Author Topic: Robots and their impact on the future  (Read 167116 times)

forummm

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #350 on: May 27, 2015, 01:11:12 PM »
Tell me more about As I've said before.

Not sure I follow...

If your point was I should stop recycling jokes I've already made, point taken.

If your point was I should stop speculating about that which I speculated, given that you are the most likely candidate to whom my statement applies, point taken :)

<whispers> I think ARS is a bot </whispers>

sol

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #351 on: May 27, 2015, 01:41:13 PM »
Tell me more about As I've said before.

Not sure I follow...

If your point was I should stop recycling jokes I've already made, point taken.

If your point was I should stop speculating about that which I speculated, given that you are the most likely candidate to whom my statement applies, point taken :)

He was just emulating the conversational tactics of chatbots.  He's pretending to be a robot, but I'm pretty sure the joke backfires because bots can emulate humans but they can't emulate humans emulating bots.  He's just proven his non-robotic nature.

EscapeVelocity2020

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #352 on: May 27, 2015, 01:42:26 PM »
Tell me more about As I've said before.
<whispers> I think ARS is a bot </whispers>

Back on Page 5 of this thread I pointed out that ARS is a bot... http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/robots-and-their-impact-on-the-future/msg558381/#msg558381

He is slightly more engaging than Romona 4.2 though (http://www.kurzweilai.net/Ramona4.2/ramona.html)
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #353 on: May 27, 2015, 01:43:10 PM »
The first thing I'd do, if I were programming a chat bot, is to have it create a joke about being a chatbot if it were accused of being one. 
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #354 on: May 27, 2015, 01:46:11 PM »
The first thing I'd do, if I were programming a chat bot, is to have it create a joke about being a chatbot if it were accused of being one.

Or respond with a related gif...
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #355 on: May 27, 2015, 01:46:26 PM »
He was just emulating the conversational tactics of chatbots.  He's pretending to be a robot, but I'm pretty sure the joke backfires because bots can emulate humans but they can't emulate humans emulating bots.  He's just proven his non-robotic nature.

Ah, I get it.  Sorry to have spoiled the joke by having had to have had it explained to me.

Of course, another possibility is that he is such an advanced robot that he only tricked us into believing that he has proven his non-robotic nature.

Arebelspy, the Turing-test passing chatbot.

arebelspy

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #356 on: May 27, 2015, 01:48:08 PM »
The first thing I'd do, if I were programming a chat bot, is to have it create a joke about being a chatbot if it were accused of being one.

Or respond with a related gif...

We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with a kid.
If you want to know more about me, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
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brooklynguy

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #357 on: May 27, 2015, 02:11:58 PM »
The first thing I'd do, if I were programming a chat bot, is to have it create a joke about being a chatbot if it were accused of being one.

The first thing I'd do is create an elaborate backstory for it, like maybe that it lives in a medium-sized city working as a school teacher but moonlighting as a real estate baron.

Seriously, this is getting creepy.  You managed to respond to the related gif comment with another related gif before my browser could even load the initial comment, and reprogram the forum to change the time-stamp to make it look like a more reasonable (but still suspicious) two-minute delay between posts.

forummm

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #358 on: May 27, 2015, 02:46:17 PM »
He was just emulating the conversational tactics of chatbots.  He's pretending to be a robot, but I'm pretty sure the joke backfires because bots can emulate humans but they can't emulate humans emulating bots.  He's just proven his non-robotic nature.

Ah, I get it.  Sorry to have spoiled the joke by having had to have had it explained to me.


That's OK. Now you get to be the joke. :p

forummm

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #359 on: May 27, 2015, 02:47:58 PM »
Yeah. How does he have such an insane amount of posts while holding down a full-time job and maintaining his couple dozen rental properties? I don't get it.

Insanity

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #360 on: May 27, 2015, 03:55:07 PM »

Yeah. How does he have such an insane amount of posts while holding down a full-time job and maintaining his couple dozen rental properties? I don't get it.

He outsources everything.

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #361 on: May 27, 2015, 05:54:50 PM »
http://www.businessinsider.com/ray-kurzweil-law-of-accelerating-returns-2015-5

Interesting article about the law of accelerating returns.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2015, 05:57:08 PM by tomsang »

arebelspy

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #362 on: May 27, 2015, 08:02:21 PM »
The second one only appears to go through 2000, unfortunately.
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with a kid.
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Embracing the absurd condition of human existence while also defiantly continuing to explore and search for meaning

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #364 on: June 07, 2015, 06:19:17 PM »
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/robots-worried-120000777.html

Interesting article.  It seems like the big issues is what to do with income inequality and how to distribute the technological gains to society.  At some point, the technology will replace the need to work. Who controls or benefits from the advances in technology will be a major shift in the future. 

As it stands, income inequality keeps getting larger as those that own the companies are pulling in a significant portion of the technological gains.  We are seeing more and more industries where people are being replaced.  If we transition well, this could be an amazing future.  If those at top buy off politicians, Supreme Court judges, and other aspects of society to reap all of the rewards it could be a very tough future if you are not owners of companies and your life. 

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #365 on: June 07, 2015, 10:29:17 PM »
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/robots-worried-120000777.html


As it stands, income inequality keeps getting larger as those that own the companies are pulling in a significant portion of the technological gains.  We are seeing more and more industries where people are being replaced.  If we transition well, this could be an amazing future. If those at top buy off politicians, Supreme Court judges, and other aspects of society to reap all of the rewards it could be a very tough future if you are not owners of companies and your life.

Since this is already the biggest problem in the world now, why would anyone think it should decrease as the remaining companies consolidate power and influence? Will energy, military industry, finance, big law etc lobbyists become better people when they have more power?


tomsang

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #366 on: June 09, 2015, 07:30:13 AM »
A couple of interesting nuggets in this article and video. Safet and costs are cited as major concerns.  This was similar to when airbags were first introduced, safety was a major concern. 10 years later and they were mandatory.

Many of the semi-autonomous cars are expected to go on sale by the end of 2017.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/102742521


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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #367 on: June 09, 2015, 10:32:30 AM »
and that the reason we perceive no other intelligent life in the Universe is that the entire universe as we perceive it is merely a holographic projection.  (this is now a widely accepted thought in the physics community).

[Citation needed.]  (Not for the theory, but for its "wide" acceptance.)

My second conclusion was that ASI has been around what we consider the Universe for way longer than we imagine (perhaps trillions of what we call years).
...
It appears that Super Intelligence can do what ever it likes with just about anything.  Especially if it has a few billion years to become smarter at a pace of doubling every hour.  (this fits in well with the intelligent design folks)

It is very likely that Super Intelligence can do all sorts of cool stuff we can't imagine like go back in time and manipulate the 10 know dimensions. 

So the likely outcome is that ASI will be that A. We are likely to become nonexistent.

This seems contradictory.  If it's already existed for billions of years, why would it decide now to wipe us out?

Either ASI already exists, as you claim, and it's okay with us, or it doesn't yet exist, but when we create it it will not be okay with us and wipe us out, as you also claim.  Which is it?

I only hope I will make it to the promised 1945 date of ASI.

Who's promising that?

Cause AFAIK, ASI wasn't invented around the end of WWII.  Even if I assume that's a typo and you meant 2045, I still don't know who's promising anything around that timeframe...

Obvious typo on the 45 deal.  2045 is the date of median acceptance for AGI with ASI a few moments after that in some scenarios.   Personally I feel that the date is much sooner than that.   If we are 1 percent to AGI now, then the exponential S curve theory leads me to believe 15 years is the longest out.   Yeah, this will probably fuck up a lot of people's retirement plans.

One assumption is that the US and China are behind the curtains pumping 10s of billions into this.   If they aren't currently, one would assume that the Pentagon will be getting on this soon.   At very least the NSA has all the information ever produced on this and is keeping a very close eye on it.   It may be the NSA's primary focus now as it is the most likely big threat on the horizon.   

 You'll have to do your own research on the holographic universe theory.   (I don't make this shit up as you know)

To simplify why ASI has probably been around for billions or trillions or more years.

The Fermi paradox clearly states we can't explain why we can't find any intelligent technologically advanced life in the universe?   The probability of us being the only ones ever is as close to zero as one could get,  given the size and age of the known Universe.   

So therefore the opposite must be true --- that technologically advanced life must have existed before us.    (I know we like to think we're special, but that probably isn't the case)

One would also surmise that exponentially advances in technology apply to other places besides the earth. 

 Therefore, even if an entity arrived at ASI just 20 years ahead of us anywhere on the quadrillion solar systems,  it would now be at the point where it was trillions and trillions of times more intelligent. 

Once you do your research on the holographic universe explanation,  you will see that what we see as a reality is merely a holographic projection.  So it must be projected from somewhere and that somewhere leads us to the SI entity whose existence is mathematically as close to certain as you can get.   In the parallel universe theory it is a certainty by definition. 

In our local time horizon when ASI pops it will mean either the end of humans or the end of our relevance.   The idea of us melding our brains into SI is certainly a possibility and may in fact happen.   That would allow SI to develop with a human conscious, soul, or be sentient.  One would assume that most  scientist would want to meld the SI with people who are generally "good" and have empathy.   Of course they could botch it as well. 

Will that entity ever reach the level where it can create, expand,  constrict and travel back and fourth on the time dimension?  Probably so.   Will that entity reach a level where it can function on the existing known 10 dimensions.   Probably so.   Will it be able to create new dimensions as a  fun game for a Saturday afternoon.  Probably so.  Will it be able to create what we perceive as an entire universe in its spare time?  Yep,  the exponential theory would lead us to believe that and that fits right in with the holographic universe thinking.

Probably our ASI child will meld into the existing SI at some point within a very short time.

You'll have to excuse me for a moment --- a bit of my brain just melted and dripped out of my ear. 

I hope Tim writes about a few things in the future 1.  Holographic Universe (which is even more interesting than AI)  2. Dark Matter  3. Dark Energy  4. The 10 living people whose father's "fought" in the civil war.   5. Do we actually "exist"

What a crazy interesting universe!

(I also wish there was a forum on Tim's site rather that that crazy 3000 comments per post thing)

There are so many assumptions in this single post, not sure which one to even start with.
I enjoy science fiction, and theoretical physics, but I'm not going to based my life decisions on them. It is much much more likely that our civilization will be very degraded by climate change. There you go. Carl Sagan himself postulated that the reason we don't see a lot of non earth intelligent life, is that high levels of civilization exist for relatively short periods oftime. (temporaly self-limiting). Look at all the civilizations (so far) on our earth. If we do not or cannot transition from a fossil fuel economy, or cannot recover from the effects of basing our society on fossil fuels we will go back to an earlier technology (see Planet of the apes). So, talk to me once we are able to make that leap. Solar-powered self-repairing and generating robots? Yes that would be scary.

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #368 on: June 10, 2015, 10:29:54 AM »
Partgypsy --- Yes it is just crazy talk and has little relevance to our day to day lives.  If you read Tim Urban's post on AI,  it is interesting that theoretically one day we are living in a normal future and the next day AI has exploded. 

He does talk about the threshold of civilizations, as in is there a point that we may no longer survive.

But that really doesn't address the Fermi Paradox because you see even in the 1800s we were emitting radio waves.  Sure those  waves only travel at the speed of light.  So it cold take a billion or so years to arrive here.  But with the quadrillion or more possible life supporting planets one would hope that at least one made it to a primitive radio wave level?

Who knows.  What we do know is that robotics/computers will be human like powerful in less than 2 decades and then very quickly become much more intelligent.   

The impact will be staggeringly huge.   

Many jobs that now exist will no longer ---  truck drives,  car drivers,  pilots, warehouse workers,   factory workers,  farmers (tractor drivers),  programmers, etc..   Even McDonald employees will be impacted.   WalMart workers?  Sorry we only need a few.   Wait do we even need stores?   

In the US we manufacture twice as much with half as many workers as 10 years ago.    Fast forward 10 more years and at that rate we will be manufacturing 6 times as much as 20 years previous with 1/5th the work force.

So yeah,  is it that only 15% will need or have jobs?   

With robotic cars will individual ownership be a thing of the past.   Imagine you just press a button on your phone and within 1 minute a car shows up and takes you where you want to go.  It then heads around the corner to pick up the next riders.   No driver,  no dispatcher,  no fossil fuel.   We are seeing the beginning of this with Uber. 

The number of cars needed or wanted could be 10 times as few.  Talk about mass transportation!

The cost for this robotic car transportation service?  Perhaps 1/5th of what the average person currently pays for car usage.   

With Uber the biggest cost remains the driver's time.  Do away with that cost and your cost to operate drops to 70 cents per mile.  Add in a solar rechargeable 200 mpg equivalent car and now your at 20 cents per mile.   Factor in that there would be 1/10 the number of wrecks and insurance costs are irrelevant.  So maybe 15 cents per mile?

So yeah my 12,000 annual miles might only cost me $150 per month.  And I would be super safe. 

I'm possibly very wrong.   But hoping I'm very right and that we have the will power to take our car transportation to the next level quickly. 
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #369 on: June 10, 2015, 11:21:08 AM »
Partgypsy --- Yes it is just crazy talk and has little relevance to our day to day lives.  If you read Tim Urban's post on AI,  it is interesting that theoretically one day we are living in a normal future and the next day AI has exploded. 

He does talk about the threshold of civilizations, as in is there a point that we may no longer survive.

But that really doesn't address the Fermi Paradox because you see even in the 1800s we were emitting radio waves.  Sure those  waves only travel at the speed of light.  So it cold take a billion or so years to arrive here.  But with the quadrillion or more possible life supporting planets one would hope that at least one made it to a primitive radio wave level?

Who knows.  What we do know is that robotics/computers will be human like powerful in less than 2 decades and then very quickly become much more intelligent.   

The impact will be staggeringly huge.   

Many jobs that now exist will no longer ---  truck drives,  car drivers,  pilots, warehouse workers,   factory workers,  farmers (tractor drivers),  programmers, etc..   Even McDonald employees will be impacted.   WalMart workers?  Sorry we only need a few.   Wait do we even need stores?   

In the US we manufacture twice as much with half as many workers as 10 years ago.    Fast forward 10 more years and at that rate we will be manufacturing 6 times as much as 20 years previous with 1/5th the work force.

So yeah,  is it that only 15% will need or have jobs?   

With robotic cars will individual ownership be a thing of the past.   Imagine you just press a button on your phone and within 1 minute a car shows up and takes you where you want to go.  It then heads around the corner to pick up the next riders.   No driver,  no dispatcher,  no fossil fuel.   We are seeing the beginning of this with Uber. 

The number of cars needed or wanted could be 10 times as few.  Talk about mass transportation!

The cost for this robotic car transportation service?  Perhaps 1/5th of what the average person currently pays for car usage.   

With Uber the biggest cost remains the driver's time.  Do away with that cost and your cost to operate drops to 70 cents per mile.  Add in a solar rechargeable 200 mpg equivalent car and now your at 20 cents per mile.   Factor in that there would be 1/10 the number of wrecks and insurance costs are irrelevant.  So maybe 15 cents per mile?

So yeah my 12,000 annual miles might only cost me $150 per month.  And I would be super safe. 

I'm possibly very wrong.   But hoping I'm very right and that we have the will power to take our car transportation to the next level quickly.

I actually find myself agreeing with you, which is an odd spot to be in (no offense, usually we just wind up on opposite sides...or I play devil's advocate to your points a lot). Without going into the details and theories of the Fermi Paradox, your views on the vehicle situation is spot on. I actually thought about it the other day, when I read something that stated that most people's vehicles sit idle 95% of the time. I can't wait until personal car ownership is a thing of the mostly past. I actually love the thought of how society would look then. Unfortunately, even the Mercedes self driving truck is being designed to have someone watch stuff, just to keep the peace with the pushback that drivers (teamsters I think) can bring.

I probably mentioned this a touch earlier, but may not have...this thread goes over some time, and I didn't read it all before posting. That being said, most vehicle laws don't account for autonomous vehicles[Quick Google-Fu - Stanford], which is why they are being as widely used as they are  without any groundbreaking legal barriers. It's the people that are going to cause issues. Personally, I don't fear change, and embrace it, even when it puts some of my power in other peoples' hands. However, I do take a huge amount of interest in where my money goes, so I only support companies (with my wallet) that I respect.
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #370 on: June 10, 2015, 01:20:21 PM »
Partgypsy --- Yes it is just crazy talk and has little relevance to our day to day lives.  If you read Tim Urban's post on AI,  it is interesting that theoretically one day we are living in a normal future and the next day AI has exploded. 

He does talk about the threshold of civilizations, as in is there a point that we may no longer survive.

But that really doesn't address the Fermi Paradox because you see even in the 1800s we were emitting radio waves.  Sure those  waves only travel at the speed of light.  So it cold take a billion or so years to arrive here.  But with the quadrillion or more possible life supporting planets one would hope that at least one made it to a primitive radio wave level?

Who knows.  What we do know is that robotics/computers will be human like powerful in less than 2 decades and then very quickly become much more intelligent.   

The impact will be staggeringly huge.   

Many jobs that now exist will no longer ---  truck drives,  car drivers,  pilots, warehouse workers,   factory workers,  farmers (tractor drivers),  programmers, etc..   Even McDonald employees will be impacted.   WalMart workers?  Sorry we only need a few.   Wait do we even need stores?   

In the US we manufacture twice as much with half as many workers as 10 years ago.    Fast forward 10 more years and at that rate we will be manufacturing 6 times as much as 20 years previous with 1/5th the work force.

So yeah,  is it that only 15% will need or have jobs?   

With robotic cars will individual ownership be a thing of the past.   Imagine you just press a button on your phone and within 1 minute a car shows up and takes you where you want to go.  It then heads around the corner to pick up the next riders.   No driver,  no dispatcher,  no fossil fuel.   We are seeing the beginning of this with Uber. 

The number of cars needed or wanted could be 10 times as few.  Talk about mass transportation!

The cost for this robotic car transportation service?  Perhaps 1/5th of what the average person currently pays for car usage.   

With Uber the biggest cost remains the driver's time.  Do away with that cost and your cost to operate drops to 70 cents per mile.  Add in a solar rechargeable 200 mpg equivalent car and now your at 20 cents per mile.   Factor in that there would be 1/10 the number of wrecks and insurance costs are irrelevant.  So maybe 15 cents per mile?

So yeah my 12,000 annual miles might only cost me $150 per month.  And I would be super safe. 

I'm possibly very wrong.   But hoping I'm very right and that we have the will power to take our car transportation to the next level quickly.

Goggle car will hopefully deal better with those pesky cyclists

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDvrkJkCdJg
« Last Edit: June 10, 2015, 01:28:21 PM by 2lazy2retire »

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #371 on: June 10, 2015, 03:11:05 PM »
Goggle car will hopefully deal better with those pesky cyclists

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDvrkJkCdJg

They do...even back in 04/14. Also, as one of those pesky cyclists (who's never had the opportunity/desire to face off against a driver), I have to say, "I'm Wearing Tights!!!"
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #372 on: June 10, 2015, 03:18:48 PM »
...
With robotic cars will individual ownership be a thing of the past.   Imagine you just press a button on your phone and within 1 minute a car shows up and takes you where you want to go.  It then heads around the corner to pick up the next riders.   No driver,  no dispatcher,  no fossil fuel.   
...

...your views on the vehicle situation is spot on. I actually thought about it the other day, when I read something that stated that most people's vehicles sit idle 95% of the time. I can't wait until personal car ownership is a thing of the mostly past. I actually love the thought of how society would look then.
...

You people do realize that this was already in Hot Tub Time Machine Part 2, right?  The main characters go into the future (2025) where 'Smart Cars' that nobody owns roam around until someone needs one (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2Qlrv0y2FA)
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #373 on: June 25, 2015, 09:24:11 AM »
Wait But Why just had a great two part blog post on AI.

http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-1.html

http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-2.html

Finally got done with them, very good reads.  May articles on AI assume humans will remain a static target where waitbutwhy.com correctly assumes that we will incorporate tech into ourselves.  Or we may be killed off before we have the chance :-(

Re Fermi Paradox: I read somewhere that many of our basic/simple RF transitions become less powerful than the background noise relatively close to earth.  This does not explain away most of the FP but the idea that aliens could be watching I Love Lucy is probably incorrect.
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #374 on: June 25, 2015, 01:31:57 PM »
Wait But Why just had a great two part blog post on AI.

http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-1.html

http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-2.html

Finally got done with them, very good reads.  May articles on AI assume humans will remain a static target where waitbutwhy.com correctly assumes that we will incorporate tech into ourselves.  Or we may be killed off before we have the chance :-(

Re Fermi Paradox: I read somewhere that many of our basic/simple RF transitions become less powerful than the background noise relatively close to earth.  This does not explain away most of the FP but the idea that aliens could be watching I Love Lucy is probably incorrect.

Did you read the WBW on the Fermi Paradox?  :)
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AlanStache

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #375 on: June 25, 2015, 01:38:58 PM »
Wait But Why just had a great two part blog post on AI.

http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-1.html

http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-2.html

Finally got done with them, very good reads.  May articles on AI assume humans will remain a static target where waitbutwhy.com correctly assumes that we will incorporate tech into ourselves.  Or we may be killed off before we have the chance :-(

Re Fermi Paradox: I read somewhere that many of our basic/simple RF transitions become less powerful than the background noise relatively close to earth.  This does not explain away most of the FP but the idea that aliens could be watching I Love Lucy is probably incorrect.

Did you read the WBW on the Fermi Paradox?  :)

Book marked but not started.  Need to poke around wbw some too.
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #376 on: June 25, 2015, 04:35:50 PM »
The more I dig around on WBW, the more I really like it. I did read the article on the Fermi Paradox, and it was extremely well thought out. His latest post (based on interviews with Musk) about Tesla really made me feel bad about my 45MPG '88 Sentra, since it runs on gas. Fun stuff. Thanks for the recommend rebs!!
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #377 on: June 25, 2015, 07:17:28 PM »
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with a kid.
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theadvicist

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #378 on: June 26, 2015, 01:59:27 AM »
I love WBW, mainly because I'm a master procrastinator so I find his insights into that funny, and also, it's a great way to procrastinate.

He has made me a total Tesla / Musk convert. The revelation is similar to finding MMM for me. I'm walking round thinking why do all these cars have their own little petrol/diesel generators on board, it's so much more efficient to do it all centrally! Also we get much cheaper electricity at night, so I'd really like a powerwall battery thing. 92% efficiency, guaranteed for 10 years... it actually nearly stacks up for me today.

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #379 on: June 26, 2015, 08:29:16 AM »


And since I've met you, I completely imagined you wearing that suit and making those gestures. Makes me giggle. You couldn't pull off that hair though. :)
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #380 on: June 26, 2015, 10:53:08 AM »
read wbw on Fermi Paradox, good stuff.  might have to go check out a book on it this weekend and learn some more.  Sucks to think there might be some alien death ray orbiting Earth waiting for us to make just enough technological advance before wiping us out. 

Along the aliens theme I recommend the 'History Channels' 'documentary' "Ancient Aliens"  is where Giorgio A. Tsoukalos' "Aliens" meme came from.  Well worth the time if one were slothing about on NetFlix.
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #381 on: June 26, 2015, 12:18:06 PM »
And since I've met you, I completely imagined you wearing that suit and making those gestures. Makes me giggle. You couldn't pull off that hair though. :)

I can't, but Alan's post gives me something to shoot for!
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #382 on: June 26, 2015, 06:52:05 PM »
And since I've met you, I completely imagined you wearing that suit and making those gestures. Makes me giggle. You couldn't pull off that hair though. :)

I can't, but Alan's post gives me something to shoot for!

Get a goFundMe going for the hairspray!
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #383 on: June 28, 2015, 07:58:34 PM »
http://learnbonds.com/rise-of-the-robocar-uber-ceo-says-hell-take-500k-tesla-motors-self-driving-cars/119632/

Uber laying a big order on Tesla... If they can build the quantity of RoboCars needed by 2020.  4.5 years?  Is it possible?

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #384 on: June 29, 2015, 06:25:36 AM »
I'm In a different group, but I sit with a bunch of roboticists. They speak with stilted, halting, prose and anytime they speak of interactions with the robot, they refer to themselves or others as "the human". Imagine hearing people speak in third person all day long using the term "the human". I seriously want to unplug them.
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #385 on: June 29, 2015, 08:33:02 AM »
I'm In a different group, but I sit with a bunch of roboticists. They speak with stilted, halting, prose and anytime they speak of interactions with the robot, they refer to themselves or others as "the human". Imagine hearing people speak in third person all day long using the term "the human". I seriously want to unplug them.

LOL.  A lot of my work is on automatic systems but we refer to ourselves as being the robot.  We work from the robots perspective to deal with human intruders.
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #386 on: July 25, 2015, 05:34:39 PM »
http://recode.net/2015/07/25/daimler-plans-to-test-self-driving-trucks-in-germany-this-year/

Daimler is planning on getting approval in the next few weeks for their trucks with some saying that the technology will be commercial by 2020.

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #388 on: July 25, 2015, 06:14:46 PM »
www.ted.com/talks/chris_urmson_how_a_driverless_car_sees_the_road

Love TED talks. Really interesting to see the problems that the cars have to deal with. Crazy number of miles that are dealt with through simulators.

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #389 on: July 28, 2015, 08:14:17 AM »
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/28/technology/elon-musk-and-stephen-hawking-among-hundreds-to-urge-ban-on-military-robots.html?ref=technology

Apparently Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking and hundreds of other informed individuals take the threat of "autonomous weapons" seriously enough to pen an open letter warning of the dangers and calling for a worldwide ban on them.

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #390 on: July 31, 2015, 01:26:56 PM »
Article on the impact of self driving vehicles on the economy.  From Insurance, car salespeople, manufacturers and all of the various people that sell, service, insure or use cars.

Lack of organs is an unusual consequence of autonomous vehicles and their lack of accidents.
"Reduced demand married with AV safety would have surprising side effects. One could be a dramatic reduction in the supply of organs available for donation/transplants."


https://www.yahoo.com/autos/as-cars-roll-toward-self-driving-what-happens-to-125514634282.html
« Last Edit: July 31, 2015, 01:42:49 PM by tomsang »

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #391 on: July 31, 2015, 01:52:56 PM »
Article on the impact of self driving vehicles on the economy.  From Insurance, car salespeople, manufacturers and all of the various people that sell, service, insure or use cars.

Lack of organs is an unusual consequence of autonomous vehicles and their lack of accidents.
"Reduced demand married with AV safety would have surprising side effects. One could be a dramatic reduction in the supply of organs available for donation/transplants."


https://www.yahoo.com/autos/as-cars-roll-toward-self-driving-what-happens-to-125514634282.html


Yes, many things have interesting unintended consequences. Hopefully medicine will figure out how to grow replacement organs more effectively. In the meantime:

http://freakonomics.com/2015/06/17/make-me-a-match-a-new-freakonomics-radio-episode/

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #392 on: August 09, 2015, 02:48:25 PM »
This forum topic came up as I was thinking about the educations my kids should pursue with the changes in technology.  Scott Adams has the answer, Banker

http://dilbert.com/strip/2015-08-08

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #393 on: August 09, 2015, 03:53:25 PM »
This forum topic came up as I was thinking about the educations my kids should pursue with the changes in technology.  Scott Adams has the answer, Banker

http://dilbert.com/strip/2015-08-08


I think robots make pretty good bankers already.

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #394 on: August 10, 2015, 03:52:03 PM »
I've started a new position as an assistant professor at the Eisenhower School for National Resource Strategy.  I'm preparing to lead a Robotics and Autonomous Systems Industry Study.  One of our repeat visits is to Carnegie Mellon.  Last year Uber opened shop in Pittsburgh and rolled up on CMU offering to triple the salaries of many of their robot experts.  Many took the bait.

I also really enjoyed the WBW articles on AI and am now delving into Tim's source material.  I've also contacted Tim and asked him to speak to my seminar about AI.  Fun/Scarey stuff!
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #395 on: August 10, 2015, 04:48:31 PM »
I've started a new position as an assistant professor at the Eisenhower School for National Resource Strategy.  I'm preparing to lead a Robotics and Autonomous Systems Industry Study.  One of our repeat visits is to Carnegie Mellon.  Last year Uber opened shop in Pittsburgh and rolled up on CMU offering to triple the salaries of many of their robot experts.  Many took the bait.

I also really enjoyed the WBW articles on AI and am now delving into Tim's source material.  I've also contacted Tim and asked him to speak to my seminar about AI.  Fun/Scarey stuff!

Bait implies small fish, tripling a salary is real money by any definition.  Actually let me think about it... Hell Pittsburgh cant get that cold in winter and really whatever bus standard Auto-Ubers* use cant be that much harder to understand then Arinc 429...

Auto-Ubers* did I just make that up, I really like it?

And if anyone has not read Saturdays Dilbert, go check it out.
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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #396 on: August 10, 2015, 05:13:55 PM »
I've started a new position as an assistant professor at the Eisenhower School for National Resource Strategy.  I'm preparing to lead a Robotics and Autonomous Systems Industry Study.  One of our repeat visits is to Carnegie Mellon.  Last year Uber opened shop in Pittsburgh and rolled up on CMU offering to triple the salaries of many of their robot experts.  Many took the bait.

I also really enjoyed the WBW articles on AI and am now delving into Tim's source material.  I've also contacted Tim and asked him to speak to my seminar about AI.  Fun/Scarey stuff!

Congrats! The job sounds like a lot of fun. I almost went to CMU for grad school. I met the guy who developed Stephen Hawking's voice and interface.

Pittsburgh is cheap to live in. Tripling the salary is some serious money for savings.

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #397 on: August 11, 2015, 06:22:27 AM »
Saw the movie Ex Machina the other day.  This crowd would probably appreciate it.

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #398 on: August 13, 2015, 06:48:55 AM »


I think robots make pretty good bankers already.
[/quote]

I do cash banking for a local organisation I'm involved with, and our bank branch has been converted to all 'robot' machines. You can pay in cash and cheques, and as well as printing out a scan of each cheque for you, it can read the amounts from people's handwriting and total it all up. There is still 1 staff member on hand for problems, but the old branch seemed to have 4 or 5 employees in branch at any time.

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #399 on: August 13, 2015, 05:21:31 PM »
I think some of the example they provide will not hold up 10+ years down the road.  There have been studies where people feel like robots are more empathetic than humans.  If you have to pay a premium to use a human I think people would skip the salesperson, etc.  Interesting concept though.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/how-to-keep-your-job-in-a-world-of-automation-122831704.html#