Author Topic: Robots and their impact on the future  (Read 356401 times)

By the River

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1700 on: July 10, 2018, 08:10:08 AM »
yep there are jobs we just dont have the skills to fill the jobs currently and this will continue to increase over time as we drop menial labor jobs in favor of automation - like truck drivers what marketable skill do they have - or fry cooks - they could potentially move to more upscale restaurants and be cooks.  but as we automate jobs away and more skills are required to do the new jobs employers may be forced into doing more  training and bring in people with better soft skills/EQ that have an apptitude to learn. 

So whats the outcome of this- employers may start doing testing of potential employees to understand their apptitude for learning.  In the engineering world its not uncommon to test potential hires on the skill set but a basic apptitude or IQ or EQ test could be the new norm to obtain a job since the employer will be forced to commit extra resources to training.  It may also come with a pay back clause to keep you around or you forfeit some of the cost to train you.  similar to college reimbursement plans.

Agree with what you say but the basic IQ test has been effectively outlawed as a job requirement (Supreme Court case Griggs vs. Duke Power).   An unforeseen effect was that companies couldn't test so they took a college degree in lieu of an IQ test which led to many jobs requiring degrees which do not need one, leading to increased student debt, yada, yada, yada.   However, specific knowledge tests are still allowed which allows the engineering aptitude or other job specific tests

boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1701 on: July 10, 2018, 08:11:02 AM »
yep there are jobs we just dont have the skills to fill the jobs currently and this will continue to increase over time as we drop menial labor jobs in favor of automation - like truck drivers what marketable skill do they have - or fry cooks - they could potentially move to more upscale restaurants and be cooks.  but as we automate jobs away and more skills are required to do the new jobs employers may be forced into doing more  training and bring in people with better soft skills/EQ that have an apptitude to learn. 

So whats the outcome of this- employers may start doing testing of potential employees to understand their apptitude for learning.  In the engineering world its not uncommon to test potential hires on the skill set but a basic apptitude or IQ or EQ test could be the new norm to obtain a job since the employer will be forced to commit extra resources to training.  It may also come with a pay back clause to keep you around or you forfeit some of the cost to train you.  similar to college reimbursement plans.

I can see things going this way, too, and I worry about the folks who fall "below the line" as that line continues to rise.  Since we value work not just for earning a living, but as part of identity and a measure of value to society, the folks who are shut out are going to have hard time.  Maybe defending against this is why so-called "bullshit jobs" are on the rise?

how old are you - the millenial generation does not identify and measure value based on their profession like the previous generations did.  Most of my generation identifies with the activities and things we enjoy doing in life not who gives us the money to allow us to do those things.  So while this may be more difficult for previous generations to grasp i believe the way the younger crowd is trending the job is part of my life identity wont be a hurdle.  the hurdle will be paying those that fall below that line a UBI.

I'm a Gen X'er, so I understand what you're saying -- though I think it's risky to over-generalize.  Boomers are going to be around a long time, and they vote.  I expect them to continue to see the world through the lens of their own values, and judge those who don't conform to their view of things.  That's a significant drag against something like UBI, gov't guaranteed jobs, or even subsidized re-training.

correct thats why i said the biggest hurdle will be UBI you can include other socialist issues as well.  but thats where the hurdle will lie

TempusFugit

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1702 on: July 11, 2018, 04:48:26 PM »
Agree with what you say but the basic IQ test has been effectively outlawed as a job requirement (Supreme Court case Griggs vs. Duke Power).   An unforeseen effect was that companies couldn't test so they took a college degree in lieu of an IQ test which led to many jobs requiring degrees which do not need one, leading to increased student debt, yada, yada, yada.   However, specific knowledge tests are still allowed which allows the engineering aptitude or other job specific tests

That's exactly correct, IMO.  This is why a good percentage of 'students' in college really have no business being there.  It isn't their fault, it's that companies use a college degree (in almost anything) as a proxy for an IQ test.  Now a degree is basically a 'job license'. 

There are lots of things that fall into the category of 'unintended consequences' and this would appear to be one. 

The elimination of lower wage jobs will be another as the fight for higher a minimum wage prices those humans out of the market. Not only are the employers motivated by cost reduction in terms of automation vs human beings, but as a society we are all becoming more and more comfortable with machine interaction over human interaction anyway, which boosts sales. 

I was surprised by the results of putting those ordering terminals on the tables at fast-casual restaurants, which showed an increase in sales.  Making the ordering of dessert, etc, an impulse decision eliminates the speed bump of waiting for the server to come by and also the potential social pressure of people who might benefit from skipping a dessert feeling embarrassed to do so.

TempusFugit

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1703 on: July 11, 2018, 05:10:44 PM »
Listened to a radiolab podcast the other day that was about the Turing test and how much closer we are today to having chatbots that can pass.

https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/more-or-less-human

In some of their conclusions about why we are so much closer now to being unable to differentiate machine from person, they speculated that our interaction with technology - our phones primarily: think autocomplete, etc - is making us think and communicate more like machines rather than it being purely a matter of the machines being more able to mimic us.  Our communication curve is bending downward (or machineward) just as the machines' is bending upward. 

I thought that was an interesting possible factor.  I also think that part of the issue is that in the modern world, when we are corresponding electronically with an actual real-world human being, there's a really good chance that that person is not a native English speaker, or are from a different cultural background, and therefore we have all had to start adapting to interactions with people who have issues with our natural language and communication.  We expect some difficulties and make allowances.

Idiomatic expressions, for example, are problematic in many workplaces due to this kind of barrier.  Regional slang or references to erstwhile common cultural touchpoints is also no longer effective.  I can't make Seinfeld references in my office and expect everyone to know what I'm talking about.  I can't reference something from US culture a decade ago, like a common toy or TV show, or even political events. So my communication style has definitely changed.  It is more plain now.  It lacks the old 'flavor' that would have made it more 'human' in some ways. 

I think that was an obvious point in the context of that discussion, but I'm also (perhaps cynically) pretty sure they didn't want to mention that for obvious reasons.

tomsang

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1704 on: July 12, 2018, 03:20:22 PM »
Interesting take on the robot human interaction TempusFugit.

I see the changes in communication when you communicating to my children through text.  They think it is funny that I capitalize and put punctuation. 

Younger employees tend to communicate through IM vs. face to face even if I am sitting next to them. 

Robots are going to be able to blend in fine as we are mudding up our ways of communication.

swampwiz

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1705 on: July 12, 2018, 04:00:00 PM »
What is amazing is the butterfly effect of this unfortunate death.  This could change the entire ride share future.  Uber coukd lose market share to another company with better tech.  Self driving systems will most certainly be much better now, thry have no choice but to improve.  The death of that individual could cause improvements that will save thousands of lives in the future.

The death of a pedestrian has always been expected, so had this not happened, it would have happened someplace, sometime else.

tomsang

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maizeman

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1707 on: July 13, 2018, 09:16:26 AM »
Definitely worth the read. Also I clearly went into the wrong field: "It was by far the largest fee I had ever been offered for a talk — about half my annual professor’s salary — all to deliver some insight on the subject of 'the future of technology.'"

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They started out innocuously enough. Ethereum or bitcoin? Is quantum computing a real thing? Slowly but surely, however, they edged into their real topics of concern. Which region will be less impacted by the coming climate crisis: New Zealand or Alaska? Is Google really building Ray Kurzweil a home for his brain, and will his consciousness live through the transition, or will it die and be reborn as a whole new one? Finally, the CEO of a brokerage house explained that he had nearly completed building his own underground bunker system and asked, “How do I maintain authority over my security force after the event?” The Event. That was their euphemism for the environmental collapse, social unrest, nuclear explosion, unstoppable virus, or Mr. Robot hack that takes everything down. This single question occupied us for the rest of the hour.

lost_in_the_endless_aisle

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1708 on: July 15, 2018, 08:26:31 PM »
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/07/11/survival-of-the-richest-the-wealthy-are-plotting-to-leave-us-behind.html

Interesting take on the future.
Very worthwhile read, though suffering (and benefiting) from taking a very particular point of view on the issue.

One argument against the mantra here (stop amassing wealth once you have enough to glide through retirement) is we don't know what new products and capabilities will be on offer in e.g. 40 years. If brain uploads/potential effective immortality (ignoring the the philosophical questions for now) are available then for $5M, should we save more now just in case?

Johnez

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1709 on: July 16, 2018, 02:39:08 AM »
Interesting article on AI and the human mind:

https://aeon.co/essays/are-humans-really-blind-to-the-gorilla-on-the-basketball-court

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Deciding what is relevant and meaningful, and what is not, are vital to intelligence and rationality. And relevance and meaning continue to be outside the realm of AI (as illustrated by the so-called frame problem). Computers can be programmed to recognise and attend to certain features of the world – which need to be clearly specified and programmed a priori. But they cannot be programmed to make new observations, to ask novel questions or to meaningfully adjust to changing circumstances. The human ability to ask new questions, to generate hypotheses, and to identify and find novelty is unique and not programmable. No statistical procedure allows one to somehow see a mundane, taken-for-granted observation in a radically different and new way. That’s where humans come in.

toganet

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1710 on: July 16, 2018, 09:09:10 AM »
https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/future-of-organizations-and-work/ai-automation-and-the-future-of-work-ten-things-to-solve-for

Cool article with some forecasts of how automation will impact work between now and 2030, and some recommendations on what to solve for.  For the impatient, the 10 things are:

  • Ensuring robust economic and productivity growth.
  • Fostering business dynamism.
  • Evolving education systems and learning for a changed workplace.
  • Investing in human capital.
  • Improving labor-market dynamism.
  • Redesigning work.
  • Rethinking incomes.
  • Rethinking transition support and safety nets for workers affected.
  • Investing in drivers of demand for work.
  • Embracing AI and automation safely.

lost_in_the_endless_aisle

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1711 on: July 17, 2018, 07:14:24 PM »
Interesting article on AI and the human mind:

https://aeon.co/essays/are-humans-really-blind-to-the-gorilla-on-the-basketball-court

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Deciding what is relevant and meaningful, and what is not, are vital to intelligence and rationality. And relevance and meaning continue to be outside the realm of AI (as illustrated by the so-called frame problem). Computers can be programmed to recognise and attend to certain features of the world – which need to be clearly specified and programmed a priori. But they cannot be programmed to make new observations, to ask novel questions or to meaningfully adjust to changing circumstances. The human ability to ask new questions, to generate hypotheses, and to identify and find novelty is unique and not programmable. No statistical procedure allows one to somehow see a mundane, taken-for-granted observation in a radically different and new way. That’s where humans come in.
Thanks for sharing that, the notion of the Suchbild is familiar to me but I never knew there was a word for it! It very much reminds of of Donald Hoffman's discussion on (e.g. the hard problem of consciousness [Hoffman is on for about 30 minutes but David Chalmers is also worthwhile; Daniel Dennett is funny since he acts like a total asshat as usual!]). Hoffman argues in favor of an explanation based on conscious-realism (there are only conscious agents) that perhaps can be taken to suggest that there are only Suchbilds of various conscious agents that reflect the fitness function of those agents.

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...in 2008 Chris Anderson, then editor of Wired, boldly proclaimed ‘the end of theory’, as the ‘data deluge makes the scientific method obsolete
The refutation, mentioned in the article, of this notion by Popper more than 40 years prior to Anderson's assertion is amusing and quite convincing. At work, I had "Lean Six Sigma" training that seemed to hinge a bit too much on the step Collect ALL the Data and pray it magically tells you what is wrong.

maizeman

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1712 on: August 16, 2018, 08:34:28 PM »
A grocery store in Arizona is going to start offering home delivery of groceries using self driving cars rather than having a human do so.

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he technology is supplied by Nuro, a self-driving vehicle startup founded by two veterans of Google's self-driving car project. ... That vehicle, known as the R1, is significantly smaller and lighter than a conventional passenger car. ... A smaller, lighter vehicle would do less damage if it ever ran into something. The vehicle's maximum speed of 25 miles per hour also makes serious injuries less likely.

Less exciting or dramatic than some of the stories posted to this thread, but happening as we speak.

https://arstechnica.com/cars/2018/08/kroger-launches-autonomous-grocery-delivery-service-in-arizona/

boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1713 on: August 17, 2018, 05:36:07 AM »
A grocery store in Arizona is going to start offering home delivery of groceries using self driving cars rather than having a human do so.

Quote
he technology is supplied by Nuro, a self-driving vehicle startup founded by two veterans of Google's self-driving car project. ... That vehicle, known as the R1, is significantly smaller and lighter than a conventional passenger car. ... A smaller, lighter vehicle would do less damage if it ever ran into something. The vehicle's maximum speed of 25 miles per hour also makes serious injuries less likely.

Less exciting or dramatic than some of the stories posted to this thread, but happening as we speak.

https://arstechnica.com/cars/2018/08/kroger-launches-autonomous-grocery-delivery-service-in-arizona/

I would say this is super exciting. Grocery stores will essentially turn into mini warehouses and auto fill small robot cars like this in local neighborhoods.

TempusFugit

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1714 on: August 17, 2018, 07:31:40 AM »
A grocery store in Arizona is going to start offering home delivery of groceries using self driving cars rather than having a human do so.

Quote
he technology is supplied by Nuro, a self-driving vehicle startup founded by two veterans of Google's self-driving car project. ... That vehicle, known as the R1, is significantly smaller and lighter than a conventional passenger car. ... A smaller, lighter vehicle would do less damage if it ever ran into something. The vehicle's maximum speed of 25 miles per hour also makes serious injuries less likely.

Less exciting or dramatic than some of the stories posted to this thread, but happening as we speak.

https://arstechnica.com/cars/2018/08/kroger-launches-autonomous-grocery-delivery-service-in-arizona/

I would say this is super exciting. Grocery stores will essentially turn into mini warehouses and auto fill small robot cars like this in local neighborhoods.

Almost a decade ago, I worked with a few friends and contracted with this particular grocer to develop and prototype some of their technology.  Not this particular project, mind you, but stuff that does involve replacing humans by offloading the work to the customer with a technological helper.   That project is only now being deployed across the country - and I'm sure it's much changed since my involvement. 

The interesting thing that I learned during that experience with this specific company is just how much money they spend on R&D.  What most of us would probably think of as a staid, 'old fashioned' industry is actually pushing a lot of technological boundaries.   

maizeman

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1715 on: August 17, 2018, 07:36:34 AM »
Almost a decade ago, I worked with a few friends and contracted with this particular grocer to develop and prototype some of their technology.  Not this particular project, mind you, but stuff that does involve replacing humans by offloading the work to the customer with a technological helper.   

I'm guessing self-checkout systems?

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The interesting thing that I learned during that experience with this specific company is just how much money they spend on R&D.  What most of us would probably think of as a staid, 'old fashioned' industry is actually pushing a lot of technological boundaries.

Yeah I wouldn't have though of grocery stores has a high R&D industry, but it kind of makes sense. When a good profit margin is 3% and the industry average margin in 1%, anything that reduces your cost of doing business or lets you charge a bit more is going to have dramatic effect on your take home profits.

robartsd

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1716 on: August 17, 2018, 12:08:21 PM »
A grocery store in Arizona is going to start offering home delivery of groceries using self driving cars rather than having a human do so.

Quote
he technology is supplied by Nuro, a self-driving vehicle startup founded by two veterans of Google's self-driving car project. ... That vehicle, known as the R1, is significantly smaller and lighter than a conventional passenger car. ... A smaller, lighter vehicle would do less damage if it ever ran into something. The vehicle's maximum speed of 25 miles per hour also makes serious injuries less likely.

Less exciting or dramatic than some of the stories posted to this thread, but happening as we speak.

https://arstechnica.com/cars/2018/08/kroger-launches-autonomous-grocery-delivery-service-in-arizona/

I would say this is super exciting. Grocery stores will essentially turn into mini warehouses and auto fill small robot cars like this in local neighborhoods.
Almost a decade ago, I worked with a few friends and contracted with this particular grocer to develop and prototype some of their technology.  Not this particular project, mind you, but stuff that does involve replacing humans by offloading the work to the customer with a technological helper.   That project is only now being deployed across the country - and I'm sure it's much changed since my involvement. 

The interesting thing that I learned during that experience with this specific company is just how much money they spend on R&D.  What most of us would probably think of as a staid, 'old fashioned' industry is actually pushing a lot of technological boundaries.   

Once grocery stores are essentially mini-warehouses, they will be consolidated to a city or regional warehouse (most chains already have a distribution center that could become the origin point for autonomous delivery). Amazon Fresh will eventually force the grocery space to either sell the grocery shopping "experience" in neighborhood stores or invest in directly competing with delivery on demand services. I do see the potential for at least two delivery brands (one focused on top quality and high customer service, the other focused on best value) in most markets. I think warehouse stores will remain serving people who are looking for saving by purchasing larger quantities at once. I can't predict what will happen to discount grocery stores - it could be that the quality of produce is low enough that their shoppers won't want to delegate the task of selecting specific items. If discount groceries shut down, "food deserts" may become even more of a problem for low income households if minimum order sizes are too high, or reliable internet access is not available to them.

boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1717 on: August 17, 2018, 01:52:41 PM »
Aldi's produce is not bad and doesn't have to be picked over. This idea that discount grocers have subpar products is hilarious. 

dougules

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1718 on: August 21, 2018, 11:05:24 AM »

dougules

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1719 on: August 21, 2018, 11:17:27 AM »
Grocery stores make a lot of money off of impulse purchases if I remember correctly.  How will automated delivery affect that?

boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1720 on: August 21, 2018, 11:37:46 AM »
Grocery stores make a lot of money off of impulse purchases if I remember correctly.  How will automated delivery affect that?

us frugal people will pay more b/c there wont be a reason to have loss leaders anymore.  I personally think the frugal chains will thrive in this environment b/c they've worked their prices down and pre packaged produce so you buy a bag of 3 green peppers or a group of this or that everything is packaged for unit pricing already and made affordable with little sales.

BrightFIRE

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1721 on: August 21, 2018, 01:16:37 PM »
Aldi's produce is not bad and doesn't have to be picked over. This idea that discount grocers have subpar products is hilarious.

Sometimes it does. But I don't find that to be unique to Aldi. My local major chain grocery often has quite terrible produce (unripe tomatoes in tomato season, rotting herbs, moldy berries), which is why I hardly ever shop there.

I personally have never liked any of the "shop for you" delivery options of fresh produce because they aren't as discerning as I am about quality/ripeness/etc.

dougules

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1722 on: August 22, 2018, 10:52:26 AM »
Aldi's produce is not bad and doesn't have to be picked over. This idea that discount grocers have subpar products is hilarious.

Sometimes it does. But I don't find that to be unique to Aldi. My local major chain grocery often has quite terrible produce (unripe tomatoes in tomato season, rotting herbs, moldy berries), which is why I hardly ever shop there.

I personally have never liked any of the "shop for you" delivery options of fresh produce because they aren't as discerning as I am about quality/ripeness/etc.

I'm not particularly impressed with Aldi's produce.  Sometimes they have good stuff, but their fruit is generally very green.  They also go for looks over flavor.  In their defense that's a very common problem even sometimes with higher end grocery stores.  It may also depend on where you are geographically. 

The point is, though, that I would not want to buy produce sight unseen.  You don't know if you're getting anything good.  A green cantaloupe and brown bananas are a bad purchase at any price. 

boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1723 on: August 22, 2018, 10:58:46 AM »
Aldi's produce is not bad and doesn't have to be picked over. This idea that discount grocers have subpar products is hilarious.

Sometimes it does. But I don't find that to be unique to Aldi. My local major chain grocery often has quite terrible produce (unripe tomatoes in tomato season, rotting herbs, moldy berries), which is why I hardly ever shop there.

I personally have never liked any of the "shop for you" delivery options of fresh produce because they aren't as discerning as I am about quality/ripeness/etc.

I'm not particularly impressed with Aldi's produce.  Sometimes they have good stuff, but their fruit is generally very green.  They also go for looks over flavor.  In their defense that's a very common problem even sometimes with higher end grocery stores.  It may also depend on where you are geographically. 

The point is, though, that I would not want to buy produce sight unseen.  You don't know if you're getting anything good.  A green cantaloupe and brown bananas are a bad purchase at any price.

i'd think this problem would remedy itself quickly with better selection to prevent returns b/c that drive up costs to the store alot.

Goodidea

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1724 on: August 22, 2018, 07:47:28 PM »
Grocery stores make a lot of money off of impulse purchases if I remember correctly.  How will automated delivery affect that?

Online stores are getting much better at upsells and retargetting.

To mock a checkout counter with a bunch of impulse snacks, chap sticks, magazines, etc...I imagine an online store could have a pre-checkout page with a bunch of random items in a grid that could be added to the cart last minute before purchase. I don't see this on Amazon much, but try registering a domain on GoDaddy or some business cards on Vistaprint. Right before you buy, you're met with a wall of cheap personalized add-on products with 1 click to add. It works.

On retargetting - a lot of grocery shoppers change their mind when it comes to the checkout line and restocking carts of "go-backs" is a regular part of a grocery worker's job. Imagine being able to ask the customer over the course of the following weeks if they want to now buy the things they left behind. Online stores can do this.

I was in a grocery store yesterday, which has been gutted from 30 checkout stands to only 6 cashier's active during busy hours. Self checkout handles 3/4 of the customers now. I feel the grocery store experience will be gone one day, so it made me appreciate my time in there. It was weird.

boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1725 on: August 22, 2018, 07:54:17 PM »
Not having self check out has always confused me at Aldi since they package everything. Well almost there is some weight things now but it would be so much faster.  Unless they've timed it and determined their cashier's are faster bc they are really quick.

maizeman

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1726 on: August 22, 2018, 07:58:59 PM »
Yeah, a lot of online stores seem to be masters of the "last minute offer" right as you click checkout and I suspect this could rapidly compensate for the loss of impulse purchases in the checkout lane.

Also, the median grocery store spends about 10% of net revenue on labor* being able to cut even a proportion of that spending from fewer cashiers and less employee time spent facing, cleaning up spills, restocking (as Goodidea pointed out already) etc would do wonders for profits if average margins are only 1% of revenue.

*Or maybe 13.5%? It's not clear to me if spending on benefits is a subset of spending on labor or in addition to it. Here's the source I'm using if you want to decide for yourself. http://www.workforce.com/2004/01/30/labor-and-benefits-expenses-in-supermarkets/

boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1727 on: August 22, 2018, 08:02:59 PM »
Amazon is already doing grocery delivery with now. They bought whole foods and opened warehouses near almost all metro areas. It's really a matter of time before our food comes from places like this. They have the warehouseing and logistics to do this. Aldi bought a lot of the old toys Rus stores. I don't know about you guys but I've not seen an aldi the size of a typical toys r us. Could they be prepping for the new game

TempusFugit

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1728 on: August 31, 2018, 07:41:29 AM »
Another article regarding the way our near constant interaction with algorithms and machines is affecting how we communicate with other humans as well. 

https://medium.com/s/story/how-facebook-has-flattened-human-communication-c1525a15e9aa

It should be no time at all before machines pass the Turing test, because humans are communicating more and more like machines every day.   

maizeman

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1729 on: September 24, 2018, 07:44:34 PM »
AI is beginning to replace more service jobs around the world. This article talks about how in China a lot of front desk workers at hotels are starting to be replaced by facial recognition technology.

Quote
The bosses haven’t yet introduced facial recognition technology at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel. But from her perch behind the front desk at the pink neo-Moorish palace overlooking Waikiki Beach, Jean Te’o-Gibney can see it coming. “Marriott just rolled it out in China,” enabling guests to check into their rooms without bothering with front-desk formalities, said Ms. Te’o-Gibney, a 53-year-old grandmother of seven. “It seems they know they will be eliminating our jobs.” Similar fears simmer throughout Marriott’s vast network of hotels, the largest in the United States.
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Unlike manufacturing workers, whose jobs have been lost to automation since as far back as the 1950s, workers in the low-wage portion of the service sector had remained until now largely shielded from job-killing technologies. Many earned too little to justify large capital costs to replace them. A typical hotel or motel desk clerk earns just over $12 an hour, according to government data; a concierge just over $13.50. And many of the tasks they perform seemed too challenging to automate. Technology is changing this calculus.

Source and full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/24/business/economy/hotel-workers-ai-technology-alexa.html

boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1730 on: September 24, 2018, 07:48:04 PM »
Makes complete sense. Probably saves them more than the wages. I can talk my way into perks I shouldn't receive at the front desk every time I check in esp if it's at a hotel I stay at a lot.