Author Topic: 31 year old man-child lives with mommy and daddy and thinks he's awesome-sauce  (Read 27575 times)

Primm

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Facinating!  I'll have to add that to my list of word differences, along with things like "lift, flat, boot, rubbish, loyry, hire, bobby" and that truly odd way you say and spell the 13th element.

Am I the only person here who read that and counted on my fingers in that sing-songy voice - "H, He, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na... " etc.

And yes, I got there in the end. Without looking it up. Had to take my socks off though.

With This Herring

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I don't think he'll ever face the consequences.  Between the booze, the rich food, and his lack of sleep, he's just going to drop dead at 40.  Either that, or one of his companions will, and it might serve to wake him up.

His poor parents.  What a complete lack of love and respect he shows them.

BlueMR2

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Sounds like he's having fun and his parents are cool with it.  If it works for them, great!

Greenway52

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As much as I personally disagree with his lifestyle, for each their own I guess. He is right about one thing though: Real estate in Toronto is absolutely crazy. And frankly a lot of home buyers (specially first time home buyers), get help from their parents for the down payment. In terms of abusing parent's wealth and kindness, I don't think those home buyers are any better than him.

That said, with his salary, if he was frugal, he could have been FI by now. Wasted opportunity in my opinion.

shelivesthedream

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Sounds like he's having fun and his parents are cool with it.  If it works for them, great!

Except they clearly aren't.

PencilThinStash

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Blech, reminds me of an old family friend - Except he's only making closer to 30k a year, not 130k. Also 31 years old, still lives at home, tries to party it up like a crazy person (he just recently came out of the closet and feels he needs to "make up for lost time").

Except that my friend bitches about how much his parents (who are some of the coolest people I know, but they're understandably fed up with him) restrict his freedom. I've sat there in their kitchen while he whines at them "I'm 31 years old, I shouldn't have a curfew! I should be able to bring home whoever I want! It's my life! None of my friends can believe I still have to deal with this crap!"

His mom coolly looks at him and says, "Then leave. It's our house and we've told you - we don't want you here anymore."

And then he goes off whining about how much debt he has (all car loan and credit card spending, his own damn fault, they paid for his college years ago), and how expensive life is.

I don't understand how the hell they haven't just kicked him out yet. I have no pity for a man-child.

afuera

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Can't help but notice the parallels.  His parents need Sarah Jessica Parker bad!!

Metric Mouse

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Facinating!  I'll have to add that to my list of word differences, along with things like "lift, flat, boot, rubbish, loyry, hire, bobby" and that truly odd way you say and spell the 13th element.

Am I the only person here who read that and counted on my fingers in that sing-songy voice - "H, He, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na... " etc.

And yes, I got there in the end. Without looking it up. Had to take my socks off though.

Probably. I'm guessing its Aluminum? That's the one that pops to my mind with the most common usage and greatest difference in pronunciation.

nereo

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Facinating!  I'll have to add that to my list of word differences, along with things like "lift, flat, boot, rubbish, loyry, hire, bobby" and that truly odd way you say and spell the 13th element.

Am I the only person here who read that and counted on my fingers in that sing-songy voice - "H, He, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na... " etc.

And yes, I got there in the end. Without looking it up. Had to take my socks off though.

Probably. I'm guessing its Aluminum? That's the one that pops to my mind with the most common usage and greatest difference in pronunciation.

Yup, Aluminum... or as they say and spell it in the UK, Aluminium.  One extra letter, one extra syllable.

Primm

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Facinating!  I'll have to add that to my list of word differences, along with things like "lift, flat, boot, rubbish, loyry, hire, bobby" and that truly odd way you say and spell the 13th element.

Am I the only person here who read that and counted on my fingers in that sing-songy voice - "H, He, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na... " etc.

And yes, I got there in the end. Without looking it up. Had to take my socks off though.

Probably. I'm guessing its Aluminum? That's the one that pops to my mind with the most common usage and greatest difference in pronunciation.

Yup, Aluminum... or as they say and spell it in the UK, Aluminium.  One extra letter, one extra syllable.

You mean Aluminium, or as they say and spell in the US and Canada (and nowhere else...), Aluminum. One missing letter, one omitted syllable.

nereo

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Facinating!  I'll have to add that to my list of word differences, along with things like "lift, flat, boot, rubbish, loyry, hire, bobby" and that truly odd way you say and spell the 13th element.

Am I the only person here who read that and counted on my fingers in that sing-songy voice - "H, He, Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F, Ne, Na... " etc.

And yes, I got there in the end. Without looking it up. Had to take my socks off though.

Probably. I'm guessing its Aluminum? That's the one that pops to my mind with the most common usage and greatest difference in pronunciation.

Yup, Aluminum... or as they say and spell it in the UK, Aluminium.  One extra letter, one extra syllable.

You mean Aluminium, or as they say and spell in the US and Canada (and nowhere else...), Aluminum. One missing letter, one omitted syllable.

To be fair, it was Aluminum before Aluminium slipped into fashion (though it was Alumium first, ...which just sounds stupid).  Regardless, it's one of those words that jumps out at you when someone uses the pronunciation you aren't accustomed to.  LIke Laboratory.

obstinate

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"Core four". What an insanely lame name for a group of friends.

RetiredAt63

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As much as I personally disagree with his lifestyle, for each their own I guess. He is right about one thing though: Real estate in Toronto is absolutely crazy. And frankly a lot of home buyers (specially first time home buyers), get help from their parents for the down payment. In terms of abusing parent's wealth and kindness, I don't think those home buyers are any better than him.

That said, with his salary, if he was frugal, he could have been FI by now. Wasted opportunity in my opinion.
My DD and her SO just bought a house in the TO area.  Expensive by my local standards, but a steal for Toronto.  Are they in Toronto?  No, they are outskirts (Georgetown area).  Small house, nice yard, decent commute to work.  They know they are not into the bar scene, they wanted a place to come home and veg out and entertain friends, and they found it.  They will do the house improvements themselves, as much as possible.  No parental help (either side) for down payment.  Yes parental house-warming gifts - barbecue and paint for the "paint the whole house inside" project (done before they moved in).  They figured out what they could afford (not nearly as much as the bank thought they could afford) and looked within that price range.

Together they make less than this guy does all by himself.  He is a leech on his parents, and if he were mine he would have been long gone.  Or paying decent rent and doing his own cooking and laundry and cleaning and some chores around the house. Gail Vaz Oxlade had that Princess show - he is a Princess.

Making Cookies

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All of this will be forgiven if he cuts his friends from two of his extravagant vacations per year and brings his parents along for Mother's Day and Father's Day.  They had the misfortune of being young poor immigrant parents back in the day and definitely should have a taste of the luxurious lifestyle once in a while to see how their hard work paid off.

Yeah I wonder what it must feel like for his parents and for other parents like them that came to the US and worked their butts off in order to give their kids opportunity, only to see them blowing money on partying while the parents are in many ways still supporting them.

I'd give him four weeks to get his life in order and move out. If he was unemployed then maybe a little more time.

Way back when I worked my way through college mowing grass, raking leaves, etc along with a job making from minimum wage to better than minimum wage (later job). Took forever to get through school.

I mowed one yard where the grandmother was housing her 20 year old grandson. He would not get off his duff to do anything for her which really bothered me. He'd come and go of course with friends. I don't think it was elder abuse but it was certainly being selfish with his time.

He wouldn't do anything around there for her and she would ask me to mow the grass and then some random other chore. It was so sad. The last time I mowed that grass there he was running a garage sale out of her dilapidated detached garage selling her old things, plus some of his own. Still not helping her though.

if I was her I would have kicked his ass out with very little notice.

jinga nation

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"Core four". What an insanely lame name for a group of friends.
I always thought Core Four was a type of portfolio for your asset allocation.
https://www.bogleheads.org/blog/core-four-portfolios/

Then Google says it's a bunch of Skankees.

BlueMR2

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Sounds like he's having fun and his parents are cool with it.  If it works for them, great!

Except they clearly aren't.

They must be, or he'd be out the door.  They're approving of it by allowing it to continue.

Slee_stack

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Sounds like he's having fun and his parents are cool with it.  If it works for them, great!

Except they clearly aren't.

They must be, or he'd be out the door.  They're approving of it by allowing it to continue.
You have a remarkably peculiar interpretation of 'being cool' about something.

Some people allow themselves to be walked on.  That doesn't mean its right to take advantage of them.


LeRainDrop

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Sounds like he's having fun and his parents are cool with it.  If it works for them, great!

Except they clearly aren't.

They must be, or he'd be out the door.  They're approving of it by allowing it to continue.
You have a remarkably peculiar interpretation of 'being cool' about something.

Some people allow themselves to be walked on.  That doesn't mean its right to take advantage of them.

Agree with slee_stack.  I read a chapter in the Feeling Good:The New Mood Therapy book that reminds me of this.  Sure, you could frame it that the parents approve of this lifestyle and "are cool with" spending their money so that their sons can continue to live it.  But if you take a more honest look at what is happening (e.g., the author's comments about his parents complaints), it is much more likely that the parents do not affirmatively "want" this situation, but have just been unable to master the tools (i.e., emotional strength) to change it.  Yes, the parents are allowing this to continue, but I don't think that is objective approval, but rather reluctant acquiescence.  Kids are taking advantage of their parents.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2016, 02:46:00 PM by LeRainDrop »

MrsPete

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He seems to believe, as most people do, that we're all somehow "required" to spend whatever we earn -- and that more spending = more fun.  So his choices are 1) buy a house or 2) live with his parents and spend extravagantly.  Soooo many other options exist for him.

He's absolutely a jerk.  He's living off his parents, though he says they don't approve of his free-spending ways, and he waits for them to leave before he brings girls over -- essentially he acts like a teenager breaking the rules of the house, being disrespectful to the people who are supporting him. 

He's also a pushover.  He says he allows his older brother to push him into spending more than he would like.  Not much of an adult, huh?

I do agree with one thing:  He says he's not lazy.  He's working full-time as a pharmacist, which is a demanding job.  I do think he's working hard in his career, but his personal life is nothing to admire.  It'd be interesting to see where he is in 10, 20, 30 years.



GuitarStv

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I've personally never seen a pharmacist do more than count pills, and have always been amazed that the process isn't completely automated in this day and age.  What am I missing?  Which part of the job is demanding?

onlykelsey

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I've personally never seen a pharmacist do more than count pills, and have always been amazed that the process isn't completely automated in this day and age.  What am I missing?  Which part of the job is demanding?

I wonder if that's a US-Canada split.  In the US they're responsible for some pretty heavy-duty interfacing with each patient's records (for potential interactions between meds), systems regulating prescription of certain drugs (opiates, amphetamines, etc), and (most demanding, from what my friends say), 2593934 different insurance companies and practitioners.

GuitarStv

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There's software that can be used to print out what all potential interactions are in Canada.  This doesn't exist in the US?  It seems like a really bad idea to leave all that information to one dude's memory rather than simply input it into a computer. . .

onlykelsey

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There's software that can be used to print out what all potential interactions are in Canada.  This doesn't exist in the US?  It seems like a really bad idea to leave all that information to one dude's memory rather than simply input it into a computer. . .

Not familiar with the details, but I imagine there is software.  If medical billing is any indicator, though, there are probably 259 competing types of software, some of which play nice with others and some of which don't.  My friends make it sound like they do a lot of arguing with prescribers as well (Are you SURE you want obese diabetic Ms. Johnson to be prescribed X on top of A, B and C??) as they can have liability for bad effects.  I know there is some traditional medicine preparation (ie of IV solutions) as well but I get the impression that's small for most pharmacists, except those in house at clinics and hospitals.

LeRainDrop

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I've personally never seen a pharmacist do more than count pills, and have always been amazed that the process isn't completely automated in this day and age.  What am I missing?  Which part of the job is demanding?

I wonder if that's a US-Canada split.  In the US they're responsible for some pretty heavy-duty interfacing with each patient's records (for potential interactions between meds), systems regulating prescription of certain drugs (opiates, amphetamines, etc), and (most demanding, from what my friends say), 2593934 different insurance companies and practitioners.

Here's a great explanation from another forum member who is a pharmacist in the US:  http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/antimustachian-wall-of-shame-and-comedy/overheard-at-work/msg1012286/#msg1012286

mm1970

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I've personally never seen a pharmacist do more than count pills, and have always been amazed that the process isn't completely automated in this day and age.  What am I missing?  Which part of the job is demanding?
Hm, one of my good friends is a pharmacist.  She does count pills, but also administers shots and meds, reviews the proper methods of taking the meds with the patients, discusses interactions, makes sure that they get what they are prescribed, etc.

Apocalyptica602

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I've personally never seen a pharmacist do more than count pills, and have always been amazed that the process isn't completely automated in this day and age.  What am I missing?  Which part of the job is demanding?
Hm, one of my good friends is a pharmacist.  She does count pills, but also administers shots and meds, reviews the proper methods of taking the meds with the patients, discusses interactions, makes sure that they get what they are prescribed, etc.

Mmmhmm, my wife is a pharmacist and while I certainly call her a 'pill counter' as a tongue-in-cheek jab that's like calling an engineer a 'wrench turner' or a professional athlete a 'ball chucker'.

Kaminoge

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My reaction to this article is that it's at least 50% (if not more) BS.

A big read flag was the "teacher" friend who supposedly can't afford all these jaunts because he's too focused on getting a house? Trust me, no teacher can afford $7000 jaunts regardless of whether they're saving for property or not. The author obviously wants to make a point about property being too expensive and a certain age group preferring to spend money on experiences rather than being locked into the property market. But then I think he just made most of the fluff up to try and make it a "cool story bro".

GuitarStv

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My reaction to this article is that it's at least 50% (if not more) BS.

A big read flag was the "teacher" friend who supposedly can't afford all these jaunts because he's too focused on getting a house? Trust me, no teacher can afford $7000 jaunts regardless of whether they're saving for property or not. The author obviously wants to make a point about property being too expensive and a certain age group preferring to spend money on experiences rather than being locked into the property market. But then I think he just made most of the fluff up to try and make it a "cool story bro".

Teachers in Ontario are well paid.  It depends on training and specialization, but to average north of 80 grand a year is not unheard of.  I think the average in Toronto is 87 grand a year.  They have a very good defined benefits pension plan as well, so there's no real push to save money.

BlueHouse

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"Core four". What an insanely lame name for a group of friends.
Especially because he's not even one of the "core".  He's "plus one".  Why doesn't he just call himself "Fifth Wheel"?  Just sad

Zx

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 Oh, if only experiences made me happy. His kind of experiences, I mean. I get no more happiness out of drinking $130 shots of scotch or driving a brand-new Porsche than I do from walking down the sidewalk in the sunshine listening to birds sing about their struggles and dreams for the future.

MgoSam

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I read the article and honestly don't see much wrong with him, apart from his thinking that's just totally awesome.

I would save a fortune by living with my parents, in fact my mom still asks me at least once a month if I want to move back in, and then tell me that she wants me to move back in. I guess it's an Asian/Indian thing. When I moved back home after college and being unable to find a job (the latter was solved fairly quickly), I was able to save a small fortune. If I moved back with my parents I would be able to rent out my entire house.


MrsPete

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I've personally never seen a pharmacist do more than count pills, and have always been amazed that the process isn't completely automated in this day and age.  What am I missing?  Which part of the job is demanding?
Pharmacist is the kind of job that is kind of invisible when everything goes well.  I can give two examples about pharmacists who did more than count pills for my family:

- Once when my youngest was small and had strep throat, the doctor accidentally prescribed an adult dosage of the antibiotic.  The pharmacist caught the mistake, questioned me about the situation, then called the doctor and the two of them agreed upon what the toddler really needed.  I was very glad that the pharmacist was there to double-check the prescription.

- A relative of mine had throat surgery (combined with cancer) and couldn't swallow the medicines he needed.  His pharmacist "compounded" or mixed his drugs into a liquid that he could take. 

Bicycle_B

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All of this will be forgiven if he cuts his friends from two of his extravagant vacations per year and brings his parents along for Mother's Day and Father's Day.  They had the misfortune of being young poor immigrant parents back in the day and definitely should have a taste of the luxurious lifestyle once in a while to see how their hard work paid off.

Yeah I wonder what it must feel like for his parents and for other parents like them that came to the US and worked their butts off in order to give their kids opportunity, only to see them blowing money on partying while the parents are in many ways still supporting them.



I'm curious too about what the parents feel.  Do they like having their children close, but just wish they would stop making noise when they get home late?  Do they wish their kid was more proper in sexual ethics/ nightlife behavior, but are glad they are getting the joy that they hoped the family would find in the West?  Do they hate everything about the lifestyle but silently bear it, hoping Dear Son will get the picture if they keep home as a safe base?  Or something else?  It's hard to know because the narrator may not be very reliable. 

I agree with posters who said there's a Mustachian part in the focus on experiences, and noted that he does have savings.  Plus he has a plan for pharmacy ownership.  Might need to slow down the spending sometime, though.  Maybe after 100% of the bucket list. Or when a new list appears, perhaps via spouse and child.

Classic case of the escalating spender's syndrome, though.  Nothing in society stops him from that drug, there's just constant reinforcement.

MgoSam

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Or when a new list appears, perhaps via spouse and child.

+1, I can certainly understand why within some cultures, it is common for parents to essentially bully their kids into marriage. Marriage is a way of instilling responsibility and getting someone to settle down. In short, it's a way of controlling your children. For people like the pharmacist, it actually might be very helpful.

Metric Mouse

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Or when a new list appears, perhaps via spouse and child.

+1, I can certainly understand why within some cultures, it is common for parents to essentially bully their kids into marriage. Marriage is a way of instilling responsibility and getting someone to settle down. In short, it's a way of controlling your children. For people like the pharmacist, it actually might be very helpful.

Helpful how? Other than getting him out of the house if he's bothering them, what exactly do his parents have to 'fix' on this guy?

MgoSam

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Or when a new list appears, perhaps via spouse and child.

+1, I can certainly understand why within some cultures, it is common for parents to essentially bully their kids into marriage. Marriage is a way of instilling responsibility and getting someone to settle down. In short, it's a way of controlling your children. For people like the pharmacist, it actually might be very helpful.

Helpful how? Other than getting him out of the house if he's bothering them, what exactly do his parents have to 'fix' on this guy?

I'm speaking as to the culture's beliefs, not my own. In India, some parents see marriage as a way of making their son into a mature human being that has responsibility to care for his wife. Having children is seen as a further way of ensuring that he has proper motivation to earn money and act rationally. In truth, I don't think it works all that well. There are too many stories of the now husband ignoring his wife and essentially carrying on as before.

VladTheImpaler

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I'd love to Impale this guy.

monstermonster

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The rudeness towards his friends in the piece is what pisses me off:

Quote
Our teacher friend, the relatively temperate one, misses out on our most extravagant outings. That’s because, like so many millennials (the official designation is someone born between 1981 and 1997), he believes a golden era of home ownership is just around the corner.
Maybe that's actually because he's a teacher and doesn't make $130,000/year not just because he wants to buy a house?

Quote
Another couple I know, a pharmacist and a physiotherapist, have been married two years and live in a condo in CityPlace. They’re shopping around for their dream home, with a budget of $800,000. I think they’re crazy—they’ll certainly have to pay more than that, and then they’re going to be shackled to a monstrous mortgage for the next 30 years, which will severely limit their ability to have any discernible amount of fun for the next two decades. I rarely see them now; once they’re ensconced in their new house, I wonder if I’ll ever see them again.
Maybe that's because they don't like you because you sound like a jerk who enjoys partying more than real relationships.

Quote
One couple I know—he’s an engineer and she’s a support worker for children with autism—bought a brown-brick four-bedroom semi with a backyard in Ajax for $500,000. They can afford a vacation now and again (they went on an all-inclusive trip to Cuba a few years back), but their nights out are limited to what Ajax has to offer. For their anniversary, they went to a hole-in-the-wall Thai restaurant for a meal that cost $30, total. They have to drive absolutely everywhere, they go out on the town maybe once a month, and most of their disposable income goes toward saving for their kid’s education.
How is a $30 meal at a hole-in-the-wall joint for your anniversary supposed to be shameful? And is saving for your kid's education supposed to be bad?

HairyUpperLip

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so... 31, single, living at home with his parents and his older brother... but, you know, he went 220km/hr in a rented race car. So he's got that going for him.
Yeah... for the record 220km/hr = 136mph.  Forgive me but that doesn't exactly impress me, especially since it's a Lamborghini.  A slightly younger, stupider me would occasionally push my VW past 120mph on the long, lonely stretches between Nevada, Utah and Wyoming.  Get it up past 180mph and I might be impressed... but those rental tracks will never let you do it.

lol, yeah 136mph is not impressive at all for a Lamborghini. It's almost like the opposite of bragging. It's like letting people know you suck at life on purpose.


HairyUpperLip

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Some of us own cars that can do just about that in a quarter mile in less than 11 seconds

<3.

kayvent

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I've personally never seen a pharmacist do more than count pills, and have always been amazed that the process isn't completely automated in this day and age.  What am I missing?  Which part of the job is demanding?
Pharmacist is the kind of job that is kind of invisible when everything goes well.  I can give two examples about pharmacists who did more than count pills for my family:

- Once when my youngest was small and had strep throat, the doctor accidentally prescribed an adult dosage of the antibiotic.  The pharmacist caught the mistake, questioned me about the situation, then called the doctor and the two of them agreed upon what the toddler really needed.  I was very glad that the pharmacist was there to double-check the prescription.

- A relative of mine had throat surgery (combined with cancer) and couldn't swallow the medicines he needed.  His pharmacist "compounded" or mixed his drugs into a liquid that he could take.

My daughter was prescribed a medicine that was taken off the shelves a year ago. My heart flooded with dread at the idea of needing to wait another 12 hours in a waiting room (Canada) to get a new prescription. The pharmacist said they would contact the doctor and gets things settled. Eight hours later I got a call and picked up the new prescription.

Goldielocks

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I have had the opportunity to complete many time studies in Pharmacies (at hospitals) in the past 5 years. 

The Pill counters are the pharmacy TECHS, and are quickly being replaced by machines.   Likewise machines are becoming the ones starting to put the pills into the custom "daily packs" of mixed pills that the long term care facilities use.

Order entry clerks confirm and process new scripts (perscriptions). 

Pharmacists check the work of others (check every script against the order, check for drug interactions, suggest alternatives to the doctors and advise about generics and interactions with OTC items like vitamins).

Retail pharmacists are often the business owner as well.   When you see only one person working, you can bet it is a pharmacist, doing all the roles, as they don't get to go on breaks as the Rx must be there to check everything, by law.

Goldielocks

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I keep thinking about this story, as I am typically a "live how you want to" philosopher... why does it bother me a little bit?

What bothers me is that there will be hedonistic adaptation...   where no matter how much you spend, it won't be as incredible as the first one or two times...  and then there is the waste of opportunity!  Oh the regret he will have in 20 years.

Like Starbucks -- once a month is a treat, but once a day does not give the same joy.

MgoSam

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Like Starbucks -- once a month is a treat, but once a day does not give the same joy.

I was just thinking about this last night. Growing up eating at a fast food place or getting ice cream was especially rewarding because it was so infrequently offered. Now that I'm an adult, I can eat what I want. If I want each Taco Bell for lunch every single day, I will. It is for this reason that I think I don't get anywhere near the same joy as I did when I was a kid. That, and well the fact that I'm not 7 years old and that the food is massively horrible for me, but the point still stands.

I was thinking of something I read in "A Guide to the Good Life," and can't recall the line or which philosopher it was, but he said that he consumes only water and bread so that when he eats something better, it tastes like the finest feast in the world. Anyone else remember this passage?

human

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I see one poster correctly pointing out that teachers in Toronto can make decent cash, see here: https://www.glassdoor.ca/Salaries/toronto-teacher-salary-SRCH_IL.0,7_IM976_KO8,15.htm?countryRedirect=true

Some of the bigger school boards average over 100k. Salaries are based on the teacher's education and years in, a Master's in education and ten years means big money in Toronto.

« Last Edit: August 07, 2016, 05:43:44 PM by human »

GuitarStv

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I was thinking of something I read in "A Guide to the Good Life," and can't recall the line or which philosopher it was, but he said that he consumes only water and bread so that when he eats something better, it tastes like the finest feast in the world. Anyone else remember this passage?

Epicurus wrote:
Quote
Again, we regard independence of outward things as a great good, not so as in all cases to use little, but so as to be contented with little if we have not much, being honestly persuaded that they have the sweetest enjoyment of luxury who stand least in need of it, and that whatever is natural is easily procured and only the vain and worthless hard to win. Plain fare gives as much pleasure as a costly diet, when once the pain of want has been removed, while bread and water confer the highest possible pleasure when they are brought to hungry lips. To habituate one's self, therefore, to simple and inexpensive diet supplies all that is needful for health, and enables a man to meet the necessary requirements of life without shrinking, and it places us in a better condition when we approach at intervals a costly fare and renders us fearless of fortune.

Which I think is strongly in the vein of what you're talking about.

Metric Mouse

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I see one poster correctly pointing out that teachers in Toronto can make decent cash, see here: https://www.glassdoor.ca/Salaries/toronto-teacher-salary-SRCH_IL.0,7_IM976_KO8,15.htm?countryRedirect=true

Some of the bigger school boards average over 100k. Salaries are based on the teacher's education and years in, a Master's in education and ten years means big money in Toronto.

How's the cost of living in Toronto, compared to other areas?

clarkfan1979

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I had a similar experience when I was 23-25 years old. Many of my friends just graduated college and were living with their parents, including me. The excuse was that everyone was saving for a house. However, the bar tabs on the weekends did not indicate any saving. It felt kind of weird. I didn't go nearly as crazy as some of my friends. However, I was still a little guilty.

kayvent

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I had a similar experience when I was 23-25 years old. Many of my friends just graduated college and were living with their parents, including me. The excuse was that everyone was saving for a house. However, the bar tabs on the weekends did not indicate any saving. It felt kind of weird. I didn't go nearly as crazy as some of my friends. However, I was still a little guilty.

Yeah, what people say and what they are actually doing sometimes doesn't match up.

In high school a lot of friends had part-time jobs "to save money for university" and I never believed a single one of them. Horrible friend? Half of them never went and the remainder saved particularly zero.

human

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I see one poster correctly pointing out that teachers in Toronto can make decent cash, see here: https://www.glassdoor.ca/Salaries/toronto-teacher-salary-SRCH_IL.0,7_IM976_KO8,15.htm?countryRedirect=true

Some of the bigger school boards average over 100k. Salaries are based on the teacher's education and years in, a Master's in education and ten years means big money in Toronto.

How's the cost of living in Toronto, compared to other areas?

Housing is high but 100k a year puts you in the top 5% of individual incomes for the whole country. Rent instead of buying and you'd live like a king. Studios at around 1500 are still doable.