Author Topic: The things people say...that irk you  (Read 110248 times)

AlwaysLearningToSave

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #50 on: October 16, 2015, 10:01:44 AM »
"ek cetera" instead of et cetera.   

AlwaysLearningToSave

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #51 on: October 16, 2015, 10:17:00 AM »
And another thing. I realize this is probably a case of language shift as someone mentioned above, because it seems to be in general use by everyone at all education levels. But as an old guy it just makes be want to tell people to get a haircut! To wit:

The word "disrespected." "He disrespected  his co-workers"  This is the most made-up, bohunk use of a word I have ever heard. I consider it worse than "irregardless"

I don't get this one.

Do you feel it should only be used as a noun or adjective and not a verb?  Or do you have a problem with the lack of descriptiveness, or what?  For example, the following examples seem perfectly acceptable to me, though some of them are clumsier than others:  "He disrespected his coworkers when he made disparaging comments about them."  Versus "He made disrespectful comments about his coworkers."  Versus "He made comments about his coworkers that showed disrespect."

I've never been irritated by this.  But now that you pointed it out once, I am forever going to notice when people use it as a verb and be irritated that I notice. 

AlwaysLearningToSave

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #52 on: October 16, 2015, 10:20:45 AM »
Obligatory: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Gv0H-vPoDc

(The video itself doesn't irk me; it's great. The stuff the video is about irks me.)

+1 to this.  Love it. 

For those who didn't follow the link to find out what it is, it is a link to Weird Al's song "Word Crimes."

AlwaysLearningToSave

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #53 on: October 16, 2015, 10:29:33 AM »
Use of the passive voice in writing.  Except where it is necessary because the subject of the verb is unknown or purposefully irrelevant.  It is especially annoying where the author has the audacity to actually include the subject of the verb in the sentence while still using passive voice.  "The ball was thrown to her by him."  Incorrect!  "He threw the ball to her." 

It seems people use the passive voice in an effort to sound formal.  At best they end up making a sentence that is hard to read.  At worst, they create ambiguity that results in confusion or the need for followup communications. 

runningthroughFIRE

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #54 on: October 16, 2015, 10:36:40 AM »
When getting home from working late and greeting my (retired/disabled) neighbors sitting in the courtyard:  "You've only got about 30-40 more years of this to go, hahaha!"

I don't know how to respond other than to smile awkwardly.
I immediately see two answers to that;
1) Not the way I'm doing it...
2) And how many more years do you have to go??
Ok, 3;
3) at least I'm not wasting away sitting around
That's what I say to closer friends when these things are brought up, but that line of conversation with my neighbors would lead to "because I'm not making the same stupid choices you did when you were my age".  Nice people, but they complain about money being tight and I've heard enough stories from them to know they did it to themselves.

All of the above mentioned along with....

"fer se"  when they mean "per se"

Saying "then" when they mean "than". eg I have more then I used to"

Saying "Would of" when they mean "would have" eg  "I would of quite but I needed the money"

For some reason the last two have  exploded in popularity the past five or so years.
Are you actually hearing it being said, or seeing it written?  If someone says this I assume they're lazily saying "would've" (and I'm guilty of this).  If it's actually being written then they deserve a slap.

bsmith

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #55 on: October 16, 2015, 10:47:35 AM »
"Lacksadaisically" instead of lackadaisically



Quote
Supposively (instead of supposedly)

Libary (library)

State of the art

There's a funny episode of "My Name is Earl" with a guy who is corrected for saying "libary" and then says "strawbRerry". Stupid, but I laughed.

parkette

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #56 on: October 16, 2015, 10:55:31 AM »
"And... Walah!" NO. It's "Voilà." With a V. I heard this often while in Australia.

Dollar Slice

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #57 on: October 16, 2015, 11:23:52 AM »
Saying "Would of" when they mean "would have" eg  "I would of quite but I needed the money"

Are you actually hearing it being said, or seeing it written?  If someone says this I assume they're lazily saying "would've" (and I'm guilty of this).  If it's actually being written then they deserve a slap.

I've seen would of/should of/could of written in actual professional books by real authors, and actual articles in respectable publications. So aggravating.

I agree with the comment about excessively using passive voice, too. I do some proofreading/editing at my job and I have to unravel and rewrite some seriously insane sentences because one of our writers likes to combine passive voice, run-on sentences, and odd ordering of clauses.
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lauraah

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #58 on: October 16, 2015, 11:34:12 AM »
"Treating myself to a xxx." Especially when preceded by complaints about the lack of money.

+1

Also, "I'm going to buy ________, I deserve it." as though the comfortable middle class lifestyle these people live is so burdensome they're entitled to a little extra.  Nevermind that these people have no worries about food, shelter, healthcare, and by any reasonable measure of prosperity, they are beyond blessed.  I think it bothers me so much because it's expressing a feeling of entitlement/slight resentment when all I see are things they should be grateful for.

Schaefer Light

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #59 on: October 16, 2015, 11:57:30 AM »
Using the word barbecue as a verb.  Barbecue is a noun meaning pork (or in some areas beef) cooked in a certain way.

Hank Sinatra

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #60 on: October 16, 2015, 11:59:58 AM »
All of the above mentioned along with....

"fer se"  when they mean "per se"

Saying "then" when they mean "than". eg I have more then I used to"

Saying "Would of" when they mean "would have" eg  "I would of quite but I needed the money"

For some reason the last two have  exploded in popularity the past five or so years.
Quote
Are you actually hearing it being said, or seeing it written?  If someone says this I assume they're lazily saying "would've" (and I'm guilty of this).  If it's actually being written then they deserve a slap.
[/quote]

You have  a point. I sort of got too involved with it. SPEAKING it is OK. It's really just idiomatic speech. Even I, myself, say "I woulda" "I shoulda" in casual conversation. But I see this  "I would of" in place of "I would HAVE" in writing A LOT these days.  But if I slapped them I would be the one to go to jail.  Go figure!

AlwaysLearningToSave

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #61 on: October 16, 2015, 12:02:18 PM »
And/or

mainly because there is a word for that already, and the word is "or". "Or" means one, the other, or both. If you want to specify you can only have one of the following you say "either a or b". If someone comes into my house, and I say would you like something to eat or drink. It is assumed they could have both. At least, I don't think people who hear me offer hospitality that way think that I am an asshole for limiting them to either one or the other. So clearly, "or" still has the same functional meaning as "and/or".

This is a hard one for me because I don't think it is universally assumed that the use of the word "or" with out a modifier showing exclusivity necessarily implies that it encompasses both.  Lots of people use "or" without a modifier assuming it to express a dichotomy when it is in fact [EDIT FOR CLARITY: they do not realize it is] unclear whether it expresses a mutually exclusive dichotomy.  So while I dislike "and/or," I at least appreciate the author's effort to give clarity to the author's intent and I prefer the use of "and/or" to the ambiguous use of an unmodified "or." 

I'm guilty of using and/or in informal communications in an attempt to be clear that I mean "one, the other, or both."  When I am drafting a contract, I will take care to draft a provision to be clear without using "and/or."  But when I'm writing an email about a relatively unimportant subject, I will use "and/or" to be appropriately clear without having to take the time and effort to write a sentence with indented subsections. 

EDIT TO ADD:  If I used the unmodified "or" intending it to mean "one, the other, or both" but the recipient did not know and could not discern whether I meant to use the term inclusively or exclusively from the context, then I failed to communicate clearly.  I would rather use "and/or" than fail to communicate clearly.  Whatever the proper rule is, enough people use incorrectly that you cannot use an unmodified "or" and assume you will be understood.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2015, 12:31:06 PM by AlwaysLearningToSave »

Hank Sinatra

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #62 on: October 16, 2015, 12:10:59 PM »
I think I mentioned this maybe on another thread. 

"Most everyone owns a cell phone"

What does that mean? "most everyone?"  They mean either "most people own a  cell phone" or Almost everyone owns  a cell phone.  "MOST everyone conveys no information other than the speaker thinks he or she is saying "most people" as far as I can gather.

This is another one along with "he disrespected such and such", that is in common usage among even the educated Speaking Class ie TV communicators, journalists and similar types.

yuka

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #63 on: October 16, 2015, 12:25:49 PM »
Starting a conversation with "To tell the truth", or "truthfully".  I always assume everything I'm going to hear after this is a lie.

I think of this one as meaning some mix of "everything up to this point was at least partially deceitful" and "Yeah, I'm being a jerk, but it's not fair for me to have to keep repressing it."

At the opposite end of this, I have something one of my professors says which I think is hilarious. I used to have some friends who would say "that's whats up" to indicate that they were excited about something. Now I have a 65-year old signals professor with a stutter and an Italian accent, and he finishes most statements with "and that's-a what's oop" the way some people would say "there you have it" or "okay?"

MrMoogle

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #64 on: October 16, 2015, 12:31:02 PM »
I saw "FYSA" a while back in a mass email, I had to google it, this is what came up:
http://tachesdhuile.blogspot.com/2011/01/learn-to-speak-pentagon-lesson-2.html

In talking about FYI and FYSA:
Quote
While each indicates "you should know about this, though I don't expect you to take action as a result," the latter expression carries an additional connotation: "I am a douchebag who has worked in the Pentagon too long to write like a normal human."

Made my day.

cube.37

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #65 on: October 16, 2015, 12:49:29 PM »
The ones that give me fits are:

- "Irregardless" - that's not a word. It's just "regardless."
- "Libery" - there's an "R" in there, people!
- "See what I'm saying?" - No, but I do hear what you're saying.

And the one that nearly sends me into convulsions every time:

- Nuclear - It's spelled n-u-c-L-E-A-R. Why do people think it's pronounced nookular?

Quick note on the "see what I'm saying." People tend to be stronger learners in one-two of the following categories: auditory, kinesthetic or visual. Someone who is more auditory tends to learn best when the medium is sound - ex. teacher speaking, music playing. The same person is also more likely to communicate using words like hear, versus kinesthetic using words like feel, and visual using words like see. For example, a kinesthetic-prone person will say something like "i feel like i understand" or "you feel me?" Versus someone who is visual, who'd say something more like "i see" or "see what I'm saying?"

This can be useful if you're giving a presentation, and plan on talking for a majority of the time. If you're half-way through and you've noticed the key decision maker says words with visual learning cues like "I see," then there is a good chance he is a strong visual leaner - you will want to pull out those charts and make use of your ppt.

GuitarStv

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #66 on: October 16, 2015, 12:58:31 PM »
The phrase 'take this offline' also makes me roll my eyes.

Yup, that one for sure. Also, "I'll shoot you an email" gets an eyeroll from me every time.

I believe it's legally required to point one (or both) index fingers in the shape of a gun while saying that you'll 'shoot an email'.

irishbear99

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #67 on: October 16, 2015, 01:14:00 PM »
The ones that give me fits are:

- "Irregardless" - that's not a word. It's just "regardless."
- "Libery" - there's an "R" in there, people!
- "See what I'm saying?" - No, but I do hear what you're saying.

And the one that nearly sends me into convulsions every time:

- Nuclear - It's spelled n-u-c-L-E-A-R. Why do people think it's pronounced nookular?

Quick note on the "see what I'm saying." People tend to be stronger learners in one-two of the following categories: auditory, kinesthetic or visual. Someone who is more auditory tends to learn best when the medium is sound - ex. teacher speaking, music playing. The same person is also more likely to communicate using words like hear, versus kinesthetic using words like feel, and visual using words like see. For example, a kinesthetic-prone person will say something like "i feel like i understand" or "you feel me?" Versus someone who is visual, who'd say something more like "i see" or "see what I'm saying?"

This can be useful if you're giving a presentation, and plan on talking for a majority of the time. If you're half-way through and you've noticed the key decision maker says words with visual learning cues like "I see," then there is a good chance he is a strong visual leaner - you will want to pull out those charts and make use of your ppt.

All this time I thought it was just people being linguistically lazy. Thank you for educating me. I literally see what you're saying (typing). :)

Silverwood

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #68 on: October 16, 2015, 01:21:02 PM »
Reading these make me not want to talk to anyone.

sheepstache

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #69 on: October 16, 2015, 01:24:43 PM »
And/or

mainly because there is a word for that already, and the word is "or". "Or" means one, the other, or both. If you want to specify you can only have one of the following you say "either a or b". If someone comes into my house, and I say would you like something to eat or drink. It is assumed they could have both. At least, I don't think people who hear me offer hospitality that way think that I am an asshole for limiting them to either one or the other. So clearly, "or" still has the same functional meaning as "and/or".

This is a hard one for me because I don't think it is universally assumed that the use of the word "or" with out a modifier showing exclusivity necessarily implies that it encompasses both.  Lots of people use "or" without a modifier assuming it to express a dichotomy when it is in fact [EDIT FOR CLARITY: they do not realize it is] unclear whether it expresses a mutually exclusive dichotomy.  So while I dislike "and/or," I at least appreciate the author's effort to give clarity to the author's intent and I prefer the use of "and/or" to the ambiguous use of an unmodified "or." 

I'm guilty of using and/or in informal communications in an attempt to be clear that I mean "one, the other, or both."  When I am drafting a contract, I will take care to draft a provision to be clear without using "and/or."  But when I'm writing an email about a relatively unimportant subject, I will use "and/or" to be appropriately clear without having to take the time and effort to write a sentence with indented subsections. 

EDIT TO ADD:  If I used the unmodified "or" intending it to mean "one, the other, or both" but the recipient did not know and could not discern whether I meant to use the term inclusively or exclusively from the context, then I failed to communicate clearly.  I would rather use "and/or" than fail to communicate clearly.  Whatever the proper rule is, enough people use incorrectly that you cannot use an unmodified "or" and assume you will be understood.

halfshellmeijin is incorrect. 'Or' can be inclusive or exclusive. It depends on context. Therefore 'or' does not equal 'and/or.'

If I offer someone food or drink, they don't think I'm limiting them to one or the other. But if a menu says a dish comes with chicken or beef or shrimp, it doesn't mean I can order it with all three for the same price. If I can pass a test or fail it, it doesn't mean I can do both.

If halfshellmeijin wants to say they're irritated by the use of 'and/or' because it's clunky and could be explained by other cues or because people redundantly use it in situations where it's obvious ('would you like food or drink'), that would make more sense.

shotgunwilly

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #70 on: October 16, 2015, 01:26:57 PM »
"fleek"
"doe"
Any slang term that replaces "th" with a D.

And my absolute worst... "Bae"

MrMoogle

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #71 on: October 16, 2015, 01:35:21 PM »
And/or

mainly because there is a word for that already, and the word is "or". "Or" means one, the other, or both. If you want to specify you can only have one of the following you say "either a or b". If someone comes into my house, and I say would you like something to eat or drink. It is assumed they could have both. At least, I don't think people who hear me offer hospitality that way think that I am an asshole for limiting them to either one or the other. So clearly, "or" still has the same functional meaning as "and/or".

This is a hard one for me because I don't think it is universally assumed that the use of the word "or" with out a modifier showing exclusivity necessarily implies that it encompasses both.  Lots of people use "or" without a modifier assuming it to express a dichotomy when it is in fact [EDIT FOR CLARITY: they do not realize it is] unclear whether it expresses a mutually exclusive dichotomy.  So while I dislike "and/or," I at least appreciate the author's effort to give clarity to the author's intent and I prefer the use of "and/or" to the ambiguous use of an unmodified "or." 

I'm guilty of using and/or in informal communications in an attempt to be clear that I mean "one, the other, or both."  When I am drafting a contract, I will take care to draft a provision to be clear without using "and/or."  But when I'm writing an email about a relatively unimportant subject, I will use "and/or" to be appropriately clear without having to take the time and effort to write a sentence with indented subsections. 

EDIT TO ADD:  If I used the unmodified "or" intending it to mean "one, the other, or both" but the recipient did not know and could not discern whether I meant to use the term inclusively or exclusively from the context, then I failed to communicate clearly.  I would rather use "and/or" than fail to communicate clearly.  Whatever the proper rule is, enough people use incorrectly that you cannot use an unmodified "or" and assume you will be understood.

halfshellmeijin is incorrect. 'Or' can be inclusive or exclusive. It depends on context. Therefore 'or' does not equal 'and/or.'

If I offer someone food or drink, they don't think I'm limiting them to one or the other. But if a menu says a dish comes with chicken or beef or shrimp, it doesn't mean I can order it with all three for the same price. If I can pass a test or fail it, it doesn't mean I can do both.

If halfshellmeijin wants to say they're irritated by the use of 'and/or' because it's clunky and could be explained by other cues or because people redundantly use it in situations where it's obvious ('would you like food or drink'), that would make more sense.

People should just start using XOR to mean either but not both.  :P

Silverwood

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #72 on: October 16, 2015, 01:37:23 PM »
In other news,

I was telling a coworker all  about my hairloom tomato plants. 
The H is silent. hEirloom lol 
« Last Edit: October 16, 2015, 05:59:54 PM by Silverwood »

AlwaysLearningToSave

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #73 on: October 16, 2015, 01:53:33 PM »
And my absolute worst... "Bae"

I know!  Where does that word even come from? 

Gone Fishing

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #74 on: October 16, 2015, 01:58:35 PM »
"fleek"
"doe"
Any slang term that replaces "th" with a D.

And my absolute worst... "Bae"

Dude, where are you from?  I have never even heard those words!

Gone Fishing

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #75 on: October 16, 2015, 02:04:00 PM »
In other news,

I was telling a coworker all  about my hairloom tomato plants. 
The H is silent. Heirloom lol

I do like plenty of HERBS and spices in my cooking, but I guess it is okay because according to Dictionary.com, the British still say it that way!  Although, I do not like a bunch of dudes named Herbert in my food.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/herb

a-scho

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #76 on: October 16, 2015, 02:09:29 PM »
like
"...and whatnot"

or
"supposably"


I broke up with a guy after a few dates because he said "and whatnot" at the end of every statement he made..................and whatnot.

margarita

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #77 on: October 16, 2015, 02:20:04 PM »
"meh"
"buddy" (especially when said to a complete stranger)

yuka

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #78 on: October 16, 2015, 02:57:59 PM »
And/or

mainly because there is a word for that already, and the word is "or". "Or" means one, the other, or both. If you want to specify you can only have one of the following you say "either a or b". If someone comes into my house, and I say would you like something to eat or drink. It is assumed they could have both. At least, I don't think people who hear me offer hospitality that way think that I am an asshole for limiting them to either one or the other. So clearly, "or" still has the same functional meaning as "and/or".

This is a hard one for me because I don't think it is universally assumed that the use of the word "or" with out a modifier showing exclusivity necessarily implies that it encompasses both.  Lots of people use "or" without a modifier assuming it to express a dichotomy when it is in fact [EDIT FOR CLARITY: they do not realize it is] unclear whether it expresses a mutually exclusive dichotomy.  So while I dislike "and/or," I at least appreciate the author's effort to give clarity to the author's intent and I prefer the use of "and/or" to the ambiguous use of an unmodified "or." 

I'm guilty of using and/or in informal communications in an attempt to be clear that I mean "one, the other, or both."  When I am drafting a contract, I will take care to draft a provision to be clear without using "and/or."  But when I'm writing an email about a relatively unimportant subject, I will use "and/or" to be appropriately clear without having to take the time and effort to write a sentence with indented subsections. 

EDIT TO ADD:  If I used the unmodified "or" intending it to mean "one, the other, or both" but the recipient did not know and could not discern whether I meant to use the term inclusively or exclusively from the context, then I failed to communicate clearly.  I would rather use "and/or" than fail to communicate clearly.  Whatever the proper rule is, enough people use incorrectly that you cannot use an unmodified "or" and assume you will be understood.

halfshellmeijin is incorrect. 'Or' can be inclusive or exclusive. It depends on context. Therefore 'or' does not equal 'and/or.'

If I offer someone food or drink, they don't think I'm limiting them to one or the other. But if a menu says a dish comes with chicken or beef or shrimp, it doesn't mean I can order it with all three for the same price. If I can pass a test or fail it, it doesn't mean I can do both.

If halfshellmeijin wants to say they're irritated by the use of 'and/or' because it's clunky and could be explained by other cues or because people redundantly use it in situations where it's obvious ('would you like food or drink'), that would make more sense.

People should just start using XOR to mean either but not both.  :P

Or, in situations like the aforementioned "chicken or beef or shrimp", we could use "chicken NAND beef NAND shrimp". We'll have also broken spoken language, because there's no way you can hear the difference between and and nand.

Heather in Ottawa

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #79 on: October 16, 2015, 05:26:59 PM »

Heather in Ottawa

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #80 on: October 16, 2015, 05:29:23 PM »
My husband: "heaven abid" (forbid)
I think it sounds ridiculous, but I've given up on trying to get him to think about whether that makes any sense. It's just how he learned to say it, I guess.

clarkfan1979

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #81 on: October 16, 2015, 06:35:43 PM »
Anytime someone tries to assume something about me or tell me to buy something.

I bet you would like "x"

You should buy "x"

About 99% of the time they are wrong.

If they like it so much, they should buy it.

fattest_foot

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #82 on: October 16, 2015, 07:45:25 PM »
I'm going to give 110%.

Or really anything higher than 100%.

That's not how percentages work.

bsmith

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #83 on: October 16, 2015, 08:03:40 PM »
Agreed, although you CAN give 110% of what you gave yesterday, if you slacked some.

Oldsmobile

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #84 on: October 16, 2015, 08:46:43 PM »
It is what it is.

I detest this phrase for multiple reasons.  I consider it to be the equivalent of whatever.  My tendency is to discount people who use these phrases instead of doing things like thinking, or making a positive step toward changing it.

An ex-girlfriend said it frequently instead of doing anything to improve her situation.  We didn't last long.

Someone in my chain of command at work likes to use this also--instead of implementing solutions, he throws out that phrase. 


GreenSheep

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #85 on: October 16, 2015, 09:00:59 PM »
"low and behold" (there's no "w")

"The problem is is that" or "The question is is that" (Why, WHY do people repeat the word "is"???)

GreenSheep

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #86 on: October 16, 2015, 09:02:28 PM »
Starting a conversation with "To tell the truth", or "truthfully".  I always assume everything I'm going to hear after this is a lie.

I was taught never to say this in a job interview (or really ever) because it implies that ONLY RIGHT NOW am I telling the truth; unless I preface my thought with "honestly" or "truthfully" or "to tell you the truth," I'm always lying.

JoeO

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #87 on: October 16, 2015, 09:59:19 PM »
I second, third, and fourth "could of / should of / would of"  -  I see it written all the time.

Any sentence with "[preposition] [person's name] and I" (i.e. using "I" as an object)  -   As in "...with my wife and I."

Using "me" as a subject - as in "Me and Bob went to..."

"very unique"
« Last Edit: October 16, 2015, 10:05:41 PM by JoeO »

Megma

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #88 on: October 16, 2015, 10:18:32 PM »
All of the above mentioned along with....

"fer se"  when they mean "per se"

Saying "then" when they mean "than". eg I have more then I used to"

Saying "Would of" when they mean "would have" eg  "I would of quite but I needed the money"

For some reason the last two have  exploded in popularity the past five or so years.

The correct contraction of "would have" being "would've" sounds very much like "would of" when it's spoken, so when people say it, it doesn't bother me BUT when some one writes it wrong it irritates me. Of is not a verb! I also have a very clear memory of learning about this specific thing in elementary school, so screwing it up to me means that you are an adult who isn't educated to even middle school level...

However nothing is worse than people saying "less" instead of "fewer." Countable and uncountable nouns is not that complicated. I see this ALL the time in advertising and it drives me crazy.
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TheBuddha

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #89 on: October 16, 2015, 10:35:27 PM »
Wow, I'm surprised so many of my pet peeves have made it into the thread already.

+1 to all of these:

"buddy" (especially when said to a complete stranger)

"very unique"

People around here say "WaRshington" instead of "Washington" sometimes. I don't understand why.

I don't know what dialect that is, but my grandmother used to say that too. She also "warshed" dishes.

" 'eck'cetera"

And the total abuse and overuse of the word "literally."

Nuculer.  Guaranteed to make you sound like a scientific ignoramus.

And my own:

  • "Google" as a verb meaning "search the internet for ___". Not everyone uses Google, I've been Google-free for ~7 years now. Just say "search" or "look up".
  • "Amount of [countable noun]" or "less [countable noun]"
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sheepstache

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #90 on: October 16, 2015, 10:44:03 PM »
Anytime someone tries to assume something about me or tell me to buy something.

I bet you would like "x"

You should buy "x"

About 99% of the time they are wrong.

If they like it so much, they should buy it.

People who narrate me. If I were feeling charitable I'd say they're doing that communication technique of re-phrasing what the person just said to show that they're listening and understand. But it gets weird when it's a. constantly wrong, or b. too much of a guess.
Me: It's a position with a lot of customers so you'd need to keep a cool head while making people happy.
Person: You're looking for someone to lay down the law.
Me: Well, no, I mean we do want the person to be self-directed, but it's more on the service side. We can't give special favors, but there are a lot of big personalities who we can't afford to offend.
Person: They need to be taken down a notch.
Me: Er...[more explanation]
Person: [acting nettled]
Like, some people just aren't good at comprehending things, but it feels like if they would just take a break from trying to tell you what you're saying, they might actually hear what you're saying.

Me: I'll have the chocolate cake please
Guy: You're a woman who likes sensual things.
Um, okay? It's like, if you already know me and want to say my lines for me, I don't even really need to be here.

bigstack

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #91 on: October 16, 2015, 10:49:19 PM »
for those complaining about "I could care less"...

do some research...it is like sarcasm based in yiddish...
also sayings like these are idioms.


get over it....and before you blow a gasket replying ..oy vey... "I could care less..."


stephQ

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #92 on: October 17, 2015, 12:12:29 AM »
"punkin" instead of "PUMPkin"

oneday

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #93 on: October 17, 2015, 01:30:32 AM »
Nuculer.  Guaranteed to make you sound like a scientific ignoramus.  Also renumeration instead of remuneration.  Guaranteed to make you sound like a financial ignoramus.

I honestly didn't know the word was actually remuneration.  Mind. Blown.
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Spiffsome

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #94 on: October 17, 2015, 03:08:13 AM »
People who 'action' items. "I'll action that issue right away."


shelivesthedream

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #95 on: October 17, 2015, 03:19:21 AM »
+1 to "veggies" (and, in a lesser way, "veg") but especially when people say "I'm a veggie" when they mean vegetarian. It really enrages me! You are neither five nor a vegetable.

On a similar note, when people say "I'm not a vegetarian, I'm a carnivore". YOU ARE AN OMNIVORE, DUMBASS. I have heard people use it jokingly ("I hate so many vegetables I'm practically a carnivore!") but many people seriously use it to describe non-vegetarian diets.

Also, "I'm a vegetarian but I eat fish". Er, no. We have a word for that already: pescatarian. (Even worse is "I'm a vegetarian but I eat chicken" - WTF?!

ETA: Also when people separate their sentences with "..." instead of ". " E.g. "How are you...did you see the rain earlier...it was really coming down...good thing I brought my umbrella...see you at the park later." There's one particular woman who does it on a professional Facebook group I'm in - drives me mad!!!
« Last Edit: October 17, 2015, 03:27:42 AM by shelivesthedream »

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #96 on: October 17, 2015, 03:36:24 AM »
for those complaining about "I could care less"...

do some research...it is like sarcasm based in yiddish...
also sayings like these are idioms.


get over it....and before you blow a gasket replying ..oy vey... "I could care less..."

I might be all alone here, but I can't tell if you're being sarcastic, or honestly upset. Poe's Law is biting me hard. Please clarify.

Nudelkopf

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #97 on: October 17, 2015, 06:12:17 AM »
And another thing. I realize this is probably a case of language shift as someone mentioned above, because it seems to be in general use by everyone at all education levels. But as an old guy it just makes be want to tell people to get a haircut! To wit:

The word "disrespected." "He disrespected  his co-workers"  This is the most made-up, bohunk use of a word I have ever heard. I consider it worse than "irregardless"
Ummm... We use this all the time with our students. E.g. "You're being disrespectful". Or is it the disrespected part?

h82goslw

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #98 on: October 17, 2015, 06:12:59 AM »
"fleek"
"doe"
Any slang term that replaces "th" with a D.

And my absolute worst... "Bae"

Dude, where are you from?  I have never even heard those words!

If I didn't have multiple teenage kids in my house I would never know those words either.  Bae is a very popular word now. 

Nudelkopf

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Re: The things people say...that irk you
« Reply #99 on: October 17, 2015, 06:17:22 AM »
"fleek"
"doe"
Any slang term that replaces "th" with a D.

And my absolute worst... "Bae"

Dude, where are you from?  I have never even heard those words!

If I didn't have multiple teenage kids in my house I would never know those words either.  Bae is a very popular word now. 
I'm pretty sure they're common even amongst not-teenagers. Pretty much anyone who uses the internet, right?