Author Topic: what would you do?  (Read 3351 times)

mohawkbrah

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 271
  • Age: 23
  • Location: Herefordshire, UK
  • every day they see me hustling those pennies away
what would you do?
« on: September 17, 2015, 10:49:41 AM »
In a bit of a situation here

i started tech college doing a health and social care course because i initially wanted to go into nursing or become a nursing assistant. But after my first day at work placement i just realized how sexist the job is to male healthcare assistants. i was just shoved into the kitchen all day doing the washing up and peeling spuds while the female work placement was spending all day with the elderly people.

so im thinking of just finding another part time job to go with what i've already got and supercharge my investing and retire as early as possible. Since i don't care about having a career and just want to be free would working as much as possible as soon as i can be the best route do you reckon? otherwise to become a nurse i would have to do 5 years of education in total.

Mr Dorothy Dollar

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 133
  • Location: Michigan
    • Dorothy Dollar
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2015, 11:17:41 AM »
I have known lots of male nurses and they seem to be in demand especially with patients that need to be assisted in moving and are heavy - hit the gym. Also, you are the new guy it could be part of making you prove yourself. I would not let this bad experience block what you seem to want out of life. If it does not improve after some time look to be placed in a different opportunity.

EngineerMum

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 130
  • Location: Perth, Western Australia
  • Working towards moderate badassity
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2015, 10:34:05 PM »
I've had this sort of thing from the other side (female engineer). Don't judge the whole industry on one workplace. Gender balance and attitudes vary massively with different workplace cultures. You'll also find that cultures change over time. Being the only one is hard (I'm the only woman in my group of over 20 at the moment) but as people get to know you, you will be judged on your performance more than your gender, if you take opportunities to show you can do the work you will win peoples' trust.

The biggest thing for me is having a boss that supports you being there, if you have that, the rest of the team will usually follow.

Also, like Mr Dorothy, I've known a few male nurses, and they are generally respected and treated well. Yes, it is usually them that are called if a patient is aggressive or something heavy needs to be lifted, but if you can handle that, it can be a great career for men.

Dexterous

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 206
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Italy
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2015, 11:59:22 PM »
I'd speak privately to the person in charge of work assignments.  Don't complain to coworkers.

When speaking to the person in charge, basically state what you just told us in a professional way.  Hopefully they'll be understanding and give you broader experience, especially if they know you might otherwise leave or lose interest in the field.

The_path_less_taken

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 654
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2015, 06:37:07 AM »
The "just started" thing leaped out at me: it really takes about 3 months to truly get to know everyone at your workplace....to know what's fair and who is a dick, etc. I'd give it a little time.

Your other question, about work....my answer might get me tossed from this board but I believe it to be true: not everyone benefits from every career. Your life now is also your life: you have to be happy at it. I wouldn't quit without giving it a real shot of at least a month or two. But if it sucks, you feel disrespected and talking calmly with HR doesn't solve it...it's a big world. There are other gigs.

If that meant working in something that paid big bucks---sales, for instance---and then taking off to travel a year....your stash will recover. Only you can decide what works for you.

In my 'ideal' world, everyone would get to play for a year or two after college, then do fun gigs that left plenty of time for hiking/skydiving/whatever outdoor adventure you crave, then work some more.

I've worked lots of different jobs. All suck to one degree or another. Nursing is an honorable but difficult profession...it will always be in demand, and will always pay very well. There are always trade offs. You chose this profession for a reason: has anything changed, truly?






redfreddie3

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 16
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2015, 07:53:18 AM »
I've been in healthcare in a nursing home and hospital setting and I can tell you that this is not a normal experience at least where I'm from.  Normally male or female it's all hands on deck helping the people not making dinner.  Normally it's a totally different group of people making the meals, making a snack for an individual here or there is normal and helping with those who cannot feed themselves but not the meal prep you are describing.  If you are serious about nursing don't give up because honestly we need as many good nurses and assistants as we can get and the population sure isn't becoming healthier. Talk to your teachers because this is not the training you need and sometimes the placements are messed up or the staff that you should be assigned to are unavailable for some reason and if that is the case they need to fix it fast.

thd7t

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1215
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2015, 09:45:40 AM »
Even though it was your first day, they needed you to be useful.  You probably don't know the facility very well, but you almost definitely know how to help out in the kitchen.  That's sometimes how it is when you jump into a new job where things are really busy.  You should give it some time.  Often people don't realize that they're helping make your first impression of a job (or in your case of a whole industry).

Kingsmen

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 9
  • Age: 39
  • Location: California
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2015, 10:21:05 AM »
I'm a male RN.  I would stick with it.  I started off working as an EMT for a private ambulance company making $8.50/hr.  I worked full time as I took my nursing prerequisite classes.  Once I got accepted into RN school, I went part time.  I graduated and already had a job offer.  When the HR department called me with the offer I couldn't believe it.  I would be making 4 times what I was making as an EMT.  I accepted the offer and couldn't be happier.  Don't worry.  As a male nurse you will command much more respect than an assistant.  You will never fear losing your job.  And although FIRE is a goal for me, you will never feel an urgency to RE because being a nurse is so rewarding spiritually.  I work in ICU so death is an everyday experience.  But so is healing.  I love being able to help people when they are at their worst.  And the nursing field is so broad, you can literally work anywhere in a variety of soecialties.  I wish you luck in whichever path you choose!

clarkfan1979

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1770
  • Age: 39
  • Location: Kauai & Denver
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2015, 10:26:38 AM »
You are new, I would stick with it. However, after being at a job for over a year, I have quit two jobs because of unequal work assignments. I was always the nice guy willing to help out. However, it sometimes involved me doing all the grunt work because I never complained. If the grunt work was not redistributed, I would quit. Then it was naturally redistributed after I was no longer there. The managers really didn't have a choice. It was going to be redistributed either way. I can't believe they would be so stubborn. It was probably a power play to make themselves feel better or they thought that I didn't have the balls or resources to quit.

jms493

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 118
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2015, 10:31:33 AM »
My wife is a RN for 10 years now...she has worked with many male RNs and I have never heard anything about this.  If you are good at your job, show up with a smile and enthusiasm for helping patients and Doctors then you will be more than fine.

My wife actually likes working with the male nurses because there is much less drama involved.

Bracken_Joy

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8553
  • Location: Oregon
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2015, 11:17:41 AM »
Care homes are worlds apart from hospital positions in my experience. And care homes vary wildly from one to the next.

Absolutely give it some more time and get to know people, and/or try a different facility. I would recommend shadowing a nurse in the setting you will want to work if at all possible. It will give you a much better idea of what your future will look like.

When I was a CNA (certified nursing assistant) I was by default treated like crap and had to earn respect to be treated well. As a nurse, I find the experience to be completely opposite- people assume you are kind and competent until proven otherwise.

pbkmaine

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7873
  • Age: 62
  • Location: The Villages, Florida
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #11 on: September 18, 2015, 12:23:15 PM »
You still get the experience on your resume, no matter what you are actually doing. Look on it as resume building exercise. This might also be a test of character by management. So be cheerful and pleasant and bide your time. If it continues to be bad, look elsewhere, while still being cheerful and pleasant. The last thing you want at this point is a bad review.

Kaspian

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1537
  • Location: Canada
    • My Necronomicon of Badassity
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2015, 12:30:42 PM »
Sometimes the first day at work sucks.  It doesn't mean it's always going to be that way.  Give it a chance.

Bajadoc

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 212
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2015, 12:40:14 PM »
Never ever ever give up. Stick with it and upgrade your skills to registered nurse. The healthcare field really has its ups and downs just like any other field.

thd7t

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1215
Re: what would you do?
« Reply #14 on: September 18, 2015, 01:03:41 PM »
You are new, I would stick with it. However, after being at a job for over a year, I have quit two jobs because of unequal work assignments. I was always the nice guy willing to help out. However, it sometimes involved me doing all the grunt work because I never complained. If the grunt work was not redistributed, I would quit. Then it was naturally redistributed after I was no longer there. The managers really didn't have a choice. It was going to be redistributed either way. I can't believe they would be so stubborn. It was probably a power play to make themselves feel better or they thought that I didn't have the balls or resources to quit.
If you didn't complain, how did they know there was an issue?  They may have thought you were happy.  I find myself in a similar situation to you.  You're saying that you can't believe their stubbornness, but it sounds like your stubbornness had a role.