Author Topic: $800 for a haircut  (Read 1422 times)

FireLane

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$800 for a haircut
« on: July 27, 2016, 02:18:55 PM »
Sometimes I wonder what people who make huge Wall Street salaries can possibly find to blow all that money on. Well, here's an answer:

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/21/fashion/new-york-mens-haircut-price.html

If I get charged $20 for a haircut, that strikes me as extravagant, and these people are paying forty times as much. And doing it multiple times per month, too! I can usually get by with one cut every two or three months.

The sad part is that not everyone who pays these ludicrous prices is even rich:

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Martial Vivot, a former Parisian who founded Salon Pour Hommes in 2008, charges $320 for one of his signature cuts. Recently, he said, he saw a client bagging groceries at the Whole Foods in Columbus Circle. “I felt like, ‘Oh, wow,’” he said. “I wondered if he could afford it.”

But all is not lost! One of the stylists seems commendably Mustachian, if you can use that word for someone who charges $200 for a haircut:

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Robin Capili, a stylist at Sally Hershberger who trained at a barbershop (and who charges a relatively more affordable $200), said he’d never spend $10,000 a month. “I’d invest in property,” he said. “A condo maybe.”

Can you be a Mustachian even if your job involves charging absurd prices to spendypants people?

RFAAOATB

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Re: $800 for a haircut
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2016, 02:20:21 PM »
Isn't this how trickle down economics is supposed to work?

Smokystache

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Re: $800 for a haircut
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2016, 02:27:09 PM »
Quote
Robin Capili, a stylist at Sally Hershberger who trained at a barbershop (and who charges a relatively more affordable $200), said he’d never spend $10,000 a month. “I’d invest in property,” he said. “A condo maybe.”

Can you be a Mustachian even if your job involves charging absurd prices to spendypants people?

I guess I never questioned this. If some people want to voluntarily pay ridiculous amounts of money for services or products with full knowledge of what they are receiving (and assuming it isn't something like gouging for life-saving medicine, etc.), then why wouldn't you use that to fund FI/RE?? As long as you're not promising results/outcomes that aren't true, then it just seems like a good business strategy to me.