Author Topic: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.  (Read 2398 times)

ice_beard

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #50 on: January 11, 2019, 01:46:24 PM »

I've cheapened out on ski equipment and am wondering if that is a good idea.  I've  skied on the same equipment for 20 years.  After about 10 they won't check the release on your bindings.  I've disregarded this and just don't get them checked anymore since I'm doing low level skiing but always wondered if I was cheaping out on my safety. 

I've got a set of modern alpine bindings, un-used I'll send you cheap.  I'm not using them, they are sitting in my garage getting older. 
I don't remember the make/model, but they are a major brand and were bought new at a ski shop end of season in like 2015 or 16.  PM me if interested. 

The "new" shaped skis make skiing so much easier, IMHO, they've probably saved skiing itself as most people new to snow sports were gravitating towards snowboarding over skiing up until those skis came out and made the learning curve much flatter.  I know if I was still skiing the trash heap ski hills of the Midwest (grew up skiing in ski Mecca of Indiana) I would probably be rockin' the most difficult skis I could find in order to make that 250' of elevation a challenge.  Ever thought about telemark skiing?  It's a blast.  I could set you up with a tele setup too!!

 

Askel

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #51 on: January 11, 2019, 02:43:50 PM »
I know if I was still skiing the trash heap ski hills of the Midwest

Hey, you be nice now! I'll have you know that we are now home to the 2nd best ski resort in the country: 

https://www.10best.com/awards/travel/best-ski-resort-2018/

Let that lack of editorial oversight sink in for a few minutes.  ;)   

TrMama

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #52 on: January 11, 2019, 02:44:43 PM »
@skp  I'm newly very risk adverse wrt equipment (see my post above for the reason) and if those were my skis, I'd replace at least the bindings and boots. However, since newer used gear is so cheap, it's probably easier to just pick up some newer skis that also have newer bindings.

Bindings that don't release when you fall are a big risk to your joints and bones because the ski makes an excellent lever. However, the opposite is also a problem. If the binding releases (or breaks) when it shouldn't, you'll fall unexpectedly. When you're a kid and your joints are still rubbery, this isn't really a problem. It's also not much of a problem if the hill you're skiing is pretty flat. However, if you're on a steep slope, you could fall face first a long ways and if you're "mature" you may not bounce back very quickly.

skp

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #53 on: January 11, 2019, 03:19:53 PM »
I think I will buy new skiis at the end of the season.  They should last me until I retire from skiing.

Daisy

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #54 on: January 12, 2019, 01:58:23 AM »
I got the IKON pass this year for $600. I plan to ski around 30 days. That's $20/day. Not bad for a Florida girl!

I make my own breakfast and pack a lunch for the mountain. I usually take sturdy vegetables like celery and carrots and a can of sardines and an apple. It's very easy to eat my homemade lunch at the restaurants/lodges on the mountains. Eat your frugal lunch while everyone else overpays for a burger or salad.

Pro-tip I received from another skier - bring your own powdered cocoa and get some free hot water on the mountain to make your own hot chocolate.

I try to stay at a hostel if alone, or rent a condo with friends. It's always nice to have a kitchen. I try to eat in as much as possible, unless swayed by friends to eat out occasionally. My one splurge would be a beer at apres-ski.

I splurged on custom boots about 10 years ago (no rental boots or off the shelf boots would fit my weird foot/calf ratio). I had the boots inspected last year and they are as good as new! I bought new skis at an end of season sale around 7 years ago so I don't need to rent equipment.

Ski towns usually have free transportation throughout the ski resort area.

Travel hack the flights.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 02:03:28 AM by Daisy »

Hula Hoop

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #55 on: January 12, 2019, 03:08:30 AM »
Love these posts. My father grew up in rural Scandinavia and used to ski to his village school during the winter, ski to his friend's houses and generally just ski around town.  No one had cars back then and this is just how people got around. 

He immigrated to the US but is still very comfortable on a pair of cross country skis and straps them on whenever it snows.  However, he thinks down hill skiing is completely insane.  Skiing is a mode of transport for him and why on earth would anyone want to hurtle down hill at a million miles per hour, chop down all the trees and build chair lifts.  Not to mention spend $$$ on skis and ski gear (his dad used to make his skis out of wood).  My mother took me down hill skiing as a kid and he was terrified ("remember what happened to Sonny Bono!")


Anyway, thanks for putting this into words for me.  Skiing is indeed a very practical way to get around for people who live in snowy climates but it has unfortunately also become this  snobby and expensive industry that is horrible for the environment.

I went down hill skiing a few times during my non-mustachian days and agree that it is fun.  But the culture and industry that surrounds it is pretty non-mustachian.  Frankly, I'd rather put that money towards FIRE. 
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 03:14:05 AM by Hula Hoop »

Askel

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #56 on: January 14, 2019, 08:04:48 PM »
Oof. Season startup is always rough. 

Lessee...

$156.13 Not one, but TWO pairs of NNN BC boots. I'm in a panic because all my duckbills are down for the count. I may send one pair back as it overlaps with an existing, but less sexy pair I already own.   

$73 Finally made it over to the shoe repair guy 100 miles away. It was a down payment on getting two pairs of those boots I refuse to give up on back in service.

$299.95 1 pair Madshus Epoch 68 skis.   I miss the days when people couldn't give stuff like this away and it could be found for pennies on the internet.   

The good news is the warranty claim on my heavy ski boots is looking good. The bad news is the boots they replaced are probably going to get fixed. And I just bought new NNN BC boots to replace the replacements anyway.   

I'll leave out the $33 breakfast, $54 bar tab, and $27 of gas to go fatbiking with the wife and friends this weekend. It was a mandatory good time. ;)   


peeps_be_peeping

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #57 on: January 14, 2019, 08:13:49 PM »
I spent $0 to ski at my local club-operated town hill on Sunday. There were high winds so they couldn't operate the chairlifts. Only the T-Bar was running so they reduced the non-member lift ticket price and gave $0 lift tickets to club members like me. I did not buy any snacks or drinks. The snow wasn't half bad either.

Linda_Norway

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #58 on: January 15, 2019, 12:53:52 AM »

$299.95 1 pair Madshus Epoch 68 skis.   I miss the days when people couldn't give stuff like this away and it could be found for pennies on the internet.   

In Oslo the big skiing clubs have a ski market where parents can buy and sell children's skis for low prices. We once found some good quality backcountry skis there, very used. They were donated by a couple who bought new ones and thought the old ones were to good to ditch. Such places usually have some pairs for adults as well, but you won't have the biggest choice.

Askel

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #59 on: January 15, 2019, 06:45:37 AM »
Yeah, we have the same thing here. Unfortunately, that class of ski is kind of a niche here and the people who do buy them tend to ski them until there's nothing left. 

I'd been keeping an eye on the second hand markets for something similar since October but nothing ever came up at the right time. 

Much Fishing to Do

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #60 on: January 15, 2019, 09:11:12 AM »
Our (admittedly modest) slopes have a season lift pass for $500.  Sure you can spend a ton off money on buying/replacing ski equipment but thats not necessary, there are ski swap used sales, and if you take care of your equipment it can last a very long time, so I think this can be small.

For someone fired who has the time to go often and loves it it doesn't seem that bad a spending choice to me.

driftwood

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #61 on: January 15, 2019, 02:02:50 PM »
Askel, thanks for the opportunity to throw my opinion on the internet.

TLDR - me blabbing about my skiing setup

I won't ever claim that the backcounty skiing I used to do or the downhill resort skiing I do now is mustachian at all. I've tried to do it mostly cheaply though, but that's not the same thing.

I've been through a few pairs of brand new boots, tried choosing myself, tried having an 'experienced' ski shop person help me choose... all pairs tore up my feet. Then I saw an ad for a ski shop selling old rental boots, bought a pair for $15. Holy shit my feet were in heaven! Those boots have been from the Snowbowl in AZ to Switzerland. I finally wore the bottom off and they couldn't clip into skis. :-( But I used the almighty power of the internet to find the exact same old model on eBay so now I'm on my second iteration of heaven. I am sad that when these die, that old model will probably not exist anywhere and I'll have to find a new pair.

I've also gone through multiple sets of skis... I've done telemark and alpine and then regular downhill setups. My current skis cost $20 from goodwill. They match my skiing ability very well, so I'm happy with them. I also know that no one in their right mind would ever steal those old pieces of shit, so that's nice as well. But then again my ski poles cost $120 I think.

And then there's the cost of lift tickets. I've been through some long dry spells when I didn't live near a place to ski. I finally won the skiing lottery though - got stationed in Colorado springs, I get the Epic Pass for $99, which is UNLIMITED visits to all Vail resorts for the whole season. HOLY FUCK! Yeah it's a big deal to me. I got stuck on a broken chairlift a few weeks ago at Vail for maybe 30ish minutes... I get off the lift and they give us all a pair of vouchers for lift tickets. That's pretty cool, but I was more excited about the hot chocolate voucher they gave us too. Until later, I look up these lift tickets, and they're charging $199 per lift ticket for one day. HOLY FUCKING SHIT THAT'S INSANE! And now I look at the other skiers now and wonder if they're paying that mad price to ski. If I had to pay that I'd quit skiing. So I'm obviously very thankful for the circumstances that are allowing me to ski for relatively cheap.

My clothes setup is all over the price map. Bought goggles new with swappable lenses,  but a $15 garage sale helmet. I wear mountaineering pants (probably cost $150-$200 in 2010), and a $90 hoodie, under a big $50 Walmart jacket. Mittens maybe $15. I definitely go with what works best, and I've gotten a lot better at looking at shiny expensive new gear and then walking away and finding a better option. I've started to really appreciate it when I have the feeling of the 'perfect' gear/clothes setup as opposed to the newest, cutting-edge technology, most baddassest setup.

I'd say the whole experience of backcountry skiing to a yurt or cabin, using an outhouse with a full moonlit-snow-covered view better than the view that many millionaires have was pretty incredible and hard to beat. But on the other hand the amount of downhill time I can get in a day at a groomed place is pretty incredible. Backcountry skiing was a cool way to travel in winter, but spending hours walking uphill and doing snow checks for avalanche danger just to ski down a 10-20 min run wasn't nearly as fun. More peaceful and magical though.

I saw it mentioned how there may be judgement about having old gear, but I've only noticed it when I used to ski with snowblades. Other than that, I think people may notice, but most don't give a shit. They want to ski/snowboard and that's what they're there for.

draco44

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #62 on: January 16, 2019, 08:10:09 AM »
Casual, 1-3x/year downhill skier here. For me it's about maximizing slope time and minimizing expenses. Others touched on this with comments about bringing in your own food, but my specific strategy is to stuff all of the pockets of my coat with snacks and a PB&J sandwich or two for those precious few days while I am on the slopes. No time or money wasted buying overpriced food in the resort cafeteria or trekking back to the parking lot to your car, you can grab a bite on the chairlift if you want, and if you happen to fall, well, you just have a bit of extra padding.

Dr Kidstache

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #63 on: January 16, 2019, 08:48:17 AM »
I am loving this thread. I've just taken up skate skiing this winter (moved somewhere with groomed trails just outside my door plus a couple nordic centers in town) and am taking lessons with a women's group in town. Also bought some snowshoes for tromping around the neighborhood with my dog.
I'm a former snowboarder, currently learning to downhill ski instead due to a disability that's easier to adapt for skiing. I'd love to be able to downhill ski more but it's costly and restricted because I can only go on days that I can participate in the adaptive program. My hope, though, is that I'll be able to mainstream by next winter and be able to get a season pass which will cut costs considerably.

2microsNH

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #64 on: January 16, 2019, 04:18:13 PM »
I'm so happy to find this thread! I've been obsessed with XC skiing for the past two years... I've lived in New England and snowshoed here for 17 years, and two years ago finally bought a decent pair of metal-edged XC skis and boots, and I'm so obsessed it's distracting... when we have snow, the only thing I can think about is getting out on my skis. I'm also a cyclist and most of my friends have fat bikes for winter, but I'm just not interested in cycling all winter -- I'd rather ski.

I'll ski anywhere; if my skis will glide on it, I'll ski it. Last week I started in 1" of fresh snow that was slush by the time I finished (snow had turned to rain), and it was a blast. I have a pair of battered rock skis for the crappy-snow days and for skiing on roads and gravelly rail trails. I prefer trails and logging roads because I love the quiet and solitude, but I'll pay for a day on groomed trails occasionally if I want a different experience.

I live in southern NH and it's been really sad seeing the winters here change so much.... every winter storm used to bring at least some snow, but the past three years we've gotten a ton of rain and sleet all winter. Even in the monster storm hitting New England this Sunday, my town will start with snow and then likely change over to rain / mix. I anticipate eventually moving north where the snow is still decent.

On a related note, it drives me nuts when people complain about the snow or describe a snowstorm as "bad" weather. I judge people who use that language very harshly.

skp

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #65 on: January 16, 2019, 04:32:56 PM »
[qu  On a related note, it drives me nuts when people complain about the snow or describe a snowstorm as "bad" weather. I judge people who use that language very harshly.
[/quote]

LOL We say that all the time.  If you don't like snow why are you living in the snow belt of Ohio.  But on the other hand I get not liking to drive in the stuff, so my compromise is, let's coexist, I'm OK if it doesn't snow a foot,  as long as  it doesn't rain, and the temp doesn't go above 35.

Linda_Norway

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #66 on: January 17, 2019, 07:18:34 AM »
I prefer the snow to fall occasionally, but in big quantities. Then we need to clean it sometimes, but not every day.

dude

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #67 on: January 17, 2019, 07:34:55 AM »

Now, a fantastic cultural and phenomenal ski trip to Japan can be had for a relatively reasonable price...  but that's another thread!!!

@ice_beard, I did a Hokkaido ski trip a few years ago for my birthday -- one of the best trips of my life! Everything about that place is magical. The trip included 2 days of cat-assisted (i.e., the 'cat hauled us 45 minutes up the snow covered road to the base of a big cirque/mountains, and we skinned and skied surrounding terrain from there) and staying in a mom-and-pop onsen lodge on the Sea of Japan -- absolutely incredible! Been plotting a return to Japan ever since.  Hopefully next season.

SEAK

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #68 on: January 17, 2019, 10:32:42 AM »
I absolutely love all forms of skiing. Grew up in Alaska cross country and downhill skiing, switched to snowboarding in college, learned to telemark ski while teaching our kids to ski, and now have come full circle and mostly cross country and downhill ski. Best part of my job is when I use cross country skis to access our streamgage sites here in Alaska.

We mostly piece together used ski gear for ourselves and the kids. I haven't found skiing to be terribly expensive. Rates at our local city owned ski area are subsidized by the city and the local cross country trails are maintained by a local non-profit. And there are plenty of areas around to just go explore without trails.

Askel

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #69 on: January 18, 2019, 02:11:30 PM »
Another payday, another hundred bucks.

$57 on tubes and rim strips to undo a tubeless conversion on the used fat bike I bough.  Another $40 on new lowers and baskets for my Black Diamond Traverse poles. 

These poles have actually been a fairly decent investment. I tend to fall on my poles a lot, so they get bent. With these, I can just replace the bent lower every other year and the baskets roughly ever 4.   And I can adjust them from 155cm to 110cm- perfect for long stride XC or getting low and aggressive on the downhill.  About the only thing they don't really work for is skate. 

Askel

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #70 on: January 18, 2019, 02:12:36 PM »
Oh, and the good news is my warranty claim went through and one set of ski boots is back in action!  May be able to stay on 3 pins for the foreseeable future. 

cookielover

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #71 on: January 20, 2019, 12:15:25 AM »
I love downhill skiing.  We live about 2 hour away from a great NW ski resort.  SO and I get season passes every year and go to ski about 15 days a year.  After the initial investment on ski gears, clothes, and vehicle related upgrade (snow tires, ski box, etc), the cost each year is not that bad.  We try to ski cheaply.  We buy season passes with discount before season starts; we bring our snack and lunch, and we ski at least 5 to 6 hours whenever we go up to the mountain.  We usually buy medium to high quality new ski gears, usually at the end of the season. For us skiing is long term investment.  We get to spend quality bonding time together, exercise all day, and enjoy beautiful sceneries.  We plan to keep skiing until we are too old to ski, and hope we ski more after I retire.

Linda_Norway

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #72 on: January 20, 2019, 01:51:25 AM »
I don't know if it counts as winter sports, but last night we walked through the forest and the snow to the neighbouring village and made dinner on a campfire near a lake, just beyond the houses. That gave a 2 hour excercise and a nice way of having dinner.

Linda_Norway

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Re: The mustachian skiing (and other non motorized winter sports) thread.
« Reply #73 on: January 21, 2019, 04:35:46 AM »
Both on Friday and on Sunday we went CC skiing close to home. On Friday the snow conditions were quite good, because we were in higher terrain. On Sunday there was minimal with snow and it was good that we used our old skies. Stones and other stuff came through the tracks in many places.

On Friday I was still a bit sick and had to stick to a short trip at slow speed. DH got heart rhythm trouble. On Sunday it went much better with both of us.