Author Topic: Robots and their impact on the future  (Read 330763 times)

Just Joe

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1650 on: April 04, 2018, 09:59:35 AM »
http://www.euronews.com/2018/04/03/russian-postal-drone-spectacularly-crashes-on-inaugural-flight

Looked like the wind got ahold of it once it cleared the buildings. Try again folks...

lost_in_the_endless_aisle

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1651 on: April 04, 2018, 06:13:42 PM »
http://www.euronews.com/2018/04/03/russian-postal-drone-spectacularly-crashes-on-inaugural-flight

Looked like the wind got ahold of it once it cleared the buildings. Try again folks...
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Just Joe

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1652 on: April 05, 2018, 08:40:02 AM »
Funny! So that was testing the effects of a large bird strike on Russian drones? ;)

Back to the drawing board folks...

maizeman

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1653 on: April 26, 2018, 09:18:08 PM »
I remember a poster years ago here here or on the ERE forums who said renting out cabins to scientists was a major source of local revenue in the alaskan bush. Now robots are reducing the need for both scientists scattered across Alaska, and presumably the potential to FIRE through building cabins in the interior of alaska to rent to scientists.

Quote
Once deployed across the state, the $1.2 million machines, built by Finnish company Vaisala, will save about 8 hours of forecaster time a day—and about $1 million a year at NWS, Buchanan says. That's because the agency tries to staff each remote site with three people, but job vacancies mean overworked employees are shuffled around the vast state to keep up. "We have a difficult time recruiting people to go to these locations," Buchanan says. Recently, some stations have skipped scheduled launches.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/04/robot-launched-weather-balloons-alaska-hasten-demise-remote-forecast-stations

maizeman

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1654 on: May 08, 2018, 08:14:45 PM »
The new google duplex service can handle calling businesses, pretending to be a real human being, to schedule appointments to check about hours.

Listen to the first couple of audio clips at the linked site (the article itself is way too long and detailed). Knowing the caller is a robot, it's kind of obvious, but if I hadn't been prompted to listen for something weird I think both of those calls could have passed for conversations between two human beings:

https://ai.googleblog.com/2018/05/duplex-ai-system-for-natural-conversation.html

boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1655 on: May 09, 2018, 07:04:08 AM »
google is ready to roll out their self driving fleet in phoenix as well.

https://www.wired.com/story/waymo-self-driving-car-service-phoenix/

assuming its cheaper than uber/lyft i would assume it will be a hit.

article says GM wont be far behind with plans for 2019. 
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tomsang

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1656 on: May 21, 2018, 02:15:55 PM »

boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1657 on: May 21, 2018, 02:30:34 PM »
Now robots are making humans organs!

https://nypost.com/2018/05/21/robots-can-now-grow-human-organs/

sweet - once you can grow a tiny organ in 20 minutes with a robot how long does it take to scale this to full size organs?   we went from 1 day for a human to 20 mins for a robot.  so to scale it to a full size functioning human organ it takes a robot a week? a month? doesnt really matter how long at this point just have to scale it
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TempusFugit

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1658 on: May 21, 2018, 05:10:34 PM »
Now robots are making humans organs!

https://nypost.com/2018/05/21/robots-can-now-grow-human-organs/

sweet - once you can grow a tiny organ in 20 minutes with a robot how long does it take to scale this to full size organs?   we went from 1 day for a human to 20 mins for a robot.  so to scale it to a full size functioning human organ it takes a robot a week? a month? doesnt really matter how long at this point just have to scale it

Wait.. so does this mean that 9 robots can have a baby on one month?

sol

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1659 on: May 21, 2018, 05:59:39 PM »
Wait.. so does this mean that 9 robots can have a baby on one month?

This year, sure.

Next year, 4.5 robots will be able to have a baby in two weeks.
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Mr Mark

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1660 on: May 24, 2018, 01:18:02 AM »
This is just the beginning. The fast food industry is ripe for being robotised. Here's a cute video of a Japanese ice cream robot.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TNqcSFgrTJY

24/7, sterile, perfect portion control, on demand.

I think it's a good thing - do we really need to waste human talent flipping burgers and serving ice cream confectionary?
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Bateaux

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1661 on: May 24, 2018, 02:37:37 AM »
Uber just took a huge step backwards in the race to autonomous service.  I'm sure competition will take full advantage.
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tomsang

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1662 on: May 24, 2018, 08:34:08 AM »
Uber just took a huge step backwards in the race to autonomous service.  I'm sure competition will take full advantage.

Yeah, the governor barred them from testing so their decision makes sense.  From watching the video, I wonder if it was a human driven car if the accident would have been avoided.  The pedestrian was hard to see.

boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1663 on: May 24, 2018, 09:12:35 AM »
Uber just took a huge step backwards in the race to autonomous service.  I'm sure competition will take full advantage.

Yeah, the governor barred them from testing so their decision makes sense.  From watching the video, I wonder if it was a human driven car if the accident would have been avoided.  The pedestrian was hard to see.

i thought the same thing but this was discussed at length and a human has better low light vision than that camera did- basically it wasnt as dark as the camera made it look.  While i still question it i think the human IF paying attention stops in time. 
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AlanStache

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1664 on: May 24, 2018, 10:18:16 AM »
Uber just took a huge step backwards in the race to autonomous service.  I'm sure competition will take full advantage.

Yeah, the governor barred them from testing so their decision makes sense.  From watching the video, I wonder if it was a human driven car if the accident would have been avoided.  The pedestrian was hard to see.

i thought the same thing but this was discussed at length and a human has better low light vision than that camera did- basically it wasnt as dark as the camera made it look.  While i still question it i think the human IF paying attention stops in time.

But in theory the lidar should have detected the obstacle and the control system stopped the car.  Merging and acting upon different sensors each with different noise/error profiles and acting appropriately is hard.
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boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1665 on: May 24, 2018, 10:25:21 AM »
Uber just took a huge step backwards in the race to autonomous service.  I'm sure competition will take full advantage.

Yeah, the governor barred them from testing so their decision makes sense.  From watching the video, I wonder if it was a human driven car if the accident would have been avoided.  The pedestrian was hard to see.

i thought the same thing but this was discussed at length and a human has better low light vision than that camera did- basically it wasnt as dark as the camera made it look.  While i still question it i think the human IF paying attention stops in time.

But in theory the lidar should have detected the obstacle and the control system stopped the car.  Merging and acting upon different sensors each with different noise/error profiles and acting appropriately is hard.

no it shouldnt have b/c it wasnt enabled - if enabled the lidar would have stopped the car i believe i dont think its a theory at this point lidar is very effective at its job and google is now rolling out a full fleet of driverless lidar cars in the same state.
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AlanStache

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1666 on: May 24, 2018, 11:36:30 AM »
....

no it shouldnt have b/c it wasnt enabled - if enabled the lidar would have stopped the car i believe i dont think its a theory at this point lidar is very effective at its job and google is now rolling out a full fleet of driverless lidar cars in the same state.

Yes exactly.  But the point was the difficulty in making a decision based on conflicting information; lidar says there is an object, camera says there is not.  The system must work out what to trust, when, while incorporating what is safe (stopping is not always safe) but not being so safe it never drives over 10mph.  All in all it would seem Uber has a hacked together amateur system if they thought disabling lidar would be good.
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boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1667 on: May 24, 2018, 11:49:00 AM »
....

no it shouldnt have b/c it wasnt enabled - if enabled the lidar would have stopped the car i believe i dont think its a theory at this point lidar is very effective at its job and google is now rolling out a full fleet of driverless lidar cars in the same state.

Yes exactly.  But the point was the difficulty in making a decision based on conflicting information; lidar says there is an object, camera says there is not.  The system must work out what to trust, when, while incorporating what is safe (stopping is not always safe) but not being so safe it never drives over 10mph.  All in all it would seem Uber has a hacked together amateur system if they thought disabling lidar would be good.

i dont know that its hacked together or that the low light tech isnt there.  Many companies including tesla are trying to move away from LIDAR if they can i belive due to the royalties they would have to pay google.  i could be wrong here but i think that new teslas have no LIDAR.
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maizeman

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1668 on: May 24, 2018, 12:32:48 PM »
I thought Tesla's didn't have lidar in the first place just because the sensor systems are so much more expensive than basically every other sensor you can put on a self driving car combined (radar/sonar/RGB cameras/infrared cameras etc).

Bateaux

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1669 on: May 24, 2018, 12:45:40 PM »
What is amazing is the butterfly effect of this unfortunate death.  This could change the entire ride share future.  Uber coukd lose market share to another company with better tech.  Self driving systems will most certainly be much better now, thry have no choice but to improve.  The death of that individual could cause improvements that will save thousands of lives in the future.
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Watchmaker

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1670 on: May 24, 2018, 01:26:35 PM »
What is amazing is the butterfly effect of this unfortunate death.  This could change the entire ride share future.  Uber coukd lose market share to another company with better tech.  Self driving systems will most certainly be much better now, thry have no choice but to improve.  The death of that individual could cause improvements that will save thousands of lives in the future.

Agreed, but it could also cost tens of thousands of lives if these events delay the large-scale adoption of driverless cars.

Bateaux

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1671 on: May 24, 2018, 01:29:16 PM »
What is amazing is the butterfly effect of this unfortunate death.  This could change the entire ride share future.  Uber coukd lose market share to another company with better tech.  Self driving systems will most certainly be much better now, thry have no choice but to improve.  The death of that individual could cause improvements that will save thousands of lives in the future.

Agreed, but it could also cost tens of thousands of lives if these events delay the large-scale adoption of driverless cars.

Yep.  Dang butterfly. 
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boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1672 on: May 25, 2018, 03:53:20 AM »
I thought Tesla's didn't have lidar in the first place just because the sensor systems are so much more expensive than basically every other sensor you can put on a self driving car combined (radar/sonar/RGB cameras/infrared cameras etc).

Lidar has dropped significantly in price and there is a startup in Florida using a different cheaper raw material in theirs that has better vision and no silicon for the actual collection sensor.

That video I posted above about them becoming 10 bucks and the size of a postage stamp in the next couple years is very close to happening.
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boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1673 on: May 25, 2018, 04:04:12 AM »
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cnbc.com/amp/2018/05/22/luminar-building-sensors-for-self-driving-cars-near-space-coast.html

Can produce them for hundreds of dollars with better vision than the sensors that cost thousands.

It's gonna get real really quick.
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tomsang

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1674 on: June 03, 2018, 07:11:15 AM »
Vegas casino workers are seeing this as a future problem. Like a frog on a pot of water on the stove, automation will slowly eliminate low skilled jobs. What is considered low skilled will ramp up year after year. I am sure bartenders a decade ago felt like there is no way a robot could make a complicated drink. Kind of like a software programmer feels like their job is too complicated. Give it 15 years and AI and automation will be eliminating high level white collar jobs.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jun/02/las-vegas-workers-strike-automation-casinos


lost_in_the_endless_aisle

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1675 on: June 03, 2018, 06:29:59 PM »
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cnbc.com/amp/2018/05/22/luminar-building-sensors-for-self-driving-cars-near-space-coast.html

Can produce them for hundreds of dollars with better vision than the sensors that cost thousands.

It's gonna get real really quick.
I'm not convinced the limiting probelm is the cost of lidar but is rather the efficacy of the AI. Driving likely requires elements of general AI to cover many of the edge and corner cases; e.g.: this. Though when I do drive around, I find myself noting how poor the human competition is in the way of driving skills.

maizeman

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1676 on: June 03, 2018, 06:37:28 PM »
I'm not convinced the limiting probelm is the cost of lidar but is rather the efficacy of the AI. Driving likely requires elements of general AI to cover many of the edge and corner cases; e.g.: this. Though when I do drive around, I find myself noting how poor the human competition is in the way of driving skills.

Current AI + LIDAR sensors + RGB cameras may not be up to human safety standards yet (or it may I haven't seen the data), but current AI + LIDAR sensors + RGB cameras is clearly a much better at driving than current AI trying to drive with just RGB images.

dougules

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1677 on: June 04, 2018, 11:00:53 AM »
What is amazing is the butterfly effect of this unfortunate death.  This could change the entire ride share future.  Uber coukd lose market share to another company with better tech.  Self driving systems will most certainly be much better now, thry have no choice but to improve.  The death of that individual could cause improvements that will save thousands of lives in the future.

Agreed, but it could also cost tens of thousands of lives if these events delay the large-scale adoption of driverless cars.

The incident with Uber is going to get scrutinized very thoroughly and the lessons are going to get propagated into future development.  Think about all the other traffic deaths happening in the world that barely get a one-liner in the news because it was a human driver alone.  There's not much happening to fix those problems, and everybody just takes them for granted. 

robartsd

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1678 on: June 04, 2018, 12:32:52 PM »
I'm not convinced the limiting probelm is the cost of lidar but is rather the efficacy of the AI. Driving likely requires elements of general AI to cover many of the edge and corner cases; e.g.: this. Though when I do drive around, I find myself noting how poor the human competition is in the way of driving skills.
Thanks for the link to Piekniewski's Blog. I thought the February post on Autonomous Vehicle Safety was very interesting.

TempusFugit

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1679 on: June 04, 2018, 05:16:01 PM »

The incident with Uber is going to get scrutinized very thoroughly and the lessons are going to get propagated into future development.  Think about all the other traffic deaths happening in the world that barely get a one-liner in the news because it was a human driver alone.  There's not much happening to fix those problems, and everybody just takes them for granted.


I often think about the US traffic fatality numbers when other 'dangers' are in the news and get everyone so agitated.  ~37,000 people in the US died in auto accidents in 2016 (almost 3K of those were teenagers - children), representing 12 fatalities per 100,000 people.  It's climbing again these past couple of years into the 40's. 

Can you imagine any product being sold to the general public that killed 37 thousand people every year?   And these are not volunteer soldiers or <insert dangerous occupation here> but regular people going about their lives. 

As you say, we don't think about this because everyone just accepts it as a normal factor in modern life. I think most of us also are in denial about our own risk. We all think that we are good drivers, so we will be fine.  But what about that guy texting his girlfriend and not paying attention to the traffic light? 

Even with those statistics, I think self-driving cars will still be a tough sell to the general public.  Most of us like to feel like we are in control and that we are the exception to the norm.  Giving up that sense of control to a machine? I dunno how quickly people will be ok with that. 

I guess we'll find out in about a decade. 

DreamFIRE

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1680 on: June 04, 2018, 05:37:24 PM »
As you say, we don't think about this because everyone just accepts it as a normal factor in modern life. I think most of us also are in denial about our own risk. We all think that we are good drivers, so we will be fine.  But what about that guy texting his girlfriend and not paying attention to the traffic light?

Yes, there's a lot of evidence of that in recent threads that discuss bicycling as well.  People think they can make eye contact with drivers and be smart to avoid accidents and will throw in a few anecdotes that they haven't been in an accident, but that doesn't help when a 16 year old girl is texting her friend and never sees you as she runs over you.  I would rather be in a car when that happens.

mozar

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1681 on: June 04, 2018, 10:11:25 PM »
A lot of fatalities/ accidents are due to infrastructure problems, lack of lighting, confusing intersections, lack of bike lane separators. I think all of the new options are really interesting (driverless cars, one or 3 wheeled transport etc.) but it won't matter until this country invests in its infrastructure. Maybe once cars are 100% automated and it is illegal to drive there will be fewer accidents but as long as their are self interested humans driving I doubt fatalities will change much. Fatalities are at the same rate as the 60's, and cars are so much better now.

I do believe trucking and short urban trips will change, which is where the money is.
Chart:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motor_vehicle_fatality_rate_in_U.S._by_year

Quote
Can you imagine any product being sold to the general public that killed 37 thousand people every year?

I don't get it either.
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boarder42

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1682 on: June 05, 2018, 05:34:27 AM »
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cnbc.com/amp/2018/05/22/luminar-building-sensors-for-self-driving-cars-near-space-coast.html

Can produce them for hundreds of dollars with better vision than the sensors that cost thousands.

It's gonna get real really quick.
I'm not convinced the limiting probelm is the cost of lidar but is rather the efficacy of the AI. Driving likely requires elements of general AI to cover many of the edge and corner cases; e.g.: this. Though when I do drive around, I find myself noting how poor the human competition is in the way of driving skills.

correct edge and corner cases really will exist much more in the interim as we get those terrible humans who suck at driving off the roads.  i have a strong feeling there are very few people who actually enjoy the utility of driving compared to those who would rather not have to worry about steering their car daily back and forth to work and on trips.  People keep echo'ing that people want control.  i think once the driving tech is proven - which i believe will be working very well this year contrary to the link above.  Just like in the stock markets there are people who will call a crash and people who say it will keep going up - the difference here is tech really doesnt regress so while the future may take a year or two longer than the optimistists are predicting the pessimists will be wrong in the end.   Tech may have been overstated in the short term by an aggressive Musk - but GM has cars with out pedals or steering wheels getting approval from the NHTSB for testing in seattle and Google is moving to full autonomy in Phoenix this year.  And like most tech once that is proven its adoption typically starts to follow exponential curves. 
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robartsd

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1683 on: June 05, 2018, 08:33:16 AM »
correct edge and corner cases really will exist much more in the interim as we get those terrible humans who suck at driving off the roads.  i have a strong feeling there are very few people who actually enjoy the utility of driving compared to those who would rather not have to worry about steering their car daily back and forth to work and on trips.  People keep echo'ing that people want control.  i think once the driving tech is proven - which i believe will be working very well this year contrary to the link above.  Just like in the stock markets there are people who will call a crash and people who say it will keep going up - the difference here is tech really doesnt regress so while the future may take a year or two longer than the optimistists are predicting the pessimists will be wrong in the end.   Tech may have been overstated in the short term by an aggressive Musk - but GM has cars with out pedals or steering wheels getting approval from the NHTSB for testing in seattle and Google is moving to full autonomy in Phoenix this year.  And like most tech once that is proven its adoption typically starts to follow exponential curves.
Piekniewski isn't predicting that we'll never get there, just that the tech is harder and further away than many people think. Even if we stop letting humans pilot large, fast, vehicles there will still be erratic humans walking around and riding bikes to create edge cases that humans may still be better at dealing with than AI. The post I linked to used data from Google's testing in California (because that was the best data available) to show that progress had slowed Google's system failed more than ten times as often as human drivers crashed per 1000 in 2017. Not all of those failures would have resulted in a crash, but it does mean the tech isn't there yet, and the progress from 2016 to 2017 was slight. I think expecting autonomous vehicles by 2020 is optimistic.

dougules

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1684 on: June 05, 2018, 11:39:03 AM »
As you say, we don't think about this because everyone just accepts it as a normal factor in modern life. I think most of us also are in denial about our own risk. We all think that we are good drivers, so we will be fine.  But what about that guy texting his girlfriend and not paying attention to the traffic light?

Yes, there's a lot of evidence of that in recent threads that discuss bicycling as well.  People think they can make eye contact with drivers and be smart to avoid accidents and will throw in a few anecdotes that they haven't been in an accident, but that doesn't help when a 16 year old girl is texting her friend and never sees you as she runs over you.  I would rather be in a car when that happens.

This is another one where intuition is overriding math.  Don't get me wrong. I don't have any illusions that biking isn't dangerous, but way more people die or get sick from lack of exercise than accidents.  When you add the fact that being in a car is not nearly as safe as it seems, the math is on the side of cycling. 


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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1685 on: June 05, 2018, 08:40:35 PM »
As you say, we don't think about this because everyone just accepts it as a normal factor in modern life. I think most of us also are in denial about our own risk. We all think that we are good drivers, so we will be fine.  But what about that guy texting his girlfriend and not paying attention to the traffic light?

Yes, there's a lot of evidence of that in recent threads that discuss bicycling as well.  People think they can make eye contact with drivers and be smart to avoid accidents and will throw in a few anecdotes that they haven't been in an accident, but that doesn't help when a 16 year old girl is texting her friend and never sees you as she runs over you.  I would rather be in a car when that happens.

This is another one where intuition is overriding math.  Don't get me wrong. I don't have any illusions that biking isn't dangerous, but way more people die or get sick from lack of exercise than accidents.  When you add the fact that being in a car is not nearly as safe as it seems, the math is on the side of cycling.
The problem is when it comes to public policy, emotions rule over math. 20 million people who are fat, sick, & nearly dead is likely a much bigger tragedy than 20K road deaths but there are few problems with that argument provided we aren't talking trying to convince homo economicus: 1) people suffer from scope neglect so the numerical difference is not properly assessed; 2) in many car accidents, it's possible to ascribe fault, while people with bad diets who don't exercise "did it to themselves" 3) suspicion of technology and scrutiny of tech companies of increasing power may make them ever larger targets for regulation (e.g. GDPR) that impact speed and scale of deployment

edit: oh and if you were just steel-manning cycling and not trying to tie this back to self-driving cars then I'm probably off track a bit
« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 08:42:20 PM by lost_in_the_endless_aisle »

tomsang

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1686 on: June 12, 2018, 09:09:58 AM »
https://www.finextra.com/newsarticle/32240/10000-jobs-could-be-lost-to-robots-says-citi

Some interesting quotes and stats in this article:

"US bank Citi has warned that it could shed half of its 20,000 tech and ops staff in the next five years due to the rise of robotics and automation."

"Meanwhile a 2016 report from the World Economic Forum predicted that  advances in automation will lead to the loss of over 5 million jobs in 15 major developed and emerging economies by 2020."

"And Barclays injvestment bank chief Tim Thorsby added that anyone whose job involves "a lot of keyboard-hitting" is "less likely to have a happy future"."

toganet

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1687 on: June 12, 2018, 09:42:48 AM »
https://www.finextra.com/newsarticle/32240/10000-jobs-could-be-lost-to-robots-says-citi

Some interesting quotes and stats in this article:

"US bank Citi has warned that it could shed half of its 20,000 tech and ops staff in the next five years due to the rise of robotics and automation."

"Meanwhile a 2016 report from the World Economic Forum predicted that  advances in automation will lead to the loss of over 5 million jobs in 15 major developed and emerging economies by 2020."

"And Barclays injvestment bank chief Tim Thorsby added that anyone whose job involves "a lot of keyboard-hitting" is "less likely to have a happy future"."

I work for a large regional bank.  I recently attended a demonstration of the "Robotic Process Automation" project that is beginning here.  I expected actual robots, but instead learned they are using software to automate the keypresses and mouse clicks that employees make when completing rote tasks.  This is trivial to do in many cases, and the software they are using makes it simple.

When the Q&A session started, the first question was, "Will this eliminate jobs?"  The presenter answered along the lines of, "That is not our intent, but rather to allow humans to focus on the things humans are good at, and let the robots do the boring, rote stuff."

I suspect both will be true.  Automation of this type is MUCH easier to implement than rebuilding systems to make the processes automated.  This will accelerate the adoption across bank systems (and probably corporate accounting depts, insurance claims processing, etc).  At first the folks who are doing less "keyboard-hitting" will get to focus on the interesting, human parts of their jobs -- but there is only so much of that work to go around. (Some of that work is probably a side-effect of mistakes made by humans that will decline in number as robots take their jobs).

So not now, but not never, I expect to see 10's of thousands of layoffs in these white-collar, but medium-skilled jobs.

GuitarStv

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1688 on: June 12, 2018, 09:43:39 AM »
Wait.. so does this mean that 9 robots can have a baby on one month?

This year, sure.

Next year, 4.5 robots will be able to have a baby in two weeks.

4.5 robots creating a baby out of wedlock?  That's going to piss off the social conservatives.

mozar

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1689 on: June 12, 2018, 07:45:18 PM »
Quote
(Some of that work is probably a side-effect of mistakes made by humans that will decline in number as robots take their jobs).

When I was a financial auditor that was all I did. There would be no work (in my field) if the accountants did it correctly. Same for IT, a lot of work is fixing bad code or dealing with networks going down. Imagine how many people would lose their jobs if everything worked.
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aceyou

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1690 on: June 14, 2018, 09:53:43 PM »
A lot of fatalities/ accidents are due to infrastructure problems, lack of lighting, confusing intersections, lack of bike lane separators. I think all of the new options are really interesting (driverless cars, one or 3 wheeled transport etc.) but it won't matter until this country invests in its infrastructure. Maybe once cars are 100% automated and it is illegal to drive there will be fewer accidents but as long as their are self interested humans driving I doubt fatalities will change much. Fatalities are at the same rate as the 60's, and cars are so much better now.

I do believe trucking and short urban trips will change, which is where the money is.
Chart:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motor_vehicle_fatality_rate_in_U.S._by_year

Quote
Can you imagine any product being sold to the general public that killed 37 thousand people every year?

I don't get it either.

Junk food?   There's a product that kills far more than 37k/year. 

For the record, I'm on your side with the car debate.  Self-driving cars can't come fast enough if you ask me.  But there are other products sold to the general public that kill more than cars. 


tomsang

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1691 on: June 16, 2018, 01:32:09 PM »
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/15/spyce-is-developing-robotic-restaurants-with-help-from-daniel-boulud.html

Interesting video and story about an automated kitchen being developed by MIT engineers and a top notch chef.

mozar

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Re: Robots and their impact on the future
« Reply #1692 on: June 16, 2018, 05:20:00 PM »
I don't get junk food either but I should say that in the "I don't get it thread."
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