Author Topic: "Because I'm worth it!"  (Read 12218 times)

With This Herring

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #50 on: August 10, 2016, 12:52:02 PM »
I'm one of those "weirdos" who can't buy used.  Sorry, just can't do it.  Skeeves me out.  There are very few things I would consider buying used, and almost all of them are because you can't get them new anymore.  I would honestly just rather do without if I can't afford to buy something new.  The only other time I might is if it was something from someone I knew who bought something and didn't/couldn't use it, so I'm essentially buying it new from them.  And used clothes?  Never.  I MIGHT spend $300 a year on myself for clothes (mostly just replacing underwear, and the occasional dress shirt) so it really isn't worth it to me to save money in this area.

Well, your choice.  I can see being skeeved out by used clothes and bedding, but would you be bothered by used metal patio furniture?  Stuff that can be completely disinfected?  Or are you only bothered by used textiles?  Just curious.

Also, I'm averaging around $60-80/year on clothes (mostly used).

Kitsune

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #51 on: August 10, 2016, 12:56:34 PM »
I'm one of those "weirdos" who can't buy used.  Sorry, just can't do it.  Skeeves me out.  There are very few things I would consider buying used, and almost all of them are because you can't get them new anymore.  I would honestly just rather do without if I can't afford to buy something new.  The only other time I might is if it was something from someone I knew who bought something and didn't/couldn't use it, so I'm essentially buying it new from them.  And used clothes?  Never.  I MIGHT spend $300 a year on myself for clothes (mostly just replacing underwear, and the occasional dress shirt) so it really isn't worth it to me to save money in this area.

Well, your choice.  I can see being skeeved out by used clothes and bedding, but would you be bothered by used metal patio furniture?  Stuff that can be completely disinfected?  Or are you only bothered by used textiles?  Just curious.

Also, I'm averaging around $60-80/year on clothes (mostly used).

And what about hotel textiles? Textiles on chairs at the dentist office? Cutlery and plates at a restaurant? Other people have touched things we use, no matter where we're using them. They're not suddenly grosser because of that.

(Plus, I have a taste for antiques - stuff was made SO MUCH BETTER and so much more solid 200 years ago. Fortunately, people who 'only furnish their houses in a modern style with new furniture' means I pay less than Ikea prices.)

GuitarStv

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #52 on: August 10, 2016, 12:59:19 PM »
The thing about the military is we were taught that everything had to fit in out sea bag. The wife, the kids, the laundry...

That's the kind of thing I fantasize about on long road trips.  :P

Chris22

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #53 on: August 10, 2016, 01:01:53 PM »
I'm one of those "weirdos" who can't buy used.  Sorry, just can't do it.  Skeeves me out.  There are very few things I would consider buying used, and almost all of them are because you can't get them new anymore.  I would honestly just rather do without if I can't afford to buy something new.  The only other time I might is if it was something from someone I knew who bought something and didn't/couldn't use it, so I'm essentially buying it new from them.  And used clothes?  Never.  I MIGHT spend $300 a year on myself for clothes (mostly just replacing underwear, and the occasional dress shirt) so it really isn't worth it to me to save money in this area.

Well, your choice.  I can see being skeeved out by used clothes and bedding, but would you be bothered by used metal patio furniture?  Stuff that can be completely disinfected?  Or are you only bothered by used textiles?  Just curious.

Also, I'm averaging around $60-80/year on clothes (mostly used).

I've no idea.  I last bought patio furniture about 10 years ago.  I don't remember it being particularly expensive ($400?) for a table and 4 rocking chairs, bought them on sale at Memorial Day?.  I suppose if some fell in my lap that would be fine, but no, I wouldn't likely set out to 'shop' for that stuff on C-list or the like.

I'm of the mindset that I don't buy a lot of stuff, and what I do buy, I save up for, buy a good quality, and keep a long long time. 

MgoSam

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #54 on: August 10, 2016, 01:03:39 PM »

(Plus, I have a taste for antiques - stuff was made SO MUCH BETTER and so much more solid 200 years ago. Fortunately, people who 'only furnish their houses in a modern style with new furniture' means I pay less than Ikea prices.)

Any advice on getting started with this? I love the concept of buying antiques but don't know anything of how to assess how good a piece is nor where to find good prices. I would love your advice on this.

Chris22

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #55 on: August 10, 2016, 01:04:11 PM »
I'm one of those "weirdos" who can't buy used.  Sorry, just can't do it.  Skeeves me out.  There are very few things I would consider buying used, and almost all of them are because you can't get them new anymore.  I would honestly just rather do without if I can't afford to buy something new.  The only other time I might is if it was something from someone I knew who bought something and didn't/couldn't use it, so I'm essentially buying it new from them.  And used clothes?  Never.  I MIGHT spend $300 a year on myself for clothes (mostly just replacing underwear, and the occasional dress shirt) so it really isn't worth it to me to save money in this area.

Well, your choice.  I can see being skeeved out by used clothes and bedding, but would you be bothered by used metal patio furniture?  Stuff that can be completely disinfected?  Or are you only bothered by used textiles?  Just curious.

Also, I'm averaging around $60-80/year on clothes (mostly used).

And what about hotel textiles? Textiles on chairs at the dentist office? Cutlery and plates at a restaurant? Other people have touched things we use, no matter where we're using them. They're not suddenly grosser because of that.

(Plus, I have a taste for antiques - stuff was made SO MUCH BETTER and so much more solid 200 years ago. Fortunately, people who 'only furnish their houses in a modern style with new furniture' means I pay less than Ikea prices.)

I dunno, rental stuff is rental stuff, it's different than stuff I'm going to own.  I can't explain why, it just is.  I also suspect I stay in a nicer quality hotel than the average MMMer would be willing to spring for ;)  Things like AirBnB also skeeve me out, for whatever reason the idea of a "professional" maid staff is different than some dude or woman doing the bedding on their own, even though intellectually I know I probably have that backwards.

Kitsune

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #56 on: August 10, 2016, 01:18:46 PM »

(Plus, I have a taste for antiques - stuff was made SO MUCH BETTER and so much more solid 200 years ago. Fortunately, people who 'only furnish their houses in a modern style with new furniture' means I pay less than Ikea prices.)

Any advice on getting started with this? I love the concept of buying antiques but don't know anything of how to assess how good a piece is nor where to find good prices. I would love your advice on this.

Advice for non-professional antiquing:

Baseline: if it's survived 100+ years and isn't wobbling, jamming (drawers, esp), or peeling (NO VENEER EVER), you're gonna have something that's gonna last for a bit. If it IS wobbling or jamming, look to see if you can fix it (a table might need a felt pad, a drawer might need a bit of sanding or oiling. No complicated repairs, at this stage).

After that, what you're looking to is your taste (highly personal, obv) and your budget. Around here, Facebook garage sale groups, Kijiji, Craigslist, and thrift/junk shops tend to be a goldmine for that sort of thing. Avoid antique shops at all costs unless you just want to browse and not buy - they know the value of what they're selling and you will NOT get a deal.

Around here, I've found old bookcases, end tables (80$, from the mid-1800s, excellent condition), bedroom bureaus (early-mid-1800s, 200$), and the like on Kijiji. Facebook groups yielded some amazing wool rugs from the 1950s (an old man who was moving into a home) for 50$ each for 8x10 rugs (we're not in an area with a bedbug issue and I inspected the rugs and had them cleaned). Thrift stores have gorgeous huge brass lamp bases for 20$ (10$ at the hardware store and an hour to re-wire them, 15$ at Homesense for a drum shade, and done).

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #57 on: August 10, 2016, 01:43:55 PM »

Total societal brainwash.

You've just summed up nine tenths of the reasoning behind the fashion industry, the vehicle industry, and the home renovations and redecoration industry. Bravo.

MgoSam

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #58 on: August 10, 2016, 01:58:11 PM »

(Plus, I have a taste for antiques - stuff was made SO MUCH BETTER and so much more solid 200 years ago. Fortunately, people who 'only furnish their houses in a modern style with new furniture' means I pay less than Ikea prices.)

Any advice on getting started with this? I love the concept of buying antiques but don't know anything of how to assess how good a piece is nor where to find good prices. I would love your advice on this.

Advice for non-professional antiquing:

Baseline: if it's survived 100+ years and isn't wobbling, jamming (drawers, esp), or peeling (NO VENEER EVER), you're gonna have something that's gonna last for a bit. If it IS wobbling or jamming, look to see if you can fix it (a table might need a felt pad, a drawer might need a bit of sanding or oiling. No complicated repairs, at this stage).

After that, what you're looking to is your taste (highly personal, obv) and your budget. Around here, Facebook garage sale groups, Kijiji, Craigslist, and thrift/junk shops tend to be a goldmine for that sort of thing. Avoid antique shops at all costs unless you just want to browse and not buy - they know the value of what they're selling and you will NOT get a deal.

Around here, I've found old bookcases, end tables (80$, from the mid-1800s, excellent condition), bedroom bureaus (early-mid-1800s, 200$), and the like on Kijiji. Facebook groups yielded some amazing wool rugs from the 1950s (an old man who was moving into a home) for 50$ each for 8x10 rugs (we're not in an area with a bedbug issue and I inspected the rugs and had them cleaned). Thrift stores have gorgeous huge brass lamp bases for 20$ (10$ at the hardware store and an hour to re-wire them, 15$ at Homesense for a drum shade, and done).

Thanks so much! I'm going to start by looking for a quality dinner table that extends.

Kitsune

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #59 on: August 10, 2016, 02:31:35 PM »

(Plus, I have a taste for antiques - stuff was made SO MUCH BETTER and so much more solid 200 years ago. Fortunately, people who 'only furnish their houses in a modern style with new furniture' means I pay less than Ikea prices.)

Any advice on getting started with this? I love the concept of buying antiques but don't know anything of how to assess how good a piece is nor where to find good prices. I would love your advice on this.

Advice for non-professional antiquing:

Baseline: if it's survived 100+ years and isn't wobbling, jamming (drawers, esp), or peeling (NO VENEER EVER), you're gonna have something that's gonna last for a bit. If it IS wobbling or jamming, look to see if you can fix it (a table might need a felt pad, a drawer might need a bit of sanding or oiling. No complicated repairs, at this stage).

After that, what you're looking to is your taste (highly personal, obv) and your budget. Around here, Facebook garage sale groups, Kijiji, Craigslist, and thrift/junk shops tend to be a goldmine for that sort of thing. Avoid antique shops at all costs unless you just want to browse and not buy - they know the value of what they're selling and you will NOT get a deal.

Around here, I've found old bookcases, end tables (80$, from the mid-1800s, excellent condition), bedroom bureaus (early-mid-1800s, 200$), and the like on Kijiji. Facebook groups yielded some amazing wool rugs from the 1950s (an old man who was moving into a home) for 50$ each for 8x10 rugs (we're not in an area with a bedbug issue and I inspected the rugs and had them cleaned). Thrift stores have gorgeous huge brass lamp bases for 20$ (10$ at the hardware store and an hour to re-wire them, 15$ at Homesense for a drum shade, and done).

Thanks so much! I'm going to start by looking for a quality dinner table that extends.

Oh god those are SO EASY to find. A lot of super well-made ones that people got in the 40s as sets (8 chairs, table, china hutch, etc) and that don't fit in most apartments, so people emptying out their grandparents places have nowhere to put them. And the boomers who inherited their nice stuff 20 years ago find that their kids mostly have apartments too small to take it, and are trying to sell. Total market glut. I think a friend got a maple table, 12 chairs, and 2 china hutches for 400$... might've been 450$. Plus movers, but still. I saw a similar set for sale around here for 900$ yesterday. I also saw a set new at the store today - 6K plus. So. :)

If you're just looking at the table, make sure that it suits your taste, doesn't wobble, and that the top is supported when extended (turkey crashing down through the boards on Thanksgiving = nightmare). Barring that, as long as it's not veneer (when that chips, it looks SO CHEAP and it's really hard to fix) and it suits your taste... :)

Oh, and if it's old and the varnish is wearing off, my advice is to NOT varnish it - cover it with lemon furniture oil instead - quick wipe every couple of months. It protects the wood, makes it look really lush, and doesn't scratch when someone puts something on the table, so the piece stays nicer longer. And varnishing smells and is a pain in the ass do to.

Making Cookies

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #60 on: August 10, 2016, 03:20:24 PM »
If I were military, I feel like I  would rather live small, buy little and buy  used, and take full advantage of the opportunities for seeing other countries :)  Its not an easy career or way of life for a family, but if its yours, take full advantage of it!

Things must have changed then since I was in. I bought several pieces of used furniture when I was renting a house overseas and then gave it away or traded it when it was time to leave. I did see people off-loading cars for nothing rather than dealing with the trouble of selling them and I bought/traded for a few to fix and flip. Admittedly these cars were not expensive cars though. Basic transportation.

Back then I was too poor to spend and trash and spend. As an E-4 I was only making $14K as I recall. That figured into my reasoning for getting out b/c I could make the same or more working many entry level jobs without the risks.




I suppose it could be generational, not simply a mentality that impacts strictly military families.  I would rather live minimally and buy used for most things -- its possible that I'm in the minority everywhere, not just in my little military town ;)

You're reading the MMM forum after all. Yeah, we are all probably a minority mindset of the USA. ;)

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #61 on: August 10, 2016, 03:30:59 PM »

As an E-4 I was only making $14K as I recall. That figured into my reasoning for getting out b/c I could make the same or more working many entry level jobs without the risks.
In retrospect, do you stand by that reasoning? I find most people in the military have no fucking clue what all their tax-free benefits are worth, and generally have a very distorted concept of how military and civilian pay compare. And this is true most of all in the lower enlisted ranks, where pre-tax value of goods and services provided (or funded via allowances) may exceed actual wages. You're here, so you're probably above average in math, but I'm still curious.

Source: I'm a career military officer (6yrs active, now ANG) as well as a tax preparer.

Chris22

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #62 on: August 10, 2016, 03:36:51 PM »

As an E-4 I was only making $14K as I recall. That figured into my reasoning for getting out b/c I could make the same or more working many entry level jobs without the risks.
In retrospect, do you stand by that reasoning? I find most people in the military have no fucking clue what all their tax-free benefits are worth, and generally have a very distorted concept of how military and civilian pay compare. And this is true most of all in the lower enlisted ranks, where pre-tax value of goods and services provided (or funded via allowances) may exceed actual wages. You're here, so you're probably above average in math, but I'm still curious.

Source: I'm a career military officer (6yrs active, now ANG) as well as a tax preparer.

There's no free lunch.  Yes, there are lots of tax-free benefits in the military, but A) a lot of them come with HUGE strings attached (free healthcare provided by the lowest common denominator, free housing that generally sucks), and B) you give away vast amounts of other opportunities in the military such as upside potential, it's much harder to own a home, it's much harder to have a working professional spouse, little control of your destiny, etc etc etc. 

Making Cookies

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Re: "Because I'm worth it!"
« Reply #63 on: August 10, 2016, 03:40:56 PM »
I am, despite being an engineer, am very average with math.

You are right - I did not factor in the value of living on a ship nor did I factor in the benefits. The low E-4 salary of the time was simply another reason for me to complete my enlistment and head to college. I briefly considered exploring re-entering as an officer where things would be much improved - more money, more freedom, more of several different aspects I considered to be positives.

In the end I began working a series of civilian jobs, married/started a family, and find myself very content. From time to time I explore the notion of working as a civilian for the military overseas - I really enjoyed living in Europe. Right now though I think stability for our kids is likely what the family needs. Maybe we'll vacation in Europe someday soon for a few weeks and scratch that itch enough.