Author Topic: Question about job raises  (Read 726 times)

dragonwalker

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Question about job raises
« on: September 14, 2019, 12:31:13 AM »
I started a new job last October 2018 in the back office department of a large regional credit union (think about 20 branches) near Los Angeles. Work is working out alright but lately something has been bothering me. I didn't realize until January of this year but when I joined last October I had just missed the cutoff for our departmental bonus by 1 week. Meaning I was not eligible for any department bonus in the 2018 year. I also missed the annual merit "raise"/incremental salary increase, and I missed the company profit sharing match for 2018. An employee that joined several weeks prior was eligible. I am trying not to be bitter about this but I'm reminded about this all the time when people discuss compensation, raises etc.

I understand that my contributions for 2018 would be limited especially because being new to the systems and going through training for nearly a month. However the fact hurts and it not only amounts to thousands of dollars lost but much more when I think about how annual raises are based on percentage increase from your current pay. I'm not trying to find some way to get this money but would it be reasonable to raise this point as a factor when the talk of raises or merit increases comes around this year? By all indications so far this year I have performed well and taken some initiative in some fields. After speaking to people I know well the company does essentially give everyone some "raise" what specific amount depends but even the new employee said it was surprisingly generous which sadly makes me SO GLAD.

I imagine that this could go down something like this: after my evaluation and they mention X percentage increase or flat dollar amount I would follow this up with the facts listed above and request something like 2% more give or take. My current salary is $52,000 so this amounts only to about an extra $1K. Is this something even worth mentioning or could it somehow hurt me to ask? It's not that I'm ungrateful but it's almost more of the principal of the matter. Averaged out over the year and after tax the increase is maybe tens of dollars every paycheck but it's not a lot to begin with and the company is doing really well.

reeshau

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Re: Question about job raises
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2019, 02:28:35 AM »
By your description, it sounds like you were surprised by this.  First lesson: ask about these things when you are interviewing, and then have something you can do about it.  But even so, this kind shaving the coin is common in HR in my experience--they may have decided to hire this position after the deadline just to save the money.

So, here you are.  If you have outstanding contributions to rely on, I would really we wary of a "put the time in" argument.  It could also dilute your points about contribution.  If you are truly ambitious, this will be evened out at your first promotion or employer change.  Keep the note in your mind for interview questions next time, and move on.

Dicey

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Re: Question about job raises
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2019, 02:49:44 AM »
Sorry, dude, but IMO, the burden is on you to figure this stuff out during the interview process, before you join the company. I had something similar happen. I was set to start a new job on Jan 3, but discovered to be eligible for certain benefits, one had to be employed on Jan. 1, or wait until the following year. I told new boss that losing a year was not acceptable. They put me on payroll the last work day of December.

To be blunt, it sounds like you didn't do your homework. Blaming them is the wrong approach and will just cause you to be bitter. Get the experience, then find another company to work for and do your due diligence before you start.

Zamboni

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Re: Question about job raises
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2019, 04:48:31 AM »
I agree with Dicey and reeshau. There is almost always some sort of deadline like that and people who joined right after it are just out of luck if they don't ask about it prior to starting the job. Usually it's in the Dec/Jan timeframe (I also started a job in mid-Dec rather than waiting for Jan 1 as it would count the Dec year as a whole year of service towards future vacation increases.) I doubt that you will be able to use that reasoning to get a bigger increase . . . if you do ask for a bigger increase, which could very well be a great idea, then be sure to focus on your contributions rather than any other argument.

wageslave23

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Re: Question about job raises
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2019, 05:35:54 AM »
Comparison is the thief of joy.  Don't worry about what other co-workers do/get, just worry about you.  As others have said base your worth on your work and make sure you are compensated fairly.  It seems if you didn't hear what others got, you would be perfectly content right now.

Fishindude

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Re: Question about job raises
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2019, 07:34:40 AM »
Comparison is the thief of joy.  Don't worry about what other co-workers do/get, just worry about you.  As others have said base your worth on your work and make sure you are compensated fairly.  It seems if you didn't hear what others got, you would be perfectly content right now.

This is pretty good advice.
Something I would add is that if you have an issue with your compensation, set a meeting with the boss, have a sit down and ask for a raise.  After managing hundreds of employees, it amazed me how few actually have the guts to do this.   

mm1970

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Re: Question about job raises
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2019, 11:04:10 AM »
Comparison is the thief of joy.  Don't worry about what other co-workers do/get, just worry about you.  As others have said base your worth on your work and make sure you are compensated fairly.  It seems if you didn't hear what others got, you would be perfectly content right now.
I disagree with this a bit.

Basically, I'd ask for a bigger increase.  Or to be specific, if you and coworker who started 3 weeks ahead are doing the same job at the same level, I'd aim to make sure that you are at the same pay after this round.

wageslave23

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Re: Question about job raises
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2019, 11:20:08 AM »
Comparison is the thief of joy.  Don't worry about what other co-workers do/get, just worry about you.  As others have said base your worth on your work and make sure you are compensated fairly.  It seems if you didn't hear what others got, you would be perfectly content right now.
I disagree with this a bit.

Basically, I'd ask for a bigger increase.  Or to be specific, if you and coworker who started 3 weeks ahead are doing the same job at the same level, I'd aim to make sure that you are at the same pay after this round.

My point is you shouldn't base your contentedness on what you are making relative to co-workers.  What if you are all under-compensated?  Try to get the most you can regardless of what others make.  Whether it is at your current company or some other company.  There will always be someone who makes more than you somewhere out there, but going to your boss and saying that you deserve more money only because so-and-so makes "x" amount is not a good idea.

Villanelle

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Re: Question about job raises
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2019, 11:22:03 AM »
If I were your supervisor and you mentioned to me anything that sounded like a complaint about how it wasn't fair that an employeed hired a few weeks earlier got a raise and bonuse, and you didn't, I'd think it sounded juvenile and I'd probably lose a smidge of respect for you.

If you think you are worth more to the company, make that argument when discussing the raise %.  It's probably not unreasonable to mention that you didn't get a 2018 raise because you missed the deadline, but that should be a side point, and you shouldn't mention that other people got it and you didn't 

Also, the fact that you seem to want a raise based on the "principle of the matter", not because you think your work is objectively worth more, is concerning.  If your coworkers are overpaid (by only about $1000!) that's not a solid reason for your employer to overpay you, too.  If you are killing it and can come up with ways to demonstrate that (glowing reviews even if that's just an email from your boss complimenting you on how quickly you caught on or telling you that they got a great customer report about you, or exceeding whatever metrics apply to your work), those are the things that are more likely to move move the needle.  Far more likely than, "Bob got a raise and I didn't".  So look for those things and mentally bring them to your meeting.

You also need to decide how much you want to push for this.  You can very easily make yourself a petulant problem child with a conversation like this, if done badly.  And that hurts future chances for raises and promotions.  That doesn't mean you shouldn't ask for a raise, but it does mean you need to be careful and thoughtful with you how discuss it, and you need to decide how hard you are willing to push to make happen something you admit isn't much money and is really just a matter of principle.