the life or you are a victim of malignant forces greater than yourself. And vice versa for saving, you are either a miser or an asshole.
I was struggling with that for a long time and finally now in my early 30s I reached the stage where I just feel a sort of cynical contempt mixed with a bit of pity when listening to people talk about this. Before I was actually bothered by thinking that maybe they're somehow right and I'm missing out on something everyone else is clued in on.

Syonyk

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Re: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt
« Reply #104 on: October 31, 2016, 06:51:45 AM »
Also, the credit card companies control a lot of the narrative.

Remember that commercial from a while ago with the smooth running coffee shop? Swipe, swipe, awipe, then some jerk shows up with cash and ruins the whole thing?

ketchup

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Re: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt
« Reply #105 on: October 31, 2016, 07:43:23 AM »
Also, the credit card companies control a lot of the narrative.

Remember that commercial from a while ago with the smooth running coffee shop? Swipe, swipe, awipe, then some jerk shows up with cash and ruins the whole thing?
I used to work at an ice cream shop while that ad was on and we *hated* it.  Our credit card machine was absurdly slow, and made everything take way longer when someone insisted on paying with credit/debit.  So it was literally the opposite experience.

The Costco credit card machines are by far the fastest of anywhere I routinely go.  Not sure why, but it seems dramatically faster there than everywhere else.

Syonyk

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Re: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt
« Reply #106 on: October 31, 2016, 08:12:36 AM »
I used to work at an ice cream shop while that ad was on and we *hated* it.  Our credit card machine was absurdly slow, and made everything take way longer when someone insisted on paying with credit/debit.  So it was literally the opposite experience.

Yeah, but you don't get to control the narrative with advertising. ;)  You just get to pay the 3% fees to pay for that advertising.

mm1970

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Re: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt
« Reply #107 on: October 31, 2016, 08:57:24 AM »
Yikes, what the fuck. It's really quite shocking how so many people are so clueless about personal finance.

It's because the society rewards that.
Can't speak for the rest of the world, but my home country you could sum up like this:
 People who have no money but spend like crazy in their spending phase: they are spontaneous, energetic, they value the good things in life, they don't concern themselves with frivolous matters, they love to have fun, they love to share their wealth
 People from the first group once their creditors catch up with them: they are victims, the banks, capitalists, lizard people conspired to destroy them and the whole human race.
People who save money in the accumulation phase: they are scrooges, a sad pathetic lonesome bunch, something mothers scare their kids with.
People who save money once they have money : rich assholes who have no compassion for the little man.

And that is everywhere..media, forums, dinner talks...you will hardly ever hear a different view. So of course that the youth has no freakin clue about anything and genuinely believes the two basic premises - you deserve whatever you want and if you can't afford it, it's someone else's fault.

This post eloquently sums up all the frustration I feel.

Thankyou.
Sad.  Very sad.

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt
« Reply #108 on: October 31, 2016, 09:13:41 AM »
There are lots of adult-shaped humans out there who for whatever reason are not and will *never* be adults except in the chronological sense.

What the hell do you do when you have to encounter one of these? I'm in a new job as a lawyer, and some of my clients really need a life coach instead. Do they just wander around forever, or is there some combination of circumstances that could possibly cause them to get their shit together?

They mostly find enablers: functional people who do the adulting so that they don't have to. Stay far, far away if you value your own sanity.

FIPurpose

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Re: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt
« Reply #109 on: October 31, 2016, 10:20:23 AM »
Stood behind an older gentleman last night at the grocery store who paid with a check. Wow - did not realize how long it had been since I witnessed someone use a paper check for anything. It took forever. Writing the check, ID verification, etc.

I think my kids thought they were witnessing an Amish tradition.

I don't think it's that uncommon.  I see it quite a bit.  Common in elderly women, 60s-90 y.o.

What gets me annoyed by them doing so is when they are waiting in line, their groceries on the conveyor belt, and they just idle the time away until the cashier finishes with the people ahead of them, rings them up and gives them the total, and then (and only then) do they pull out their checkbook to start writing a check. Seriously folks you can fill out everything save for the amount instead of holding up everyone else. This is a major reason why I love the automated self-checkout lanes.

It'll make you even more annoyed to learn that the machines do not require anything to be filled out. It just scans for the bank info at the bottom of the check.

sleepyguy

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Re: 6 Women, $270,000 of collective debt
« Reply #110 on: October 31, 2016, 10:44:54 AM »
Sad (and funny!) but there is some real TRUTH to that!

Trainwreck indeed.. those ladies in the article are totally clueless... well ONE of them seemed on the right track.

Yikes, what the fuck. It's really quite shocking how so many people are so clueless about personal finance.

It's because the society rewards that.
Can't speak for the rest of the world, but my home country you could sum up like this:
 People who have no money but spend like crazy in their spending phase: they are spontaneous, energetic, they value the good things in life, they don't concern themselves with frivolous matters, they love to have fun, they love to share their wealth
 People from the first group once their creditors catch up with them: they are victims, the banks, capitalists, lizard people conspired to destroy them and the whole human race.
People who save money in the accumulation phase: they are scrooges, a sad pathetic lonesome bunch, something mothers scare their kids with.
People who save money once they have money : rich assholes who have no compassion for the little man.

And that is everywhere..media, forums, dinner talks...you will hardly ever hear a different view. So of course that the youth has no freakin clue about anything and genuinely believes the two basic premises - you deserve whatever you want and if you can't afford it, it's someone else's fault.

This post eloquently sums up all the frustration I feel.

Thankyou.
Sad.  Very sad.