Author Topic: $49 Egg Dinner  (Read 9121 times)

alamedagal

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$49 Egg Dinner
« on: February 01, 2016, 10:15:34 AM »
Last night, we celebrated the new year with two other couples at a "fancy" restaurant in the San Francisco Bay Area.

It was a prix fixe menu for $49 per person which included appetizer & dessert & choice of entree (fish, beef, or egg).  Most of us opted for fish or beef but one of us picked the egg choice just for kicks.  The portions were all small but the egg wins as the most ridiculous entree ever.  This will be an ongoing joke in my family for years to come.

Ashyukun

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2016, 10:28:27 AM »
Is that caviar on the left side of it? Even if so- that's still ridiculous. It had better have been the best damn egg (or portion thereof) that they'd ever had!

slugline

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2016, 10:29:21 AM »
Wow.

Any hope of the other courses "picking up the slack"? Sounds like a once-in-a-lifetime experience . . . . or at least I would really try to not make that choice twice in a lifetime. . . .

nereo

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2016, 11:04:53 AM »
what were the appertizers and desserts?

alamedagal

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2016, 12:14:30 PM »
The appetizer was family style bread and dips.  For the table of six, there were 6 pieces of bread/cracker and about 1/2 cup of each of the following:  smoked trout mousse, chicken liver mousse, pate, hummus, squid, crab fritters (6 tater tot size) and simple lettuce salad to share.

Dessert was individual servings in small mason jars of honey panna cotta with chocolate crumbles and melon ball size coffee ice cream.

The service was excellent and despite the small servings (the fish and beef versions had the same size protein as the egg and the same level of garnish), the food was very tasty.

It was a fun evening for all and the egg just made it all the more amusing. 

For the person who asked, the condiment next to the egg was not caviar.  I don't recall what it was (something vegetarian).


gimp

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2016, 12:29:05 PM »
I read, and really like, this description of food and classes:

- Lower class: was it enough food?
- Middle class: did the food taste good?
- Upper class: was the food interesting?

Nice restaurants in SF are somewhere between #2 and #3; the more you pay, the more it's at #3. Small portions are expected.

Guess who avoids nice restaurants in SF? This guy. I would prefer all of the above on my plate - #1, 2, and 3 - but it's pretty hard to get, and I don't care enough about food to want to pay good money for it.

MgoSam

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2016, 01:07:07 PM »
Yeah, I'm more of a #1 and #2 type person, based on gimp's description.

Don't misunderstand, I like interesting foods, but I'm not really willing to pay for them. I don't mind splurging on foods if I'm cooking it with a group of friends, but I haven't been able to internally justify going to a fancy restaurant.

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2016, 01:41:57 PM »
I read, and really like, this description of food and classes:

- Lower class: was it enough food?
- Middle class: did the food taste good?
- Upper class: was the food interesting?

Nice restaurants in SF are somewhere between #2 and #3; the more you pay, the more it's at #3. Small portions are expected.

The reason for this is because you can saturate #1 and #2 by reaching a level where people aren't willing to pay more to get more. #3 can't be saturated.

There's an upper limit to how much the human stomach can hold. All-you-can-eat buffets serving cheap, starchy, greasy food optimize their price point to what the market will bear. Past a certain point, charging more per plate is a money-loser because customers balk at paying more than that specific price for a meal when what they're buying is quantity. Fast food dining generally requires about an hour's take-home pay. Ask more than that for food that is simply edible and not pleasant, and people start balking.

Satisfying the sensory expectations of the diner is easy: just load up the salt, sugar, and grease, and add a few unique seasonings. That's how volume dining works. For volume dining, you can ask about three times the average hourly take-home pay in the region, and do good business. When you start asking more for things that are tasty, significant numbers of people (middle-class and otherwise) decide to get their gustatory pampering elsewhere.

You can't max out "interesting" or "pleasant experience", though, because of hedonic adaptation. No matter how luxurious the surroundings are, people get used to them, and they don't feel like they're getting something unique anymore. Charge $50 for a glass of wine and $500 for a martini, and there will always be someone else who manufactures a reason to charge double the price. At that point it's not what kind of meal you deliver but how you deliver it. Load up on the pretentiousness, so that you've got French accents among the table waiters, Italian marble in the crapper, and unique, custom artwork on the wall. Create some kind of buzz by wrapping diners in tablecloths or doing some other randomly stupid thing. Then you can charge as much as you like, and people with more money than sense will start buying exclusivity, service, and ambience.

coolistdude

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2016, 01:42:31 PM »
I can just picture the restaurant worker: 'Now see here, it says "egg" not "eggs". So sorry, so sad. Please tip on top of gratuity.'

MsPeacock

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2016, 01:52:31 PM »
Is that a chicken egg? It looks so tiny - like a quail egg. Something about the size of the yolk to the size of the white...

Laughable - and I'm glad you could laugh about it... At least it looks pretty on the plate????

Shor

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2016, 08:48:48 AM »
Is that caviar on the left side of it? Even if so- that's still ridiculous. It had better have been the best damn egg (or portion thereof) that they'd ever had!
Brussel Sprouts. When you cook them up though, you need to roast them in to some kind of sauce or flavor because they are pretty bitter on their own. Usually it's used to soak up grease and meat juices so they absorb all the flavors.

I read, and really like, this description of food and classes:

- Lower class: was it enough food?
- Middle class: did the food taste good?
- Upper class: was the food interesting?

Nice restaurants in SF are somewhere between #2 and #3; the more you pay, the more it's at #3. Small portions are expected.

Guess who avoids nice restaurants in SF? This guy. I would prefer all of the above on my plate - #1, 2, and 3 - but it's pretty hard to get, and I don't care enough about food to want to pay good money for it.
#3 sounds more like: "I have money, will spend it.. Entertain Me!!"
Overall cost of that meal is < $1 for materials..

Also I would argue that McDonalds is tasty and falls solidly in to the middle class category :D

WildJager

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2016, 04:43:09 PM »
Is that caviar on the left side of it? Even if so- that's still ridiculous. It had better have been the best damn egg (or portion thereof) that they'd ever had!
Brussel Sprouts. When you cook them up though, you need to roast them in to some kind of sauce or flavor because they are pretty bitter on their own. Usually it's used to soak up grease and meat juices so they absorb all the flavors.

I think they were talking about the smaller nuggets next to the brussel sprouts (those would be some big ass fish eggs... I just realized typing that out that this is an egg dish so that would be very fitting).  I figured they were lentils or something along those lines. 

- Mustachian class: food is fuel, not entertainment.

As someone who loves good food, and has seen plenty of people in this category (very adventurous types from my perspective), I'd have to respectfully disagree.  Mustachian food are dishes that are high class chef quality, but made at home because you learned how to cook from scratch and cost a fraction of the price.  ;)

SewingmyStache

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2016, 09:23:28 PM »
I read, and really like, this description of food and classes:

- Lower class: was it enough food?
- Middle class: did the food taste good?
- Upper class: was the food interesting?


I really only like to eat out in the 3rd category.  I can do enough tasty food at home.  When I eat out, I like to have something I can't /won't make at home - either fancy chefy food or some ethnic food.  I'm always disappointed in myself when I end up eating something at a restaurant that I could have easily made at home.  That being said, I can fry an egg and roast brussel sprouts.

MgoSam

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2016, 09:32:57 PM »
I read, and really like, this description of food and classes:

- Lower class: was it enough food?
- Middle class: did the food taste good?
- Upper class: was the food interesting?


I really only like to eat out in the 3rd category.  I can do enough tasty food at home.  When I eat out, I like to have something I can't /won't make at home - either fancy chefy food or some ethnic food.  I'm always disappointed in myself when I end up eating something at a restaurant that I could have easily made at home.  That being said, I can fry an egg and roast brussel sprouts.

+1. That makes perfect sense.

gimp

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #14 on: February 03, 2016, 12:18:44 AM »
I tend to agree. I refuse to get stuff like burgers or mac and cheese at a restaurant. Hell, I don't get steak anymore - I can make one better at all but real steakhouses, and I don't go to those, can't afford that. I'll feel ripped off if I don't get #1, and I won't go back if I don't get #2, but I am almost always in search of a cheap #3 - something inexpensive but interesting.

nereo

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2016, 09:54:33 AM »
I read, and really like, this description of food and classes:

- Lower class: was it enough food?
- Middle class: did the food taste good?
- Upper class: was the food interesting?


I really only like to eat out in the 3rd category.  I can do enough tasty food at home.  When I eat out, I like to have something I can't /won't make at home - either fancy chefy food or some ethnic food.  I'm always disappointed in myself when I end up eating something at a restaurant that I could have easily made at home.  That being said, I can fry an egg and roast brussel sprouts.
+1.  On the rare occasions when we do eat out I want to experience something I haven't ever had before.  Sometimes this is obscure (to me) ethnical mom-and-pop restaurant, and other times it's avant-gard haute cuisine using ingredients I never looked at as food before or combinations/techniques I've never considered before.

Eric

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #16 on: February 04, 2016, 04:15:08 PM »
I read, and really like, this description of food and classes:

- Lower class: was it enough food?
- Middle class: did the food taste good?
- Upper class: was the food interesting?


I really only like to eat out in the 3rd category.  I can do enough tasty food at home.  When I eat out, I like to have something I can't /won't make at home - either fancy chefy food or some ethnic food.  I'm always disappointed in myself when I end up eating something at a restaurant that I could have easily made at home.  That being said, I can fry an egg and roast brussel sprouts.

Sure, but when I leave a restaurant and I'm still as hungry as when I entered, it's hard to feel like it was worth it.  Just look at that portion size!  That's not even enough for a 3 year old.

nereo

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #17 on: February 04, 2016, 04:25:36 PM »
I read, and really like, this description of food and classes:

- Lower class: was it enough food?
- Middle class: did the food taste good?
- Upper class: was the food interesting?


I really only like to eat out in the 3rd category.  I can do enough tasty food at home.  When I eat out, I like to have something I can't /won't make at home - either fancy chefy food or some ethnic food.  I'm always disappointed in myself when I end up eating something at a restaurant that I could have easily made at home.  That being said, I can fry an egg and roast brussel sprouts.

Sure, but when I leave a restaurant and I'm still as hungry as when I entered, it's hard to feel like it was worth it.  Just look at that portion size!  That's not even enough for a 3 year old.
That's actually an ostrich's egg surrounded by artichoke halves and entire heads of cauliflower.
:-P

Kitsune

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #18 on: February 04, 2016, 05:33:45 PM »
I tend to agree. I refuse to get stuff like burgers or mac and cheese at a restaurant. Hell, I don't get steak anymore - I can make one better at all but real steakhouses, and I don't go to those, can't afford that. I'll feel ripped off if I don't get #1, and I won't go back if I don't get #2, but I am almost always in search of a cheap #3 - something inexpensive but interesting.

I'm willing to pay for something that hits all those points, within reason (and within reasonable frequence: this is NOT an every month kind of expense).

My favourite restaurant is in the country, and it's a 55$CAD prix-fix menu (this place, for the curious: http://www.lebocage.qc.ca/en/restaurant.htm). The place is a bed-and-breakfast that's also a restaurant. In winter, you get to sit next to a fireplace in a Victorian dining room. In the summer, it's in the greenhouse or herb garden: the atmosphere is lovely. The food is TO DIE FOR - the sample menu on the website is relatively close to what they actually serve. The last time we went, both appetizers were lovely, I wound up with a roast quail in some kind of amazing sauce and my husband wound up with the most amazing inch-and-a-half-thick venison steak in a gorgeous sauce... Yum. AND it's bring-your-own-wine, so for less than 150$ for the evening, you basically have 4 hours worth of excellent food, excellent wine, excellent conversation, and excellent atmosphere. It's not cheap, but I have never been to another place that delivers that kind of quality AND quantity for that kind of price. In the city, the closest I've come was about 4x the price, which... Nope. Not happening.

My second-favorite is a low-cost souvlaki joint in the city that has the most amazing tzatziki I have EVER tasted. :)

nereo

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #19 on: February 04, 2016, 05:56:42 PM »
I tend to agree. I refuse to get stuff like burgers or mac and cheese at a restaurant. Hell, I don't get steak anymore - I can make one better at all but real steakhouses, and I don't go to those, can't afford that. I'll feel ripped off if I don't get #1, and I won't go back if I don't get #2, but I am almost always in search of a cheap #3 - something inexpensive but interesting.

I'm willing to pay for something that hits all those points, within reason (and within reasonable frequence: this is NOT an every month kind of expense).

My favourite restaurant is in the country, and it's a 55$CAD prix-fix menu (this place, for the curious: http://www.lebocage.qc.ca/en/restaurant.htm). The place is a bed-and-breakfast that's also a restaurant. In winter, you get to sit next to a fireplace in a Victorian dining room. In the summer, it's in the greenhouse or herb garden: the atmosphere is lovely. The food is TO DIE FOR - the sample menu on the website is relatively close to what they actually serve. The last time we went, both appetizers were lovely, I wound up with a roast quail in some kind of amazing sauce and my husband wound up with the most amazing inch-and-a-half-thick venison steak in a gorgeous sauce... Yum. AND it's bring-your-own-wine, so for less than 150$ for the evening, you basically have 4 hours worth of excellent food, excellent wine, excellent conversation, and excellent atmosphere. It's not cheap, but I have never been to another place that delivers that kind of quality AND quantity for that kind of price. In the city, the closest I've come was about 4x the price, which... Nope. Not happening.

My second-favorite is a low-cost souvlaki joint in the city that has the most amazing tzatziki I have EVER tasted. :)

I feel like I should get facepunched for saying this, but thanks for sharing Kitsune.  It's halfway between me and my inlaws anyway, and at $38USD could meet critera #3 for us without being too expensive.  Woot!

Kitsune

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #20 on: February 04, 2016, 06:24:32 PM »
I tend to agree. I refuse to get stuff like burgers or mac and cheese at a restaurant. Hell, I don't get steak anymore - I can make one better at all but real steakhouses, and I don't go to those, can't afford that. I'll feel ripped off if I don't get #1, and I won't go back if I don't get #2, but I am almost always in search of a cheap #3 - something inexpensive but interesting.

I'm willing to pay for something that hits all those points, within reason (and within reasonable frequence: this is NOT an every month kind of expense).

My favourite restaurant is in the country, and it's a 55$CAD prix-fix menu (this place, for the curious: http://www.lebocage.qc.ca/en/restaurant.htm). The place is a bed-and-breakfast that's also a restaurant. In winter, you get to sit next to a fireplace in a Victorian dining room. In the summer, it's in the greenhouse or herb garden: the atmosphere is lovely. The food is TO DIE FOR - the sample menu on the website is relatively close to what they actually serve. The last time we went, both appetizers were lovely, I wound up with a roast quail in some kind of amazing sauce and my husband wound up with the most amazing inch-and-a-half-thick venison steak in a gorgeous sauce... Yum. AND it's bring-your-own-wine, so for less than 150$ for the evening, you basically have 4 hours worth of excellent food, excellent wine, excellent conversation, and excellent atmosphere. It's not cheap, but I have never been to another place that delivers that kind of quality AND quantity for that kind of price. In the city, the closest I've come was about 4x the price, which... Nope. Not happening.

My second-favorite is a low-cost souvlaki joint in the city that has the most amazing tzatziki I have EVER tasted. :)

Hey, the way we justify it is to say that we only spend money on things we value. Our total restaurant expenses in the year are that place maybe once a year, 10$ souvlaki when we wind up back in Montreal. I'm VERY comfortable saying our total restaurant bill in a year is under 300$ for the family. I feel like if we spend money to eat out, it needs to be worth the experience and also not outrageously priced... :)

I feel like I should get facepunched for saying this, but thanks for sharing Kitsune.  It's halfway between me and my inlaws anyway, and at $38USD could meet critera #3 for us without being too expensive.  Woot!

Tabaxus

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2016, 09:52:40 AM »
That's nothing.  See:  https://next.tocktix.com/#/home

This is actually cheap for this restaurant, too.

WildJager

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2016, 05:17:34 PM »
That's nothing.  See:  https://next.tocktix.com/#/home

This is actually cheap for this restaurant, too.

I hear Patrick Bateman likes to go there when vacationing to Chicago.


neophyte

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2016, 02:10:25 PM »
Is that caviar on the left side of it? Even if so- that's still ridiculous. It had better have been the best damn egg (or portion thereof) that they'd ever had!
Brussel Sprouts. When you cook them up though, you need to roast them in to some kind of sauce or flavor because they are pretty bitter on their own. Usually it's used to soak up grease and meat juices so they absorb all the flavors.

I think they were talking about the smaller nuggets next to the brussel sprouts (those would be some big ass fish eggs... I just realized typing that out that this is an egg dish so that would be very fitting).  I figured they were lentils or something along those lines. 

Hmmm.... Capers, maybe?

Goldielocks

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2016, 08:16:49 PM »
Is that caviar on the left side of it? Even if so- that's still ridiculous. It had better have been the best damn egg (or portion thereof) that they'd ever had!
I bet it is something like "beetj uice caviar"... where they put a beetjuice / gelatin mixture through a sieve into ice water and create tiny balls.
This one is dark, so hard to tell what base juice it could be... mushroom? 

Kitsunegari

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #25 on: February 19, 2016, 08:10:51 PM »
I tend to agree. I refuse to get stuff like burgers or mac and cheese at a restaurant. Hell, I don't get steak anymore - I can make one better at all but real steakhouses, and I don't go to those, can't afford that. I'll feel ripped off if I don't get #1, and I won't go back if I don't get #2, but I am almost always in search of a cheap #3 - something inexpensive but interesting.

I'm willing to pay for something that hits all those points, within reason (and within reasonable frequence: this is NOT an every month kind of expense).

My favourite restaurant is in the country, and it's a 55$CAD prix-fix menu (this place, for the curious: http://www.lebocage.qc.ca/en/restaurant.htm). The place is a bed-and-breakfast that's also a restaurant. In winter, you get to sit next to a fireplace in a Victorian dining room. In the summer, it's in the greenhouse or herb garden: the atmosphere is lovely. The food is TO DIE FOR - the sample menu on the website is relatively close to what they actually serve. The last time we went, both appetizers were lovely, I wound up with a roast quail in some kind of amazing sauce and my husband wound up with the most amazing inch-and-a-half-thick venison steak in a gorgeous sauce... Yum. AND it's bring-your-own-wine, so for less than 150$ for the evening, you basically have 4 hours worth of excellent food, excellent wine, excellent conversation, and excellent atmosphere. It's not cheap, but I have never been to another place that delivers that kind of quality AND quantity for that kind of price. In the city, the closest I've come was about 4x the price, which... Nope. Not happening.

My second-favorite is a low-cost souvlaki joint in the city that has the most amazing tzatziki I have EVER tasted. :)

I guess now I know where we'll be sleeping next time we go to Foresta Lumina!
And what's the souvlaki place? Is it close to metro Jean Talon?

LPeters

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2016, 08:48:26 PM »
Along the class perspective lines, I have a book recommendation. It's about the differences between classes how they see the world and communicate, invisible expectations around socializing, dressing, where to live, where to send children to be educated: it's called Crossing the Tracks for Love by Ruby Payne.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B008VHT0V4/ref=mp_s_a_1_8?qid=1455939764&sr=1-8&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=Ruby+Payne

Kitsune

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Re: $49 Egg Dinner
« Reply #27 on: February 20, 2016, 04:58:02 AM »
I tend to agree. I refuse to get stuff like burgers or mac and cheese at a restaurant. Hell, I don't get steak anymore - I can make one better at all but real steakhouses, and I don't go to those, can't afford that. I'll feel ripped off if I don't get #1, and I won't go back if I don't get #2, but I am almost always in search of a cheap #3 - something inexpensive but interesting.

I'm willing to pay for something that hits all those points, within reason (and within reasonable frequence: this is NOT an every month kind of expense).

My favourite restaurant is in the country, and it's a 55$CAD prix-fix menu (this place, for the curious: http://www.lebocage.qc.ca/en/restaurant.htm). The place is a bed-and-breakfast that's also a restaurant. In winter, you get to sit next to a fireplace in a Victorian dining room. In the summer, it's in the greenhouse or herb garden: the atmosphere is lovely. The food is TO DIE FOR - the sample menu on the website is relatively close to what they actually serve. The last time we went, both appetizers were lovely, I wound up with a roast quail in some kind of amazing sauce and my husband wound up with the most amazing inch-and-a-half-thick venison steak in a gorgeous sauce... Yum. AND it's bring-your-own-wine, so for less than 150$ for the evening, you basically have 4 hours worth of excellent food, excellent wine, excellent conversation, and excellent atmosphere. It's not cheap, but I have never been to another place that delivers that kind of quality AND quantity for that kind of price. In the city, the closest I've come was about 4x the price, which... Nope. Not happening.

My second-favorite is a low-cost souvlaki joint in the city that has the most amazing tzatziki I have EVER tasted. :)

I guess now I know where we'll be sleeping next time we go to Foresta Lumina!
And what's the souvlaki place? Is it close to metro Jean Talon?

No- Villa du Souvlaki, a half-block from Decarie and Sherbrooke. :)