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General Discussion => Welcome and General Discussion => Topic started by: Frugalbeach on July 17, 2020, 06:53:52 AM

Title: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Frugalbeach on July 17, 2020, 06:53:52 AM
Question...has anyone else noticed an explosion of hoarding behaviors in friends, family, neighbors?  I'm talking crazy stockpiling that would last regular folks years?  For example, 30 to 40 cans of condensed soup in the pantry when you've never seen this person eat soup?
I won't even go to paper towels or toilet paper or Clorox products.
Specific examples would be appreciated (and fun)!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Pigeon on July 17, 2020, 07:05:52 AM
Not at all.  I do think many people, myself included, have significantly larger than normal grocery orders because we shop less frequently and do not want to make extra trips to the store if we are out of something.  But I have not noticed what I would consider hoarding.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: slappy on July 17, 2020, 07:07:39 AM
I haven't noticed anything recently. My area is very low in cases and I haven't seen any empty shelves at the store.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on July 17, 2020, 07:08:43 AM
Well, I haven't seen any friends, family, or neighbors in 4 months, so I don't know if they're hoarding...

But no, I haven't heard of or witnessed this behavior when I've been out shopping.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on July 17, 2020, 07:09:42 AM
Question...has anyone else noticed an explosion of hoarding behaviors in friends, family, neighbors?  I'm talking crazy stockpiling that would last regular folks years?  For example, 30 to 40 cans of condensed soup in the pantry when you've never seen this person eat soup?
I won't even go to paper towels or toilet paper or Clorox products.
Specific examples would be appreciated (and fun)!

I've only visited two other houses since we went into shutdown in mid-March. People (including us) seem to be stocking up a bit to avoid grocery shopping frequently, but none of it is beyond a few months' supply.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sibley on July 17, 2020, 07:34:51 AM
Are people stockpiling a bit more? I've seen some of that. I haven't seen anyone who's tipped over the edge into hoarding. However, the stress of the pandemic absolutely could contribute to an existing tendency or problem to make it much more serious. IE, someone who's a bit of a worrywart might be pushed into a full blown anxiety disorder.

Frugalbeach, if you're seeing evidence of mental illness in your friends and family, it would be a kindness to gently encourage them to talk to their doctor.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: dcheesi on July 17, 2020, 08:01:30 AM
Nothing like the early days of the pandemic, no.

Then again, I'm in a region that's not spiking to the degree that others have; I wouldn't be surprised to see a resurgence of panic buying in the hardest hit areas. It's obvious that things are going to get a lot worse in those hot-spots before they get better, and hunkering down with zero outside contact may be warranted (or even mandated) for some period of time.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Christof on July 17, 2020, 08:02:25 AM
In February we added to our pantry to last four weeks instead of two to cater for an unexpected quarantine. But I wouldnĎt call that hoarding. We did have a lack of toilet paper, bread and disinfectant in March and April, but that feels like a distant past now. Many states have less than a dozen new cases per day and the whole country hoovers around 500 at a population that is a quarter of the US. Shopping is totally back to normal levels, at least in grocery stores.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: LaineyAZ on July 17, 2020, 08:10:38 AM
Went to the Costco here in AZ for the first time in 5 months and was pleasantly surprised that the shelves seemed full. However, at the local Safeway, supplies of a variety of items seem definitely thinned out.

For myself, I think it's a good idea to stock up because I expect the fall/winter 2020/2021 to be worse in every way:  increased Covid-19 cases, increased deaths, supply chain issues, more homeless, and more economic fallout.  I'm not at the point of buying the 20 lb. bag of rice at Costco, but I'm close.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: alex753 on July 17, 2020, 08:22:26 AM
I've noticed there is a shortage/hoarding of isopropyl alcohol.  I've uses it to sanitize my electric razor for a long time and it's pretty important to me to keep from getting breakouts from the bacteria buildup when it is not sanitized.  I had to get some online.

At least paper products are readily available now.  That was ridiculous.

But yes.  Peoples' behavior over this has been completely ludicrous and most are erroneously scared and or terrified.  Not how life was intended to be lived.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 17, 2020, 08:32:22 AM
I personally think it is a good idea to stock up. I agree with LaineyAZ that this fall is predicted to begin a second phase of the virus outbreak. At that point, the normal flu season and colds. It makes sense to stock up on things you will eat or essentials like toilet paper and OTC meds. Don't forget the pets needs too. My dogs eat prescription dog food and my Vets office ran out of the food! So I had to order it on line and it was backordered a while. I don't think people should go to the store and buy 10 overflowing carts of supplies, but each week throw in a few extras to stock up.

It doesn't hurt to stock up and you can be generous with your supplies. Prepare a dinner for a person in need or donate some to the food pantry.

We have all been accustomed to full shelves in our stores. Our new reality may be that we may need to get used to empty shelves.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: LaineyAZ on July 17, 2020, 08:52:43 AM
I personally think it is a good idea to stock up. I agree with LaineyAZ that this fall is predicted to begin a second phase of the virus outbreak. At that point, the normal flu season and colds. It makes sense to stock up on things you will eat or essentials like toilet paper and OTC meds. Don't forget the pets needs too. My dogs eat prescription dog food and my Vets office ran out of the food! So I had to order it on line and it was backordered a while. I don't think people should go to the store and buy 10 overflowing carts of supplies, but each week throw in a few extras to stock up.

It doesn't hurt to stock up and you can be generous with your supplies. Prepare a dinner for a person in need or donate some to the food pantry.

We have all been accustomed to full shelves in our stores. Our new reality may be that we may need to get used to empty shelves.

This is the other point I wanted to make.  If we do miraculously get a vaccine this winter and things go back to normal-ish, the worst part of stocking up is that you can then donate to the food bank or someone in need.  So what's the harm? 
and I guess we should define "stocking up" vs. "hoarding" as in, don't be the guy who went out and bought all of the hand sanitizer so he could charge his friends and neighbors a big mark-up when they needed some.  But being prudent and getting some extra of items you already use?  Yes, that's more than reasonable.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on July 17, 2020, 09:19:05 AM
I personally think it is a good idea to stock up. I agree with LaineyAZ that this fall is predicted to begin a second phase of the virus outbreak. At that point, the normal flu season and colds. It makes sense to stock up on things you will eat or essentials like toilet paper and OTC meds. Don't forget the pets needs too. My dogs eat prescription dog food and my Vets office ran out of the food! So I had to order it on line and it was backordered a while. I don't think people should go to the store and buy 10 overflowing carts of supplies, but each week throw in a few extras to stock up.

It doesn't hurt to stock up and you can be generous with your supplies. Prepare a dinner for a person in need or donate some to the food pantry.

We have all been accustomed to full shelves in our stores. Our new reality may be that we may need to get used to empty shelves.

Yes to stocking up on pet food! We had about 2 weeks' worth of rabbit chow left when the shutdown started in March, and the only remaining available bag size was 25 lbs through an online store. So yeah, it may have looked like hoarding to buy a giant bag for 2 rabbits but 1) they needed to eat, and 2) it ended up being way cheaper per pound than the smaller bags. We will keep buying the bulk size and breaking it down into smaller containers to stay fresh, even after the pandemic is over.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 17, 2020, 09:41:01 AM
Yes, agree with OtherJen. I recently bought three 5 lb. bags of rice. I broke the bags down into 15 one lb. bags and vacuum packed them flat. We don't eat rice every day but now I have a nice supply. They are stacked neatly and waiting to be used. The price was pretty cheap too. Very frugal!

I used to do a lot of purchasing at my old job. Mostly food ingredients for the projects we worked on. I have the mentality of never wanting to run out of things. At my job, if we ran out of ingredients, that meant down time. I never allowed us to run out of anything and we never had down time due to running out of ingredients. So, I try to apply that thinking to my pantry at home.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Tyler durden on July 17, 2020, 09:49:49 AM
Put me in the hoarding of pet food as well. Thatís a store i only need to go to for pet food. If I can avoid single unnecessary trips all the better.

We have 120 pounds of food for our 40 pound dog.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 17, 2020, 10:11:57 AM
Tyler durden, nice you are taking good care of your dog. My only concern is that the dog might get tired of the food and won't eat it. My dogs are on prescription dog food and the Vet has changed the type a few times which means I end up with food the dogs are no longer eating. So, between the two dogs we ended up having close to 2 cases of canned dog food they were not eating. Each case costs about $38! So, we ended up donating it to the local animal welfare. So much for stocking up! At least the food got donated and some dog who needed it got it. Better than tossing it.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on July 17, 2020, 10:20:08 AM
I keep multiple pantries. At the beginning of the pandemic, I thought it would be a good excuse to work them down. Then I got worried about potential food shortages. Four months in, my larders are maybe 10% depleted. I think I'll just keep wwhittling them down slowly.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: slappy on July 17, 2020, 10:22:25 AM
Put me in the hoarding of pet food as well. Thatís a store i only need to go to for pet food. If I can avoid single unnecessary trips all the better.

We have 120 pounds of food for our 40 pound dog.

This will be me once I can finally get to Costco.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: kanga1622 on July 17, 2020, 10:33:42 AM
I don't personally know of any. But I am also one that will buy a year's worth of shampoo if I find a good sale. And I just bought a year's worth of conditioner because I didn't want to pay shipping and it can only be purchased online.

We have a higher stockpile than normal of most household items and some grocery items. As in, I will buy/look for more when we have 2 full containers in the closet rather than 1. We have MORE than enough storage space to keep extra laundry soap, peroxide, hand soap, TP, etc. on hand. And we've already run out of some things and been unable to replace. Several items we eat on a regular basis (1-2 times a month) have been out of stock since March. So either our store decided not to carry them or they just are always sold out when I shop every 2 weeks.

My cart always looks nuts when I go to Walmart but I am generally shopping every 2 weeks and it takes a lot to feed a family of 4 for that long.

We solve the pet food issues by ordering online from Chewy. It is delivered to my door in a matter of days. But as soon as we put a 25 lb bag in the "open" canister, I place an order for the next bag. All the while we have a fully unopened bag in the closet.  So we usually have something between 50-75 lbs of food on hand for our 80 lb dog. He eats a 25lb bag in a bit less than a month.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Rosy on July 17, 2020, 10:44:16 AM
I have stocked up for the pandemic as well as for the hurricane season.

That means two entirely different shopping criteria
- hurricane means power outage. How and what to eat when you have no refrigeration (meat will go bad) - no way to cook - and the misery of no AC.
No electricity means candles and batteries and besides that plenty of drinking water and washing water. A bit of comfort food and candy as well as normal emergency supplies.

For the pandemic it means regular food and supplies for two months at least - YMMV

OP as far as the canned soup when they don't normally eat canned soup - yeah, that may be foolish.
Do I want to make fun of hoarding - hardly. If some extra soup in the cupboard makes people feel more in control and keep their sanity - let them.

Right now it is a good idea to have some extra on hand and if you don't need it you can always donate. It is what I normally do when the expiration dates on my hurricane food supplies are imminent.
Admittedly I have some prepper tendencies so yeah, certain things I keep a years supply of - but - two shelves full is all I allow myself of those items.

... and yes, we have a two-three months supply of catfood:).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 17, 2020, 10:58:30 AM
I order a lot of food items on line and other household essentials. I shop at some really weird places at times too. Places that are oddball. I have searched and searched for disinfectant spray and cannot find any place to ship it that is a fair price. You can probably get it on ebay and pay $45 for a can of it. Not going to do that.

I did find Lysol liquid concentrate and mixed it with water and put it in a spray bottle. We use that for incoming shipments but I would prefer the spray because it is not so wet. Anyone have information on where to buy Lysol spray or another brand of disinfectant? Any place I find it on line says it has to be picked up in the store, shipping not available.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Spiffy on July 17, 2020, 11:01:34 AM
Here in central Texas the shelves are empty of toilet paper, lysol wipes, etc. at my HEB. It had gotten back to normal over the last few weeks. Now it is starting again.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Captain Cactus on July 17, 2020, 12:28:55 PM
A work friend in CA was ordering from various bulk purchase places at once back in April... I'm talking 200 rolls of toilet paper, boxed cake mixes, etc... it was because of people like her that there were shortages for everyone else. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on July 17, 2020, 12:52:21 PM
Yes, agree with OtherJen. I recently bought three 5 lb. bags of rice. I broke the bags down into 15 one lb. bags and vacuum packed them flat. We don't eat rice every day but now I have a nice supply. They are stacked neatly and waiting to be used. The price was pretty cheap too. Very frugal!

I used to do a lot of purchasing at my old job. Mostly food ingredients for the projects we worked on. I have the mentality of never wanting to run out of things. At my job, if we ran out of ingredients, that meant down time. I never allowed us to run out of anything and we never had down time due to running out of ingredients. So, I try to apply that thinking to my pantry at home.

I'm the same way. I hate running out of staples, especially now when I go out for supplies once a week at most (rather than running to the neighborhood Aldi whenever the list was 5-10 items long). We bought a 25-lb bag of certified gluten-free oatmeal and a 20-lb bag of rice at the start of the pandemic and broke those down into smaller packages. Even with the shipping cost for the oatmeal (purchased direct from Bob's Red Mill), it was cheaper per lb than buying the 2-lb bags in the grocery store. As long as it's something we can feasibly use up in a year, I prefer to buy bulk.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: TikiTime on July 17, 2020, 01:22:59 PM
Words of wisdom from a covid positive household.  That toilet paper is needed.  I had a month's worth of tp for 4 adults when we were quarantined.  Diarrhea is a lovely symptom, the tp was gone in 8 days.  Luckily, a friend picked me up a huge pack from Sam's, enough to normally last half a year.  I am very grateful to now have that on hand.  Double the amount of detergent so you never run out of a month's supply.  Anything you need to disinfect, etc., overcompensate.  You need more than you think! 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 17, 2020, 01:57:07 PM
Here is another thing I am going to stock up on in the next few days is pet friendly salt for our driveway and sidewalks. I buy it in July or August to make sure we have it on hand for winter. We have about six 50# bags in the garage and I am going to buy five more 50# bags so we will have a stockpile of 11 bags. Some winters we only go thru 5 or 6 bags and some twice that amount. Buying it now will cost less before they jack the prices up in the winter and will ensure we have it when we need it. Sometimes they run out of it and you have to buy something you don't want. We want the pet friendly stuff so the dogs feet don't get burned. Plus, avoiding the hardware store with the virus out there.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PDXTabs on July 17, 2020, 02:06:34 PM
Lysol wipes

Lysol wipes are the one thing that I consistently can't get and I'd really like. But I don't think that it is hording, I think that usage is way up.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 17, 2020, 02:44:51 PM
PDXTabs, I also have had a hard time finding Lysol wipes. Don't know if you are interested but what I did was buy baby wipes. I got the Walmart brand. Then I poured rubbing alcohol into the container. Maybe 6 ounces, enough to saturate all the wipes. I use that to wipe down things. Probably not approved by hospital standards but works for me!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on July 17, 2020, 02:50:10 PM
I havenít inspected anyone elseís pantry, but mine is definitely a lot fuller than usual. I donít want to worry about going to the store. I donít want to worry if I canít get a pickup slot.

I think it is not far fetched to think that this winter might be kind of bad. Letís just say that I plan to have my thanksgiving turkey in the freezer by Sept. 1.

Minimalism is dead to me!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: TheFrenchCat on July 17, 2020, 05:34:46 PM
I'm glad other people are shopping less frequently too.  I've only been shopping once every 2 weeks.  Once I got called a hoarder by some random lady who was buying a single bag of stuff.  Uh,yeah, no.  I didn't even have any toilet paper or sanitizing products, just food.  At least she had a mask.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on July 17, 2020, 06:50:19 PM
What's your definition of hoarding?  I'm keeping a couple months worth of non-perishables now, where I'd rarely have more than a week or two of extra food before.  It's mostly stuff we would eat anyway, but an awful lot more than we would normally keep.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Channel-Z on July 17, 2020, 06:55:21 PM
Lysol and wipes are still difficult to find. One of my co-workers basically goes out every night looking for them.

I had heard people were panic-shopping at places like Walmart in the fringes of my metro area because they didn't want to go shopping with a mask (Walmart mask mandate begins Monday).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MayDay on July 17, 2020, 07:13:12 PM
On one hand you consider us hoarding. We normally keep a very lean pantry. When shortages started happening we suddenly shopped a ton to build up 2-4 weeks worth of supplies.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Buffaloski Boris on July 17, 2020, 07:16:42 PM
Hoarding is such an ugly word. I prefer prudence. Prudent people stock supplies before an entirely predictable time of adversity. Like a winter return of COVID. So I donít know of any food hoarders. I do know a few people practicing prudence.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SwordGuy on July 17, 2020, 07:30:30 PM
We make sure we have supplies in case we get hammered by a hurricane (again).  We've had 2 or 3 bad ones in the last 5 years. 

We've also increased our stock of key items and some staples.    But more on the let's have several weeks on hand more than usual.

Once we get our old home sold and have time and mental energy to really put some thought into it, I would like to up our supplies to a 3 month level for key items.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: simmias on July 17, 2020, 07:49:04 PM
Hoarding is such an ugly word. I prefer prudence. Prudent people stock supplies before an entirely predictable time of adversity. Like a winter return of COVID. So I don’t know of any food hoarders. I do know a few people practicing prudence.

Found the hoarder!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mountain mustache on July 17, 2020, 09:12:54 PM
After the experience I had trying to buy food in Arizona in March and April, I find myself stocking up more and more this Summer. There were weeks in mid-March/early April where I could get almost no food at the stores. I work really early in the morning, so my only time to shop was in the evenings, when shelves were empty. I would say I never "stock up" in one visit. But each time I go shopping I buy "1 for now, 2 for later" which is a good rule of thumb. I am keeping more rice, dried beans, canned tomatoes, coconut milk, etc on hand...these are staples I use all the time *anyway* not random foods I'm buying just for the sake of it. But literally in Tucson, AZ I could not find rice, beans, pasta, canned tomatoes of any kind, peanut butter, frozen veggies, etc for over 6 weeks at one point...so now I just have a pantry that is stocked for 2-3 months if I absolutely *need* it so I don't have to go through a stressful situation of being unprepared as I was this Spring. Also toilet paper. I last saw toilet paper in a grocery store in early March, and saw it for the first time during Covid in June. 3 months without seeing toilet paper on a store shelf. Ridiculous. Now I will have a years worth all the time just because.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Buffaloski Boris on July 18, 2020, 05:53:28 AM
Hoarding is such an ugly word. I prefer prudence. Prudent people stock supplies before an entirely predictable time of adversity. Like a winter return of COVID. So I donít know of any food hoarders. I do know a few people practicing prudence.

Found the hoarder!

Wrats! Outted!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on July 18, 2020, 01:06:59 PM
I suppose someone can look at what I did and consider it hoarding.  We had almost zero canned/prepared food, which is stupid when you live where a natural disaster could knock out power and water.  Now the pantry is full.  Did the person at Costco think I was a hoarder when I bought a case of strawberry preserves?  Maybe, but I don't care.  I added to our dried food stores, including buying 50# of popping corn.  I stocked up on several quarts of cooking oil.  I went from having 2 jars of peanut butter to having 8-10.  I decided to stock 6-12 months worth of toiletries and OTC medications.  I also changed our dog food policy, making sure we buy/order a new bag as soon as the previous bag is opened (any more than that and my fussy dog will refuse the food for being rancid).

I call it being prepared and prudent.  At the same time, when a toilet paper order I hadn't expected to ship actually did, we took the box of 80 individually wrapped rolls to the local food bank.  As I started using some of the canned foods I'd stocked up on, I got a better sense of how much we might need, and sent cases of canned milk, canned corn, canned green beans, and more to the food bank as well, including 25# of rice.

One thing I haven't done is stock up on water.  I don't think it's necessary for Covid, but it would be in a natural disaster.  We used to store water, but it's a hassle to manage, especially since we don't typically drink bottled water.  I think I'll buy another set of Berkey filters and plan on using bleach + filtering if we end up without safe water.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: centwise on July 18, 2020, 02:02:48 PM
My friends and family have joined the throngs who have been baking more (so, stocking up on flour and sugar) and cooking at home a lot more (buying more groceries), but I don't think any of them have engaged in panic-buying or hoarder-level of stocking up.

At my house I habitually keep a large stock of pantry staples, I always have some vegetables and meat in the freezer, and I typically buy giant packages of Costco paper products (TP, paper towels and kleenex) that last for 5-6 months.

If someone saw my pantry they might have thought that I was "hoarding" during the pandemic lockdown. But actually I was in great shape when the lockdown started. I already had a large quantity and variety of dried legumes, rice (three kinds), sugar, various flours, etc. So there was no need for panic buying; I simply did not need to buy any of the items that were in short supply. I shopped for freshies and dairy every three weeks, and I didn't buy toilet paper until June. Now the grocery store shelves are pretty full, and if there are any shortages, I haven't noticed them.

So I'm in the camp of those who would call it "prudence and good planning"!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 18, 2020, 03:08:48 PM
It makes perfect sense to stock up. They want us to stay in our homes as much as possible so it makes no sense to go out shopping every single day for food and household items. People can stock up slowly and it doesn't have to cost a fortune. Just starting off with the basics like rice, pasta, pasta sauces, beans, canned tuna, canned chicken, canned beef, canned corned beef. Canned beans and dried beans. I am not a big fan of canned veggies but I buy corn, green beans and would consider peas.

I would encourage people to stock up slowly and build a full pantry.

What unique things have some of you stocked up on?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dave1442397 on July 18, 2020, 03:45:18 PM
25lb bags of rice are completely normal in Asian households :)

I stocked up on cereal, because our local Wegmans ran out of my favorite (Fall Harvest) at one point, so now I have maybe a couple of months worth in the house.

Nothing else, really. We went to Costco a couple of months ago, and next time we go I'll buy more toilet paper and paper towels, but I always do that. We have plenty of room to store paper products, so we usually have a six-month supply sitting around.

One thing I stopped buying is chocolate, and candy in general. I've lost 28lbs in the past twelve weeks, and I need to keep it off!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mountain mustache on July 18, 2020, 03:58:32 PM

What unique things have some of you stocked up on?

I am stocking up on chocolate big time for the Fall/Winter. That was a very random thing that I could not find ANYWHERE for months in the Spring. My mom actually mailed me chocolate chips because she keeps like a dozen bags on hand at any one time. I don't eat a lot of chocolate, but I like to have a piece or two every day...it's like my one treat. So now I will have a dozen of my favorite bars on hand (Alter Eco) and a few bags of chocolate chips as well.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MilesTeg on July 18, 2020, 04:01:09 PM
We've gone from keeping 3-4 weeks of non perishables on hand to 2-3 months. Now that TP and other paper products are available we've been probably 'hording' them. About 8-12 months worth on hand, but we avoid using paper towels as much as possible and there's only 2 if us so it's really not all that much.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Buffaloski Boris on July 18, 2020, 04:33:23 PM
I think we should ask the folks in say Detroit who encountered stripped shelves in their stores for weeks on end how much of a supply of staples at home would be ďprudenceĒ versus hoarding.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: centwise on July 18, 2020, 04:44:43 PM
I think we should ask the folks in say Detroit who encountered stripped shelves in their stores for weeks on end how much of a supply of staples at home would be ďprudenceĒ versus hoarding.

Well this sort of thing feeds on itself, of course. If people perceive that a shortage is starting, then they all run out and buy as much of that thing as they can, because they are afraid they won't be able to find it later. So fear of the shortage causes a drastic shortage.

But those of us in this thread who prudently ALREADY had well-stocked pantries at the beginning of the crisis neither suffered from, nor contributed to, the shortages. And now that the shortages are a thing of the past in most places, it would be prudent to slowly build up your pantry while availability is good, so that you won't contribute to future panic-buying when the next round of shortages (if any) rolls around.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on July 18, 2020, 04:53:33 PM
A couple weeks sure, but is keeping multiple months of food normally a prudent thing to do?  It has never been necessary in my life prior to covid, so wasn't really something I had ever seriously considered.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: StarBright on July 18, 2020, 05:06:02 PM
I've gone from keeping no extra non-perishables to keeping a couple weeks' worth.

I still am not sure what the line is between reasonable and hoarding. I did get more toilet paper at costco a few weeks ago even though we weren't completely out yet. But the rising covid cases has me being careful.

I haven't been able to find any wipes or lysol since this thing began. I will definitely buy at least two containers if I ever come across them.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: centwise on July 18, 2020, 05:17:21 PM
A couple weeks sure, but is keeping multiple months of food normally a prudent thing to do?  It has never been necessary in my life prior to covid, so wasn't really something I had ever seriously considered.

Keeping multiple months of basics is completely normal for me. It's much cheaper to buy in bulk and on sale. I have room for it, but to be honest, it doesn't even take up that much space. And more importantly, it simplifies my life enormously if I only have to buy certain items 2-3 times/ year. That would include rice, flour, sugar, dried beans, jam, canned goods, as well as TP and cleaning supplies. If meat is on sale then I stock up on that too.

It means that I don't have to think about those things AT ALL during my regular small shopping trips for fresh items. It makes regular shopping simple and fun. I never have to rack my brain to remember to pick up TP or a jar of jam because I know I already have those things.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on July 18, 2020, 05:31:06 PM
A couple weeks sure, but is keeping multiple months of food normally a prudent thing to do?  It has never been necessary in my life prior to covid, so wasn't really something I had ever seriously considered.

Keeping multiple months of basics is completely normal for me. It's much cheaper to buy in bulk and on sale. I have room for it, but to be honest, it doesn't even take up that much space. And more importantly, it simplifies my life enormously if I only have to buy certain items 2-3 times/ year. That would include rice, flour, sugar, dried beans, jam, canned goods, as well as TP and cleaning supplies. If meat is on sale then I stock up on that too.

It means that I don't have to think about those things AT ALL during my regular small shopping trips for fresh items. It makes regular shopping simple and fun. I never have to rack my brain to remember to pick up TP or a jar of jam because I know I already have those things.

None of that was something I've ever had to spend time thinking about either though.  If we were cooking/eating and saw that something was running low, we just write it down on the grocery list that's on a magnet on the fridge.  Same if TP or any other thing was running out.  I never had to rack my brain for anything, it just went on the list.  When you're keeping vast quantities of perishables, you've got to make sure it's not going bad.  Flour goes bad in a couple years, canned stuff goes bad, oats go off in flavour after 6-8 months, etc.  Seems like much more of a pain in the ass way to have to live.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on July 18, 2020, 05:42:48 PM
I have generally kept a well stocked pantry, because I donít drive and I had 3 kids. Iíve lived I. Hurricane country and blizzard country. On a tight budget itís better to stock up when a staple goes on sale.

Itís only been the last few years with no kids at home that Iíve let my pantry shrink, and I deeply regretted it this spring.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: centwise on July 18, 2020, 06:53:38 PM
A couple weeks sure, but is keeping multiple months of food normally a prudent thing to do?  It has never been necessary in my life prior to covid, so wasn't really something I had ever seriously considered.

Keeping multiple months of basics is completely normal for me. It's much cheaper to buy in bulk and on sale. I have room for it, but to be honest, it doesn't even take up that much space. And more importantly, it simplifies my life enormously if I only have to buy certain items 2-3 times/ year. That would include rice, flour, sugar, dried beans, jam, canned goods, as well as TP and cleaning supplies. If meat is on sale then I stock up on that too.

It means that I don't have to think about those things AT ALL during my regular small shopping trips for fresh items. It makes regular shopping simple and fun. I never have to rack my brain to remember to pick up TP or a jar of jam because I know I already have those things.

None of that was something I've ever had to spend time thinking about either though.  If we were cooking/eating and saw that something was running low, we just write it down on the grocery list that's on a magnet on the fridge.  Same if TP or any other thing was running out.  I never had to rack my brain for anything, it just went on the list.  When you're keeping vast quantities of perishables, you've got to make sure it's not going bad.  Flour goes bad in a couple years, canned stuff goes bad, oats go off in flavour after 6-8 months, etc.  Seems like much more of a pain in the ass way to have to live.

You are totally right about the list thing. I'm remembering back to my disorganized past, when I had little kids and was completely frazzled, sick and sleep-deprived. I was always stopping by the grocery store on my way home from work trying to think of what we might need!

I eventually got myself organized -- and part of that was keeping the pantry stocked. It's not vast quantities -- it's a very narrow pantry closet. Things definitely keep for 2-6 months without loss of flavour or quality, and I assure you nothing ever goes bad (or gets thrown out). And I make a lot fewer shopping trips. It's the exact opposite of a "pain in the ass". This works better for me.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 19, 2020, 05:10:34 AM
For me, the hardest thing to keep on hand is dairy products and produce. We have done curbside and have had Peapod delivery and I did go to the store a few times. I also signed up for Imperfect Foods which is a hodge podge every week of choices. They may offer meat, fish, cheese, vegetables but it doesn't seem abundant. Kind of like first come, first served. A year ago I was getting Misfits which is another vegetable delivery service but you had no choice. You got what they sent which is great if you like what you get. I am not a big fan of zucchini, yellow squash and eggplant which was sent in almost every box. I was constantly trying to find recipes to use up the stuff. So,  I finally gave Misfits up. The next spring I bought into a CNA which is a local farm on my street. It was very good but kind of ran into the same issues of too many vegetables that I really didn't want. So, did not sign up this year.

It is just the two of us and we are not big milk drinkers. But we do use it to make some recipes and need milk on hand. I decided to buy a case of the 8 oz. tetra pack boxes of milk. It has worked out fabulously! It is always fresh because I only open what I need and nothing goes bad!

I have a small garden and tomatoes is my favorite thing to grow. I have discovered that next year I need to grow cherry tomatoes so I can have tomatoes for my salads before the larger variety of tomatoes becomes ripe. Cherry tomatoes are usually abundant and come early. I have some lettuce growing but started it late. I need to investigate more about growing lettuce and different varieties.

I wish I could find an online service that mailed out yogurt, cheese, cream cheese and other dairy choices.

It is about time I do another Peapod order and when I do, I do order a lot to keep stocked up and also to avoid too many delivery charges. The drawback of Peapod is that during the first months of the virus they were also short of items. You would place your order and when it arrived you were missing tons of things. You weren't charged of course but it stinks when you thoughtfully shop on line and plan for meals then the items are not available. Some of the missing items were the very reason I ordered from Peapod, dairy, cheese, some produce missing!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on July 19, 2020, 07:11:08 AM
It's probably not hoarding, but opportunism, but a friend of mine is very bitter on the subject of people buying up the kiddie pools at Walmart and Target, and then reselling them at huge markups on ebay.

A good place to go if you're trying to stock up is restaurant supply stores.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on July 19, 2020, 07:19:14 AM
I'm also  somebody who always buys in bulk anyway. So I didn't change my life much. The only annoying thing is we happened to be a little low on TP when the lockdown began, so we were living a square at a time for a while.

We also donate excess to the food pantry, so the food stays fresh.

When our area began to reopen, I had to restock, which meant taking my husband to Costco and doing a couple of two cart runs.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on July 19, 2020, 07:48:03 AM
25lb bags of rice are completely normal in Asian households :)

I stocked up on cereal, because our local Wegmans ran out of my favorite (Fall Harvest) at one point, so now I have maybe a couple of months worth in the house.

Nothing else, really. We went to Costco a couple of months ago, and next time we go I'll buy more toilet paper and paper towels, but I always do that. We have plenty of room to store paper products, so we usually have a six-month supply sitting around.

One thing I stopped buying is chocolate, and candy in general. I've lost 28lbs in the past twelve weeks, and I need to keep it off!
Congratulations!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sibley on July 19, 2020, 07:55:55 AM
I think we should ask the folks in say Detroit who encountered stripped shelves in their stores for weeks on end how much of a supply of staples at home would be ďprudenceĒ versus hoarding.

My parents are in the Detroit area, and they are highest of high risk for covid. They've been doing grocery delivery or pickups for months now. I've advised them to do a couple big orders and build up some stock. The memory of not being able to get basics is very fresh in their minds. I had to ship them cat food in March. They will be visiting me this week, and there's a few things that I've already set aside for them to take home because it's just not available in their stores, pandemic or not.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: partgypsy on July 19, 2020, 08:09:17 AM
For me, other than a few staples (flour, rice, some canned goods) it doesn't work well for me to have a lot of extra food, bc it's hard to keep track of and I don't want to waste food. I did make some larger groc trips at the beginning including shelf stable plant milk because I thought we may have to stay at home up to 4 weeks. And that first month after stocking up maybe went shopping 2 times. Anyways ive been stretching out going yo groc store, no more than once a week. Might mean we run out of fresh produce, bread and or milk, but not a big deal if it's just a couple days. We are eating pretty well actually (doing more cooking/baking). As far as tp I order a box of the more environmentally friendly to every few months from Amazon. I had ordered before covid hit, and the next time I ordered (April) no shortage. Maybe it's not people's favorite or something.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on July 19, 2020, 08:10:42 AM
We were among the luckier people in the Detroit area. No kids (so milk shortages weren't an issue), we don't eat normal bread, and we had access to warehouse clubs and independent stores, plus I have the schedule freedom to shop at off hours. I was never able to get everything on my list (and still can't always), but I was always able to get enough.

Still, it was very sobering to see empty shelves and cases, but often one or two things would be gone at a time: one week, there would be no chicken but a full case of ground turkey, another week the chicken would be stocked but there were no pork products, and then all of the meat would be stocked but there would be no dairy products. Some weeks there were pallets of canned beans, other weeks: nothing. I could only get yogurt, dried beans, and canned tomatoes at a small independent store for several weeks. It was about 5 or 6 weeks before I could get toilet paper of any kind, and by that point we had split our bulk pack with my parents and I needed to restock both houses. So yeah, I'm stocking up on various things because I fully expect another panic and more shortages this fall.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on July 19, 2020, 09:18:38 AM
Milk freezes quite well. Use wide mouth canning jars and donít fill them all the way up. Cheeses also freezes well. Blocks of cheese are a little crumbly, but bags of shredded cheese are absolutely fine.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on July 19, 2020, 09:33:37 AM
Milk freezes quite well. Use wide mouth canning jars and donít fill them all the way up. Cheeses also freezes well. Blocks of cheese are a little crumbly, but bags of shredded cheese are absolutely fine.
For milk, plastic is more forgiving. Just pour a little off and freeze in the original container. For cheese, grate, then spread out on a cookie sheet and flash freeze. Once it's frozen, pour into a zippy bag and put it back in the freezer. Easy peasy. No need to defrost before use, just take out what you want.

Oh, and be sure to defrost the frozen milk completely and shake furiously before using.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dave1442397 on July 19, 2020, 09:49:40 AM
Congratulations!

Thanks!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Christof on July 19, 2020, 01:49:10 PM
We stocked dried milk powder. ItĎs not the same as fresh, organic milk, but good enough as a backup. Bonus is we can store it for over a year.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on July 19, 2020, 03:58:15 PM
Milk freezes quite well. Use wide mouth canning jars and donít fill them all the way up. Cheeses also freezes well. Blocks of cheese are a little crumbly, but bags of shredded cheese are absolutely fine.
For milk, plastic is more forgiving. Just pour a little off and freeze in the original container. For cheese, grate, then spread out on a cookie sheet and flash freeze. Once it's frozen, pour into a zippy bag and put it back in the freezer. Easy peasy. No need to defrost before use, just take out what you want.

Oh, and be sure to defrost the frozen milk completely and shake furiously before using.

We don't go through milk very fast - it's cheapest if I buy a gallon and freeze it in two or three cup jars (I have tons of them.)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Trudie on July 19, 2020, 05:42:46 PM
Weíre pretty well stocked, but not hoarding.  We live in a Covid hotspot, so I am in no hurry to go out to the stores.  Itís also a university town, so I expect things to get way worse before they get better...especially this fall when students return and we start seeing flu on top of everything else.  So, Iím starting to be strategic with purchases and am getting a few extras here and there.  I need to peruse our drug cabinet and make sure weíre set.  Iíve been able to get everything except lemon ammonia, which I use to deodorize workout clothes.

Part of it for me is that I just find going out way more stressful than I used to.  I prefer to avoid the experience.  I also think itís more difficult for families with children, so I am happy to stay out of the mix.  I think behavior will get more frantic with the return to school.  There is a lot of planning and anxiety for families.  Oddly enough, I think it may lead to some panic at the stores.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: LaineyAZ on July 19, 2020, 05:50:37 PM
Ö.
What unique things have some of you stocked up on?

Items I'm looking to stock up on now before Fall include
a) over-the-counter medicines for cold and flu.  I think when regular flu season hits it's going to be a panic to figure out whether it's regular flu or Covid-19, so everyone who is even slightly sick will be buying all of the OTC meds; 

b)  some gardening seeds and starter plants.  Here in metro Phoenix that will be our growing season so I'd like to plant a few things like tomatoes and green onions.  Wish I had more space and some decent desert gardening knowledge, but that will be a 2021 goal.

The other aspect we haven't talked about much is job loss.  Tens of millions have lost their jobs, and a well-stocked pantry can at least be a buffer for some of that immediate need. 
What's the expression - our society is 9 missed meals away from chaos?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on July 19, 2020, 07:35:41 PM
Milk freezes quite well. Use wide mouth canning jars and donít fill them all the way up. Cheeses also freezes well. Blocks of cheese are a little crumbly, but bags of shredded cheese are absolutely fine.
For milk, plastic is more forgiving. Just pour a little off and freeze in the original container. For cheese, grate, then spread out on a cookie sheet and flash freeze. Once it's frozen, pour into a zippy bag and put it back in the freezer. Easy peasy. No need to defrost before use, just take out what you want.

Oh, and be sure to defrost the frozen milk completely and shake furiously before using.

We don't go through milk very fast - it's cheapest if I buy a gallon and freeze it in two or three cup jars (I have tons of them.)
When I was single, it drove me nuts to waste milk, so I used to buy quarts, even though they were more expensive. If I had to leave for a trip, I just tossed the container in the freezer. Now we blow through Costco 2-half gallon packs with ease, and bonus kid doesn't like the taste of powdered milk/won't drink it, even though I am a fan for its shelf stability.

Blah, blah, blah...all of that was preamble to one of my favorite frugal things. I started buying quarts of milk in plastic jugs with handles and screw tops. I wash them thoroughly, refill with water and freeze. I've found four of them fit across the bottom of my travel cooler and will keep food cold for 8-10 hours, which is awesome! I throw a couple of them into lined freezer bags when I do my regular grocery shopping as well. They store really neatly in the freezer. I guess I got my money's worth out of those more expensive quarts of milk after all.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cgbg on July 19, 2020, 08:38:13 PM
I assume that the fall will be bad. Iím all good on shelf stable items for the rest of 2020, including holiday baking.

I created a dinner meal plan for every day of every week between now and January. I went to Costco last week for the last time until 2021. Lunch is always leftovers and we are both pretty set on breakfast rotations and none of that involves cereal. I just made sure my pantry and freezers have enough to carry us through 2020. Iím done going into grocery stores for the year.

Now, to be sure, I donít have a holiday ham or turkey in my chest freezer but thatís ok because I still intend to have a small curbside order each week to 2 weeks.  Itís just the two of us so we have plenty of storage room. If the college aged kids come home, I think Iíll still have enough since we will be more into soups, stews and chili for the fall and I can never really make a small batch.

Realistically my meal plan will last for longer as we tend to have one to two leftover dinner nights each week. Iím still trying to scale down meals from when we had two teenage boys living here.

I also bought a couple of day old chicks about 10 days ago. Theyíll be ready to lay eggs in November so I shouldnít run out of those either. My excuse was that I had two broody hens so naturally baby chicks made sense. But the bonus is that Iíll have a steady supply of eggs when my older hens and my younger hens take a break.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MyAlterEgoIsTaller on July 20, 2020, 01:22:07 PM
I have a friend who is convinced there will be no food, gasoline, heating fuel, or electricity by winter.  He and his wife bought a giant freezer and filled it full of meat, and bought a generator to keep the freezer going, and solar panels to keep the generator going...  As a mostly-vegetarian I'm not too impressed with this - though I guess if things devolve to the level he's predicting, I know where to find some meat.

I live where there are big snow storms and long power outages, and I'm not close to stores so I was already in the habit of infrequent stock-ups of large-ish quantities.  Back when stay-home started it was winter and I was already prepared with a good 2 to 4 week supply of most everything.  The only thing I went a little crazy on was cat food - I saw it out of stock most places online, so when I found some I bought a couple huge bags.  That was irrational hoarder panic, since half the time my cat turns her nose up at what I offer and catches herself a chipmunk for breakfast.

Now my grocery stores are still out of disinfecting wipes, but I'm a one-person household, working at home, and going virtually nowhere since March, so I have no pressing need to disinfect much. Everything else that disappeared for a time is back now in my usual stores - paper products, baking supplies, rice and beans.  But seeing what happened in the spring has made me want to stockpile just a little more of those things than usual for the fall and winter.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Runrooster on July 20, 2020, 07:36:53 PM
I can't even think about hoarding yet, I'm still using up the supplies I bought during the empty grocery stores in March!
I bought/have left:
1. 6 frozen pizzas/2 left - I thought I'd be needing junk food once a week at least.
2. 4 pints haagen dazs /4 left - I ate 3, was given 3 more.
3. 6 boxes cereal/6 left - My Mom used to eat Cheerios like popcorn, with salt added.  Plus I think 3 were free and 3 were really cheap. Turns out she has a food sensitivity to oatmeal.  I started eating it for dessert yesterday.
4.lots of toilet paper/ lots of toilet paper - I think we have a 6 month supply, assuming no one else in our family needs it.
5. 20 pounds rice/ 15 pounds left - this is just normal shopping for us, usually lasts a year
6. various beans- this one I might could stock up on, as my Mom is only eating 4 of the many beans we have, but the stores didn't run low last time.
7. 15 cans beans/8 can beans - I actually would stock up on these if I saw good prices but I haven't.  Before they would come down to 33 cents a can, now they're 89 cents.  If the worst happens, I'll be out of work and will have time to pressure cook beans anyway.
8. yeast flour plenty- didnt use this as no one felt like baking and found good deals on sourdough bread
9. eggs /4dozen- so these have gotten cheap at times but I have no interest in freezing eggs, guess we'll have to eat the cost
10 various soup, pasta, frozen veg-I didnt buy extra nor did I use more. we eat mostly fresh fruit and veg and there wasnt a shortage yet.
11. ETA 30 granola bars, 3 bags chocolate - have about a 6 month supply at the rate I usually eat them

I probably forgot something but what else should I stockpile?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MonkeyJenga on July 20, 2020, 08:24:17 PM
I usually never keep much food on hand. Anything that's too snacky, I'll eat immediately, and anything too ingredient-y, I may never get around to turning into food. But now I'm stocking up on enough food and hygiene supplies to last through winter, in case fall harvests are interrupted or supply chains fail. The freezer is small, so everything's gotta be shelf-stable. Thankfully most things will keep for at least a year. For things like milk and eggs, I'm looking into vegan alternatives.

I'm not buying out the entire store, but I'm adding extras to my weekly grocery order. Bf and I are also preparing for winter gardening, so we can grow some fresh greens. We're kinda sorta preparing to dehydrate large amounts of gleaned fruit, but ugh it's such a pain... Avoiding scurvy would be real nice, though. Plus, free food!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Missy B on July 20, 2020, 11:58:06 PM
Costco has been vewwy, vewwy quiet lately. Went from lineups all the time to no line at all, even though they haven't increased the numbers allowed in. I assume that people made multiple stocking-up trips and are feeling relaxed at the moment, because our cases are still low.
There's some things on sale I think I'll get this weekend. Cases have started climbing here, and while I'm not personally afraid to grocery shop I'm concerned the numbers may trigger more panic buying from people.

The key new difference in my province, like so many other places, is stupid 20-30 year olds having parties and spreading their COVID all around. Their stupidity and selfishness can easily destroy the livelihoods of millions of people in my province alone.
More taxes for them.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: lthenderson on July 21, 2020, 06:51:33 AM
We probably have a two year supply of salsa, a half year supply of tomato sauce and juice, year supply of green beans, two year supply of frozen corn, a year supply of chickens and beef. We still have 100 lbs of rice which should last us well into next year. But all that stuff is homegrown (with the exception of the rice) and preserved in our large walk in pantry and chest deep freeze in the basement. We planted 25 or so tomato plants this year and will probably start canning them here in a few weeks to up our tomato stores to have enough for several years. So although it may look like hoarding, I think of it as just gardening. In future years I will be "hoarding" supplies of fruits as our orchard planted five years ago is starting to come online.

What I would hoard if I could find some is some hand sanitizer that doesn't smell repulsive. I miss the days when we could use better smelling stuff like Purell and GermX.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on July 21, 2020, 06:54:32 AM
Costco has been vewwy, vewwy quiet lately. Went from lineups all the time to no line at all, even though they haven't increased the numbers allowed in. I assume that people made multiple stocking-up trips and are feeling relaxed at the moment, because our cases are still low.
There's some things on sale I think I'll get this weekend. Cases have started climbing here, and while I'm not personally afraid to grocery shop I'm concerned the numbers may trigger more panic buying from people.

The key new difference in my province, like so many other places, is stupid 20-30 year olds having parties and spreading their COVID all around. Their stupidity and selfishness can easily destroy the livelihoods of millions of people in my province alone.
More taxes for them.

So much this.  My province (Ontario)  has almost 90% of new cases under 60.  I'm  betting on Canada Day celebrations being a contributor, there were 2 big ones (unauthorized) in Ottawa, plus lots of neighbourhood ones.  And the usual, bars and restaurants.

I'm stockpiling a bit as I shop.  If I see something on sale that I normally eat, something that keeps, I am buying extra.  If nothing else it will cut down on the winter driving.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: I'm a red panda on July 21, 2020, 08:58:37 AM
PDXTabs, I also have had a hard time finding Lysol wipes. Don't know if you are interested but what I did was buy baby wipes. I got the Walmart brand. Then I poured rubbing alcohol into the container. Maybe 6 ounces, enough to saturate all the wipes. I use that to wipe down things. Probably not approved by hospital standards but works for me!

Early on, I had to use cloth wipes with a spray bottle of water on my baby's butt for over a month because baby wipes were so impossible to find, since people were using them like lysol wipes.  I don't cloth diaper, so that was fun to deal with as laundry.

I've never used a sanitizing wipe.  If you are making your own anyway- why not use a rag? Or paper towels?  Why buy baby wipes that people need for babies?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on July 21, 2020, 09:50:09 AM
Count me in the group that has stocked up compared to the past.

Normally we would keep a weeks worth of food in the house, last winter we started batch cooking and vacuum packing portions so we would eat better so we have a good supply of precooked meals

Then late April / early March watching covid start I bought a little bit extra each trip so we would have a good base of 3+ months worth of rice, beans, nuts, oatmeal, coffee and the basics.

As things went on i had a hard time finding some basics that I needed to make our favorite batch meals such as crushed tomatoes or chicken stock and we just about ran out of precooked meals so now that things have simmered down a bit I have purchased extras of those items that we use regularly and we have been making more batch meals.

Isopropyl - we had one bottle, could not find any and ran out so now that it is popping up every once in a while I have bought a few extra bottles.

My laundry detergent ran out and went MIA on the shelves for a while and I breakout in horrible hives from most laundry detergent so when it came back in stock I grabbed a few extra bottles.

My goal is to avoid the store as much as possible and have a little extra of critical items to hold us over if things go out of stock.

Now if you asked the instacart delivery person that delivered my Costco order last month she would probably say I am a hoarder considering she thought she was delivering to a business :)

But hey, itís once every month 1/2 to two months for my big order
Last month...
6 cases of lacroix (we go through one a week)
6 cases of coke
8 128 oz cans of crushed tomatoes (already half gone 2 weeks later)
60 eggs
2 flats of sunchips
2 cases of chicken stock
15 lbs of potatoes
22 evol breakfast burritos (We eat one for breakfat every other day)
Olive oil
16 lbs of mixed frozen fruit (daily smoothies for lunch)
2 large jars of peanut butter
3 64 oz almond milk
4 lbs of butter
Lots of cheese
Large container of chilli powder
Large container of cumin
Large container of bay leaves
Bag of onions
Bag of garlic
Bale of bounty select a size
Bale of toilet paper
2 whole chickens


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Captain Cactus on July 21, 2020, 10:15:08 AM
I just went onto the Bob's Red Mill website to check out their bulk items (ie oat meal, musli, etc...) and was disappointed to see shipping was over $30+ for any bulk items...items not considered bulk had free shipping if over $50. 

Any recommendations for ordering bulk organic items online?  I don't want to step foot into a Costco/BJs, etc...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 21, 2020, 10:18:51 AM
I just went onto the Bob's Red Mill website to check out their bulk items (ie oat meal, musli, etc...) and was disappointed to see shipping was over $30+ for any bulk items...items not considered bulk had free shipping if over $50. 

Any recommendations for ordering bulk organic items online?  I don't want to step foot into a Costco/BJs, etc...

Try this place:
https://pleasanthillgrain.com/buy-oat-groats-rolled-organic-superpail-sale-bulk
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on July 21, 2020, 12:16:35 PM

I probably forgot something but what else should I stockpile?

I'm new to stockpiling anything other than grains and legumes.  One of our favorite new "stockpile" items is organic strawberry jam from Costco.  You can use it in the normal way on sandwiches and toast, add it to yogurt, make jam tarts (crostata) or homemade pop tarts, make flaky turnovers, put it on ice cream, flavor a smoothie, make thumbprint cookies, and more.  Mostly we add it to homemade yogurt.  I've been topping up the case I bought as we go through it, but on my next Costco trip I'll buy a second case.

We're trying to set ourselves up to need nothing other than perishables by the beginning of September, with 6 - 12 months worth of pantry and freezer foods stored, plus OTC medications, cleaning supplies, etc.  Call it hoarding if people must, but we plan on shopping this way well into the future -- it saves time and money, and we're done with replicating the once a week (or more often) shopping model.  If I can afford to buy a year's worth of jam in one go and have space to store it, why shop for it weekly/monthly?  It doesn't seem all that different from canning it myself for the year (except this jam is less expensive than starting with strawberries).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mountain mustache on July 21, 2020, 12:29:56 PM

I probably forgot something but what else should I stockpile?

 One of our favorite new "stockpile" items is organic strawberry jam from Costco.  You can use it in the normal way on sandwiches and toast, add it to yogurt, make jam tarts (crostata) or homemade pop tarts, make flaky turnovers, put it on ice cream, flavor a smoothie, make thumbprint cookies, and more.  Mostly we add it to homemade yogurt.  I've been topping up the case I bought as we go through it, but on my next Costco trip I'll buy a second case.
.

This jam is so good! And SO affordable, and low(er) in sugar. I always buy two jars at a time. My pandemic "hoarding" list has 3x Costco strawberry jam jars haha.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on July 21, 2020, 01:07:08 PM
You might think we are stockpiling cheese when we go to Costco, but no.  We just eat a lot of cheese.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on July 21, 2020, 01:31:34 PM
I like how this thread turned pro-hoarding. LOL
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on July 21, 2020, 02:27:34 PM
You might think we are stockpiling cheese when we go to Costco, but no.  We just eat a lot of cheese.

Same here.  I did stockpile Tillamook cheese when I finally went to Costco in mid-May after not having been since early March, but that's because most other cheddar cheeses are disappointing.  We like Tillamook so much I shred and freeze it so we have have the convenience of shredded cheese at the block Tillamook price.  But we also buy the sliced Tillamook at Costco.  I need to buy 2-3 of those a month (it seems my youngest is living on cheese these days, he polished off 2.5# of sliced cheese in 13 days earlier this month).  If I hadn't bought so much in May, my monthly cheese from Costco would easily be 12 - 15#.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on July 21, 2020, 02:30:53 PM
You might think we are stockpiling cheese when we go to Costco, but no.  We just eat a lot of cheese.

Same here.  I did stockpile Tillamook cheese when I finally went to Costco in mid-May after not having been since early March, but that's because most other cheddar cheeses are disappointing.  We like Tillamook so much I shred and freeze it so we have have the convenience of shredded cheese at the block Tillamook price.  But we also buy the sliced Tillamook at Costco.  I need to buy 2-3 of those a month (it seems my youngest is living on cheese these days, he polished off 2.5# of sliced cheese in 13 days earlier this month).  If I hadn't bought so much in May, my monthly cheese from Costco would easily be 12 - 15#.
We buy the Costco brand block cheese, but accidentally got Tillamook once when someone put a block there and swapped.  Not that we don't like the good stuff, we just buy the regular. 

Right before we went on quarantine, we bought the shredded colby jack (what, 4 lbs ?  8 lbs?)  The two-pack.  I've lost count of how many we go through in a month now.  Quesadillas, nachos, mac and cheese, scrambled eggs, burritos...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PDXTabs on July 21, 2020, 02:31:05 PM
Same here.  I did stockpile Tillamook cheese when I finally went to Costco in mid-May after not having been since early March, but that's because most other cheddar cheeses are disappointing.

You should try the Kerrygold (from Costco).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on July 21, 2020, 06:36:36 PM
Huh.  I thought American cheeses all came in spreadable jar based form.  :P
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Runrooster on July 21, 2020, 07:02:09 PM

I'm new to stockpiling anything other than grains and legumes.  One of our favorite new "stockpile" items is organic strawberry jam from Costco.  You can use it in the normal way on sandwiches and toast, add it to yogurt, make jam tarts (crostata) or homemade pop tarts, make flaky turnovers, put it on ice cream, flavor a smoothie, make thumbprint cookies, and more.  Mostly we add it to homemade yogurt.  I've been topping up the case I bought as we go through it, but on my next Costco trip I'll buy a second case.

Thanks for the idea.  I see it gets rave reviews on the internet too.  Just not big jam eaters.  I buy yogurt pre-made, ditto turnovers.   I also don't eat bread too often and like it savory when I do.  I also eat a lot of fresh strawberries, my favorite fruit, so the jam seems superfluous.  I did buy 2 jars of fig jam 2 years ago; went through one.  Have to remember to pull out the second one for the rare bread eating. 

I did like the salsa idea; not sure if I'll buy some but I may stockpile canned tomatoes if I find the right kind.  I have 5 cans, I can easily go through double that.  Well, not easily - my Mom is allergic to the salt in there, and in canned spaghetti sauce of which I bought 4 bottles after cleaning out the 4 we had lying around.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Steeze on July 21, 2020, 07:05:49 PM
I went to throw the trash out today and someone in my building threw out 4 giant sized cans of marinara sauce - unopened ... it was 100+ degrees out, think they are still good?

Seems like they were throwing out the hoard! Should at least donate it sheesh.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on July 21, 2020, 08:14:58 PM
Did you check the expiration date on the jars? Some people take those seriously.  I personally would eat marinara sauce past the sell by date, but wouldn't donate it because food pantries wouldn't take it and also it doesn't seem right to give old food.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Papa bear on July 21, 2020, 08:35:27 PM
I just went onto the Bob's Red Mill website to check out their bulk items (ie oat meal, musli, etc...) and was disappointed to see shipping was over $30+ for any bulk items...items not considered bulk had free shipping if over $50. 

Any recommendations for ordering bulk organic items online?  I don't want to step foot into a Costco/BJs, etc...

Try this place:
https://pleasanthillgrain.com/buy-oat-groats-rolled-organic-superpail-sale-bulk
Has anyone bought from this place?

https://www.webstaurantstore.com

Iíve been looking at giant bags of oatmeal...


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Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PDXTabs on July 21, 2020, 08:58:50 PM
I personally would eat marinara sauce past the sell by date, but wouldn't donate it because food pantries wouldn't take it and also it doesn't seem right to give old food.

Some will for sure, Boulder Food Rescue (https://www.boulderfoodrescue.org/) comes to mind.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on July 21, 2020, 09:13:21 PM
I just went onto the Bob's Red Mill website to check out their bulk items (ie oat meal, musli, etc...) and was disappointed to see shipping was over $30+ for any bulk items...items not considered bulk had free shipping if over $50. 

Any recommendations for ordering bulk organic items online?  I don't want to step foot into a Costco/BJs, etc...

Try this place:
https://pleasanthillgrain.com/buy-oat-groats-rolled-organic-superpail-sale-bulk
Has anyone bought from this place?

https://www.webstaurantstore.com

Iíve been looking at giant bags of oatmeal...


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I purchased my vacuum packing machine and bags from them everything arrived in good order and timely.

No idea on food but I am happy with the equipment.


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Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Nickyd£g on July 22, 2020, 08:02:52 AM
I had been prepping for Brexit for about a year when Covid hit and must say I was bloody delighted I had supplies in and didn't have to brave the screaming crowds or miss out on loo roll. I'm back to prepping for Brexit again, should have about 6 months worth of food, meds, toiletries and household goods by December.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on July 22, 2020, 09:47:24 AM
I like how this thread turned pro-hoarding. LOL

Ha ha, what do you expect! MMM is all about hoarding followed by controlled consumption. We are a group self selected to be pro-hoarding. Even more amusing is how many of us were food and supplies hoarders before the pandemic, so that it involved little change of lifestyle (myself also guilty as charged.)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on July 23, 2020, 08:35:42 AM
I like how this thread turned pro-hoarding. LOL

Ha ha, what do you expect! MMM is all about hoarding followed by controlled consumption. We are a group self selected to be pro-hoarding. Even more amusing is how many of us were food and supplies hoarders before the pandemic, so that it involved little change of lifestyle (myself also guilty as charged.)
Ha! Nailed it. When my family used to tease me, I'd retort that I had what the Mormons would charitably call a "good start". No one's laughing at me now.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PoutineLover on July 23, 2020, 08:58:06 AM
I wouldn't say that I hoard, but I do keep a good supply of food on hand at all times. I like to have stuff like meat in the freezer, flour, rice, canned goods and pasta. Generally it's just so that I never NEED to go shopping for any given meal, there's always something in the house to make. Since the pandemic started, it definitely made me want to keep more food available, especially when things are hard to find and I don't want to shop as often. Can't really qualify it as hoarding though, since my apartment is small and I don't have room for a big stash. I'm really annoyed at the people who bought tons of shit that they didn't need/wouldn't eat just because they were panicking.
Early on when shelves were almost empty I saw someone with an entire cart full of chicken that was on sale, leaving none for anyone else. I hope they were cooking for a group home other something, because otherwise it was an unreasonable amount.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on July 23, 2020, 09:50:33 AM
I wouldn't say that I hoard, but I do keep a good supply of food on hand at all times. I like to have stuff like meat in the freezer, flour, rice, canned goods and pasta. Generally it's just so that I never NEED to go shopping for any given meal, there's always something in the house to make.

Yeah, I always kept a wide variety of items for versatility -as soon as I ran out of something, I replaced it- but never kept a deep stock of most food items. The pandemic has definitely changed that.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: kanga1622 on July 23, 2020, 10:56:39 AM
This thread may have turned not pro-hoarding (as most of us would be willing to share with family/friends/neighbors in need) but pro-planning.

I grew up in a tiny town that had a grocery store for a good portion of my childhood. When that closed and it was a 25 mile drive to the nearest grocery store, we learned to keep bookshelves in the basement with our usual food supplies (canned soup, tomato sauce, pasta, baking supplies, etc.) and we had 2 upright freezers full of meat. Pretty normal for people in farm country. Not a lot different from my grandfather that had a prolific garden and would can hundreds of jars of tomato juice, chili starter, pickles, vegetable juice, whole tomatoes, salsa, etc.

I still have that mentality even though I can literally see Walmart from my backyard. I don't want to run to the store for 1-2 items. So we've always kept a decent pantry stock and our upright freezer is full of several ingredients but also leftovers in single serve portions for those nights I don't feel like cooking. The only COVID related switch for me is keeping a higher threshold on my stock level and shopping every 2 weeks rather than once per week.

Honestly, if I felt safe going to Costco right now, we'd probably have a lot more stockpiled. :)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on July 23, 2020, 11:06:21 AM
Honestly, if I felt safe going to Costco right now, we'd probably have a lot more stockpiled. :)

If it eases your mind, Costco has been one of my safest and easiest shopping experiences since this began. They imposed a strict mask requirement at all stores back in April. It's worth a try if you can go at an off hour (I like weekday mornings).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: StarBright on July 23, 2020, 11:58:55 AM
Honestly, if I felt safe going to Costco right now, we'd probably have a lot more stockpiled. :)

If it eases your mind, Costco has been one of my safest and easiest shopping experiences since this began. They imposed a strict mask requirement at all stores back in April. It's worth a try if you can go at an off hour (I like weekday mornings).

+1
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 23, 2020, 12:35:40 PM
I am stocked up to the moon here but I just found out that I am out of a certain soup that I like. I am like, OMG, how did that happen! I actually ran out of something! So now I have to stock up on that. By the way, have any of you tried buying cans or jarred products at Walmart online? That is a disaster. They will throw glass jars of spaghetti sauce in the bottom of the box. No packaging materials, no dividers, no cardboard/bubble wrap to protect the jars. Just all tossed in the bottom and shipped. I have received quite a few shipments of jars broken, lids popped off and a box full of sauce. I do not understand why they do this. I have called repeatedly to get refunds, complained of the condition of the broken jars, etc. They always say they will report it. They just don't care! The cans come extremely dented like they went thru a war zone. GRRRRR!!!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: oldladystache on July 23, 2020, 12:42:54 PM
By the way, have any of you tried buying cans or jarred products at Walmart online? That is a disaster. They will throw glass jars of spaghetti sauce in the bottom of the box. No packaging materials, no dividers, no cardboard/bubble wrap to protect the jars. Just all tossed in the bottom and shipped. I have received quite a few shipments of jars broken, lids popped off and a box full of sauce. I do not understand why they do this. I have called repeatedly to get refunds, complained of the condition of the broken jars, etc. They always say they will report it. They just don't care! The cans come extremely dented like they went thru a war zone. GRRRRR!!!
I have had the same experience. Mostly dented cans. How hard can it be to pack things properly?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on July 23, 2020, 12:46:30 PM
Same here.  I did stockpile Tillamook cheese when I finally went to Costco in mid-May after not having been since early March, but that's because most other cheddar cheeses are disappointing.

You should try the Kerrygold (from Costco).

Our Costco has Kerrygold butter, but doesn't often have Kerrygold cheese other than the Dubliner.  We used to splurge on that occasionally.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on July 23, 2020, 01:11:44 PM
I am stocked up to the moon here but I just found out that I am out of a certain soup that I like. I am like, OMG, how did that happen! I actually ran out of something! So now I have to stock up on that. By the way, have any of you tried buying cans or jarred products at Walmart online? That is a disaster. They will throw glass jars of spaghetti sauce in the bottom of the box. No packaging materials, no dividers, no cardboard/bubble wrap to protect the jars. Just all tossed in the bottom and shipped. I have received quite a few shipments of jars broken, lids popped off and a box full of sauce. I do not understand why they do this. I have called repeatedly to get refunds, complained of the condition of the broken jars, etc. They always say they will report it. They just don't care! The cans come extremely dented like they went thru a war zone. GRRRRR!!!

I learned my lesson in April -- Target does the same thing.  Everything arrived dented, no packing materials are used, and one huge box was easily 50# with everything jumbled together and much of it destroyed.  This was when there was no way I would go to the store for a refund.  Costco does better with their 2 day grocery program, but it's still not perfect.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: slappy on July 23, 2020, 01:16:54 PM
I haven't had much issue with ordering stuff online. I order from Sams all the time and I don't have dents, broken stuff, etc. We had four jars of spaghetti sauce come from walmart with no issues.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on July 23, 2020, 01:17:36 PM
I have been doing curbside with Walmart and have zero issues maybe try curbside?


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Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Buffaloski Boris on July 23, 2020, 08:18:41 PM
(https://meme-generator.com/wp-content/uploads/mememe/2020/03/mememe_f41ddaf8fff14b7db372f058dd56716f-1.jpg)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 24, 2020, 06:46:29 AM
The Walmart in my town is small and not a super Walmart and does not offer curbside service. Most of the grocery stores in my area do not offer it either. The one store that does is a small family store and prices are sky high.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on July 24, 2020, 06:59:03 AM
Thatís a bummer, pretty much all of the stores including bike shops are doing curbside.

First time during this pandemic that I am glad to be in a city instead of being jelly of my cousin that moved totally off grid up in the mountains a year ago.


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Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 24, 2020, 09:08:04 AM
I order a lot from Peapod which is a grocery delivery service. They just delivered today. The trouble with them is that sale items are hard to come by. They have sale items but not much stuff. Then, before delivery you get the invoice and then it will tell you what is out of stock in  your order. So you don't know what is out of stock so you can choose something else. It stinks in some ways.

So, I ordered some sauce from Amazon. It said it was a case of 12 jars. I have been having so much bad luck with Walmart and broken jars I thought maybe buying a case from Amazon would be better and it would be in the manufacturer's cardboard box. The box arrived 3 days ago and it was from Walmart! The Amazon person drop shipped it from Walmart! Guess what? They threw all 12 jars in the bottom of the box, no packing materials at all. The jars were not wrapped in paper, bubble...nothing! The box was also too big and with no packaging materials, the glass jars had a bumpy ride. The Hub opened up the box that was dripping all over the driveway and ants were crawling al over it! Most of the jars were broken and the others lids had popped off. The whole box was filled with glass and sauce. Seriously, I would think a 6 years old kid would know better that the stuff would break if it had no packaging materials. I contacted the Amazon person and they begrudgingly said they would refund my money. GRRRRR!!!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: coppertop on July 24, 2020, 09:25:56 AM
We are vegetarian, and right after things began shutting down here (just before St. Patrick's Day), our staple foods totally disappeared from store shelves.  Rice, pasta, tomato products, dried and canned beans, oatmeal, etc. People even reported difficulty in finding tofu.  I said never again, so now I do have a fully stocked pantry, which I inventory, and expect will last me a few months.  Funny how everyone is keto or low carb and telling us we are killing ourselves by eating starches, but when the panic button hits, they have to have cupboards full of pasta and rice.  The two Aldi stores near me are still low or totally out of tomato products, chickpeas are not to be found, and are limiting facial tissue to one box at a time. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on July 24, 2020, 09:50:21 AM
I order a lot from Peapod which is a grocery delivery service. They just delivered today. The trouble with them is that sale items are hard to come by. They have sale items but not much stuff. Then, before delivery you get the invoice and then it will tell you what is out of stock in  your order. So you don't know what is out of stock so you can choose something else. It stinks in some ways.

So, I ordered some sauce from Amazon. It said it was a case of 12 jars. I have been having so much bad luck with Walmart and broken jars I thought maybe buying a case from Amazon would be better and it would be in the manufacturer's cardboard box. The box arrived 3 days ago and it was from Walmart! The Amazon person drop shipped it from Walmart! Guess what? They threw all 12 jars in the bottom of the box, no packing materials at all. The jars were not wrapped in paper, bubble...nothing! The box was also too big and with no packaging materials, the glass jars had a bumpy ride. The Hub opened up the box that was dripping all over the driveway and ants were crawling al over it! Most of the jars were broken and the others lids had popped off. The whole box was filled with glass and sauce. Seriously, I would think a 6 years old kid would know better that the stuff would break if it had no packaging materials. I contacted the Amazon person and they begrudgingly said they would refund my money. GRRRRR!!!
That is just maddening.  OMG.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 24, 2020, 10:05:33 AM
We are vegetarian, and right after things began shutting down here (just before St. Patrick's Day), our staple foods totally disappeared from store shelves.  Rice, pasta, tomato products, dried and canned beans, oatmeal, etc. People even reported difficulty in finding tofu.  I said never again, so now I do have a fully stocked pantry, which I inventory, and expect will last me a few months.  Funny how everyone is keto or low carb and telling us we are killing ourselves by eating starches, but when the panic button hits, they have to have cupboards full of pasta and rice.  The two Aldi stores near me are still low or totally out of tomato products, chickpeas are not to be found, and are limiting facial tissue to one box at a time.

Lots of chickpeas thru Walmart: https://www.walmart.com/search/?query=chickpeas

Warning, if you buy cans, expect them to be dented upon arrival. If you spend $35 you get free shipping. Easy enough to do!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: reformed spendthrift on July 24, 2020, 10:06:08 AM
If you live in the midwest, having lots of soup is pretty normal. I can't tell you the amount of cream of chicken I use for various recipes. Back in the 70's it was all about cream of mushroom. I try to cook healthier now but some of my old school recipes call for a lot of canned items.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: kanga1622 on July 24, 2020, 11:55:36 AM
Honestly, if I felt safe going to Costco right now, we'd probably have a lot more stockpiled. :)

If it eases your mind, Costco has been one of my safest and easiest shopping experiences since this began. They imposed a strict mask requirement at all stores back in April. It's worth a try if you can go at an off hour (I like weekday mornings).

I wish! Unfortunately we tagged along with my in-laws 1-2 times a year and picked up just a few items. But the store is 65 miles away in a city with a much higher COVID rate than my own locale. So we are hunkering down at home and avoiding the "city" as much as possible. As this is the only Costco store within about 150+ miles, it is a busy place pretty much all the time. We were just about to get our own membership now that we knew what they carried but we put the brakes on this idea now.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 24, 2020, 12:07:09 PM
Honestly, if I felt safe going to Costco right now, we'd probably have a lot more stockpiled. :)

If it eases your mind, Costco has been one of my safest and easiest shopping experiences since this began. They imposed a strict mask requirement at all stores back in April. It's worth a try if you can go at an off hour (I like weekday mornings).

I wish! Unfortunately we tagged along with my in-laws 1-2 times a year and picked up just a few items. But the store is 65 miles away in a city with a much higher COVID rate than my own locale. So we are hunkering down at home and avoiding the "city" as much as possible. As this is the only Costco store within about 150+ miles, it is a busy place pretty much all the time. We were just about to get our own membership now that we knew what they carried but we put the brakes on this idea now.

You could still get the membership and shop Costco on line. You will not be able to buy everything you see in the store but you will find a wide range of things. They have meat, fish, they will ship it frozen too. Since the virus, they have had less to offer but slowly they are getting in more stock. I order from them a lot.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: birdie55 on July 24, 2020, 12:13:34 PM
Some Costco stores have delivery, same day or soon.  Check someday.costco.com to see if your local Costco has local delivery.  Instacart does the delivery.   The prices are a little higher than in the store, but I find it worth it to pay extra to get the Costco items I am used to buying.  Delivered to my front porch.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MissPeach on July 24, 2020, 12:56:57 PM
We're not hoarding but with the long line to get in stores around here (about 45 minutes on average) I stopped going to as many stores to save my time and sanity. I used to go to 2 stores weekly and another one or two monthly. Now I rotate the two weekly ones to every other week and go less to the monthly ones. This means I'm buying 2-3 weeks worth of food instead of one. Sadly this means I also have to drive to the store when before I walked and carried things home.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Master of None on July 24, 2020, 01:09:39 PM
Just got an email from Sam's Club that they are having a promotion from 7/24-8/23 to get 5% back on all purchases in club or online if you make the purchase with your Sam's Club Mastercard. We have been planning on stocking up a staples and this seems like the perfect time to get a bit more cash back in the process. I'll be loading up on flour, rice, cereal, pasta noodles, and some meat. Probably will join the hordes in grabbing plenty of TP and paper towels.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: slappy on July 24, 2020, 01:40:52 PM
Just got an email from Sam's Club that they are having a promotion from 7/24-8/23 to get 5% back on all purchases in club or online if you make the purchase with your Sam's Club Mastercard. We have been planning on stocking up a staples and this seems like the perfect time to get a bit more cash back in the process. I'll be loading up on flour, rice, cereal, pasta noodles, and some meat. Probably will join the hordes in grabbing plenty of TP and paper towels.

Of course, because I just stocked up at sams last weekend.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on July 24, 2020, 01:59:06 PM
I wish! Unfortunately we tagged along with my in-laws 1-2 times a year and picked up just a few items. But the store is 65 miles away in a city with a much higher COVID rate than my own locale. So we are hunkering down at home and avoiding the "city" as much as possible. As this is the only Costco store within about 150+ miles, it is a busy place pretty much all the time. We were just about to get our own membership now that we knew what they carried but we put the brakes on this idea now.

We stayed away from Costco from early March through mid-May, but continued to order online using the "2 Day Grocery" program, which of course wasn't only 2 days because of demand.  The prices are higher than in store (to cover picking and packing), but we didn't want to risk going in store and the prices were acceptable compared to non-Costco prices.  Overall they did a decent job of packing things, although the peanut cans did end up dented.

I think Sam's Club also does delivery of non-perishable food.

Last night I mentioned to DH that we were more cautious early on when our county had far fewer cases, and I think it's time we go back to acting how we did the first couple of months.  Unfortunately, our young adult sons went back to work (essential business but they were allowed leave of absence at first), so there's no way to be as careful as we were before.  I do need to make one more in person Costco trip because one OTC med my kid takes has to be gotten from the pharmacist and can't be ordered online at all.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: JoJo on July 25, 2020, 11:53:35 AM
I've seen increased talk about a 2nd big lockdown.  I'm thinking about picking up a little extra stuff on the next trip to the supermarket on the non-parishables.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 25, 2020, 12:21:23 PM
Does anyone know where you can order cases of canned items? Like 28 oz cans of tomatoes or green beans, corn in cans that actually come packed in the original case from the factory?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: birdie55 on July 25, 2020, 12:31:34 PM
I ordered some canned tomatoes through Walmart.com.  Vitacost has canned foods and you can always look on Amazon.com too.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 25, 2020, 12:45:32 PM
I have had too many dented cans from Walmart and broken jars. I am looking for a place that ships the stuff in original cases, not just chucked into the bottom of a box like Walmart does.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: birdie55 on July 25, 2020, 01:06:41 PM
I ordered a case of 12 cans of tomatoes from Walmart and they came intact in the original case.  Cardboard bottom and plastic shrink wrapped.  It was the only time I ordered canned goods from Walmart and they came intact. no dents. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SotI on July 25, 2020, 02:05:40 PM
I stocked up beyond our regular prep level in late Feb - early March.
We've bern good since, just replenishing when we run low (i.e. 50% of planned items).
Otherwise, I just add fresh produce every two weeks or so.

I may opportunistically buy discounted or special offers in bulk, though.
Worst case, we would be good for a couple of months without external supplies.
That's not Corona-related, though. We generally plan for some emergencies and like to be as self-sufficient as possible.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: StarBright on July 25, 2020, 04:09:24 PM
One thing I've definitely noticed myself stocking up on is shelf stable food for a Little Free Pantry that I oversee. We have about 10 families who regularly stock it, but it is running out almost as fast as we can fill it these days.

But basically when food goes on sale for about a dollar (or less) a unit I stock up. This week I bought lots of cereal, granola bars, spaghetti, canned sauce, canned fruit, peanut butter, microwave rice & beans, and tuna pouches.  (I got 5 boxes of cheerios for $1.29, pasta was .69 so it evened out.)

So I spent an extra $50 on those items this week. I restocked the pantry last night and it was empty this morning. People are really hurting right now.

FWIW- because someone always asks this: we actually have our pantry near a security camera and people do not wipe out the pantry. People are really good about taking a few things and leaving the rest for others. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SavinMaven on July 25, 2020, 08:56:09 PM
FWIW- because someone always asks this: we actually have our pantry near a security camera and people do not wipe out the pantry. People are really good about taking a few things and leaving the rest for others.

Is the security camera visible? To what do you attribute the camaraderie you've seen?

I ask because we tried a free pantry in our town in March, and while 99% of people who came only took a few items, once every day or two we would have someone clear it out (some consecutive days, it was the same couple, taking even the plastic tubs items were displayed in) and eventually those stocking it gave up. Would love to find out what makes this successful so we could try to get it going again.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: StarBright on July 26, 2020, 12:35:08 PM
FWIW- because someone always asks this: we actually have our pantry near a security camera and people do not wipe out the pantry. People are really good about taking a few things and leaving the rest for others.

Is the security camera visible? To what do you attribute the camaraderie you've seen?

I ask because we tried a free pantry in our town in March, and while 99% of people who came only took a few items, once every day or two we would have someone clear it out (some consecutive days, it was the same couple, taking even the plastic tubs items were displayed in) and eventually those stocking it gave up. Would love to find out what makes this successful so we could try to get it going again.

Security cam is visible and it is located at a church and the priest's house is VERY close by.

We also have a couple of signs on it that say something like "if you need extra food help please contact X phone number", and another that posts the regular (three times a week) food pantry hours that is within walking distance of the little free pantry.

I did take a call the other day from a woman who missed the food pantry hours and didn't want to clean out the pantry. I met her at the pantry and brought her some extra groceries. It worked nicely - but also - people are really good at not taking advantage of it. I only meet someone to bring them extra food about once a month.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on July 31, 2020, 07:21:43 AM
We just got a second fridge, and we already have a chest freezer. It sounds a little extreme, but with all these teens and teen-sized tweens around, the food goes pretty fast. My husband's family (3 boys) had three fridges when he was growing up. 

3 gallons of milk usually last us only a week, so the new fridge should help us stay at home for two weeks at a time as needed.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: kanga1622 on July 31, 2020, 12:02:45 PM
We just got a second fridge, and we already have a chest freezer. It sounds a little extreme, but with all these teens and teen-sized tweens around, the food goes pretty fast. My husband's family (3 boys) had three fridges when he was growing up. 

3 gallons of milk usually last us only a week, so the new fridge should help us stay at home for two weeks at a time as needed.

We have a dorm fridge in the basement next to our upright freezer. That extra space is CRITICAL in keeping an extra gallon of milk, lunchmeat, OJ, and yogurt on hand. It is the only way we can stretch grocery shopping to two week rotations. And we only have 1 kid in the house that drinks milk! Even though it is a small fridge, it is just enough to restock those high traffic items that don't necessarily freeze as well.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 31, 2020, 01:03:15 PM
It is just the Hub and I and we have a big upright freezer and a refrigerator with a freezer in the basement. Everything is full and I have been thinking about buying another freezer. I like to buy turkey breast, ham and prime rib when it goes on sale so we have it for the year. I also have some garden produce I need room for.

I have looked for an upright freezer thru various stores and for some reason I can't get one to my zipcode. Constantly out of stock. Is everyone hoarding up on freezers too?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Christof on July 31, 2020, 01:07:51 PM
I have looked for an upright freezer thru various stores and for some reason I can't get one to my zipcode. Constantly out of stock. Is everyone hoarding up on freezers too?

IsnĎt storage in the cloud aka craigslist a thing in the US anymore?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: honeybbq on July 31, 2020, 01:08:53 PM
I probably look a little bit hoardish right now... but it's all due to the pandemic. I didn't "stock up" when the shit hit the fan, and we had to go without a lot of basics (canned tomatoes and beans) that we eat a lot of.

I put in several online orders from various e-tailers (eg costco, etc) with overlapping items because often they wouldn't arrive. Sometimes I would get the things I wanted and sometimes I wouldn't. I think I have enough all purpose flour right now to last through the end of the year because at one point I got 3 orders to go through, each had all purpose flour in them. That's ok- it'll keep. I'd rather have "too much" than "not enough". We also got down to literally our last roll of TP in April... you bet I got a bunch from Costco as soon as they had it in stock!! Again, the alternative... not so pleasant.

Easy enough to keep and use up over time. "Hoarding" has a connotation that implies there is something unreasonable or unneeded about the stock pile. Right now I'm finding it perfectly acceptable (and preferable) to have one.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on July 31, 2020, 02:02:18 PM
I have looked for an upright freezer thru various stores and for some reason I can't get one to my zipcode. Constantly out of stock. Is everyone hoarding up on freezers too?

IsnĎt storage in the cloud aka craigslist a thing in the US anymore?

Yes, have been looking at Craigs List too and the only one I found was about 9 years old and way over priced. I even looked for restaurant commercial type freezers on CL but nothing used that was affordable.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on July 31, 2020, 02:56:47 PM
I have looked for an upright freezer thru various stores and for some reason I can't get one to my zipcode. Constantly out of stock. Is everyone hoarding up on freezers too?

IsnĎt storage in the cloud aka craigslist a thing in the US anymore?

Yes, have been looking at Craigs List too and the only one I found was about 9 years old and way over priced. I even looked for restaurant commercial type freezers on CL but nothing used that was affordable.

This. Yeah, for those outside of the US, weíve had shortages on various things since March. Freezers and bicycles in a reasonable price range are difficult to find right now, new or used.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MicroRN on August 01, 2020, 08:54:23 AM
I normally keep a large stockpile of food and buy in bulk so I can't say my routine has changed much.  We have 2 deep freezers. We buy pork & beef by the half animal, and raise and butcher our own chickens.  I regularly buy large amounts of in-season produce to can or freeze.  I just bought 15lbs of locally grown jalapenos to turn into candied jalapeno slices & jalapeno jelly.  I buy basics like rice, flour, sugar, and rolled oats in huge bags and store them in buckets.  I keep powdered milk/butter on hand for baking.  We have our own chickens, so when eggs disappeared from the store we were fine and I had enough to share with people.  Dried beans are a staple in our house & used at least once a week, so I usually have several pounds each of multiple varieties on hand.  We did run a bit low on toilet paper, but I did cloth diapers, so I'm not afraid to use rags as a backup.  I usually stay ahead on things like toiletries and pet food, because I hate having to make unexpected shopping trips for just a couple items.   

I do it for 2 reasons - 1) because it's cheaper to do it that way, if you can afford the initial outlay and 2) I like having everything on hand to cook without having to run out to the store for something.

My line between hoarding vs stockpiling is - will you actually USE what you have stored?  Are you regularly working through & rotating your stocks?  Panic buying is not the same as a considered stockpile.     
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: jeninco on August 01, 2020, 08:54:13 PM
^--- I resemble this, although not so much. We buy 1/2 steer each year in the fall (although this year they sold out before we got an order in, alas!), and went into the pandemic with 35 lbs of flour, 20 lbs of oats )(I make our granola), maybe 1-2 dozen pounds of various beans, and 10 lbs of sugar.  However, because we moved to making a lot more of our own bread and pasta (and more regular baking of yummy baked things) we ran through our supply pretty quickly. We have two active adults and two teenaged boys/young men.

I think I just fully re-stocked for at least the second time, perhaps the third: I bought another 10 lbs sugar, 30 lbs flour (20 lbs AP, 10 lbs ww), 20 lbs oats, 15 or so lbs various beans, 4 or 5 kinds of hot sauces in various configurations (chipotles in adobo sauce are very popular around here). But as @MicroRN pointed out, it's really pre-buying: we'll use all this stuff (in fact, probably in the next 6-8 weeks).

And, indeed, the biggest pain of the whole shopping experience was having to take everything out of the pantry so the new stuff could go on the bottom/in the back so the older supply gets used first. FIFO, yo.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on August 01, 2020, 09:33:47 PM
IsnĎt storage in the cloud aka craigslist a thing in the US anymore?

This made me laugh!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on August 02, 2020, 05:07:37 PM
I'm managing my anxiety about a fall second wave by preserving my vegetable harvest. Seeing my shelves and freezer fill up again is soothing. I think that the satisfaction is more from the ability to exercise control over a fear of going without, as opposed to a belief that there'll be a shortage of cabbage in the next year.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on August 02, 2020, 05:55:27 PM
I'm managing my anxiety about a fall second wave by preserving my vegetable harvest. Seeing my shelves and freezer fill up again is soothing. I think that the satisfaction is more from the ability to exercise control over a fear of going without, as opposed to a belief that there'll be a shortage of cabbage in the next year.

Breaking News - The prayers of millions of children have been answered this year by the ongoing cabbage shortage.  Children say they're setting their sights on Lima beans next.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on August 02, 2020, 10:52:07 PM
Jeninco, I donít know how big your pantry is, but mine is 2 feet deep.  I store everything in lines from front to back and in the same categories, eg, all soups in a line, all beans in a line, etc.  If thereís not enough of a category to make a full line, I leave a break and continue with another category.  When I remove an item, I reach to the back (thereís enough height to get my arm in), then push the rest of the line back, making room at the front for new items.  As long as everyone keeps to the system, itís really easy.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on August 03, 2020, 12:14:22 AM
I'm managing my anxiety about a fall second wave by preserving my vegetable harvest. Seeing my shelves and freezer fill up again is soothing. I think that the satisfaction is more from the ability to exercise control over a fear of going without, as opposed to a belief that there'll be a shortage of cabbage in the next year.

Breaking News - The prayers of millions of children have been answered this year by the ongoing cabbage shortage.  Children say they're setting their sights on Lima beans next.
Sufferin' succotash!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on August 03, 2020, 06:32:46 AM
I'm managing my anxiety about a fall second wave by preserving my vegetable harvest. Seeing my shelves and freezer fill up again is soothing. I think that the satisfaction is more from the ability to exercise control over a fear of going without, as opposed to a belief that there'll be a shortage of cabbage in the next year.

Breaking News - The prayers of millions of children have been answered this year by the ongoing cabbage shortage.  Children say they're setting their sights on Lima beans next.
Sufferin' succotash!

LOL

I had a brief moment of feeling normal this spring when there was a shortage of dried beans.  I felt as though the rest of the world was finally coming around to seeing the value in the little nuggets of shelf-stable, high protein, high fibre delights. While some people stockpile gold, I prefer my treasure to be edible.

I do worry that those beautiful little marvels will now go neglected and unappreciated in the back of the cupboards of people who won't actually eat them though. I worry about the strangest things.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: lthenderson on August 03, 2020, 06:55:14 AM
I had a brief moment of feeling normal this spring when there was a shortage of dried beans.  I felt as though the rest of the world was finally coming around to seeing the value in the little nuggets of shelf-stable, high protein, high fibre delights. While some people stockpile gold, I prefer my treasure to be edible.

We've always had dried beans in our pantry but this year, I pressure canned some for the first time and wonder why I haven't been doing that all my life. It is such a treat to open a jar and be eating beans within minutes versus having to wait an entire day to get them cooked.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 03, 2020, 06:57:13 AM
I am guilty of having beans in the back of my cupboard. However, with the exception of split green peas, I never know how to prepare beans. I know how to make chili with kidney beans (canned). For some reason I had to have these Christmas lima beans. I had a recipe at the time and I guess I made it and it was ho hum. I was gung ho when I bought them and probably have 5 lbs. of them. I think people would eat beans if they knew how to cook them!

I was not brought up in a household that made bean recipes except chili.

My grandparents lived in Kentucky and they always had soup beans, whatever that is! I have never had them, don't know how to cook them either! I was told my grandpa would demand his beans every single day! By the way, he lived to be 113 years old! Maybe there is something to the beans! Grandma lived to age 91!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Moonwaves on August 03, 2020, 07:13:56 AM
My grandparents lived in Kentucky and they always had soup beans, whatever that is! I have never had them, don't know how to cook them either! I was told my grandpa would demand his beans every single day! By the way, he lived to be 113 years old! Maybe there is something to the beans! Grandma lived to age 91!
I had to google it and I would definitely eat soup beans (https://whatscookingamerica.net/soup/appalachian-soupbeans.htm). Sounds sooo good. Looks like pinto beans are the tradtional bean but it can also be made with lima/butter beans. This salad (https://www.mortgagefreeinthree.com/yasmeens-turkish-piyaz-salad/) is also really good. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: StarBright on August 03, 2020, 07:28:18 AM
I am guilty of having beans in the back of my cupboard. However, with the exception of split green peas, I never know how to prepare beans. I know how to make chili with kidney beans (canned). For some reason I had to have these Christmas lima beans. I had a recipe at the time and I guess I made it and it was ho hum. I was gung ho when I bought them and probably have 5 lbs. of them. I think people would eat beans if they knew how to cook them!

I was not brought up in a household that made bean recipes except chili.

My grandparents lived in Kentucky and they always had soup beans, whatever that is! I have never had them, don't know how to cook them either! I was told my grandpa would demand his beans every single day! By the way, he lived to be 113 years old! Maybe there is something to the beans! Grandma lived to age 91!

I grew up in Indiana (with a Grandma from Kentucky) and we call soup beans "Ham and Beans" and it is legitimately one of my top two comfort foods. We eat it at least once a month starting in the fall.

The recipe I grew up with is the same as the soup beans recipe that Moonwaves linked to except we tend to make ours with white beans instead of pinto beans. When we're feeling fancy we mix in a dab of molasses or brown sugar, a hit of hot sauce and a dash or two of cider vinegar (just to brighten up the flavor). We eat ours with cornbread crumbled in. Heaven!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on August 03, 2020, 07:32:47 AM
I am guilty of having beans in the back of my cupboard. However, with the exception of split green peas, I never know how to prepare beans. I know how to make chili with kidney beans (canned). For some reason I had to have these Christmas lima beans. I had a recipe at the time and I guess I made it and it was ho hum. I was gung ho when I bought them and probably have 5 lbs. of them. I think people would eat beans if they knew how to cook them!

I was not brought up in a household that made bean recipes except chili.

Come to think of it, growing up we only ever had beans in the form of tinned pork and beans. I guess that I got turned on to them in my late teens and 20s when I was vegetarian / vegan and started living on my own. Nowdays, I eat a serving of beans or legumes in some form or other most days.

@Roadrunner53 , I present you with the brand-new thread: How do YOU eat your BEANS? Where we can all share our favorite tips and recipes for you. https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/share-your-badassity/how-do-you-eat-your-beans/

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 03, 2020, 07:42:09 AM
Salad looks good!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on August 03, 2020, 07:52:40 AM
My grandparents lived in Kentucky and they always had soup beans, whatever that is! I have never had them, don't know how to cook them either! I was told my grandpa would demand his beans every single day! By the way, he lived to be 113 years old! Maybe there is something to the beans! Grandma lived to age 91!
I had to google it and I would definitely eat soup beans (https://whatscookingamerica.net/soup/appalachian-soupbeans.htm). Sounds sooo good. Looks like pinto beans are the tradtional bean but it can also be made with lima/butter beans. This salad (https://www.mortgagefreeinthree.com/yasmeens-turkish-piyaz-salad/) is also really good.

We do a version of soup beans regularly. I like some sort of pork, onions, garlic, pepper, cumin, and chili powder in it. We eat ours over rice or with corn tortillas/chips with cheese and salsa.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on August 03, 2020, 08:24:00 AM
I'm managing my anxiety about a fall second wave by preserving my vegetable harvest. Seeing my shelves and freezer fill up again is soothing. I think that the satisfaction is more from the ability to exercise control over a fear of going without, as opposed to a belief that there'll be a shortage of cabbage in the next year.

Breaking News - The prayers of millions of children have been answered this year by the ongoing cabbage shortage.  Children say they're setting their sights on Lima beans next.
Sufferin' succotash!

LOL

I had a brief moment of feeling normal this spring when there was a shortage of dried beans.  I felt as though the rest of the world was finally coming around to seeing the value in the little nuggets of shelf-stable, high protein, high fibre delights. While some people stockpile gold, I prefer my treasure to be edible.

I do worry that those beautiful little marvels will now go neglected and unappreciated in the back of the cupboards of people who won't actually eat them though. I worry about the strangest things.

Worst case scenario they can always end up as new bean bag chairs.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Captain Cactus on August 03, 2020, 09:52:40 AM
I'm still slowly stockpiling extra food.  A small part of me does fear things getting really bad this fall, to the point that the shelves will be bare or we won't want to go to the grocery store. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 03, 2020, 10:21:00 AM
Captain Cactus, I am doing the same thing. I am not buying hundreds of cans of things but 6 here and there. I just bought some rice (10 one pound bags) and we are not big rice eaters. I buy it, put in some bay leaves to help keep bugs out and then vac seal them. I have bought different pasta's, canned tomato products. Some extra meat and froze it. And yes, paper towels, toilet paper and kleenex.

I am also worried about the fall with the Corona Virus and the flu season.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: merlin7676 on August 03, 2020, 12:56:37 PM
We're not doing a sky is falling stockpile, but we are getting extra stuff with our normal grocery shopping. Everytime we go, we grab a few here and there of canned soups and veggies, a few boxes of pasta and sauce, bags of beans, boxes of mac and cheese, bag of rice etc. Best to be safe rather than sorry and if we don't end up "needing" it this fall/winter, then we will have less grocery shopping to do.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: John Galt incarnate! on August 03, 2020, 01:44:05 PM


I just bought some rice (10 one pound bags) and we are not big rice eaters. I buy it, put in some bay leaves to help keep bugs out and then vac seal them.


I bought two 5-gallon plastic bottles that are used for water coolers.

One is for rice and the other for beans.

They  are  "weevilproof."
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: John Galt incarnate! on August 03, 2020, 01:50:11 PM
My grandparents lived in Kentucky and they always had soup beans, whatever that is! I have never had them, don't know how to cook them either! I was told my grandpa would demand his beans every single day! By the way, he lived to be 113 years old! Maybe there is something to the beans! Grandma lived to age 91!
I had to google it and I would definitely eat soup beans (https://whatscookingamerica.net/soup/appalachian-soupbeans.htm). Sounds sooo good. Looks like pinto beans are the tradtional bean but it can also be made with lima/butter beans. This salad (https://www.mortgagefreeinthree.com/yasmeens-turkish-piyaz-salad/) is also really good.

We do a version of soup beans regularly. I like some sort of pork, onions, garlic, pepper, cumin, and chili powder in it. We eat ours over rice or with corn tortillas/chips with cheese and salsa.

I like my homemade bean soup, pea soup, and lentil soup.

Sometimes I have the bean soup w/ rice.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on August 03, 2020, 01:54:21 PM


I just bought some rice (10 one pound bags) and we are not big rice eaters. I buy it, put in some bay leaves to help keep bugs out and then vac seal them.


I bought two 5-gallon plastic bottles that are used for water coolers.

One is for rice and the other for beans.

They  are  "weevilproof."

There were two pirates on a ship, the rest of the crew had starved away when supplies had run out.  In frustration one of them opened the grain barrel and stared at the two bugs running around the bottom in the dust.

"Aha!" Says one pirate, looking pleased with himself, "I'll eat the smaller bug!"

"Why does that please you so much?", says the other pirate.

"'Tis the lesser of two weevils!"
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: John Galt incarnate! on August 03, 2020, 01:55:30 PM


I just bought some rice (10 one pound bags) and we are not big rice eaters. I buy it, put in some bay leaves to help keep bugs out and then vac seal them.


I bought two 5-gallon plastic bottles that are used for water coolers.

One is for rice and the other for beans.

They  are  "weevilproof."

There were two pirates on a ship, the rest of the crew had starved away when supplies had run out.  In frustration one of them opened the grain barrel and stared at the two bugs running around the bottom in the dust.

"Aha!" Says one pirate, looking pleased with himself, "I'll eat the smaller bug!"

"Why does that please you so much?", says the other pirate.

"'Tis the lesser of two weevils!"

Ha ha!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: John Galt incarnate! on August 03, 2020, 01:59:10 PM
Don't let your dried peas stay in storage for too long.

If you do no matter how long you boil them they will stay mostly hard and have an awful, bitter taste.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: KBecks on August 05, 2020, 04:56:17 AM
I went to two big box stores yesterday (yikes) and I noticed that the shelves that are usually full are noticeably less full, esp. in housewares where I was shopping.  Also, cleaning items, of course.  I am trying to think -- do we need anything?  Are we missing anything?  But we are really not.  And there are good alternative places to shop -- the hardware store, online stores, secondhand -- I don't think things will be scarce soon, but it was a little different from what we have grown used to.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on August 06, 2020, 02:02:02 PM


I just bought some rice (10 one pound bags) and we are not big rice eaters. I buy it, put in some bay leaves to help keep bugs out and then vac seal them.


I bought two 5-gallon plastic bottles that are used for water coolers.

One is for rice and the other for beans.

They  are  "weevilproof."

The weevils are already in the beans and rice, my friend. They don't come in from outside so much as....... hatch.....
Stick your rice and beans in the freezer for a week before storing.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mountain mustache on August 06, 2020, 02:14:38 PM


I just bought some rice (10 one pound bags) and we are not big rice eaters. I buy it, put in some bay leaves to help keep bugs out and then vac seal them.


I bought two 5-gallon plastic bottles that are used for water coolers.

One is for rice and the other for beans.

They  are  "weevilproof."

The weevils are already in the beans and rice, my friend. They don't come in from outside so much as....... hatch.....
Stick your rice and beans in the freezer for a week before storing.

Ugh...I *knew* this, but liked to pretend that it's not true, because I don't like thinking about it too much....good reminder to stick things into the freezer for a while.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: nereo on August 06, 2020, 02:18:09 PM


I just bought some rice (10 one pound bags) and we are not big rice eaters. I buy it, put in some bay leaves to help keep bugs out and then vac seal them.


I bought two 5-gallon plastic bottles that are used for water coolers.

One is for rice and the other for beans.

They  are  "weevilproof."

The weevils are already in the beans and rice, my friend. They don't come in from outside so much as....... hatch.....
Stick your rice and beans in the freezer for a week before storing.

Ugh...I *knew* this, but liked to pretend that it's not true, because I don't like thinking about it too much....good reminder to stick things into the freezer for a while.

reminds me... we moved several months ago and our large flour countained (with several lbs of flour still inside) got packed into a box and put into storage and moved 3x until we were able to unpack it about 6 months later.  Less flour but lots more meal-worms inside...

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 06, 2020, 03:09:47 PM
Some people swear bay leaves work for weevils but vac packing removes oxygen so if they should hatch they won't have oxygen. Freezing is supposed to be the best solution to kill them. However, I have no room in my freezer!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: LaineyAZ on August 06, 2020, 06:14:09 PM
Don't let your dried peas stay in storage for too long.

If you do no matter how long you boil them they will stay mostly hard and have an awful, bitter taste.

How long is too long?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on August 06, 2020, 06:32:30 PM
Don't let your dried peas stay in storage for too long.

If you do no matter how long you boil them they will stay mostly hard and have an awful, bitter taste.

How long is too long?

You'll know when you boil them and they stay mostly hard.  :P
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on August 06, 2020, 06:50:42 PM


I just bought some rice (10 one pound bags) and we are not big rice eaters. I buy it, put in some bay leaves to help keep bugs out and then vac seal them.


I bought two 5-gallon plastic bottles that are used for water coolers.

One is for rice and the other for beans.

They  are  "weevilproof."

The weevils are already in the beans and rice, my friend. They don't come in from outside so much as....... hatch.....
Stick your rice and beans in the freezer for a week before storing.

Ugh...I *knew* this, but liked to pretend that it's not true, because I don't like thinking about it too much....good reminder to stick things into the freezer for a while.

It's a good sign. It means your produce was grown with a minimum of pesticide, and hasn't been irradiated. Good products come with good little critters.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 06, 2020, 07:13:56 PM


I just bought some rice (10 one pound bags) and we are not big rice eaters. I buy it, put in some bay leaves to help keep bugs out and then vac seal them.


I bought two 5-gallon plastic bottles that are used for water coolers.

One is for rice and the other for beans.

They  are  "weevilproof."

The weevils are already in the beans and rice, my friend. They don't come in from outside so much as....... hatch.....
Stick your rice and beans in the freezer for a week before storing.

Ugh...I *knew* this, but liked to pretend that it's not true, because I don't like thinking about it too much....good reminder to stick things into the freezer for a while.

It's a good sign. It means your produce was grown with a minimum of pesticide, and hasn't been irradiated. Good products come with good little critters.

Eggs = invisible extra protein
Larvae = not so invisible ick factor protein

Freezing is even more important if you are saving seeds for planting.  They just need to be REALLY dry first.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Trudie on August 09, 2020, 08:39:46 PM
Weíre not hoarding.  I like to think of it as ďcultivating.Ē  Haha.  I like having a variety of foods on hand so we can experiment at home and try new recipes.  After all, cooking nice meals and sitting down to enjoy them helps pass the time.  We live in a condo, without a deep freeze, so most of our extra provisions are shelf stable.  But I do keep our freezer full of fish, chicken, seafood, pork and beef.  Right now our garden is producing heavily too.  In a couple of weeks I will start canning.

We live in a university town.  Students are just returning now, and I anticipate a very rough fall with COVID on top of the seasonal flu.  Like, maybe like March all over again.  From April-August when classes went online and most students went home things were more manageable.  But  I expect things to start closing down again.  (As I type this I can hear a loud house party down the block.  Our state has no mask mandate, and the university has no way to require tests of students in off campus housing.) I also anticipate more food chain disruptions.  I feel like my trips to the store should be minimal.  I miss the relaxed enjoyment of it, and itís so stressful that I want to avoid it.  My husband also has an underlying condition so we try to go during the hour reserved for vulnerable people.

Every ten days or so I do a Walmart pick up order.  This helps me keep other household items on hand and avoid the store.  Every 5-6 weeks we go to Costco to stock up. 

Iíve also been clearing my shelves of things I donít need and sending them to the food pantry.  There are lots of people barely hanging on right now.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on August 09, 2020, 09:21:56 PM
Some people swear bay leaves work for weevils but vac packing removes oxygen so if they should hatch they won't have oxygen. Freezing is supposed to be the best solution to kill them. However, I have no room in my freezer!
I hear you on this. My solution is to make room. Not kidding. You don't have to keep it in the freezer forever, just long enough to kill off any possible vermin. I usually pop a 5# bag or container in the freezer for a week, then move it to the pantry, then stick in another one. Repeat. As I understand, once they've been frozen, they're pretty safe. Well, except, be sure to use airtight containers so new vermin can't move in once it's in your pantry. You could do the same with a pound or two at a time. Pour it into a zip bag if you need to smush it in to some random cranny. I have a vacuum sealer but rarely use it because the bags are so expensive + more plastic waste.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on August 10, 2020, 07:10:24 AM
This past week has been a good one for my instinct to stock up. After hearing a short piece on the radio about local commercial fishermen doing home deliveries, I've put in an order for some frozen freshwater fish (which has the added advantages of supporting local small businesses, reducing the carbon footprint of my food, and getting access to fish varieties that I remember eating as a kid when I fished with my dad). I also picked a batch of apples from a public park and have been canning applesauce and making dried apple slices. 

Thanks Dicey for the reminder on how to keep bugs out of dried goods. I have too many bags of grains sitting around - it's time to get them into containers before the bugs move in!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: LaineyAZ on August 10, 2020, 08:19:13 AM
Ö.
Iíve also been clearing my shelves of things I donít need and sending them to the food pantry.  There are lots of people barely hanging on right now.

Same here, Trudie.  My project today is to clear out my hall pantry and find items to donate.  A local church that gives out food boxes has been running low, so this Saturday they've asked for donations of canned goods and also "shelf stable milk." 
That last one brought back memories of my mom buying dried milk and preparing it for us - it didn't taste the best but it's better than nothing.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: jeninco on August 10, 2020, 12:16:10 PM
Some people swear bay leaves work for weevils but vac packing removes oxygen so if they should hatch they won't have oxygen. Freezing is supposed to be the best solution to kill them. However, I have no room in my freezer!
I hear you on this. My solution is to make room. Not kidding. You don't have to keep it in the freezer forever, just long enough to kill off any possible vermin. I usually pop a 5# bag or container in the freezer for a week, then move it to the pantry, then stick in another one. Repeat. As I understand, once they've been frozen, they're pretty safe. Well, except, be sure to use airtight containers so new vermin can't move in once it's in your pantry. You could do the same with a pound or two at a time. Pour it into a zip bag if you need to smush it in to some random cranny. I have a vacuum sealer but rarely use it because the bags are so expensive + more plastic waste.

OK, I am now headed over to stick 20 lbs of flour into the chest freezer. Back in a few, 'Kay?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on August 11, 2020, 09:16:46 PM
Aggggh. We lost power for a week because of Tropical Storm Isaias.  As reported earlier, I have 2 fridges and a chest freezer (just stocked up the new fridge). I just can't.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: adamR18 on August 12, 2020, 12:36:05 AM
This week, when I made my normal run to the discount grocery (Save-a-Lot), they were out of paper towels. AGAIN. This is the second week they haven't had them, after it seemed the supply chain had been fixed through June and July.

So I decided... I am privileged enough to have plenty of money in the bank... enough to stock up a big pantry so that I don't encounter these random shortages anymore. So off to Sams Club I went... only bought non-perishable food products that I would normally eat, and of course the paper products that have been so hard to come by... and now I feel pretty secure that I can eat for a month or so in the event of a quarantine. Also got it all organized and have decided to implement a first in/first out system, replacing all of those items individually as I use them up. Everything in the pantry is now organized in order of expiration date.

This is so different from my previous shopping habit, where I would go to the store on Sunday with a meal plan/list, not buy anything extra, and had a completely empty pantry by Saturday night. (I don't do any fancy cooking.)

It feels prudent to be prepared... and I don't consider it hoarding, as it all fit in my pantry/cabinets. No one would walk in and think I have an excess of items.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on August 12, 2020, 02:07:25 AM
This week, when I made my normal run to the discount grocery (Save-a-Lot), they were out of paper towels. AGAIN. This is the second week they haven't had them, after it seemed the supply chain had been fixed through June and July.

So I decided... I am privileged enough to have plenty of money in the bank... enough to stock up a big pantry so that I don't encounter these random shortages anymore. So off to Sams Club I went... only bought non-perishable food products that I would normally eat, and of course the paper products that have been so hard to come by... and now I feel pretty secure that I can eat for a month or so in the event of a quarantine. Also got it all organized and have decided to implement a first in/first out system, replacing all of those items individually as I use them up. Everything in the pantry is now organized in order of expiration date.

This is so different from my previous shopping habit, where I would go to the store on Sunday with a meal plan/list, not buy anything extra, and had a completely empty pantry by Saturday night. (I don't do any fancy cooking.)

It feels prudent to be prepared... and I don't consider it hoarding, as it all fit in my pantry/cabinets. No one would walk in and think I have an excess of items.

The store cupboard approach is a good one, imo. Not only does it let you not notice any supply chain blips, but you'll also find you pay a lower cost per unit if you buy bulk on good specials.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on August 12, 2020, 06:41:01 AM
Aggggh. We lost power for a week because of Tropical Storm Isaias.  As reported earlier, I have 2 fridges and a chest freezer (just stocked up the new fridge). I just can't.

Oh no!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on August 12, 2020, 06:58:17 AM
Another relevant article from the always-interesting Johnny S.

https://granolashotgun.com/2020/08/10/lazaretto-dining/
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on August 12, 2020, 10:48:23 AM
Aggggh. We lost power for a week because of Tropical Storm Isaias.  As reported earlier, I have 2 fridges and a chest freezer (just stocked up the new fridge). I just can't.
This utterly blows.  I'm so sorry.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on August 12, 2020, 10:48:59 AM
There was an interesting WSJ article in the last week or so that tracked availability of various grocery categories and itís not just my imagination. There is still less product coming in and more product going out.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: nereo on August 12, 2020, 11:03:10 AM
Aggggh. We lost power for a week because of Tropical Storm Isaias.  As reported earlier, I have 2 fridges and a chest freezer (just stocked up the new fridge). I just can't.
This utterly blows.  I'm so sorry.

This is the one thing pushing us towards buying a small backup generator. 
I can (and have) gone several days without power.  We have a backup heat source should things fail in the winter.  But an extended blackout of just a few days in the summer could cost us several hundred $ in wasted food.

I'm constantly weighing the probability of that happening with the cost of a used generator (roughly $500 from what I've seen).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 12, 2020, 11:48:15 AM
Aggggh. We lost power for a week because of Tropical Storm Isaias.  As reported earlier, I have 2 fridges and a chest freezer (just stocked up the new fridge). I just can't.
This utterly blows.  I'm so sorry.

This is the one thing pushing us towards buying a small backup generator. 
I can (and have) gone several days without power.  We have a backup heat source should things fail in the winter.  But an extended blackout of just a few days in the summer could cost us several hundred $ in wasted food.

I'm constantly weighing the probability of that happening with the cost of a used generator (roughly $500 from what I've seen).

Back up generators are a good idea. Especially for those of us who lived through the 1998 ice storm.  I had one at last-house.  My neighbours had propane heating and installed a Back up generator that was permanently wired to the house.  If there was a power failure it came on automatically.  It also came on for 10 minutes once a week, just to keep everything running and catch any issues.  I also had a backup sump pump on a battery backup.  Very reassuring to hear the sump pump run during a power failure, no flooded basement.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 12, 2020, 12:02:45 PM
Isaias knocked our power out for only 7 hours but I was so thankful for our generator. Our freezers/refrigerators kept humming, we watched tv, had ac and slept with ac on in the bedroom. Decadent when others were out of power for a week but we have had the generator since before the year 2000 when they predicted that everything was going to go haywire and didn't. It is a very loud gas generator and now we are bouncing around the idea of getting a permanent generator that auto switches when power goes out. I suppose it might be a good selling point for a house to have a permanent generator in line.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on August 12, 2020, 02:04:58 PM
Aggggh. We lost power for a week because of Tropical Storm Isaias.  As reported earlier, I have 2 fridges and a chest freezer (just stocked up the new fridge). I just can't.
This utterly blows.  I'm so sorry.

This is the one thing pushing us towards buying a small backup generator. 
I can (and have) gone several days without power.  We have a backup heat source should things fail in the winter.  But an extended blackout of just a few days in the summer could cost us several hundred $ in wasted food.

I'm constantly weighing the probability of that happening with the cost of a used generator (roughly $500 from what I've seen).

Same... every time the power goes out, I think "I must buy a generator, but not now because they are out of stock/too expensive". Then I forget, like everyone else.

It would make sense for us to buy one, since we lose power like this every other year. I hate how polluting the generators are, though.

Thanks for the sympathy, @mm1970. I don't even know how much I lost because I was afraid to look (then went out of town). Now that we finally have power back, it's all refrozen too. But probably more than $500 worth of food, since I usually blow about $400/Costco run... and more than that in time, since there were a lot of precooked meals that I had made.  Not the greatest week!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on August 12, 2020, 06:26:17 PM
Not a substitute for a back-up generator, but an effective stopgap is to create and keep blocks of ice in the freezer as a matter of course. I like quart milk cartons with screw caps for small spaces and warehouse size plastic containers (salsa, popcorn) where there is more room. They will buy you a few hours, more if you don't open the freezer. Pro Tip: if you use large containers, choose heavy plastic and don't overfill or they will crack.

I use the quart milk jugs to grocery shop. I toss them in a cooler and carry insulated bags. Once I shop, I pop a couple milk jugs on the bottom, then fill the insulated bags. That way I can batch errands without worry. Once home, they go right back in the freezer. They cost me nothing and work all the time.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: JoJo on August 12, 2020, 07:39:32 PM
Not a substitute for a back-up generator, but an effective stopgap is to create and keep blocks of ice in the freezer as a matter of course. I like quart milk cartons with screw caps for small spaces and warehouse size plastic containers (salsa, popcorn) where there is more room. They will buy you a few hours, more if you don't open the freezer. Pro Tip: if you use large containers, choose heavy plastic and don't overfill or they will crack.

I use the quart milk jugs to grocery shop. I toss them in a cooler and carry insulated bags. Once I shop, I pop a couple milk jugs on the bottom, then fill the insulated bags. That way I can batch errands without worry. Once home, they go right back in the freezer. They cost me nothing and work all the time.

Another good alternative to milk jugs is the 2 liter soda bottles... these are super rare to crack and the cap/lid screws on really tight so no leakage.  I've had problems with spiling/cracking on the milk jugs.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Trudie on August 12, 2020, 08:36:11 PM
I live in the Midwest and we were just in the path of a derecho ( inland hurricane).  We lost power for 31 hours, but some people may lose it for a week.  We were pretty well prepared, but it shifted my mindset...Iím definitely going to stay stocked this fall going into winter.  I will never be without matches, candles, excess dry goods...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 13, 2020, 05:02:45 AM
I live in the Midwest and we were just in the path of a derecho ( inland hurricane).  We lost power for 31 hours, but some people may lose it for a week.  We were pretty well prepared, but it shifted my mindset...Iím definitely going to stay stocked this fall going into winter.  I will never be without matches, candles, excess dry goods...

Emergency candle are stinky, my emergency candles are the pretty ones in jars, bought on sale.   Smell nice, very stable and safe, burn for a long time.  Matches are always near candles.

You have a manual can opener, of course.  I have 2, no electric can opener. Using a manual can opener is strength training for my hands.  ;-)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on August 13, 2020, 05:21:16 AM
I live in the Midwest and we were just in the path of a derecho ( inland hurricane).  We lost power for 31 hours, but some people may lose it for a week.  We were pretty well prepared, but it shifted my mindset...Iím definitely going to stay stocked this fall going into winter.  I will never be without matches, candles, excess dry goods...

Oh, wow. That was a bad storm. I was watching it on radar to see if we would get clipped (we didnít). Glad youíre okay!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 13, 2020, 07:50:28 AM
I have quite a stockpile of food, TP, paper towels I have accumulated over the last 5 months but I am afraid I am forgetting something. I have some medicines, Mucinex liquid for chest congestion, some Coricidin HP cold medicine, Nyquil, Pepto Bismol, rubbing alcohol, aspirin, peroxide, Betadine, bandages. We have batteries. I don't really have candles. I am not a fan of them due to fire hazard. I need to get some kind of battery lanterns. I don't have matches but do have grill lighters.

Anyone have suggestions on stocking up on items?

OMG, one thing I did stock up on was a couple of one lb. canned hams. I made a soup and cut up one ham in chunks to put in the soup. It was disgusting! Like blubber. The texture was disgusting! GAG ME! Glad I only bought two of them. Maybe I can cut the other one up and cook on the grill till it is dry. Or feed it to my dogs but it is probably too salty. What happened to canned hams? My Mom used to bake them in the oven and they were good years and years ago!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: nereo on August 13, 2020, 08:12:04 AM
I have quite a stockpile of food, TP, paper towels I have accumulated over the last 5 months but I am afraid I am forgetting something. I have some medicines, Mucinex liquid for chest congestion, some Coricidin HP cold medicine, Nyquil, Pepto Bismol, rubbing alcohol, aspirin, peroxide, Betadine, bandages. We have batteries. I don't really have candles. I am not a fan of them due to fire hazard. I need to get some kind of battery lanterns. I don't have matches but do have grill lighters.

Anyone have suggestions on stocking up on items?

for battery-powered lanterns there's a ton of LED options now that are fantastic.  I wish they were available when I was a teenager.  We've got a couple of BlackDiamond Moji.... very small, light, and bright enough to read by or illuminate a dinner table. It has its own clip which comes in useful for hanging (e.g. we've clipped it to our light fixture above our kitchen table during blackouts). 13 hours run time on High, 70 hours on low.  We store fresh batteries taped to the side of each lantern (not IN the lantern, which can lead to leaks/destruction if left too long).
There are tons of other great options in the 'compact LED lantern' segment now.
LED headlamps are also preferable to hand-held flashlights.

My other suggestion would be to consider how you might cook your food.  An exterior gas grill can work great, and/or a camping stove -- just make sure you have extra fuel. We also have a propane kitchen stove, so no worries there.  If all your appliances are electric you'll want a cooking surface.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 13, 2020, 08:47:02 AM
Is this the lantern? https://www.amazon.com/Black-Diamond-Color-Lantern-White/dp/B076KRS947/ref=asc_df_B076KRS947/?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=&hvpos=&hvnetw=o&hvrand=&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=e&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4583863979994220&psc=1

I do have a generator, electric appliances and gas grill and propane tanks full.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: nereo on August 13, 2020, 08:57:49 AM
Is this the lantern? https://www.amazon.com/Black-Diamond-Color-Lantern-White/dp/B076KRS947/ref=asc_df_B076KRS947/?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=&hvpos=&hvnetw=o&hvrand=&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=e&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4583863979994220&psc=1
]

That's the one.  It's about the size of a baseball and about half the weight.  it won't "light up the whole room" but will give you enough light to eat at the table or go to the bathroom or read in bed.  We take them camping and a single set of batteries will last us all week with moderate use.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on August 13, 2020, 10:27:40 AM
For the freezer/ fridge...I got these freezer gel ice packs once in a package.  They are great, and similar to ones that my stepdad gets with his insulin.  They last forever.  All of those have since cracked and broken, but I found some similar ones on line with Amazon.  They really do work.  We camped in the desert once and they stayed solid for a few days, at least.

This brand is what we have.  So we always have them in the spare freezer.  When our fridge died a year ago, they were super handy.  We were without for a few days.

https://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Shock-Freeze-Packs-Screw/dp/B0773FVRZY/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=cooler+shock+ice+packs&qid=1597336005&s=hpc&sr=1-4-catcorr
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: penguintroopers on August 13, 2020, 10:57:54 AM
If you need freezer ice bags just ask a friend that gets a meal/produce delivery box. They have a bunch.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on August 13, 2020, 12:14:51 PM
I spent some time last spring making a spreadsheet of what I wanted to have in stock by September, so Iíve been working on that a little at a time this summer. Iím going to defrost the freezer this weekend and then go to Sams next week.

If your power goes out, your solar yard lights can come in the house.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Trudie on August 14, 2020, 12:06:28 PM
Thanks for all the product stock up tips.  We werenít caught flat-footed and had enough supplies on hand, but I went to a thrift store this week and bought some cheap bags of random tea candles and stuff.  I definitely need to get an LED lantern and more batteries.

We live in a condo in a 90 year old renovated school.  Our brick walls and Pella Windows stood like a mighty fortress.  I was really proud of the old gal.  We live on the west side of the building and it was coming from that direction, straight at us.  Trees, debris, and lawn furniture were strewn about.

The thing about the derecho was that we had no warning it was coming, until it was right on us.  Our phones didnít send out messages from the NWS.  Thankfully, local emergency management started sounding the sirens and we went to our basement.  Most of us had never heard the term ďderechoĒ until this week.

Anyway, we donít have a lot of storage in our freezer, but weíre fortunate that power was restored and the contents of our freezer were saved.  This has definitely changed my view on preparedness.  It was comforting to know that we have a full stash of provisions in our dry, organized storage downstairs. 

Weíve seen so much this last six months that has caused disruptions in food supplies and food chains.  Everything from shut downs in meat processing, to E. coli tainted food, to store shut downs due to weather.  I am definitely thinking about self sufficiency much more, planting my garden, and keeping a few more supplies on hand to minimize trips to the store.  We need to be prepared for the long haul.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 14, 2020, 12:42:06 PM
Is this the lantern? https://www.amazon.com/Black-Diamond-Color-Lantern-White/dp/B076KRS947/ref=asc_df_B076KRS947/?tag=bingshoppinga-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=&hvpos=&hvnetw=o&hvrand=&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=e&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4583863979994220&psc=1
]

That's the one.  It's about the size of a baseball and about half the weight.  it won't "light up the whole room" but will give you enough light to eat at the table or go to the bathroom or read in bed.  We take them camping and a single set of batteries will last us all week with moderate use.

Bought 2 August 13th!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on August 14, 2020, 10:27:40 PM
and now... we have pantry moths!  I'm at my limit, I declare! I do have a lot of grains stored in canisters so the damage is probably limited to the dry pasta and maybe a few other items, but this is really disheartening.

I went to the grocery store for the first time since losing/regaining power... it was a very modest purchase as I was too depressed to stock up again.  However, because we had no fresh food, we've been eating takeout every night. What a year, everything is upside down.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 15, 2020, 05:17:23 AM
Poundwise, so sorry to hear of the food losses but forget going to the store. Sit at your computer and order replacements. I buy pasta, rice, canned stuff on line thru Walmart and Target. However, I will tell you, they both pack horribly and I have had dented cans and forget buying stuff in glass. I also buy canned stuff from Costco.

One thing I do is only buy enough to satisfy the minimum amount to get free shipping. With Walmart that is $35. If you place a $100 order they will try to jam it all into one shipment and the box will weigh 75 lbs. Not easy to drag heavy packages into the house. I also try not to order breakable things. I am a slow learner though. I ordered a whole case of sauce from Amazon. They said 'case'. Well the Amazon seller placed my order with Walmart and Walmart put 12 jars of sauce in the bottom of a box with no bubble wrap. Well, I am sure you can imagine a whole box of glass jars clanking around for a few days on a truck. They all were broken or the caps blew off. It was a disaster and it all had to go in the trash. The Amazon person finally refunded me. I was under the impression that drop shipping was not allowed on Amazon. When I mentioned that to the seller, he refunded me promptly.

You can order from many stores and have curbside service or delivery service. I would explore that route to replenish. The less stress the better. In CT we have Peapod and they deliver for a modest fee. They shop, deliver and all you need to do it put it away.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SquashingDebt on August 15, 2020, 05:37:24 AM
@Poundwise, I'm so sorry to hear about your power outage and now pantry moths.  My power was out for 50 hours or so back in April and while I was able to haul some of the contents of my 2 chest freezers to a friend's house for temporary storage, I lost everything in my fridge and about half of what was in my freezers.  It was really frustrating.  Good luck getting everything cleaned up and re-stocked.  One small silver lining for me was being able to defrost and deep clean everything before filling it up again.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 15, 2020, 06:09:36 AM
SquashingDebt, you say you have two chest freezers. How many people in your household. It is just the hub and me and we have an upright freezer (21 CF) a regular refrigerator with a top freezer, both in the garage and I am finding that I am running out of room for stuff I want to buy. I have filled my freezer but now I have no room for sale stuff like turkeys, and other things that are seasonal sales. I kind of feel like a hoarder if I get another freezer but in one way it could be an insurance policy if one unit breaks down as is what happened two years ago to us. We were fantastically lucky and were able to order the freezer from Sears and it was delivered next day. We lost no food at all. Now, Sears must have sold off the Kenmore brand because I can't find anything like what we got and they want $75 delivery fee. I am looking at a freezer thru Home Depot but am on the fence. I want it but feel like I am nuts to buy another one. We are bargain shoppers so I am thinking I am being frugal in an oddball way if I buy it. It is $899 plus tax and free delivery. I have looked on Craigslist and the few that I saw were over priced and old. Seems freezers are a hot commodity these days and I know if I hesitate, they may be hard to come by soon.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on August 15, 2020, 07:58:08 AM
Can you recoup some of the losses by eating the moths?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SquashingDebt on August 15, 2020, 11:04:33 AM
SquashingDebt, you say you have two chest freezers. How many people in your household. It is just the hub and me and we have an upright freezer (21 CF) a regular refrigerator with a top freezer, both in the garage and I am finding that I am running out of room for stuff I want to buy. I have filled my freezer but now I have no room for sale stuff like turkeys, and other things that are seasonal sales. I kind of feel like a hoarder if I get another freezer but in one way it could be an insurance policy if one unit breaks down as is what happened two years ago to us. We were fantastically lucky and were able to order the freezer from Sears and it was delivered next day. We lost no food at all. Now, Sears must have sold off the Kenmore brand because I can't find anything like what we got and they want $75 delivery fee. I am looking at a freezer thru Home Depot but am on the fence. I want it but feel like I am nuts to buy another one. We are bargain shoppers so I am thinking I am being frugal in an oddball way if I buy it. It is $899 plus tax and free delivery. I have looked on Craigslist and the few that I saw were over priced and old. Seems freezers are a hot commodity these days and I know if I hesitate, they may be hard to come by soon.

I'm just one person.  They're both quite small - basically the smallest you can buy.  I get a lot of free vegetables from work and sometimes like to buy meat in bulk, so I fill them up pretty easily.  The problem is actually eating everything in a reasonable amount of time, haha.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on August 15, 2020, 11:06:52 AM
Can you recoup some of the losses by eating the moths?

:D Now THAT is an idea! Maybe it will turn out that they produce a mystery chemical that stops Covid in its tracks! Actually a long time ago we did eat quite a few moth larva by mistake... box of Special K... maybe you didn't want to hear that.

Thank you for the restocking suggestions, @SquashingDebt and @Roadrunner53! I just have to pick myself off the ground and clean out the chest freezer that is full of bad food that thawed then refroze.  The lesson here is to have a generator if you're going to have that many freezers, or a place where you can quickly transfer the food after 2 days. 

@Roadrunner53, have you tried frying slices of the gross canned ham?


Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on August 15, 2020, 11:59:26 AM
Can you recoup some of the losses by eating the moths?

:D Now THAT is an idea! Maybe it will turn out that they produce a mystery chemical that stops Covid in its tracks! Actually a long time ago we did eat quite a few moth larva by mistake... box of Special K... maybe you didn't want to hear that.

Like the old saying goes . . . When life gives you moths, teach 'em who's higher up the food chain!  This was a frugality forum once upon a time, before the emergence of the vitamin blender . . .

:P
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 15, 2020, 12:26:51 PM
I only have one gross ham left and it is just one lb. I might try grilling it till it is brown and crispy on the edges. Otherwise BLEH! Never again. I said that about 15 years ago and then I go and buy two of them recently thinking they would be good to add to something like macaroni and cheese or soup. Well, they didn't get any better!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on August 15, 2020, 01:01:02 PM
I buy the small tins of flakes of ham.  Two uses, mashed with mayo and relish for sandwich filling, or mashed as the base for quiche.  Maybe some quiche is in your future?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Hadilly on August 15, 2020, 01:54:48 PM
Thanks to you fine people, I found myself buying $450 worth of food at Berkeley Bowl the other day. Itís all stuff I will use, but still. The clerk assured me I wasnít be extravagant because it all fit in the cart!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on August 15, 2020, 01:57:26 PM
I only have one gross ham left and it is just one lb. I might try grilling it till it is brown and crispy on the edges. Otherwise BLEH! Never again. I said that about 15 years ago and then I go and buy two of them recently thinking they would be good to add to something like macaroni and cheese or soup. Well, they didn't get any better!

Cut the ham up into little cubes, freeze it in the freezer, and add a few cubes of ham to baked beans/Hawaiian pizza whenever you make either.  That's what we do.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: moneypitfeeder on August 15, 2020, 06:47:56 PM
@Poundwise , I have had pantry moths and they are a pain. We left birdseed in the house when we went on vacation and came home to a nightmare. If you are still having issues getting rid of them, I got pantry moth traps, basically thin cardboard open-ended boxes with sticky tape and a lure on the inside. They helped tremendously. I got them from Amazon, but they are probably locally available. Best of luck!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 17, 2020, 10:02:14 AM
Okay, this pantry moth thing has got me worried! I went to the garage shelves and discovered I have a ton of different pastas in the regular boxes they come in. So, I vacuum packed about 10 packages of spaghetti and put in some bay leaves. My vac sealer is not one that you lift the lid but slide the bag in and it sucks it into the machine to seal. Well, It sucks in so much that I am wasting too much bag with a two inch seal on each end. I have lots more things to vacuum seal so I ordered another more manual vac machine where you manually lift the lid and align the bag to the seal bar. I can see I have become a bit of a hoarder with all the vac sealing I need to do. I have instant mashed potato flakes too to seal and some flour. I already sealed up my rice. I realized I have split peas I will have to seal too. I will do a little at a time. I keep ordering stuff and the Hub puts it away so I didn't realize I had so much of everything! LOL!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on August 17, 2020, 11:08:48 AM
If my sad tale can prevent 5 other people from making the same mistake, it is good!

I used to prevent moth infestations by pre-freezing bags of flour and other items (especially corn meal and ice cream cones), then sealing in ziplock bags, but the pandemic and other extra burdens have made me more careless this year. Mistake!

My wonderful husband went through the pantry and cleaned it because he saw I was too demoralized to do anything but doomscroll this week.  Unfortunately, I find that some items that he thought were okay, like the corn starch, are infested. 


Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on August 17, 2020, 11:47:40 AM
Poundwise, chalk it up to a learning experience and move on. Easy for me to say but nothing you can do but chuck the stuff and buy more. You are much wiser now and if anything, you have opened up my eyes to this. I have had those bugs years ago before I started this semi hording thing. The stuff was pasta that was on the shelf for a long, long time like years. It did not infest the house though!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on August 17, 2020, 06:24:58 PM
Okay, this pantry moth thing has got me worried! I went to the garage shelves and discovered I have a ton of different pastas in the regular boxes they come in. So, I vacuum packed about 10 packages of spaghetti and put in some bay leaves. My vac sealer is not one that you lift the lid but slide the bag in and it sucks it into the machine to seal. Well, It sucks in so much that I am wasting too much bag with a two inch seal on each end. I have lots more things to vacuum seal so I ordered another more manual vac machine where you manually lift the lid and align the bag to the seal bar. I can see I have become a bit of a hoarder with all the vac sealing I need to do. I have instant mashed potato flakes too to seal and some flour. I already sealed up my rice. I realized I have split peas I will have to seal too. I will do a little at a time. I keep ordering stuff and the Hub puts it away so I didn't realize I had so much of everything! LOL!

OK, person who has worked in a commercial kitchen for some years back in the day here. You don't need to vacuum seal etc. When you get dry goods in:

- Take it out of the original packaging and into a sealed plastic container! This is key. Packed goods are stored in massive warehouses at various points in the supply chain and there are tiny bugs and vermin all over the place. They're more likely to lay eggs in the packaging than in the food. And any rats and mice crawl over that packaging.

- Use a hot or cold treatment for particularly susceptible items. Flour is susceptible to flour mites and various other things. Stick the plastic container in the freezer for 48 hours. That's all that is needed. Dried beans/peas/lentils are very susceptible to weevils. These lay eggs in the plant when it is growing. Same thing, stick the sealed container in the freezer for 48 hours.

- Manage your pantry. This means rotating food. When you refill a plastic container, make sure any old product is on the top of the container to be used first. Wash empty containers before refilling. Clean up any spills on shelving. A tiny spill of flour on a shelf is food for a month for a weevil.

You should never have ANY open packs or folded over paper packs in a pantry. You don't need to spend any money. My pantry is all old ice cream containers - they stack, they hold a full packet from the supermarket, and you can just write on them with a permanent marker.

If you follow those rules you have waaaaay less chance of getting an infestation, and if you do get one you have waaaaay less chance of it spreading through your pantry.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on August 17, 2020, 08:05:16 PM
Thanks to you fine people, I found myself buying $450 worth of food at Berkeley Bowl the other day. Itís all stuff I will use, but still. The clerk assured me I wasnít be extravagant because it all fit in the cart!
Oh, Berkeley Bowl is a heavenly place! Alas, I rarely have need to squeeze through the Caldecott's bores since hitting FIRE nearly eight years ago. I used to have an account just up the street and it was a highlight of my day to stop there on the way home, and on the company's mileage.

It's one of my favorite places to take people from out of town, except we're not doing much of that these days...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Linea_Norway on August 19, 2020, 01:32:48 AM
I only have one gross ham left and it is just one lb. I might try grilling it till it is brown and crispy on the edges. Otherwise BLEH! Never again. I said that about 15 years ago and then I go and buy two of them recently thinking they would be good to add to something like macaroni and cheese or soup. Well, they didn't get any better!

Here in Norway they sell hams cooked with spices around easter and christmas. I always buy a small one. We use it cubed in lots of dishes, one favorite is cubed ham, cubed potatoes, cubed vegetables, all stirfried with herbs. We also use it in thin slices on homemade pizza. It tastes okay, but not too often. And I make sure I buy a small size.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Hadilly on August 19, 2020, 11:39:50 AM
Dicey, I hope you can make it over again one day.  It really is a great place to shop. Have you been to Berkeley Bowl West? Make a day of it and hit The Cheeseboard, Fournee, get some Indian food at Vikís or Mexican at Casa Latina. You can tell what I like to do in the East Bay!!!

I am pro ham, but I like to freeze it so I can use small amounts. Linea_Norway, that sounds like a yummy dish!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on August 22, 2020, 09:11:28 AM
No, I haven't. I shopped the original store, in a former bowling alley, hence the name, and then they opened the new store. I think I was aware of the newest location (CA. 2009), but it wasn't on my route. If I ever find myself in Berkeley, I'll plan to check it out. When I was single, I ate out more and threw more down for fancy/exotic ingredients. BB was a handy place to grab something quick and fresh for dinner for one, as was the nearby Whole Foods. Once I was married and feeding a family of four, my shopping and dining habits definitely shifted. Thanks for the recommendations!

I should add that I used to live in Orinda, so BB was closer. I've moved further east and retired, so it's not "on my page" any more. For you young folks, before we had ubiquitous GPS, there was a thing called a Thomas Guide. If something was on your page, it was relatively local.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 13, 2020, 09:40:42 AM
So, how is everyone doing on their stock piles of supplies?

It has been about 1 1/2 months since any updates on this subject.

Have any of you found new resources to buy supplies from or come up with some unique items you have stockpiled?

I have have purchased items from Foodservicedirect.com  They sell food in large quantities.  It could be of interest to some of you. I have purchased from them for a few years and the food is good. Plus, the frozen food is packed really good with dry ice. The shipping can get a little pricy, just be aware of that. They are a supplier for restaurants, deli's but will ship to home addresses.

Still have not found Lysol or Clorox wipes. Bought some generic brand at a drug store. Just one container. Did buy a bottle of concentrated Lysol which I don't like because it is too wet when sprayed and the aroma is YUK. But it is Lysol!

Is everyone still hunkering down or have some of you gone out to the stores and restaurants. Stuff has opened up in most states but no way I am going to eat at a restaurant!

Went out the other day and got a flu shot.

As predicted, the virus ramped up again as soon as school started up. Seems like this virus is never going to go away...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 13, 2020, 11:16:55 AM
I did go out a few weeks ago and got a flu shot, and bought all the stuff that had accumulated on my "drug store" list.

And I went to Sams at the end of August? Beginning of September? and stocked up on coffee, and they had 5 packs of Chlorox Wipes, which really should last me pretty much forever.

I'm glad I made my spreadsheet at the beginning of summer, and I'm glad that I actually stocked up, because it's starting to look like we have another bad round coming. I've been doing things outside (walked the picket line this morning!) but am definitely not going into stores.

The one thing that seems to be out of stock everywhere is toilet bowl cleaner. There's some on Amazon for about $15/bottle. No, thanks. NB - I have plenty of toilet cleaning options, so am not stressed about this, but dh like an easy squirt bottle...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 13, 2020, 11:24:55 AM
I'm not getting a flu shot this year.  Given that we're never near other people (and none in my family have had any sort of cold this entire year), I just don't see flu as being a real concern for us.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 13, 2020, 11:33:55 AM
Winter is coming* so going into squirrel mode is standard.  I've always bought ahead, along the lines of "just started a container of something, time to buy its replacement".

I'm stocking up on some Metro store brand items I like because once I stop going to the community garden I wont be near a Metro very often.

My odds of being exposed to the flu this year are pretty low, but I'll get the shot anyway.  Aging into a higher risk category means more "better safe than sorry" choices.

*seasons: winter is coming, winter is here, winter is still here, winter might be over, oops no it is still here, spring was short this year, everything grow like mad because winter is coming, winter is coming.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on October 13, 2020, 11:39:08 AM
I'm not getting a flu shot this year.  Given that we're never near other people (and none in my family have had any sort of cold this entire year), I just don't see flu as being a real concern for us.
I had the same thought (why do I need this if I'm taking more precautions than usual this year anyway), but my local grocery store gave me a $10 gift card for getting my shot at their pharmacy, so I gladly got one last month.  I'm still hopeful that I'll get to see my family for Christmas, and I'm working the November election, so it probably does make sense to have the shot after all, just one more layer of protection.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on October 13, 2020, 11:55:46 AM
Still have a good stock of dry foods such as rice, oatmeal, nuts and beans have a decent amount of meat that we have been eating down.

Still doing curbside, insta cart and online shopping where possible. Figure curbside and delivery are good for the employees health as well with less people coming and going so win win.

We have been eating well, having dessert each night and making a point to mix it up so we do not feel deprived since we are not eating out for other reasons.

We have done what we can to hoard good times by getting out to ride the bikes, camp and visit family in a socially distanced way to hold us over for the winter.

As things / products have been more available I have started to slide and use up some of our supplies hope it does not bite me in the rear this winter but we have enough to survive.

FYI, I have been able to get Lysol and Clorox wipes from Office Depot. I have the app on my phone and would check it several times a day and managed to get enough to make it through the winter. Night time seems like the best time to score some...

Some things still seem to be hit or miss, Coke life has been out of stock since spring, daily shower cleaner is hard to come by and other products seem to go away for a week or two but come back.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PoutineLover on October 13, 2020, 11:57:43 AM
I bought a new storage shelf because I had been accumulating more food than usual and it was overflowing my existing spaces. Made a world of difference and now everything is nice and organized. Been batch cooking and freezing, maintaining a good supply of non perishables, and still trying to limit trips to the grocery store and stock up when I see sales. Just wondering whether I should get an extra pack of TP beyond the extra I already have in case there's another shortage..
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mntnmn117 on October 13, 2020, 12:06:46 PM
Word of caution with those chest freezers. You really can go overboard and end up with stuff going bad. Not like getting sick, but that ham from March is pretty unappealing after a while. I recommend doing at least 1 meal out of the freezer a week or go on a freezer meal binge/super low grocery bill month.

I'm currently annoyed with canning lids being completely out of stock everywhere since early September. I've got 10 gallons of apples and no canning lids.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 13, 2020, 12:36:58 PM
Canning lids, try here: https://www.lehmans.com/search?w=canning+lids#

In case you have not seen this article, it is a wake up call! https://www.reuters.com/article/health-coronavirus-australia-study-idUSKBN26X03F

I have stocked up on canned:
roast beef
chicken
ground beef
pork
pork with BB sauce
tuna
salmon
corned beef
corned beef hash
spam...this is not something I would typically buy but trying to give my dogs pills in it. They don't like it! LOL!
cream of mushroom soup
cream of chicken soup
various types of tomatoes, diced, whole peeled
veggies
jarred, Alfredo sauce
jarred, Spaghetti sauce
Condensed milk


I am thinking of buying canned turkey. Most of the canned meats are on a wait list. I just got the pork in 28 oz cans after a long wait.

I am still getting Imperfect Foods delivered here about once a week. I seem to have a lot of issues with them. My delivery days are supposed to be on Fridays but for some reason, the last few weeks it was delayed to Tuesdays. They use Fedex and we sometimes get late deliveries around 8 pm from them. Who really wants to be playing with a box of veggies at that hour! NOT ME!

Flu shots not only protect you but others. My dad, years ago, had a stroke and was frail from it. His doctor insisted that family members get the flu shot to protect him from it. It takes two weeks for the shot to kick in. Please, all of you think about getting the shot. We already have a pandemic and this is just one more thing to help protect us. It is covered by most health insurance.
https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/when-to-get-your-flu-shot-in-2020-%E2%80%94-timing-matters/ar-BB194jzT
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: BicycleB on October 13, 2020, 12:56:20 PM
Got my flu shot 2-3 weeks ago.

It's been a couple months since I had trouble finding anything at the locally dominant grocery, HEB.

I do take specific care to be ahead on TP and a little ahead on cleansers. That should get me through a few weeks' shortage if one occurs, or an outbreak that bumps our household usage for a week. I imagine that even if America's COVID debacle keeps ramping up, the reduced surprise factor will allow a relatively steady flow of most goods, including staples. I respect the planning ahead everyone is doing though!!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 13, 2020, 01:00:26 PM
Word of caution with those chest freezers. You really can go overboard and end up with stuff going bad. Not like getting sick, but that ham from March is pretty unappealing after a while. I recommend doing at least 1 meal out of the freezer a week or go on a freezer meal binge/super low grocery bill month.

I'm currently annoyed with canning lids being completely out of stock everywhere since early September. I've got 10 gallons of apples and no canning lids.

I was on youtube and found this video on organizing a small chest freezer. Really great idea!!!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydbsVS5rbSM
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: LetItGrow on October 13, 2020, 01:13:18 PM
Word of caution with those chest freezers. You really can go overboard and end up with stuff going bad. Not like getting sick, but that ham from March is pretty unappealing after a while. I recommend doing at least 1 meal out of the freezer a week or go on a freezer meal binge/super low grocery bill month.

I'm currently annoyed with canning lids being completely out of stock everywhere since early September. I've got 10 gallons of apples and no canning lids.

I was on youtube and found this video on organizing a small chest freezer. Really great idea!!!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydbsVS5rbSM

Maybe eats up some storage space, but being able to easily find the food you want far outweighs that.

Definitely struggled in the past sifting through to get last pound of bacon that I know is there somewhere.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 13, 2020, 04:21:58 PM
I'm not getting a flu shot this year.  Given that we're never near other people (and none in my family have had any sort of cold this entire year), I just don't see flu as being a real concern for us.

My dh is teaching one class in person.

Also, there was a gift card.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: nereo on October 13, 2020, 04:51:13 PM
I'm not getting a flu shot this year.  Given that we're never near other people (and none in my family have had any sort of cold this entire year), I just don't see flu as being a real concern for us.

While I agree you are probably extremely low risk for getting the flu, whatís the argument against getting a free (to you) vaccination? 
Time saved? Avoiding the needle prick and resulting soreness? Minute chance of complications?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 13, 2020, 05:10:12 PM
I'm not getting a flu shot this year.  Given that we're never near other people (and none in my family have had any sort of cold this entire year), I just don't see flu as being a real concern for us.

While I agree you are probably extremely low risk for getting the flu, whatís the argument against getting a free (to you) vaccination? 
Time saved? Avoiding the needle prick and resulting soreness? Minute chance of complications?

Typically I go in to my family doctor to get the shot.  I'm trying to stay away from medical places this year, just seems prudent.  I guess I could get the shot elsewhere, it just isn't a burning need.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 14, 2020, 04:29:46 AM
The Hub and I went to a drive thru Flu Shot clinic at the local VNA. We stayed in the car, filled out our paperwork, showed our medical cards, got the shot by one nurse and off we went. Very organized, simple process and quick. The nurse had on protective gear, we had our masks on and she even told us to keep the pens we used that she gave us so she didn't have to touch them.

Our VNA has 3 Friday's scheduled. First one was Oct. 9th, second one, Oct. 16th, third one Oct. 23rd. Check in your local area for VNA Flu shot schedules. Or some other places may have drive thru.

Just like a lot of people have no idea how they got the Covid-19 virus, the same with the flu. You just never know where these things are lurking!

I was really sick in February this year. I held off going to the doctor like I normally do because I hate going and hoped to fight it off. It got worse. The Hub was sick too but not as bad. I chalked it up to bronchitis. I couldn't lay down to sleep due to coughing. I slept sitting up for 4 nights and finally caved and called the doctor. They prescribed medicine and an inhaler prescription. I did get over it but I still wonder if I had Covid-19. At that time it was in the early stages and on the West coast. I am on the east coast. I have heard that there were cases on the east coast but at the time they didn't recognize it. So...who knows what I had but since there is not vaccine for it yet, I will protect myself...hopefully, from the flu!

So, let's all stay healthy so we can enjoy our hoarded supplies!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PMG on October 14, 2020, 07:16:52 AM
I havenít chimed in here before, so hereís a wall of text to make up for that.

Flu Shot Dilemma:

We got our flu shots last week. I almost posted about it here on the Mustachian People Problems thread, it was a bit of a dilemma. The big chain pharmacy offered a $5 off $20 coupon with flu shot, but we never shop that pharmacy and itís quite over priced. If we got two coupons weíd have to put quite a bit of work (and time in the store) into spending them on things that we might or might not otherwise buy.  So I decided it would be better to get our vaccines from the locally owned pharmacy. Keep our insurance spending close to home and itís a much smaller pharmacy with a robust delivery service, so much less foot traffic. Great choice but oh the siren call of ďfreeĒ money.  I tried to look at it like skipping spending $30-40.

Upgrading some Kitchen Gear:

But on the way home from the pharmacy we stopped at Walmart to buy a bag of dirt so we could transplant the house plants and bring them insideÖ quick in and out of the store, donít have to touch anything except the dirtÖ but if weíre in the store weíd better grab some frozen fruit and the things that were in the bag they clerk forgot on our last grocery orderÖ because this is pandemic, and itís hard to get by without milk and eggs! One thing lead to another and we bought a clearance Kitchen Aid Mixer marked down from $375 to $190Ö So I didnít really save that $30-40 dollars did I? hah.  This all ties to pandemic hoarding I swear. We handmade bread and pasta and baked goods in normal times and have really been looking forward to increasing that with cooler weatherÖ

Keeping track of so much food:

Limiting our grocery shopping due to pandemic has made us pay attention to how much food we eat, how often we need treats and variety. It's hard for us to separate how many of the changes in our food lifestyle this past year have been related to buying a house, growing family or pandemic, but Iím expecting these changes to stick around at least until we have another large lifestyle changing event.

We've always cooked mostly from scratch and didn't eat out often, but now we're getting better at it and we keep so much more food on hand. I counted 25 pounds of dried beans recently. We are down to about a pound of rice, so time to restock that. Previously weíd run out of things for a while and just eat something else, but now weíre keeping everything in stock. We got a large-ish box of dry milk. Hoping we donít have to use it, but nice to have on hand. We used to buy mostly fresh fruits and vegetables, but now we also buy a variety of frozen to stretch things out.  Same thing with meats.

Meal Planning and recipe organization:

Weíve started meal planning to help make sure we spread variety out between shopping trips and to help alleviate the stress of decision making on long days. I love it. We donít always follow it, but itís still invaluable. I do it in three week chunks to match our shopping trips.

Iíve also been working on getting our favorite recipes into a binder. My spouse is getting much more interested in following recipes and creating complex flavors. We even sometimes manage to be in the kitchen together without sniping at each other!

Upgrading Kitchen Gear Continued:

Weíve bought more bulk and leftover storage containers.  It was time, but we might not have, or at least not bought as many as we did if we werenít keeping so much extra around. I found weevils in a bag of rice and that prompted a bit of a frenzy.

Bulk orders vs Grocery pick up:

Weíve done some online or bulk orders via Target and Amazon, but have stepped that back since starting to do a grocery pick up in a town an hour away about every 3 weeks. No local stores offer pick up. I love grocery pick up. Want to continue it forever. Pairs so nicely with menu planning.

Garden:

We grew a small garden this year and have a little bit of fall greens trying to make it, and weíre hoping to manage some salad greens in a plastic tub over winter.

Balancing Risk:


He WFH full time, pre-pandemic. Due to pandemic I WFH and go in to the office one day a week (or so). We have gotten lax and done more non-urgent in store shopping. We know we need to stopÖ but there are a lot of excuses.

We did go to two outdoor restaurants in August/September. Weíve had two social events with friend that were outdoors and mostly safe but maybe not, and another two bonfires that were really great and a model for how weíd like to keep up social interaction during winter.

Spouse has also started up his voice lessons again just this week. I have huge reservations about it, but, Iíve decided to just bite my tongue and get more serious about reducing risk in other ways Iíve mentioned that we got more lax. He has made a lot of sacrifices this year and is full time WFH, gave up the gym even though itís back openÖ this is his one outlet and it seems necessary even if I do worry about it a lot. They do wear masks the whole time and stay spread apart, but that might be the riskiest activity yet. That and my once a week office time with my boss who thinks itís all a conspiracyÖ
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 14, 2020, 07:25:50 AM
For everyone new to using a chest freezer, here's a tip from someone who has had one for many years:

- Get a magnetic whiteboard and dry erase marker.
- Stick the whiteboard on the front of your chest freezer.
- Every time something goes in/out of the freezer your whiteboard gets updated.
- Date the items

This way you never forget what you've got in there, and can plan meals without leaving the lid open for long periods of time shuffling things around.  It also helps you keep track of which items need to be used up.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: nereo on October 14, 2020, 07:43:59 AM
For everyone new to using a chest freezer, here's a tip from someone who has had one for many years:

- Get a magnetic whiteboard and dry erase marker.
- Stick the whiteboard on the front of your chest freezer.
- Every time something goes in/out of the freezer your whiteboard gets updated.
- Date the items

This way you never forget what you've got in there, and can plan meals without leaving the lid open for long periods of time shuffling things around.  It also helps you keep track of which items need to be used up.

I like it!!
We also keep a roll of painter's tape and a marker nearby.  Everything which goes in gets labeled with what it is and the date.  We wind up freezing a lot of things in yogurt containers and mason jars
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 14, 2020, 07:49:38 AM
For everyone new to using a chest freezer, here's a tip from someone who has had one for many years:

- Get a magnetic whiteboard and dry erase marker.
- Stick the whiteboard on the front of your chest freezer.
- Every time something goes in/out of the freezer your whiteboard gets updated.
- Date the items

This way you never forget what you've got in there, and can plan meals without leaving the lid open for long periods of time shuffling things around.  It also helps you keep track of which items need to be used up.

I like it!!
We also keep a roll of painter's tape and a marker nearby.  Everything which goes in gets labeled with what it is and the date.  We wind up freezing a lot of things in yogurt containers and mason jars

Oh yeah.  We do the same.  Masking tape and a sharpie are your friends, otherwise it can be hard to figure out which frosty bag or plastic take out container is full of frozen tomato soup and which one is full of three alarm chili.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Just Joe on October 14, 2020, 08:33:48 AM
Not a substitute for a back-up generator, but an effective stopgap is to create and keep blocks of ice in the freezer as a matter of course. I like quart milk cartons with screw caps for small spaces and warehouse size plastic containers (salsa, popcorn) where there is more room. They will buy you a few hours, more if you don't open the freezer. Pro Tip: if you use large containers, choose heavy plastic and don't overfill or they will crack.

I use the quart milk jugs to grocery shop. I toss them in a cooler and carry insulated bags. Once I shop, I pop a couple milk jugs on the bottom, then fill the insulated bags. That way I can batch errands without worry. Once home, they go right back in the freezer. They cost me nothing and work all the time.

I'm reading to catch up on this thread. Has anyone owned the fancier than usual extra high efficiency refrigerators? I believe one brand is "Sub Zero". How do these fare in a power outage? Are they slower to lose their cool than a typical fridge? I assume they are insulated better than the average fridge?

I grew up in the boonies and most of our power outages were in the winter so my parents could put food outside in coolers, sometimes in the cold garage to prevent thawing. Outages could be a week or more. Never had a genny.

These days DW and I rarely have power outages but our house came with a permanently installed automatic generator (Generac) that powers the HVAC, family room, the master bedroom, and the fridge. Its not a big generator but it gets the job done. We moved a microwave to the family room during the last outage and it really put a load on the motor - so I know that we can't run much more than what is already on those circuits. So no deep freezer additions unless we invest in a larger generator. I might consider a quieter one but really, I don't want to spend the money until this one ages out. 

Most of our outages so far since we've lived here have been less than eight hours. Genny runs on propane. We could go weeks but then we'd need to order more propane at $3 a gallon. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 14, 2020, 08:48:37 AM
If it is summertime and your house has cooled down, can you turn off the breaker to the HVAC and if you had a freezer, flip on the breaker on to the freezer? Freezers usually keep stuff frozen for 48 hours if the door isn't opened. If you cycled it on for maybe 4 hours at a clip, you could keep everything frozen and keep the house cool. Invest in some fans maybe to keep the house cool when the HVAC is turned off.

I have no experience with Sub Zero refrigerators but they are nice!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: LaineyAZ on October 14, 2020, 08:55:36 AM
I've been continuing to stock up on canned goods and paper goods.  We're a small household and don't have a separate freezer.  Also I know that there will be holiday food drives soon, so anything that we can't eat within a reasonable time will be donated.

No flu shot yet - the two places I've tried don't have the senior version.  I didn't realize until this year that if you are age 65 or older that's a different shot.  I still want to get it because having the flu makes you that much more vulnerable to getting a worse outcome if you get Covid-19. 

I've gotten some takeout food but only had one sit-down indoor restaurant meal.  It was a quick breakfast with family. 

I do believe there will be shortages this winter so I'm keeping an eye on store shelves generally when I shop.  And it seems like we all agree that "hoarding" is wrong, but "stocking up" is prudent.

 


Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 14, 2020, 09:11:33 AM
I've been continuing to stock up on canned goods and paper goods.  We're a small household and don't have a separate freezer.  Also I know that there will be holiday food drives soon, so anything that we can't eat within a reasonable time will be donated.

No flu shot yet - the two places I've tried don't have the senior version.  I didn't realize until this year that if you are age 65 or older that's a different shot.  I still want to get it because having the flu makes you that much more vulnerable to getting a worse outcome if you get Covid-19. 

I've gotten some takeout food but only had one sit-down indoor restaurant meal.  It was a quick breakfast with family. 

I do believe there will be shortages this winter so I'm keeping an eye on store shelves generally when I shop.  And it seems like we all agree that "hoarding" is wrong, but "stocking up" is prudent.

Check out The Visiting Nurses Association (VNA). That is where I got the curbside 'Senior flu shots' and they have an abundance they told me. Last year I called all the stores with pharmacies and no one had the senior shot. I found VNA by chance and they were fully stocked with senior flu shots too.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Just Joe on October 14, 2020, 10:09:26 AM
We uncharacteristically got flu shots this year - us and the kids. No reason we figure to dodge the flu germs and the COVID germs. Could a person get both at the same time? We went to the local pharmacy and insurance paid for them I think. DW did the reservations.

Starting to stock up on the staples a little more. Aldi was empty stock in a couple aisles. Don't know what that means going forward.

More of the things the discussion participants have detailed.

I know the Republican leadership wants to continue on as if there isn't a COVID threat and the Dems want to be more cautious - but I figure this virus could really be such a problem that everything NEEDs to shut down again regardless of what the politicians want. I'm in a red state/county with perhaps a 50% mask participation rate and our numbers are climbing again.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: dresden on October 14, 2020, 10:12:25 AM
The shortages are due to hoarding, but also due to supply chain disruption.

I think many people didn't keep sufficient back-up supplies and were caught off guard.  The pandemic was a wake-up call.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 14, 2020, 11:52:15 AM
I've been continuing to stock up on canned goods and paper goods.  We're a small household and don't have a separate freezer.  Also I know that there will be holiday food drives soon, so anything that we can't eat within a reasonable time will be donated.

No flu shot yet - the two places I've tried don't have the senior version.  I didn't realize until this year that if you are age 65 or older that's a different shot.  I still want to get it because having the flu makes you that much more vulnerable to getting a worse outcome if you get Covid-19. 

I've gotten some takeout food but only had one sit-down indoor restaurant meal.  It was a quick breakfast with family. 

I do believe there will be shortages this winter so I'm keeping an eye on store shelves generally when I shop.  And it seems like we all agree that "hoarding" is wrong, but "stocking up" is prudent.

How do you know if you're a hoarder?
According to the Mayo Clinic, some key symptoms to watch out for if you believe you or someone you know may be a hoarder are: Cluttered living spaces. Moving items from one pile to another without the ability to throw anything away. Acquiring useless items, including trash, newspapers, and magazines.

Definition of stock up
: to get a large quantity of something for later use óoften + on

So, instead of hoarders, we are stocker uppers! Our items are definitely not useless!

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 14, 2020, 11:56:17 AM
Useless is partly a function of use rate.

Stocking up on 150 lbs of flour is useless (at least for our family).  Although flour itself is useful, in large enough quantity it becomes useless.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 14, 2020, 01:41:58 PM
I go through 150 lbs of flour most winters!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 14, 2020, 02:16:57 PM
I go through 150 lbs of flour most winters!

There's got to be a better way to simulate snow in warm areas . . .


:P
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 14, 2020, 04:29:49 PM
I hate winter, so I just stay inside and bake. ;-)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 16, 2020, 04:34:01 AM
Canned corn may be scarce.

https://nypost.com/2020/10/15/heres-why-canned-corn-might-be-tough-to-find-in-stores/
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 16, 2020, 07:10:28 AM
Canned corn may be scarce.

https://nypost.com/2020/10/15/heres-why-canned-corn-might-be-tough-to-find-in-stores/

Oh no.  What will we do without old bits of corn swimming in a putrid sick sweet gloop?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: lthenderson on October 16, 2020, 07:38:20 AM
No corn shortage where I live. I'm still eating from the monster crop we bagged and froze from five years ago. I probably still have another year or two left in my freezer. To GuitarStv's point, it is all natural and nothing but corn and perhaps a dollop of butter I add when nuking it before serving.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 16, 2020, 08:20:43 AM
No idea what GuitarStv is getting at "old bits of corn swimming in a putrid sick sweet gloop". Must be some brand I never have seen before.

Canned corn is packed normally in water with salt or sea salt or no salt. Most vegetable manufacturers process the foods directly from the fields to their plants that are typically located on site. The vegetables are picked and processed quickly to retain a good fresh quality.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on October 16, 2020, 08:33:36 AM
Maybe he is thinking of creamed corn? To me that is the standard canned corn.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 16, 2020, 08:35:38 AM
Haha, to me non creamed corn is the standard!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 16, 2020, 08:38:36 AM
Maybe he is thinking of creamed corn? To me that is the standard canned corn.

Creamed corn is also disgusting, but all canned vegetables I've tasted are ass (corn and peas being the only two I'm familiar with - granted).  They're about 3% of the flavour of fresh or frozen vegetables.  The canning process destroys any 'good fresh quality' that may have once existed and converts the vegetable into a mushy off-colour facsimile of the real thing that tastes markedly different.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: LaineyAZ on October 16, 2020, 08:51:57 AM
Maybe he is thinking of creamed corn? To me that is the standard canned corn.


Creamed corn is also disgusting, but all canned vegetables I've tasted are ass (corn and peas being the only two I'm familiar with - granted).  They're about 3% of the flavour of fresh or frozen vegetables.  The canning process destroys any 'good fresh quality' that may have once existed and converts the vegetable into a mushy off-colour facsimile of the real thing that tastes markedly different.

Agree about the taste, but canned food keeps people alive, which is the goal of getting through any food shortages caused by supply-chain, weather, or other disruptions.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 16, 2020, 08:53:11 AM
I donít eat much corn thatís not on the cob, but I donít think canned corn is mushy. It tastes like... cooked corn. Itís nice for casseroles like tamale pie or corn casserole. Some years I have so much fresh corn that I freeze a bunch, but not always.

I like canned green beans, too. They donít taste like fresh, but they are good in their own way, especially with bacon. ;-) And I think pressure cooked green beans taste pretty much like canned.

Not my first choice, but they have the advantage of being shelf stable and I usually have a can of corn and a can of green beans in the pantry.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 16, 2020, 08:57:37 AM
If you're pressure cooking green beans, peas, corn . . . you're doing it wrong.  That may actually qualify as an international hate crime against vegetable.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 16, 2020, 09:14:40 AM
Maybe he is thinking of creamed corn? To me that is the standard canned corn.

Creamed corn is also disgusting, but all canned vegetables I've tasted are ass (corn and peas being the only two I'm familiar with - granted).  They're about 3% of the flavour of fresh or frozen vegetables.  The canning process destroys any 'good fresh quality' that may have once existed and converts the vegetable into a mushy off-colour facsimile of the real thing that tastes markedly different.

Wow, how do you really feel? No one said you had to buy them. Of course canned vegetables are not equivalent to fresh in texture. Everyone knows that. Sometimes we choose to use other sources of food items during shortages for nutritional reasons. Not all of us find that canned vegetables taste like ass. Some are better than others. A lot of people home can their own vegetables and take a lot of pride in doing so, putting good food away for the harsh winter months.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 16, 2020, 09:37:07 AM
Wow, how do you really feel?

I'm not a fan.

:P
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Fiddlestix on October 16, 2020, 10:40:18 AM
Around these parts, this is a staple: John Cope's Toasted Dried Sweet Corn (and yes we made corn pudding for many a Sunday and holiday dinner).

https://lancasteronline.com/features/why-do-so-many-people-insist-on-serving-copes-dried-corn-for-thanksgiving/article_c16b3d2e-751b-11e4-800e-9bebf9d9fd60.html

In fact, I think I'll look for some now.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on October 16, 2020, 10:44:42 AM
I'm biased because most vegetables served to me in childhood came out of a can and were then boiled to death (grayish green beans and peas and mushy beets, carrots, and mushrooms are horrid), but I do understand that they are important shelf-stable staples. One of the local food banks just put out a request for donations of various canned veggies.

I tend to prefer frozen vegetables if fresh aren't in season. And I like frozen broccoli in recipes (broccoli rice casserole, broccoli cheese soup) and frozen mixed veggies in soups and cottage pie.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 16, 2020, 12:22:52 PM
I actually just added a can of corn to my grocery order. LOL

What amazes me are canned potatoes.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 16, 2020, 12:39:43 PM
Don't forget to buy canned B&M brown bread in a can. It is very good!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Pigeon on October 16, 2020, 01:44:37 PM
I am grocery shopping once a week.  I need to start building a small stash of  paper products as I do think everything will go back to lockdown.   We have fairly decent supplies in most of the stores.  I haven't seen Lysol wipes, but plenty of other off brands.  We've got toilet bowl cleaners in the stores.  The meat supplies seem to be mostly back to normal.  My freezer is full and I tend to keep stocked up on most things.  We did a CSA this summer and had our last delivery this week.  I used a different one than in prior years because of WFH, and it was a disappointment.

We got flu shots a couple weeks ago.  I haven't gotten them consistently in past years, but figured this was the year not to skip.  I dragged one reluctant adult daughter with me to the local grocery store's pharmacy, as they had signs plastered all over about the ease of getting them, just walk right in.  Not so much, as it turns out.  We got there at 1:30.  We waited ten minutes to be told they close at 2 for half an hour for the pharmacist to take lunch, which is fine, but you'd think they'd have that on their hundreds of signs.  Because there was someone ahead of us, they wouldn't get to us before that, so they told us to come back at 2:30.  We did, but didn't get our shots until nearly 4.  Adult daughter was not amused with me.

I am WFH, and other than the grocery store and outside walks, don't go anywhere.  Dh is a public school teacher, and has to be in classrooms with far too many students and not terribly careful colleagues.  Ugh.  Two adult daughters and one boyfriend live with us.  Oldest one is in nursing school, with some in person clinicals and labs, but most classes are online.  BF is working remotely.  DD2 is in college living at home this semester with minimal outside exposure, except for periodic trips to visit her bf.  I'm not thrilled with our level of outside contact, especially spouse's  public school, and suspect they will have outbreaks.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: birdie55 on October 16, 2020, 03:07:36 PM
Don't forget to buy canned B&M brown bread in a can. It is very good!

I have been trying to find this in multiple stores, no luck yet.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 16, 2020, 03:20:21 PM
Pigeon, Sounds like you have a lot of people around you that are out and about. I hope they are all careful with social distancing, washing hands and all that stuff.

Maybe you could think about doing curbside shopping for most shopping and only go to the store maybe once a month. One of the bigger stores in my town finally started offering curbside service and it is great. Of course, I prefer to pick out my own meats but most everything else is prepackaged except produce. If you shop once a month you could stock up on meats and then do curbside other times. My Hub needed a prescription the other day and I had the pharmacy deliver. I wasn't too happy that they had a delivery fee but less chance of exposure. Curb side had a fee too but only about $2.95 which I thought was fantastic. You could do some vegetable delivery service like Imperfect foods or Misfits. They delivery every week or every two weeks. You can pause delivery too if you need too. I also order a lot of stuff on line thru Walmart, Target, Amazon, Boxed and other odd ball places. Most places have a minimum order amount then you can get free shipping. Stick to smaller orders. Walmart has a $35 minimum for free shipping. If by chance I order a lot, I try to break it into two orders. Otherwise, they will pack the boxes with 100 lbs. of product. Learned that the hard way! Also, avoid buying anything in glass jars thru Walmart or Target. I have had many broken jars.

Also, can you have a pow wow with your family and set down some plans so that all of you are on the same page protecting yourselves. Like maybe having sanitizing wipes at the door when you first enter to wipe hands and anything that might have been exposed to the virus.

It is just the Hub and I and we don't go out much but when we do I cringe. The Hub has pain in his one foot so I had to take him to the doctors office two weeks ago. The office only wants the patient in the waiting room and not the spouse. So, I waited in the car. However, he needed a prescription so I had to go into the pharmacy and I was not thrilled at all! Sick people go to pharmacies! UGH. We all need battle plans to fight this thing. Take care, be careful!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 16, 2020, 03:26:59 PM
Don't forget to buy canned B&M brown bread in a can. It is very good!

I have been trying to find this in multiple stores, no luck yet.

 . . . what fresh hell is this???
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 16, 2020, 03:27:56 PM
Don't forget to buy canned B&M brown bread in a can. It is very good!

I have been trying to find this in multiple stores, no luck yet.

One of my local stores has it and I have also ordered it on line. Maybe Walmart or Amazon. However, you might have to buy a case! Crazy, but that is what I did! It will last a long time and is very good for any meal of the day. Even a dessert!

https://www.walmart.com/ip/B-M-Raisin-Brown-Bread-16-oz/10291606   Pick up only
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 16, 2020, 04:53:28 PM
We've been letting go of some of the food we stockpiled in the first month of the pandemic.  I know we won't eat it all and I want to donate food when it still has time left before the "best by" date.  I hate to think of shortages returning -- maybe I should start buying fresh meat each week now and save what we have in the freezer for potential shortages.

Our kid had surgery this week, which was postponed because of a Covid positive co-worker in late September.  While the other kid is still going to work (great safety protocols in place -- no one tested positive despite the coworker), none of us are going into stores or anywhere we could be exposed, because getting Covid while recovering from surgery would be bad.  And given increasing Covid numbers, we're going to keep it this way.  We did it for 3 months starting last March, and we can do it again.  We'll use curbside pickup or delivery.  I've had mixed feelings about it, but my risk is just too high to make shopping safe.

I had no idea canned corn was getting hard to find.  I have a case I pulled out of the pantry with the intention of donating it.  I think we have 10# frozen corn, so we'll still donate the cans, and hopefully someone will be glad to have it if there is indeed a shortage.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 16, 2020, 05:07:05 PM
Don't forget to buy canned B&M brown bread in a can. It is very good!

I have been trying to find this in multiple stores, no luck yet.

 . . . what fresh hell is this???

Wow, so much negativity. If you never tried it, how can you make comments on it? Lets try to be more positive! We are in a pandemic and we are all trying to find alternatives to things we take for granted. If you have tried it and don't like it so be it but why bash something you have no experience with. Let us all be more positive in our comments. We are all trying to survive this pandemic as best we can!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 16, 2020, 06:19:56 PM
Don't forget to buy canned B&M brown bread in a can. It is very good!

I have been trying to find this in multiple stores, no luck yet.

 . . . what fresh hell is this???

Wow, so much negativity. If you never tried it, how can you make comments on it? Lets try to be more positive! We are in a pandemic and we are all trying to find alternatives to things we take for granted. If you have tried it and don't like it so be it but why bash something you have no experience with. Let us all be more positive in our comments. We are all trying to survive this pandemic as best we can!

These comments are intended to be tongue in cheek.  Also, as a Canadian I'm genetically pre-disposed to whinging.

If you like canned vegetables, more power to you.  My mom was a huge fan of canned peas and corn, and we spent a lot of my childhood living in remote northern communities where fresh veggies were not always available.  Let's just say that the first time I tasted fresh peas and corn was pretty eye opening and resulted in some vows to solemnly stand against the menace of canned vegetables.

Coming from that background . . . I'm sure you can understand a certain recalcitrance to immediately sing praises of canned bread.  :P
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on October 16, 2020, 07:08:12 PM
Don't forget to buy canned B&M brown bread in a can. It is very good!

I have been trying to find this in multiple stores, no luck yet.

 . . . what fresh hell is this???

Wow, so much negativity. If you never tried it, how can you make comments on it? Lets try to be more positive! We are in a pandemic and we are all trying to find alternatives to things we take for granted. If you have tried it and don't like it so be it but why bash something you have no experience with. Let us all be more positive in our comments. We are all trying to survive this pandemic as best we can!

These comments are intended to be tongue in cheek.  Also, as a Canadian I'm genetically pre-disposed to whinging.

If you like canned vegetables, more power to you.  My mom was a huge fan of canned peas and corn, and we spent a lot of my childhood living in remote northern communities where fresh veggies were not always available.  Let's just say that the first time I tasted fresh peas and corn was pretty eye opening and resulted in some vows to solemnly stand against the menace of canned vegetables.

Coming from that background . . . I'm sure you can understand a certain recalcitrance to immediately sing praises of canned bread.  :P

I'm not sure anyone would can bread, when you can have the dry ingredients to hand. Even over a fire, a quick bread is very simple and quick to make.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on October 17, 2020, 07:20:30 AM
Don't forget to buy canned B&M brown bread in a can. It is very good!

I have been trying to find this in multiple stores, no luck yet.

 . . . what fresh hell is this???
Maybe GuitarStv reads nutrition labels...

https://www.bmbeans.com/product/brown-bread-plain

My Dad was from Boston.  This bread and Gulden's Mustard were two of his faves. I think I might give one of each to my siblings for Christmas. I think seeing it on the pantry shelf might be a poignant reminder of him. RIP, Pops.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 17, 2020, 07:37:19 AM
Bread in a can:

https://www.wikihow.com/Make-Bread-in-a-Can
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 17, 2020, 07:48:50 AM
Bread in a can:

https://www.wikihow.com/Make-Bread-in-a-Can

What dark, soul destroying secrets must be lurking in your shady past to have so twisted your perception of acceptable comestibles?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on October 17, 2020, 09:03:32 AM
Bread in a can:

https://www.wikihow.com/Make-Bread-in-a-Can

What dark, soul destroying secrets must be lurking in your shady past to have so twisted your perception of acceptable comestibles?
OMG, at my childhood home, our neighbors were Mormon. She used to bake all of her bread in tin cans! The top of the loaf straight out of the oven and slathered with butter, honey, or PB, or jam was so, so yummy! But it wasn't brown bread.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on October 17, 2020, 01:19:06 PM
Bread in a can:

https://www.wikihow.com/Make-Bread-in-a-Can

What dark, soul destroying secrets must be lurking in your shady past to have so twisted your perception of acceptable comestibles?
OMG, at my childhood home, our neighbors were Mormon. She used to bake all of her bread in tin cans! The top of the loaf straight out of the oven and slathered with butter, honey, or PB, or jam was so, so yummy! But it wasn't brown bread.

When I was a kid, my mom made banana bread and pumpkin bread in cans.  They would be special treats for us, or gifts for our teachers.  I don't know why - probably we couldn't afford bread pans.

I have made single-serve cakes in repurposed vegetable/bean cans.  I thought it was a cool way to "reduce-reuse-recycle" instead of buying a new thing. (Though this is completely different from "canning bread").
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on October 17, 2020, 03:50:12 PM
Using an empty can as a bread pan seems very reasonable.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 17, 2020, 04:04:10 PM
Also, they work for baking in the crockpot.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sibley on October 17, 2020, 04:25:25 PM
I have stocked up on people and cat food, nonfood items, and voted. Covid cases are increasing in my area, and given the number of Trump signs and people with masks on yet I can see their noses just fine plus the people without masks.... I'm staying home. I will have to venture out to the pharmacy this week, as I will need to pick up my new inhaler. Otherwise, plan to limit my trips out to the minimum.

I am also not a fan of canned vegetables. Much prefer to buy frozen. As for those debating hoarding vs stocking - when it comes to food, my definition of hoarding is having more food in the house than you can eat before it goes bad. If you're donating food because it'll expire before you get to it, you hoarded.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 17, 2020, 05:01:11 PM
I have stocked up on people and cat food, nonfood items, and voted. Covid cases are increasing in my area, and given the number of Trump signs and people with masks on yet I can see their noses just fine plus the people without masks.... I'm staying home. I will have to venture out to the pharmacy this week, as I will need to pick up my new inhaler. Otherwise, plan to limit my trips out to the minimum.

I am also not a fan of canned vegetables. Much prefer to buy frozen. As for those debating hoarding vs stocking - when it comes to food, my definition of hoarding is having more food in the house than you can eat before it goes bad. If you're donating food because it'll expire before you get to it, you hoarded.

I too prefer fresh veggies first, frozen second and canned third. As far as canned veggies go, only kernel corn and green beans. But when in survival mode you need green veggies. I hope it never gets so bad that we only have canned veggies to survive on. I certainly am not a farmer and am limited on vegetables I can grow. I did grow lettuce, basil, peppers, tomatoes. Not enough to survive on! I subscribe to Imperfect foods and get fresh veggies thru them.

I am doing a curbside grocery store run tomorrow. Have to go to another store too but not curbside. YUK!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: HBFIRE on October 17, 2020, 05:34:59 PM

I like canned green beans, too. They donít taste like fresh, but they are good in their own way

Call me weird, but I prefer canned green beans to fresh ones.  In fact, I'm not that fond of the fresh version now that I think about it haha.  I think that's the only case for me.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: fuzzy math on October 17, 2020, 06:45:46 PM

I like canned green beans, too. They donít taste like fresh, but they are good in their own way

Call me weird, but I prefer canned green beans to fresh ones.  In fact, I'm not that fond of the fresh version now that I think about it haha.  I think that's the only case for me.

I know. I'm tempted to go buy a can because they're so junky and delicious. I don't buy anything in a metal can due to BPA concerns and the horror of having opened some past expiration date cans at my mom's house and seeing what a leeched / disintegrating can looks like.  I'm also oddly hungry for creamed corn now too!

I don't think I'm specifically stocking up on anything now, other than dog food. There was a moment in March where I thought about the horror of my dog having a month straight of diarrhea if they were to stop stocking my warehouse store dog food. It was incredibly difficult to switch her last time. When we move in a couple years we'll be going to an area that only has the other brand of warehouse store so I'm going to have to very slowly switch her food. I also recognize that overall we keep slightly higher stock levels than before February and wonder how I'll ever learn to keep less.

My local FB group has warehouse employees who post daily what they got in. Tons of locals read it and ask daily about this or that. The hot items seem to be TP, paper towels (lots of people are apparently picky about brands of both of these), Lysol, wipes, face shields, bacon, chest freezers and trampolines. I think the trampoline shortage is finally over now that its fall!

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 17, 2020, 08:16:22 PM
My stockpiles are quite full. The only thing that is annoying is that dairy, produce and deli products are not hoardable. You can't buy 20 lbs. of lettuce or any fresh veggies or deli or dairy stuff to last long.

I thought I had a good idea and froze two lbs. of deli roast beef. When I opened the first package, it was totally gross! YUK! It looked gray and wet and gag me gross. It was nice pink roast beef when I froze it. I chucked it. It probably could have been salvaged somehow but, YUK, gag me, no way!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 18, 2020, 04:59:19 AM
Hard salami freezes fine, and luckily thatís also the only lunchmeat I especially like. Milk, butter and cheese freeze well, and eggs freeze well enough to use in baking.

Thinking more about green beans - in the Before Times, I regularly cooked at my churchís soup kitchen. Canned green beans were always a hit. People asked for seconds. Salad, not so much.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 18, 2020, 05:37:30 AM
"Hard salami freezes fine, and luckily thatís also the only lunchmeat I especially like. Milk, butter and cheese freeze well, and eggs freeze well enough to use in baking."

Yes, I have not resorted to freezing eggs yet but have considered it. Have watched some video's on youtube on how to do it. When I shop, I buy about 3 dozen eggs at a time so I have plenty all the time. I have frozen butter in my freezer. Milk is another story, I have been buying the shelf stable 8 oz. boxed milk by the case. It is so perfect for us. We don't use much milk here but when we do, all we need is one or two containers so no waste. As far as cost, I have not analyzed it but I do know when I bought normal milk in the past, I have thrown out so much milk over the years. We just don't go thru milk fast enough and it goes sour. We freeze cheese, sandwich pepperoni, deli ham, deli turkey, and walnuts.

Cranky: "Thinking more about green beans - in the Before Times, I regularly cooked at my churchís soup kitchen. Canned green beans were always a hit. People asked for seconds. Salad, not so much." Did you make the make the green bean casserole that people have during the holidays?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 18, 2020, 08:13:21 AM
We pretty much just use milk for cooking and the occasional bowl of cereal, so the half gallon of ultrapasteurized milk works pretty well for us, but I like to have a backup for winter weather, and I was glad of it last spring when it was so hard to get a pickup slot for groceries. Shelf stable milk doesnít seem common around here - Iíve only seen the little individual cartons for school lunches.

We donít even make green bean casserole for the soup kitchen, just the industrial sized can of green beans heated up. But clearly plenty of people love them. Oh, I also often work at a food pantry we operate at a public school, and while nobody wants canned peas (and no wonder) canned corn and canned green beans are snapped up.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 18, 2020, 08:24:59 AM
We pretty much just use milk for cooking and the occasional bowl of cereal, so the half gallon of ultrapasteurized milk works pretty well for us, but I like to have a backup for winter weather, and I was glad of it last spring when it was so hard to get a pickup slot for groceries. Shelf stable milk doesnít seem common around here - Iíve only seen the little individual cartons for school lunches.

We donít even make green bean casserole for the soup kitchen, just the industrial sized can of green beans heated up. But clearly plenty of people love them. Oh, I also often work at a food pantry we operate at a public school, and while nobody wants canned peas (and no wonder) canned corn and canned green beans are snapped up.

You can get the individual 8 oz. (18 count) containers of milk thru Costco or Boxed.com. Costco is a few dollars cheaper
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: saguaro on October 18, 2020, 08:47:38 AM
I too prefer fresh veggies first, frozen second and canned third. As far as canned veggies go, only kernel corn and green beans. But when in survival mode you need green veggies. I hope it never gets so bad that we only have canned veggies to survive on. I certainly am not a farmer and am limited on vegetables I can grow. I did grow lettuce, basil, peppers, tomatoes. Not enough to survive on! I subscribe to Imperfect foods and get fresh veggies thru them.

Same here, fresh, then frozen, then canned though I absolutely hate canned peas.

We have a plot in our local community garden and grew peppers, tomatoes, zucchini, squash, cucumbers, cabbage.  I grew lettuce in a pot on my deck during the summer (too many rabbits in the community garden).  Canned and froze what I could but with limited freezer space still not going to last the winter.   Have stocked up on other things though and plan to do a big Costco run next week. 

Also my garage gets cold enough in the winter that's safe to store things like potatoes, carrots, apples in closed containers but not subject them to freezing.   Just have to make sure I use it all before it warms up in there which is like in March.

Covid cases are also spiking in our area so starting to limit the grocery trips again like we did in spring.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: fuzzy math on October 18, 2020, 08:52:50 AM
I have pinto beans soaking and ham thawing this morning for soup beans!! I have unknowingly been making them for the last year. I normally put leftover pasta sauce or some concentrated tomato paste in them and have been calling them "ranch beans".
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Imma on October 18, 2020, 10:01:08 AM
We're in a second lockdown already. We get groceries delivered and I made sure to stockpile this summer. Ever since the second lockdown has been announced shops have been empty again. The first lockdown was a surprise (although I always have a full pantry) but everyone knew the second wave was coming. I also canned this summer and we're growing spinach, kale, beetroot and endive in the garden.

I actually just ate canned peas for dinner (in a Shepherd's pie) and I also eat canned corn fairly often. Both are not often found fresh where I live. I also eat canned beans and lentils quite often - I have dried ones too but I don't always want to plan ahead. I think canned beans taste perfectly fine. I make sure to buy the brands that don't add sugar or salt.

I much prefer fresh green beans over canned but I don't mind canned at all. We used to grow tons of green beans at home and 9 months a year we ate them canned. I won't eat canned potatoes, mushrooms or asparagus though. Those are disgusting.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 18, 2020, 01:30:10 PM
This expert says "the darkest of the pandemic is yet to come".

Batten down the hatches, get your pantries full and stay home as much as possible!

I just did curbside and had to go into one store too. Scary times ahead.

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/osterholm-pandemic-forecast_n_5f8c6e02c5b67da85d1f2d67
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 18, 2020, 02:12:35 PM
As for those debating hoarding vs stocking - when it comes to food, my definition of hoarding is having more food in the house than you can eat before it goes bad. If you're donating food because it'll expire before you get to it, you hoarded.

We could certainly eat all of the food we stockpiled before the best by or expiration dates, which are years in the future, but I know a) we don't need to because we solved the fresh produce shortage when we found a produce wholesaler who started selling to the public, b) we don't prefer canned foods in general, and c) we bought canned corn because we couldn't get frozen, and once our preferred frozen option became available we bought that and planned to donate the canned.

When we were stockpiling, we knew all along we would donate some of it. Indeed, when I debated buying a case of canned corn, DH pointed out we could donate it if we didn't use it or frozen became available, which it did several months in. At the same time we were stockpiling we were also buying for the food bank -- in addition to non-perishable food we donated 240 individually wrapped rolls of toiler paper.

We did buy some canned foods we ended up not wanting. I had fond memories of Spam and au gratin potatoes from my childhood -- the taste didn't live up to the memories and meat ended up not being in short supply as long as one was flexible. I have one kid who liked the Spam and would have eaten it, but I decided to donate it anyway.  I kept the cans of corned beef hash (another memory that disappointed) for him. I didn't care for the canned chicken we bought, but we're using it in soup and make chicken salad for the guys to use in sandwiches.

The urgent need for food donations is now, not a couple of years in the future when the cans have a couple of months left before expiring. Our local food bank keeps sending out pleas for donations. When I bought a case of canned pumpkin last week I set aside half of it for the food bank. If I buy a two pack of oil I give one to the food bank.

As for canned vs. frozen or fresh vegetables, we prefer fresh, then frozen, with canned a distant third.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 18, 2020, 02:21:33 PM
This expert says "the darkest of the pandemic is yet to come".

Batten down the hatches, get your pantries full and stay home as much as possible!

I just did curbside and had to go into one store too. Scary times ahead.

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/osterholm-pandemic-forecast_n_5f8c6e02c5b67da85d1f2d67

Good advice! If I could have my kids on leave of absence again I would, but at this point they'd lose their jobs.

We're done with going into stores even with masks and hand sanitizer (we started going again in late June, I think). It will be Instacart and curbside pickups from here on out.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 18, 2020, 02:35:52 PM
Curbside grocery service was really good, however, I didn't realize till I got home that the store didn't have certain items that I specifically wanted and needed. I looked at the receipt when I got home and there were things listed that they were out of. Frustrating!

Another frustrating thing is that there were 8 parking spaces dedicated to curbside pick up and people who were not doing curbside were parked and in the store shopping. GRRRRR! I was lucky to get the last space available.

I have not done instacart. How much does it cost and how do you go about doing that?

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 18, 2020, 02:47:04 PM
 Aldi does instacart and so does my local IGA. I think thereís a separate Instacart app, but I havenít tried it. I understand that the prices are quite a bit higher than in the store.

Aldi, you order for curbside pickup through Instacart, but the people who put your order together are Aldi employees.

Giant Eagle, the big chain in my area, uses their own employees which I prefer. Some of the Instacart shoppers seem pretty clueless about groceries.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 18, 2020, 03:17:52 PM
Curbside grocery service was really good, however, I didn't realize till I got home that the store didn't have certain items that I specifically wanted and needed. I looked at the receipt when I got home and there were things listed that they were out of. Frustrating!

Another frustrating thing is that there were 8 parking spaces dedicated to curbside pick up and people who were not doing curbside were parked and in the store shopping. GRRRRR! I was lucky to get the last space available.

I have not done instacart. How much does it cost and how do you go about doing that?

We tried curbside with Target and it was a disaster -- they tried at first to send us home with half of what we'd ordered and been charged with. Then they brought out what they said was the rest, and it was still missing items.  I didn't order for curbside only to have to do an inventory in my car and repeatedly have to try to fix it.

I'm trying Instacart Express for free for 30 days (worked that out with online customer service). That's $99 per year (or $10 per month) -- it eliminates the delivery fee and lowers the service fee. One thing I learned was Sprouts doesn't have inflated prices on the Instacart website, and they honor their sale prices, so they're my preferred store. Aldi's markups are minimal.  Costco's markups are high, but so are their markups on 2 day non-perishable grocery delivery.  I plan to use Instacart at Costco only for things I can't get elsewhere (my dogs eat their Nature's Domain food).

This week I did two orders through Instacart, and in both cases I had groceries on my doorstop in just under an hour. I expect this to change as more people return to using grocery delivery. The person who picked out my produce and perishables at Sprouts did a fantastic job. I paid for an Instacart Aldi delivery several months ago and that was a disaster in terms of the produce -- I don't think it's going to work well someplace like Aldi where you have to really check the produce to make sure it's fresh.

It's still not frugal.  At Sprouts my food order was $76.18, the service fee was reduced to $1.45, and I ended up tipping $9.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 18, 2020, 03:39:22 PM
I checked my Costco and instacart doesn't deliver to my zipcode. I am located about 15 miles from Costco. We have Stop & Shop either curbside or home delivery (formerly Peapod).

I have ordered some meat from Rastelli's (on line). Not cheap but really good quality. I ordered pork burgers from Red Top Farms, I order some things from Walmart (shelf stable). I have also ordered from QVC some meat products and Schwann's for frozen things. Imperfect foods for vegetable delivery. I have also ordered from a food service company on line too for frozen things. I have a lot of bases covered. Dairy, deli and some produce are the stumbling blocks. Where is the milkman when you need him? I could order from Stop & Shop and have that stuff delivered too.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Runrooster on October 18, 2020, 08:05:13 PM
While I share the distaste for canned veg generally, for some reason Im okay with canned tomatoes for cooking only. I like the petite diced as far as size, already peeled and the canning semi-cooks them.  It doesnt taste like fresh, but I dont expect it to.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on October 19, 2020, 04:11:24 AM
As for those debating hoarding vs stocking - when it comes to food, my definition of hoarding is having more food in the house than you can eat before it goes bad. If you're donating food because it'll expire before you get to it, you hoarded.

We could certainly eat all of the food we stockpiled before the best by or expiration dates, which are years in the future, but I know a) we don't need to because we solved the fresh produce shortage when we found a produce wholesaler who started selling to the public, b) we don't prefer canned foods in general, and c) we bought canned corn because we couldn't get frozen, and once our preferred frozen option became available we bought that and planned to donate the canned.

When we were stockpiling, we knew all along we would donate some of it. Indeed, when I debated buying a case of canned corn, DH pointed out we could donate it if we didn't use it or frozen became available, which it did several months in. At the same time we were stockpiling we were also buying for the food bank -- in addition to non-perishable food we donated 240 individually wrapped rolls of toiler paper.

We did buy some canned foods we ended up not wanting. I had fond memories of Spam and au gratin potatoes from my childhood -- the taste didn't live up to the memories and meat ended up not being in short supply as long as one was flexible. I have one kid who liked the Spam and would have eaten it, but I decided to donate it anyway.  I kept the cans of corned beef hash (another memory that disappointed) for him. I didn't care for the canned chicken we bought, but we're using it in soup and make chicken salad for the guys to use in sandwiches.

The urgent need for food donations is now, not a couple of years in the future when the cans have a couple of months left before expiring. Our local food bank keeps sending out pleas for donations. When I bought a case of canned pumpkin last week I set aside half of it for the food bank. If I buy a two pack of oil I give one to the food bank.

As for canned vs. frozen or fresh vegetables, we prefer fresh, then frozen, with canned a distant third.
I used to do the same things for the Food Bank, until I got to take a tour. OMG, they are so efficient! They have such  great connections with manufacturers and growers that they buy food for way less than I can, even with my ninja shopping skills. Now I don't buy food, I give cash instead. I'm grateful that years of mustachianism has allowed me the freedom to give generously.

Earlier this month, my civic group hosted a city-wide Food Drive. We collected more than 19 tons of food and over $16k in cash. Someone from the Food Bank commented that the beauty of community food drives is the variety of food it brings in.  Mostly, it raises awareness, even if it is less efficient.

If you're interested, there is a picture and a video clip on the last two pages of my journal, which is linked below. No need to bother with the rest of my blathering, it's pure drivel.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 19, 2020, 04:42:23 AM
While I share the distaste for canned veg generally, for some reason Im okay with canned tomatoes for cooking only. I like the petite diced as far as size, already peeled and the canning semi-cooks them.  It doesnt taste like fresh, but I dont expect it to.

I absolutely love tomatoes and canned are great too! San Marzano whole, peeled tomatoes are fantastic! Also, look for fire roasted tomatoes.

Here is a simple sauce recipe that is delicious!
https://food52.com/recipes/13722-marcella-hazan-s-tomato-sauce-with-onion-butter
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 19, 2020, 06:55:57 AM
While I share the distaste for canned veg generally, for some reason Im okay with canned tomatoes for cooking only. I like the petite diced as far as size, already peeled and the canning semi-cooks them.  It doesnt taste like fresh, but I dont expect it to.

Agreed.  Canned tomatoes are fine . . . probably because you're always cooking the crap out of the tomatoes to make a sauce anyway.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: I'm a red panda on October 19, 2020, 09:17:41 AM
As for those debating hoarding vs stocking - when it comes to food, my definition of hoarding is having more food in the house than you can eat before it goes bad. If you're donating food because it'll expire before you get to it, you hoarded.

We could certainly eat all of the food we stockpiled before the best by or expiration dates, which are years in the future, but I know a) we don't need to because we solved the fresh produce shortage when we found a produce wholesaler who started selling to the public, b) we don't prefer canned foods in general, and c) we bought canned corn because we couldn't get frozen, and once our preferred frozen option became available we bought that and planned to donate the canned.

When we were stockpiling, we knew all along we would donate some of it. Indeed, when I debated buying a case of canned corn, DH pointed out we could donate it if we didn't use it or frozen became available, which it did several months in. At the same time we were stockpiling we were also buying for the food bank -- in addition to non-perishable food we donated 240 individually wrapped rolls of toiler paper.

We did buy some canned foods we ended up not wanting. I had fond memories of Spam and au gratin potatoes from my childhood -- the taste didn't live up to the memories and meat ended up not being in short supply as long as one was flexible. I have one kid who liked the Spam and would have eaten it, but I decided to donate it anyway.  I kept the cans of corned beef hash (another memory that disappointed) for him. I didn't care for the canned chicken we bought, but we're using it in soup and make chicken salad for the guys to use in sandwiches.

The urgent need for food donations is now, not a couple of years in the future when the cans have a couple of months left before expiring. Our local food bank keeps sending out pleas for donations. When I bought a case of canned pumpkin last week I set aside half of it for the food bank. If I buy a two pack of oil I give one to the food bank.

As for canned vs. frozen or fresh vegetables, we prefer fresh, then frozen, with canned a distant third.
I used to do the same things for the Food Bank, until I got to take a tour. OMG, they are so efficient! They have such  great connections with manufacturers and growers that they buy food for way less than I can, even with my ninja shopping skills. Now I don't buy food, I give cash instead. I'm grateful that years of mustachianism has allowed me the freedom to give generously.

Earlier this month, my civic group hosted a city-wide Food Drive. We collected more than 19 tons of food and over $16k in cash. Someone from the Food Bank commented that the beauty of community food drives is the variety of food it brings in.  Mostly, it raises awareness, even if it is less efficient.

If you're interested, there is a picture and a video clip on the last two pages of my journal, which is linked below. No need to bother with the rest of my blathering, it's pure drivel.

Our food bank has told us that for food, donating money is the best option.
But they have NO connections to get discounted toilet paper. They are in dire need of toilet paper.  Ironically, they did a huge toilet paper drive in February, because the need was so great.  I can't imagine how bad it got in March and April...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 19, 2020, 09:24:21 AM
As for those debating hoarding vs stocking - when it comes to food, my definition of hoarding is having more food in the house than you can eat before it goes bad. If you're donating food because it'll expire before you get to it, you hoarded.

We could certainly eat all of the food we stockpiled before the best by or expiration dates, which are years in the future, but I know a) we don't need to because we solved the fresh produce shortage when we found a produce wholesaler who started selling to the public, b) we don't prefer canned foods in general, and c) we bought canned corn because we couldn't get frozen, and once our preferred frozen option became available we bought that and planned to donate the canned.

When we were stockpiling, we knew all along we would donate some of it. Indeed, when I debated buying a case of canned corn, DH pointed out we could donate it if we didn't use it or frozen became available, which it did several months in. At the same time we were stockpiling we were also buying for the food bank -- in addition to non-perishable food we donated 240 individually wrapped rolls of toiler paper.

We did buy some canned foods we ended up not wanting. I had fond memories of Spam and au gratin potatoes from my childhood -- the taste didn't live up to the memories and meat ended up not being in short supply as long as one was flexible. I have one kid who liked the Spam and would have eaten it, but I decided to donate it anyway.  I kept the cans of corned beef hash (another memory that disappointed) for him. I didn't care for the canned chicken we bought, but we're using it in soup and make chicken salad for the guys to use in sandwiches.

The urgent need for food donations is now, not a couple of years in the future when the cans have a couple of months left before expiring. Our local food bank keeps sending out pleas for donations. When I bought a case of canned pumpkin last week I set aside half of it for the food bank. If I buy a two pack of oil I give one to the food bank.

As for canned vs. frozen or fresh vegetables, we prefer fresh, then frozen, with canned a distant third.
I used to do the same things for the Food Bank, until I got to take a tour. OMG, they are so efficient! They have such  great connections with manufacturers and growers that they buy food for way less than I can, even with my ninja shopping skills. Now I don't buy food, I give cash instead. I'm grateful that years of mustachianism has allowed me the freedom to give generously.

Earlier this month, my civic group hosted a city-wide Food Drive. We collected more than 19 tons of food and over $16k in cash. Someone from the Food Bank commented that the beauty of community food drives is the variety of food it brings in.  Mostly, it raises awareness, even if it is less efficient.

If you're interested, there is a picture and a video clip on the last two pages of my journal, which is linked below. No need to bother with the rest of my blathering, it's pure drivel.

Our food bank has told us that for food, donating money is the best option.
But they have NO connections to get discounted toilet paper. They are in dire need of toilet paper.  Ironically, they did a huge toilet paper drive in February, because the need was so great.  I can't imagine how bad it got in March and April...

Why does a food bank need toilet paper at all?

I went without toilet paper for several months this year.  It's not ideal, but certainly is not a necessity if you have a shower head in the room where you poop.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 19, 2020, 10:06:21 AM
As for those debating hoarding vs stocking - when it comes to food, my definition of hoarding is having more food in the house than you can eat before it goes bad. If you're donating food because it'll expire before you get to it, you hoarded.

We could certainly eat all of the food we stockpiled before the best by or expiration dates, which are years in the future, but I know a) we don't need to because we solved the fresh produce shortage when we found a produce wholesaler who started selling to the public, b) we don't prefer canned foods in general, and c) we bought canned corn because we couldn't get frozen, and once our preferred frozen option became available we bought that and planned to donate the canned.

When we were stockpiling, we knew all along we would donate some of it. Indeed, when I debated buying a case of canned corn, DH pointed out we could donate it if we didn't use it or frozen became available, which it did several months in. At the same time we were stockpiling we were also buying for the food bank -- in addition to non-perishable food we donated 240 individually wrapped rolls of toiler paper.

We did buy some canned foods we ended up not wanting. I had fond memories of Spam and au gratin potatoes from my childhood -- the taste didn't live up to the memories and meat ended up not being in short supply as long as one was flexible. I have one kid who liked the Spam and would have eaten it, but I decided to donate it anyway.  I kept the cans of corned beef hash (another memory that disappointed) for him. I didn't care for the canned chicken we bought, but we're using it in soup and make chicken salad for the guys to use in sandwiches.

The urgent need for food donations is now, not a couple of years in the future when the cans have a couple of months left before expiring. Our local food bank keeps sending out pleas for donations. When I bought a case of canned pumpkin last week I set aside half of it for the food bank. If I buy a two pack of oil I give one to the food bank.

As for canned vs. frozen or fresh vegetables, we prefer fresh, then frozen, with canned a distant third.
I used to do the same things for the Food Bank, until I got to take a tour. OMG, they are so efficient! They have such  great connections with manufacturers and growers that they buy food for way less than I can, even with my ninja shopping skills. Now I don't buy food, I give cash instead. I'm grateful that years of mustachianism has allowed me the freedom to give generously.

Earlier this month, my civic group hosted a city-wide Food Drive. We collected more than 19 tons of food and over $16k in cash. Someone from the Food Bank commented that the beauty of community food drives is the variety of food it brings in.  Mostly, it raises awareness, even if it is less efficient.

If you're interested, there is a picture and a video clip on the last two pages of my journal, which is linked below. No need to bother with the rest of my blathering, it's pure drivel.

Our food bank has told us that for food, donating money is the best option.
But they have NO connections to get discounted toilet paper. They are in dire need of toilet paper.  Ironically, they did a huge toilet paper drive in February, because the need was so great.  I can't imagine how bad it got in March and April...

Toilet paper, diapers, dish soap , laundry detergent, pet food are always in HUGE demand because you can never get those with food stamps.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 19, 2020, 10:07:16 AM
As for those debating hoarding vs stocking - when it comes to food, my definition of hoarding is having more food in the house than you can eat before it goes bad. If you're donating food because it'll expire before you get to it, you hoarded.

We could certainly eat all of the food we stockpiled before the best by or expiration dates, which are years in the future, but I know a) we don't need to because we solved the fresh produce shortage when we found a produce wholesaler who started selling to the public, b) we don't prefer canned foods in general, and c) we bought canned corn because we couldn't get frozen, and once our preferred frozen option became available we bought that and planned to donate the canned.

When we were stockpiling, we knew all along we would donate some of it. Indeed, when I debated buying a case of canned corn, DH pointed out we could donate it if we didn't use it or frozen became available, which it did several months in. At the same time we were stockpiling we were also buying for the food bank -- in addition to non-perishable food we donated 240 individually wrapped rolls of toiler paper.

We did buy some canned foods we ended up not wanting. I had fond memories of Spam and au gratin potatoes from my childhood -- the taste didn't live up to the memories and meat ended up not being in short supply as long as one was flexible. I have one kid who liked the Spam and would have eaten it, but I decided to donate it anyway.  I kept the cans of corned beef hash (another memory that disappointed) for him. I didn't care for the canned chicken we bought, but we're using it in soup and make chicken salad for the guys to use in sandwiches.

The urgent need for food donations is now, not a couple of years in the future when the cans have a couple of months left before expiring. Our local food bank keeps sending out pleas for donations. When I bought a case of canned pumpkin last week I set aside half of it for the food bank. If I buy a two pack of oil I give one to the food bank.

As for canned vs. frozen or fresh vegetables, we prefer fresh, then frozen, with canned a distant third.
I used to do the same things for the Food Bank, until I got to take a tour. OMG, they are so efficient! They have such  great connections with manufacturers and growers that they buy food for way less than I can, even with my ninja shopping skills. Now I don't buy food, I give cash instead. I'm grateful that years of mustachianism has allowed me the freedom to give generously.

Earlier this month, my civic group hosted a city-wide Food Drive. We collected more than 19 tons of food and over $16k in cash. Someone from the Food Bank commented that the beauty of community food drives is the variety of food it brings in.  Mostly, it raises awareness, even if it is less efficient.

If you're interested, there is a picture and a video clip on the last two pages of my journal, which is linked below. No need to bother with the rest of my blathering, it's pure drivel.

Our food bank has told us that for food, donating money is the best option.
But they have NO connections to get discounted toilet paper. They are in dire need of toilet paper.  Ironically, they did a huge toilet paper drive in February, because the need was so great.  I can't imagine how bad it got in March and April...

Why does a food bank need toilet paper at all?

I went without toilet paper for several months this year.  It's not ideal, but certainly is not a necessity if you have a shower head in the room where you poop.

Does everyone in your house take a shower every time they poop??
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: I'm a red panda on October 19, 2020, 10:30:32 AM

Why does a food bank need toilet paper at all?

I went without toilet paper for several months this year.  It's not ideal, but certainly is not a necessity if you have a shower head in the room where you poop.

Most people in the US consider toilet paper a necessity.  Food banks provide it to people to help them have dignity.
(And it's not just poop. Most women typically dry themselves when they pee, including to wipe themselves when dealing with their period. Using a cloth isn't really a good option if you don't have access to inexpensive laundry, and laundrymats are EXPENSIVE to use.)

I am happy to donate toilet paper to our food bank to help those in need of it.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 19, 2020, 11:14:48 AM
As for those debating hoarding vs stocking - when it comes to food, my definition of hoarding is having more food in the house than you can eat before it goes bad. If you're donating food because it'll expire before you get to it, you hoarded.

We could certainly eat all of the food we stockpiled before the best by or expiration dates, which are years in the future, but I know a) we don't need to because we solved the fresh produce shortage when we found a produce wholesaler who started selling to the public, b) we don't prefer canned foods in general, and c) we bought canned corn because we couldn't get frozen, and once our preferred frozen option became available we bought that and planned to donate the canned.

When we were stockpiling, we knew all along we would donate some of it. Indeed, when I debated buying a case of canned corn, DH pointed out we could donate it if we didn't use it or frozen became available, which it did several months in. At the same time we were stockpiling we were also buying for the food bank -- in addition to non-perishable food we donated 240 individually wrapped rolls of toiler paper.

We did buy some canned foods we ended up not wanting. I had fond memories of Spam and au gratin potatoes from my childhood -- the taste didn't live up to the memories and meat ended up not being in short supply as long as one was flexible. I have one kid who liked the Spam and would have eaten it, but I decided to donate it anyway.  I kept the cans of corned beef hash (another memory that disappointed) for him. I didn't care for the canned chicken we bought, but we're using it in soup and make chicken salad for the guys to use in sandwiches.

The urgent need for food donations is now, not a couple of years in the future when the cans have a couple of months left before expiring. Our local food bank keeps sending out pleas for donations. When I bought a case of canned pumpkin last week I set aside half of it for the food bank. If I buy a two pack of oil I give one to the food bank.

As for canned vs. frozen or fresh vegetables, we prefer fresh, then frozen, with canned a distant third.
I used to do the same things for the Food Bank, until I got to take a tour. OMG, they are so efficient! They have such  great connections with manufacturers and growers that they buy food for way less than I can, even with my ninja shopping skills. Now I don't buy food, I give cash instead. I'm grateful that years of mustachianism has allowed me the freedom to give generously.

Earlier this month, my civic group hosted a city-wide Food Drive. We collected more than 19 tons of food and over $16k in cash. Someone from the Food Bank commented that the beauty of community food drives is the variety of food it brings in.  Mostly, it raises awareness, even if it is less efficient.

If you're interested, there is a picture and a video clip on the last two pages of my journal, which is linked below. No need to bother with the rest of my blathering, it's pure drivel.

Our food bank has told us that for food, donating money is the best option.
But they have NO connections to get discounted toilet paper. They are in dire need of toilet paper.  Ironically, they did a huge toilet paper drive in February, because the need was so great.  I can't imagine how bad it got in March and April...

Why does a food bank need toilet paper at all?

I went without toilet paper for several months this year.  It's not ideal, but certainly is not a necessity if you have a shower head in the room where you poop.

Does everyone in your house take a shower every time they poop??

When there's no TP available at the stores they do.


2020 - Showing us what is really discretionary spending.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Blue Skies on October 19, 2020, 11:53:47 AM

Why does a food bank need toilet paper at all?

I went without toilet paper for several months this year.  It's not ideal, but certainly is not a necessity if you have a shower head in the room where you poop.

Personally, I would much rather donate toilet paper to the food bank than the cake mix and frosting that our local food bank always has on their most wanted list...

If people can't afford food, is cake really that important?  Apparently around here, it is.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on October 19, 2020, 12:27:31 PM

Why does a food bank need toilet paper at all?

I went without toilet paper for several months this year.  It's not ideal, but certainly is not a necessity if you have a shower head in the room where you poop.

Personally, I would much rather donate toilet paper to the food bank than the cake mix and frosting that our local food bank always has on their most wanted list...

If people can't afford food, is cake really that important?  Apparently around here, it is.
Speaking from personal experience getting a birthday cake made from the food pantry supplies was the only thing I received for my b day at times and made my day.

I know it is not necessary to life as far as nutrition goes (probably has a better nutritional value that the blocks of greasy government cheese we would get) but it sure made my day and sometimes survival is about more than just nutritional sustenance.

I am guessing it also made my mom happy to see a smile on my face and who knows maybe it kept one or both of us going.

Let them eat cake


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Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 19, 2020, 12:39:02 PM

Why does a food bank need toilet paper at all?

I went without toilet paper for several months this year.  It's not ideal, but certainly is not a necessity if you have a shower head in the room where you poop.

Personally, I would much rather donate toilet paper to the food bank than the cake mix and frosting that our local food bank always has on their most wanted list...

If people can't afford food, is cake really that important?  Apparently around here, it is.

LET THEM EAT CAKE!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Just Joe on October 19, 2020, 03:46:06 PM
Don't forget to buy canned B&M brown bread in a can. It is very good!

I have been trying to find this in multiple stores, no luck yet.

One of my local stores has it and I have also ordered it on line. Maybe Walmart or Amazon. However, you might have to buy a case! Crazy, but that is what I did! It will last a long time and is very good for any meal of the day. Even a dessert!

https://www.walmart.com/ip/B-M-Raisin-Brown-Bread-16-oz/10291606   Pick up only

$20 per can?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 19, 2020, 04:31:59 PM
Our food bank isn't just a food bank, they're a family services association and also work to provide housing, etc.  They do specifically ask for food donations in addition to monetary donations.  Usually they ask for canned goods, peanut butter, cereal, etc.  Mostly basics.  They also need personal hygiene items.  They accept gently used clothing and household goods.

I grew up poor and cake mix cake with canned frosting is what we had for every birthday.  I'll donate whatever they ask for without judgment.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on October 19, 2020, 05:15:16 PM
Our food bank isn't just a food bank, they're a family services association and also work to provide housing, etc.  They do specifically ask for food donations in addition to monetary donations.  Usually they ask for canned goods, peanut butter, cereal, etc.  Mostly basics.  They also need personal hygiene items.  They accept gently used clothing and household goods.

I grew up poor and cake mix cake with canned frosting is what we had for every birthday.  I'll donate whatever they ask for without judgment.

I'm weirdly balanced between applauding your attitude to donating whatever they want, and wondering at what you consider to be poor with your cake mix story!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Runrooster on October 19, 2020, 07:04:21 PM
While I share the distaste for canned veg generally, for some reason Im okay with canned tomatoes for cooking only. I like the petite diced as far as size, already peeled and the canning semi-cooks them.  It doesnt taste like fresh, but I dont expect it to.

Agreed.  Canned tomatoes are fine . . . probably because you're always cooking the crap out of the tomatoes to make a sauce anyway.

Glad to hear I'm not alone.  A month ago my grocery store offered $0.37 cans of 14 oz kidney beans, black beans, green beans, or corn, limit 12 per account, which means 24 for us.  I stocked up thinking it was a 6 month price, making two trips to do so.  Then this week they repeated the offer but with canned tomatoes instead of green beans or peas.  I guess everyone else got their fill, because the store was well stocked even of garbanzo beans which they'd run out of both earlier visits.  I bought 12 more beans, and 12 tomatoes. I usually try to stock 6 cans of the 28 oz tomatoes, and had just bought 3, but I'm sure they'll get used promptly.  The nice thing is that the ad only lists kidney and black beans, which we eat more slowly, but actually includes all beans.

But we are having tomato fights.  My Mom became allergic to table salt (but can eat sea salt) two years ago.  That ruled out canned tomatoes for her meals, but the first summer she had a nice bounty in the garden and I stocked up when they were cheap in the store.  This summer we didnt grow any and the prices never dropped below $.99 a pound if even that.  So its mid October and I resent paying $2/pound for fresh tomatoes with mediocre flavor that will be cooked.  I finally realized that hey, they sell no salt added cans of tomatoes, at either $1/28oz or $0.37/14 oz.  My Mom tried them and so far says they are not bothering her.  But, she still wants to cook with fresh tomatoes.  She offers to use less. Id rather use more and canned.  Id stop buying fresh but I want 2-3 for my daily fresh salads.  Which she will cook with unless I buy her 2-3 pounds extra.  I think maybe canning has gotten better because tomatoes dont have that tinny flavor I remember from decades ago?

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 19, 2020, 07:19:48 PM
My Mom became allergic to table salt (but can eat sea salt) two years ago

?

Is it the iodine that she has a problem with?  That's the only thing I can think of that would be in table salt but not sea salt.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Imma on October 20, 2020, 01:35:46 AM

Why does a food bank need toilet paper at all?

I went without toilet paper for several months this year.  It's not ideal, but certainly is not a necessity if you have a shower head in the room where you poop.

Personally, I would much rather donate toilet paper to the food bank than the cake mix and frosting that our local food bank always has on their most wanted list...

If people can't afford food, is cake really that important?  Apparently around here, it is.
Speaking from personal experience getting a birthday cake made from the food pantry supplies was the only thing I received for my b day at times and made my day.

I know it is not necessary to life as far as nutrition goes (probably has a better nutritional value that the blocks of greasy government cheese we would get) but it sure made my day and sometimes survival is about more than just nutritional sustenance.

I am guessing it also made my mom happy to see a smile on my face and who knows maybe it kept one or both of us going.

Let them eat cake


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I know my local foodbank even has party boxes for kids. When it's your kid's birthday you get cake mix, treats that a kid could take to school, something like a bag of crisps and a bottle of soda to celebrate at home, and a small toy. Is it necessary for survival? No. Is it amazing for those kids to grow up like everyone else? Yes. I can't imagine how awful it must be for kids when you're the only one in class who can't afford to bring in a treat for your birthday.

They also hand out summer holiday boxes for families with children that include vouchers donated by businesses and grocery gift cards so families can take a trip to the zoo or the pool and bring their favourite treats from home.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 20, 2020, 03:57:23 AM
Don't forget to buy canned B&M brown bread in a can. It is very good!

I have been trying to find this in multiple stores, no luck yet.

One of my local stores has it and I have also ordered it on line. Maybe Walmart or Amazon. However, you might have to buy a case! Crazy, but that is what I did! It will last a long time and is very good for any meal of the day. Even a dessert!

https://www.walmart.com/ip/B-M-Raisin-Brown-Bread-16-oz/10291606   Pick up only

$20 per can?

It says $2.22 per 16 oz. can.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on October 20, 2020, 04:39:28 AM
My Mom became allergic to table salt (but can eat sea salt) two years ago

?

Is it the iodine that she has a problem with?  That's the only thing I can think of that would be in table salt but not sea salt.

Table salt has free flow agents, maybe?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Runrooster on October 20, 2020, 08:57:52 AM
My Mom became allergic to table salt (but can eat sea salt) two years ago

?

Is it the iodine that she has a problem with?  That's the only thing I can think of that would be in table salt but not sea salt.

Table salt has free flow agents, maybe?

My Mom has mouth sores which makes lemon juice difficult, as well as anything hard or sharp, plus spicy foods.  Grated cheese bothers her but not the expensive block cheese from Costco, but inexpensive cream cheese is great.  She's lost 20 pounds in 6 months despite a lifetime of failing to lose weight. At 145, this is a big deal. 

So, long story, it might be caking agents or iodine or both.  Pink salt seems to be okay only if it's something, I forget what. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PMG on October 20, 2020, 09:55:48 AM
As for those debating hoarding vs stocking - when it comes to food, my definition of hoarding is having more food in the house than you can eat before it goes bad.

This is a useful metric for me. We'd rather keep less food around, it's so much work to be shuffling things around and bursting at the seams. But this is what we need to do right now, and we are so fortunate to be able to. My guesstimate is that if we did not buy anything new we'd completely empty our cupboards in 3 months. We'd be very tired of beans, but we'd have enough spices to still have a little flavor through to the end. It's a continual dilemma whether to use things up or to just keep restocking things as we use them. As is we'll just keep adding and taking away and someday we'll get back to scheduling that around sales more than security.

One silly thing I am hoarding (in the sense that I am intentionally not using it up.) is some quinoa that I bought about 18 months ago. One brand was changing it's packaging so they had everything marked down to $1.50 - 1.99 a pound IIRC.  Great price. I stopped at several different stores and bought them out. I guess we've eaten 20 pounds of it, now we're finally down to the last package of that quinoa and I know I'm going to have to pay regular price again.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: BicycleB on October 20, 2020, 03:14:54 PM

Speaking from personal experience getting a birthday cake made from the food pantry supplies was the only thing I received for my b day at times and made my day.

I know it is not necessary to life as far as nutrition goes (probably has a better nutritional value that the blocks of greasy government cheese we would get) but it sure made my day and sometimes survival is about more than just nutritional sustenance.

I am guessing it also made my mom happy to see a smile on my face and who knows maybe it kept one or both of us going.

Let them eat cake


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Our food bank isn't just a food bank, they're a family services association and also work to provide housing, etc.  They do specifically ask for food donations in addition to monetary donations.  Usually they ask for canned goods, peanut butter, cereal, etc.  Mostly basics.  They also need personal hygiene items.  They accept gently used clothing and household goods.

I grew up poor and cake mix cake with canned frosting is what we had for every birthday.  I'll donate whatever they ask for without judgment.

@the_fixer, @K_in_the_kitchen - thank you for posting (and standing up for the dignity of kids in the same situation today. It may not be same as starving in some distant African desert, but the feeling of poor in our judgmental society can last forever. Sometimes a symbol of being valued makes a big difference).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on October 20, 2020, 04:03:37 PM
Don't forget to buy canned B&M brown bread in a can. It is very good!

I have been trying to find this in multiple stores, no luck yet.

One of my local stores has it and I have also ordered it on line. Maybe Walmart or Amazon. However, you might have to buy a case! Crazy, but that is what I did! It will last a long time and is very good for any meal of the day. Even a dessert!

https://www.walmart.com/ip/B-M-Raisin-Brown-Bread-16-oz/10291606   Pick up only

$20 per can?

It says $2.22 per 16 oz. can.
When I click on it, it says $23.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on October 20, 2020, 04:23:29 PM

Speaking from personal experience getting a birthday cake made from the food pantry supplies was the only thing I received for my b day at times and made my day.

I know it is not necessary to life as far as nutrition goes (probably has a better nutritional value that the blocks of greasy government cheese we would get) but it sure made my day and sometimes survival is about more than just nutritional sustenance.

I am guessing it also made my mom happy to see a smile on my face and who knows maybe it kept one or both of us going.

Let them eat cake


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Our food bank isn't just a food bank, they're a family services association and also work to provide housing, etc.  They do specifically ask for food donations in addition to monetary donations.  Usually they ask for canned goods, peanut butter, cereal, etc.  Mostly basics.  They also need personal hygiene items.  They accept gently used clothing and household goods.

I grew up poor and cake mix cake with canned frosting is what we had for every birthday.  I'll donate whatever they ask for without judgment.

@the_fixer, @K_in_the_kitchen - thank you for posting (and standing up for the dignity of kids in the same situation today. It may not be same as starving in some distant African desert, but the feeling of poor in our judgmental society can last forever. Sometimes a symbol of being valued makes a big difference).

Just FYI, in my post about cake mix, I wasn't referring to that poster's definition of poor in regards to another definition of poor being starving in an african desert. It was totally based on my own childhood, where cake mixes were luxury items! Mums baked birthday cakes from scratch. No one used cake mixes because they were expensive, and ordering a cake was absolutely unheard of. I remember getting some cake mixes as a birthday present once, given in much the same way that you might give a kid a necklace making kit or something - hobbycraft! I don't think I've bought a cake mix as an adult. They're frickin expensive and not even that good!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on October 20, 2020, 04:29:09 PM

Speaking from personal experience getting a birthday cake made from the food pantry supplies was the only thing I received for my b day at times and made my day.

I know it is not necessary to life as far as nutrition goes (probably has a better nutritional value that the blocks of greasy government cheese we would get) but it sure made my day and sometimes survival is about more than just nutritional sustenance.

I am guessing it also made my mom happy to see a smile on my face and who knows maybe it kept one or both of us going.

Let them eat cake


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Our food bank isn't just a food bank, they're a family services association and also work to provide housing, etc.  They do specifically ask for food donations in addition to monetary donations.  Usually they ask for canned goods, peanut butter, cereal, etc.  Mostly basics.  They also need personal hygiene items.  They accept gently used clothing and household goods.

I grew up poor and cake mix cake with canned frosting is what we had for every birthday.  I'll donate whatever they ask for without judgment.

@the_fixer, @K_in_the_kitchen - thank you for posting (and standing up for the dignity of kids in the same situation today. It may not be same as starving in some distant African desert, but the feeling of poor in our judgmental society can last forever. Sometimes a symbol of being valued makes a big difference).
Happy to share my experience. As a country we have such abundance that we (including myself) can forget about the people we do not see or share experiences with day to day.


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Title: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on October 20, 2020, 04:46:53 PM

Speaking from personal experience getting a birthday cake made from the food pantry supplies was the only thing I received for my b day at times and made my day.

I know it is not necessary to life as far as nutrition goes (probably has a better nutritional value that the blocks of greasy government cheese we would get) but it sure made my day and sometimes survival is about more than just nutritional sustenance.

I am guessing it also made my mom happy to see a smile on my face and who knows maybe it kept one or both of us going.

Let them eat cake


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Our food bank isn't just a food bank, they're a family services association and also work to provide housing, etc.  They do specifically ask for food donations in addition to monetary donations.  Usually they ask for canned goods, peanut butter, cereal, etc.  Mostly basics.  They also need personal hygiene items.  They accept gently used clothing and household goods.

I grew up poor and cake mix cake with canned frosting is what we had for every birthday.  I'll donate whatever they ask for without judgment.

@the_fixer, @K_in_the_kitchen - thank you for posting (and standing up for the dignity of kids in the same situation today. It may not be same as starving in some distant African desert, but the feeling of poor in our judgmental society can last forever. Sometimes a symbol of being valued makes a big difference).

Just FYI, in my post about cake mix, I wasn't referring to that poster's definition of poor in regards to another definition of poor being starving in an african desert. It was totally based on my own childhood, where cake mixes were luxury items! Mums baked birthday cakes from scratch. No one used cake mixes because they were expensive, and ordering a cake was absolutely unheard of. I remember getting some cake mixes as a birthday present once, given in much the same way that you might give a kid a necklace making kit or something - hobbycraft! I don't think I've bought a cake mix as an adult. They're frickin expensive and not even that good!
I agree that it is not the most economical and the pantry probably stocks pretty much everything you need to make a cake from scratch but there is also a need for easy to prepare items.

In my case my mom worked 2 full time jobs to support us, she was gone from daybreak until I put myself to bed most nights. To this day she can not cook. From grade school on up I did all of the cooking so boxed food was quick, shelf stable and easy enough for me to cook and few ingredients were needed.

If they gave me flour, rice, beans and ingredients not sure I would have been able to feed myself as my diet pretty much consisted of hamburger helper, noodles with butter, minute rice, dry soup mixes, Mac n cheese, canned food and goober grape PB&J.


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Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 20, 2020, 05:47:37 PM

I'm weirdly balanced between applauding your attitude to donating whatever they want, and wondering at what you consider to be poor with your cake mix story!

I come from a working class family, but there were times we dropped below the poverty line.  I grew up with utility shutoff notices coming in on a regular basis (and the last minute scramble to pay it off hours before the shut off would occur), bill collectors routinely calling (and we kids had to answer every phone call to screen them out and say our parents weren't home), my parents having to take the sky high interest rate at a shady used car lot because they didn't have decent credit or the cash available to buy something outright, buying clothing at thrift stores and yard sales (I don't have a problem with this, but back then it was a necessity for us, not a frugal and eco-friendly choice), etc.  There was a period of time we were on AFDC, living in a dilapidated house converted into three apartments that were infested with rats and insects, literally stepping over drunks in the gutter on our way to the bus stop, where the neighborhood kids (including us) would run over to the Salvation Army and grab the out of date bread products being dropped off outside for the food bank before the volunteers had a chance to get it into the building.  I've had a Christmas where the only gifts we got were the ones from the people the Salvation Army gave our names to, along with a cat my mom adopted for free on Christmas Eve in the hopes he would take care of the mice and rats.  So I've been poor by just about every standard definition out there.  And as bad as it was, I know many people had and have it worse.

A cake mix and can of frosting is cheap compared to almost any other way of getting a birthday cake, and if bought on sale and made with sale eggs and cheap vegetable oil, is cheaper than making a homemade cake.  I'm not saying only poor people use cake mix -- I'm saying that for us, the cake made with a box mix and can of frosting made our birthdays special, and I'll donate it if the food bank wants me to.

One thing that nags me is how some people think the poor should be able to do certain things because it's never occurred to them how different it is when you truly don't have enough money.  For example, so often the advice is to buy in bulk, but you have to be able to get a little bit ahead with the grocery money before you can do that.  Or they should make a cake and icing from scratch, but you have to buy all the ingredients and if you aren't going to use them all (for example only need 3 cups of flour, half cup of cocoa, a teaspoon of vanilla, etc.), you've spent money on food you don't need.

I won't judge what the food bank asks for.  Right now they want boxed stuffing, canned green beans, cream of mushroom soup, boxed mashed potatoes, and canned gravy.  Those aren't the foods I eat at Thanksgiving, but I'm not above buying them for people who will eat them.  The ability to judge others for their food choices speaks of significant privilege.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 20, 2020, 06:00:08 PM

Just FYI, in my post about cake mix, I wasn't referring to that poster's definition of poor in regards to another definition of poor being starving in an african desert. It was totally based on my own childhood, where cake mixes were luxury items! Mums baked birthday cakes from scratch. No one used cake mixes because they were expensive, and ordering a cake was absolutely unheard of. I remember getting some cake mixes as a birthday present once, given in much the same way that you might give a kid a necklace making kit or something - hobbycraft! I don't think I've bought a cake mix as an adult. They're frickin expensive and not even that good!

I suppose it depends where you live.  Even now, cake mix goes on sale for 69Ę a box and frosting can go on sale for 99Ę, add 3 cheap eggs and a small amount of cheap vegetable oil, and you can still make a cake for about $2, so I imagine 40+ years ago my parents spent maybe $1 to bake the cake mix cake.  To bake a cake from scratch my mom would have needed to spend grocery money on ingredients in excess of what she would actually need, and that would have cost more than a cake mix.  Growing up we didn't have flour in the house, or vanilla extract, or cocoa powder, or even baking powder.  And we never had money for real butter, just the cheapest margarine spread.

I don't care for cake mix cake now -- I ate gluten free for several years because my son was diagnosed with celiac disease.  When I started eating wheat again, I could taste the chemicals in processed foods.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 20, 2020, 06:04:24 PM
thank you for posting (and standing up for the dignity of kids in the same situation today. It may not be same as starving in some distant African desert, but the feeling of poor in our judgmental society can last forever. Sometimes a symbol of being valued makes a big difference).

So true!  Kids want to fit in, too, and I remember friends talking about their birthdays.  We always had a couple of gifts, too.  I knew my grandmother would send money and tell my mom to buy us a gift from her and my grandfather -- what I didn't know until much later was she sent extra so we would have a gift from our parents, too.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 20, 2020, 06:14:15 PM

I agree that it is not the most economical and the pantry probably stocks pretty much everything you need to make a cake from scratch but there is also a need for easy to prepare items.

In my case my mom worked 2 full time jobs to support us, she was gone from daybreak until I put myself to bed most nights. To this day she can not cook. From grade school on up I did all of the cooking so boxed food was quick, shelf stable and easy enough for me to cook and few ingredients were needed.

If they gave me flour, rice, beans and ingredients not sure I would have been able to feed myself as my diet pretty much consisted of hamburger helper, noodles with butter, minute rice, dry soup mixes, Mac n cheese, canned food and goober grape PB&J.

I had to learn to cook food from ingredients after I was an adult.  My mom had a disability that took away the use of her hands, plus she'd been battered in her first marriage every time she made a mistake with cooking, so she wasn't keen on it.  During the divorce she was diagnosed with cancer, which weakened her.  By the time she remarried the cooking in our house was 90% done by my brother and I (he was 12, I was 8).  My dad commuted an hour each way to his blue collar job and worked 12 hour days, so he wasn't the one cooking.  We would rotate through Hamburger Helper, Mac ' n Cheese, TV dinners (bought on sale), hot dogs with canned beans, canned soup, canned hash with instant potatoes, etc.  I never saw raw rice or dried pinto beans before I married.  Sure, they would've been cheaper, but they weren't even the kinds of food we ate, so my mom didn't know how to cook them either.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on October 20, 2020, 06:30:05 PM

Why does a food bank need toilet paper at all?

I went without toilet paper for several months this year.  It's not ideal, but certainly is not a necessity if you have a shower head in the room where you poop.

Personally, I would much rather donate toilet paper to the food bank than the cake mix and frosting that our local food bank always has on their most wanted list...

If people can't afford food, is cake really that important?  Apparently around here, it is.
Speaking from personal experience getting a birthday cake made from the food pantry supplies was the only thing I received for my b day at times and made my day.

I know it is not necessary to life as far as nutrition goes (probably has a better nutritional value that the blocks of greasy government cheese we would get) but it sure made my day and sometimes survival is about more than just nutritional sustenance.

I am guessing it also made my mom happy to see a smile on my face and who knows maybe it kept one or both of us going.

Let them eat cake


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I know my local foodbank even has party boxes for kids. When it's your kid's birthday you get cake mix, treats that a kid could take to school, something like a bag of crisps and a bottle of soda to celebrate at home, and a small toy. Is it necessary for survival? No. Is it amazing for those kids to grow up like everyone else? Yes. I can't imagine how awful it must be for kids when you're the only one in class who can't afford to bring in a treat for your birthday.

They also hand out summer holiday boxes for families with children that include vouchers donated by businesses and grocery gift cards so families can take a trip to the zoo or the pool and bring their favourite treats from home.

I love this. Bringing treats to school on your birthday was such a big deal when I was little. Anything that gives a kid a bit of normalcy is a good thing.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on October 20, 2020, 07:07:22 PM

I agree that it is not the most economical and the pantry probably stocks pretty much everything you need to make a cake from scratch but there is also a need for easy to prepare items.

In my case my mom worked 2 full time jobs to support us, she was gone from daybreak until I put myself to bed most nights. To this day she can not cook. From grade school on up I did all of the cooking so boxed food was quick, shelf stable and easy enough for me to cook and few ingredients were needed.

If they gave me flour, rice, beans and ingredients not sure I would have been able to feed myself as my diet pretty much consisted of hamburger helper, noodles with butter, minute rice, dry soup mixes, Mac n cheese, canned food and goober grape PB&J.

I had to learn to cook food from ingredients after I was an adult.  My mom had a disability that took away the use of her hands, plus she'd been battered in her first marriage every time she made a mistake with cooking, so she wasn't keen on it.  During the divorce she was diagnosed with cancer, which weakened her.  By the time she remarried the cooking in our house was 90% done by my brother and I (he was 12, I was 8).  My dad commuted an hour each way to his blue collar job and worked 12 hour days, so he wasn't the one cooking.  We would rotate through Hamburger Helper, Mac ' n Cheese, TV dinners (bought on sale), hot dogs with canned beans, canned soup, canned hash with instant potatoes, etc.  I never saw raw rice or dried pinto beans before I married.  Sure, they would've been cheaper, but they weren't even the kinds of food we ate, so my mom didn't know how to cook them either.
I forgot about TV dinners - my favorite was the Salisbury steak with mashed potatoes, gravy, corn and apple dessert.

Fortunately I eat better now days but my mom is still helpless when it comes to cooking.

We were on the phone just last week and she turned on the oven for the first time since she move in two years ago because I talked her into cooking her frozen pot pie in the oven instead of the microwave.

She had to take out the doughnuts, chips and other ďfoodĒ she stores in the oven.


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Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Just Joe on October 21, 2020, 08:34:27 AM
Home Economics was such a useful class in middle school and high school. Honestly everyone would benefit from taking it. I didn't. It was a girls' class back then.
Also include personal finance and shopping effectively.

Then run everyone through a basic shop class - basic vehicle and home maintenance lessons including changing the car's oil.
Also - all the reasons we do maintenance in the first place.

Its easy to expect parents to do these as a matter of raising their children but it is so easy to overlook families who struggle with even the most basic life lessons.
I would have benefited from being able to cook as a bachelor. I ate so much crap back then.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on October 21, 2020, 09:40:03 AM
Home Economics was such a useful class in middle school and high school. Honestly everyone would benefit from taking it. I didn't. It was a girls' class back then.
Also include personal finance and shopping effectively.

Then run everyone through a basic shop class - basic vehicle and home maintenance lessons including changing the car's oil.
Also - all the reasons we do maintenance in the first place.

Its easy to expect parents to do these as a matter of raising their children but it is so easy to overlook families who struggle with even the most basic life lessons.
I would have benefited from being able to cook as a bachelor. I ate so much crap back then.

I had Home Economics in 7th and 8th grades, but I don't remember them as being that useful (the classes as they were presented to me - not the concept of studying home ec all together).  I remember that we focused on cooking in 7th and sewing in 8th.  I had access/instruction to both available at home, so maybe that's why I don't remember them being so great - hopefully other kids got more out of it.  I did enjoy the break from academics.

I had shop class both years as well - we did drafting, woodworking, printmaking, and some basic engineering (though not presented as engineering) - I would have loved auto/home maintenance, but that wasn't part of the class.

Boys and girls were in both classes - we had no choice, the classes were just assigned randomly.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on October 21, 2020, 09:48:21 AM
I was one of two boys in a home economics class and I loved that class, we got to cook food and eat it and the following year I made a stuffed animal for my sister.

That along with business math (taught you to balance a check book / budget and useful stuff), shop and a construction class (we built a house) were the best part of school.


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Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 21, 2020, 10:38:23 AM
My friend Nina was the first girl in Orange County Florida to take shop class in 1969-ish? It was quite the battle to make that happen. I took the required home Ec class and did learn a lot that has proven to be useful, I admit, though I was mad about it at the time.

In my recent history, I ventured down to the IGA this morning. It was a little picked over in several aisles, but I did find toilet cleaner!

Iím going to make a big Aldi trip next week and then lay low for.. a while.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 21, 2020, 11:12:49 AM
I have two elderly dogs and each are on so many medications it would make your head spin. Both can be beyond picky eaters. Both weigh around 15-18 lbs. The younger of the two slipped on the stairs and fell down about 10 days ago and was in unbearable pain. I took him to the vets and they gave me pain and muscle relaxant pills to give to him. Which have worked miraculously however, this is the dog that takes 9 pills a day on top of these new meds. Because he has been hurting so much, he refused to eat and I worry about all these meds without food in his belly. I have tried chicken, roast beef, canned sardines added to the prescription dog food. He decides he doesn't like any of it and walks away. Leaving me tearing my hair out. So my latest addition to their food is cooked chicken livers. They love them and have been eating really good but now I am low on livers and have to make a trip to the grocery store to get more! So here is another food item I need to stock up on...who knew!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 21, 2020, 12:45:11 PM

I forgot about TV dinners - my favorite was the Salisbury steak with mashed potatoes, gravy, corn and apple dessert.

Our favorite was the Swanson with Salisbury steak/gravy, mashed potatoes, corn, and chocolate cake.  We kids fought over the Salisbury steak every week -- I don't know why my dad bothered to buy any other variety.  We hated to get the sliced turkey in gravy.  Fried chicken was acceptable.

I just googled TV dinners and was reminded of the one that was franks and beans, apple slices, and chocolate cake.  Clearly it was aimed at kids.  We didn't get that one very often, but we liked that it didn't have a frozen vegetable.

For being "TV dinners", we never ate them in the living room on TV trays, in front of the TV.  Once my mom remarried we heated 6 of them in the oven (with a "Hungry Man" version for my dad), set the table with paper napkins, forks, and cups of milk or juice, and ate at the table with the TV off.  And now I recall how much we fought to be able to make TV dinners on our dishes night.  Of course back then the whole tray went into the trash with no rinsing.

I can't imagine liking TV dinners now, but we ate them once a week for years.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 21, 2020, 12:50:08 PM
Home Economics was such a useful class in middle school and high school. Honestly everyone would benefit from taking it. I didn't. It was a girls' class back then.
Also include personal finance and shopping effectively.

Then run everyone through a basic shop class - basic vehicle and home maintenance lessons including changing the car's oil.
Also - all the reasons we do maintenance in the first place.

Its easy to expect parents to do these as a matter of raising their children but it is so easy to overlook families who struggle with even the most basic life lessons.
I would have benefited from being able to cook as a bachelor. I ate so much crap back then.

I took a semester of home ec in middle school -- it was the cooking semester, not the sew and iron semester, because my mom had no desire to help with sewing at home and the cooking class didn't have homework.  But we didn't learn how to cook much of anything.  We made things like juice from frozen concentrate, jello, instant pudding, cherries jubilee, which was ice cream + canned cherry pie filling + whatever we used to set it on fire, likely brandy and I doubt middle schools can do that now, biscuits using Bisquick. etc.  The class was definitely co-ed.  Instead of the sewing semester I took mechanical drawing (precursor to drafting), which had only a few girls.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on October 21, 2020, 12:53:12 PM
I have two elderly dogs and each are on so many medications it would make your head spin. Both can be beyond picky eaters. Both weigh around 15-18 lbs. The younger of the two slipped on the stairs and fell down about 10 days ago and was in unbearable pain. I took him to the vets and they gave me pain and muscle relaxant pills to give to him. Which have worked miraculously however, this is the dog that takes 9 pills a day on top of these new meds. Because he has been hurting so much, he refused to eat and I worry about all these meds without food in his belly. I have tried chicken, roast beef, canned sardines added to the prescription dog food. He decides he doesn't like any of it and walks away. Leaving me tearing my hair out. So my latest addition to their food is cooked chicken livers. They love them and have been eating really good but now I am low on livers and have to make a trip to the grocery store to get more! So here is another food item I need to stock up on...who knew!

I'm sorry to hear your dog got hurt!  Will he eat his prescription food if you add something like chicken broth?  One of mine gets fussy about his food sometimes and broth usually helps.  I'm guessing maybe you've already tried it since you've tried so many other things.  If chicken livers work, would beef liver?  I would think you could cook it, puree it, and freeze what you don't need right away.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Just Joe on October 21, 2020, 01:08:37 PM
Home Economics was such a useful class in middle school and high school. Honestly everyone would benefit from taking it. I didn't. It was a girls' class back then.
Also include personal finance and shopping effectively.

Then run everyone through a basic shop class - basic vehicle and home maintenance lessons including changing the car's oil.
Also - all the reasons we do maintenance in the first place.

Its easy to expect parents to do these as a matter of raising their children but it is so easy to overlook families who struggle with even the most basic life lessons.
I would have benefited from being able to cook as a bachelor. I ate so much crap back then.

I took a semester of home ec in middle school -- it was the cooking semester, not the sew and iron semester, because my mom had no desire to help with sewing at home and the cooking class didn't have homework.  But we didn't learn how to cook much of anything.  We made things like juice from frozen concentrate, jello, instant pudding, cherries jubilee, which was ice cream + canned cherry pie filling + whatever we used to set it on fire, likely brandy and I doubt middle schools can do that now, biscuits using Bisquick. etc.  The class was definitely co-ed.  Instead of the sewing semester I took mechanical drawing (precursor to drafting), which had only a few girls.

One of the family kids took a class like that - the teacher wasn't very motivated so there was a ton of missed opportunities to learn useful things.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 21, 2020, 01:53:32 PM
I have two elderly dogs and each are on so many medications it would make your head spin. Both can be beyond picky eaters. Both weigh around 15-18 lbs. The younger of the two slipped on the stairs and fell down about 10 days ago and was in unbearable pain. I took him to the vets and they gave me pain and muscle relaxant pills to give to him. Which have worked miraculously however, this is the dog that takes 9 pills a day on top of these new meds. Because he has been hurting so much, he refused to eat and I worry about all these meds without food in his belly. I have tried chicken, roast beef, canned sardines added to the prescription dog food. He decides he doesn't like any of it and walks away. Leaving me tearing my hair out. So my latest addition to their food is cooked chicken livers. They love them and have been eating really good but now I am low on livers and have to make a trip to the grocery store to get more! So here is another food item I need to stock up on...who knew!



I'm sorry to hear your dog got hurt!  Will he eat his prescription food if you add something like chicken broth?  One of mine gets fussy about his food sometimes and broth usually helps.  I'm guessing maybe you've already tried it since you've tried so many other things.  If chicken livers work, would beef liver?  I would think you could cook it, puree it, and freeze what you don't need right away.

Thank you! He was in so much pain I thought it was 'the end' for him. At times he laid on the floor flopping like a fish out of water and like he was having a convulsion. I still don't know what was going on other than he was in horrific pain. The vet and technicians were so nice and concerned about him. They called me on Monday after his emergency Saturday appointment to see how he was doing. K I have tried everything known to man to get these dogs to eat. The one older dog...almost 17 years old has been a fuss pot his whole life. He will go a day without eating and that is normal for him. But the other one that hurt his back, used to be  Mr. Piggy and got pretty fat and had to go on diet dog food. He did lose the weight but then developed other problems. Since then, he has lost his desire to eat. So since chicken liver is the new food that entices them to eat, I have to buy some more. I will buy some beef liver too. Called the local grocery store and they have chicken livers available so tomorrow I will do another curbside pick up. Anything for my 'boyz'!

I have also been mashing chicken livers with cream cheese to make liverwurst balls to put their pill into! YIKES!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on October 21, 2020, 03:38:35 PM
So since chicken liver is the new food that entices them to eat, I have to buy some more. I will buy some beef liver too. Called the local grocery store and they have chicken livers available so tomorrow I will do another curbside pick up. Anything for my 'boyz'!

I have also been mashing chicken livers with cream cheese to make liverwurst balls to put their pill into! YIKES!

I know that it's off topic, but I love your dedication to your dogs! Your love shows.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 21, 2020, 04:13:03 PM
Home Economics was such a useful class in middle school and high school. Honestly everyone would benefit from taking it. I didn't. It was a girls' class back then.
Also include personal finance and shopping effectively.

Then run everyone through a basic shop class - basic vehicle and home maintenance lessons including changing the car's oil.
Also - all the reasons we do maintenance in the first place.

Its easy to expect parents to do these as a matter of raising their children but it is so easy to overlook families who struggle with even the most basic life lessons.
I would have benefited from being able to cook as a bachelor. I ate so much crap back then.

I took a semester of home ec in middle school -- it was the cooking semester, not the sew and iron semester, because my mom had no desire to help with sewing at home and the cooking class didn't have homework.  But we didn't learn how to cook much of anything.  We made things like juice from frozen concentrate, jello, instant pudding, cherries jubilee, which was ice cream + canned cherry pie filling + whatever we used to set it on fire, likely brandy and I doubt middle schools can do that now, biscuits using Bisquick. etc.  The class was definitely co-ed.  Instead of the sewing semester I took mechanical drawing (precursor to drafting), which had only a few girls.

My home ec was all cooking from scratch. We made pies. We held a tea for our moms. We learned that boys would like us better if we let them win at tennis. ;-) (Any boy who ever played tennis with me won easily because I am terrible at sports, but it did not improve my dating life.) We learned that we were supposed to dry the sink after we did the dinner dishes.

What was really useful was learning to plan how to make a meal with multiple dishes be ready at the same time - we wrote all the steps out.

In sewing we made a skirt and then a project of our choice and I made an elaborate lined cape with a hood, which someone stole when I was in college. I was just telling my dd about that cape last month!

Mind you, in 4H when I was 10yo old we baked bread from scratch and sewed a skirt (with a zipper) and a blouse (with buttonholes).

In Montessori, home ec is Practical Life, and my 7th and 8th traders cooked and sold a lunch every week, alternating between a full spaghetti dinner and pepperoni rolls with a side salad. We paid for our class trip every year with the profits. They also sewed pillowcases and made quilts. I ran into a former student last year and he showed me the leather bag he had sewn in college.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 21, 2020, 04:22:46 PM
So since chicken liver is the new food that entices them to eat, I have to buy some more. I will buy some beef liver too. Called the local grocery store and they have chicken livers available so tomorrow I will do another curbside pick up. Anything for my 'boyz'!

I have also been mashing chicken livers with cream cheese to make liverwurst balls to put their pill into! YIKES!

I know that it's off topic, but I love your dedication to your dogs! Your love shows.

Thank you! I do love my boyz and do all I can for them!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: nessness on October 21, 2020, 05:25:33 PM
While I share the distaste for canned veg generally, for some reason Im okay with canned tomatoes for cooking only. I like the petite diced as far as size, already peeled and the canning semi-cooks them.  It doesnt taste like fresh, but I dont expect it to.
I actually think canned tomatoes are better than store-bought fresh tomatoes for cooking - they are left on the vine longer, since it doesn't matter if they get bruised in transport, so develop more flavor.

Neither compare to homegrown tomatoes, of course.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on October 21, 2020, 08:21:24 PM
Be careful not to give your dogs too much liver because it is high in vitamin A which can cause problems due to being fat soluble and not easily flushed from the body.  (My cats and dog love it too, but only get it once a month or so.  If you canít get them to eat anything, try throwing food in the blender and syringing it down their throats.  Desperate times call for desperate measures!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 22, 2020, 04:19:23 AM
SunnyDays, Thanks for the information and I did look that up. Seems I am okay because I really only give them a little on their food to entice them to eat their dog food.

https://itsadoggiething.com/can-dogs-eat-chicken-liver/
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on October 23, 2020, 09:21:06 AM

Just FYI, in my post about cake mix, I wasn't referring to that poster's definition of poor in regards to another definition of poor being starving in an african desert. It was totally based on my own childhood, where cake mixes were luxury items! Mums baked birthday cakes from scratch. No one used cake mixes because they were expensive, and ordering a cake was absolutely unheard of. I remember getting some cake mixes as a birthday present once, given in much the same way that you might give a kid a necklace making kit or something - hobbycraft! I don't think I've bought a cake mix as an adult. They're frickin expensive and not even that good!

I suppose it depends where you live.  Even now, cake mix goes on sale for 69Ę a box and frosting can go on sale for 99Ę, add 3 cheap eggs and a small amount of cheap vegetable oil, and you can still make a cake for about $2, so I imagine 40+ years ago my parents spent maybe $1 to bake the cake mix cake.  To bake a cake from scratch my mom would have needed to spend grocery money on ingredients in excess of what she would actually need, and that would have cost more than a cake mix.  Growing up we didn't have flour in the house, or vanilla extract, or cocoa powder, or even baking powder.  And we never had money for real butter, just the cheapest margarine spread.

I don't care for cake mix cake now -- I ate gluten free for several years because my son was diagnosed with celiac disease.  When I started eating wheat again, I could taste the chemicals in processed foods.

Yeah, they are definitely not that price here. A mid brand cake mix today would cost about $4. When I was a kid, they were three times that. The kind with the little baking trays and the frosting included were way out of the price range of most people except as a very special treat.

Things like flour, sugar, butter have always been standard grocery items here. Even students flatting for the first time would have most of that around. Pantry staples, maybe less so today. And they're cheap - I can get a couple kilos of flour and sugar for the price of a cake mix. It's slowly changing, but baked goods here are still far cheaper made at home.

I think our pricing comes out near opposite to the USA's, because most raw ingredients are made locally (I'm including Australia and the islands in this), but processed stuff is either imported or locally manufactured in fairly small batches (compared to the US). A 750ml bottle of water here is $2, but a 750ml bottle of coke is about $4. A cake mix is $4 but a 1.5 kilo bag of flour is $2. Apples currently are about $4 a kilo, but a can of chinese made apple pie filling is nearly that at $3.20. It's a lot cheaper to make your own.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 23, 2020, 10:59:28 AM
Keep in mind that the NZ dollar is currently .67 US dollars - theyíve got the same name but are t the same currency, of course.

All the same, I havenít seen cake mix for under $1 in ages, and the price of everything has really gone up this year.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: AnnaGrowsAMustache on October 25, 2020, 04:52:22 AM
Keep in mind that the NZ dollar is currently .67 US dollars - theyíve got the same name but are t the same currency, of course.

All the same, I havenít seen cake mix for under $1 in ages, and the price of everything has really gone up this year.

We're always going to be a lot more expensive than you guys for processed foods. We're a very small market, a very long way away. Coke might be bottled here, but in minute amounts compared to a US bottling plant. The overlords still want the same profit margin.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on October 27, 2020, 11:00:19 AM
Mega trip to Aldi this morning, because weíre going back to staying home - most things were in stock, but the canned beans were pretty low, there was NO canned pumpkin (not a problem for me because Iím well stocked) and tragically NO bacon.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 27, 2020, 12:57:43 PM
I had to go to my local grocery store yesterday to get a prescription and I have so much stuff, I didn't buy any food! That is not like me at all. But freezers, fridges, shelves are full...screaming full!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Captain Cactus on October 27, 2020, 02:13:41 PM
I've been accumulating a variety of non-perishables over the past few months.  My wife rolls her eyes but I think she's glad we have it on hand.  It basically consists of dried grains, beans, etc... from Bob's Red Mill.  Also a few dozen organic canned beans from Amazon ($.99/each, free shipping), pasta, and some Raman Noodles (for me...love those). 

Still not visiting places frequently... no restaurants for us, with the exception of Chinese once a month or so.  One of us hits the store every 7-10 days for our regular stuff.  I suspect there will always be something in the grocery store, even if it's not our preferred form of sustenance.  Our non-perishable stash is designed to buy us some extra days between grocery store visits.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on October 27, 2020, 02:36:56 PM
I've been accumulating a variety of non-perishables over the past few months.  My wife rolls her eyes but I think she's glad we have it on hand.  It basically consists of dried grains, beans, etc... from Bob's Red Mill.  Also a few dozen organic canned beans from Amazon ($.99/each, free shipping), pasta, and some Raman Noodles (for me...love those). 

Still not visiting places frequently... no restaurants for us, with the exception of Chinese once a month or so.  One of us hits the store every 7-10 days for our regular stuff.  I suspect there will always be something in the grocery store, even if it's not our preferred form of sustenance.  Our non-perishable stash is designed to buy us some extra days between grocery store visits.

My husband teases me about this. I remind him that I do 95% of the grocery shopping, so he was spared the bare dry goods shelves and meat and dairy cases and the complete lack of paper products for weeks on end, and didn't have to wait in lines to get into the stores.

So far, we've stocked up on pet food. Like I said in March, we humans can survive on popcorn if we have to, but we have obligate carnivores and an obligate herbivore in the house. We're still well stocked with things like white rice, oats, flour, masa harina, beans, and canned tomatoes from earlier this year. I'd be happier if we had some more coffee beans, another bottle of olive oil, a few more cans of tuna, and some brown rice (and a freezer of meat and fish), so those are on the shopping list.

We don't eat in restaurants, but I think it's time to grab carryout from a local restaurant. We've done so a couple of times in the last month. It's a nice treat and break from cooking.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on October 30, 2020, 07:21:14 AM
For those who are getting bored with home made foods, here are some OMGGG, good looking recipes to try! They don't look all that difficult either!

https://www.butterbeready.com/classic-red-wine-braised-short-ribs/

I don't have any short ribs in the freezer but if I did, that would be my first choice!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GoCubsGo on October 30, 2020, 09:11:23 AM
I went to Costco last night and it was packed which isn't unusual.  I wandered over to the paper towel aisle where they haven't had stock 4 out of my last 5 visits.  To my surprise they had 9 packs left on the pallet.  Then I saw something I haven't seen since February.  A half full pallet of Lysol Spray (4 packs). I literally did a double take.  One per customer.  I walked back towards that section 15 minutes later and not only was the Lysol all gone, so was the paper towels.  The Lysol price sign was even taken down.  The Costco worker said they do that so they don't get a thousand questions.   Steak was still in stock but $1 more per pound as it has been the last few months.  I'm guessing we will get another big surge of buying before winter.....
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on October 30, 2020, 11:11:20 AM
No major supply issues at our regular metro Detroit Costco today. Paper towels were available but understocked; toilet paper was well stocked. Organic ground beef and coffee beans were the usual prices; 2-lb blocks of cheddar were $1 cheaper than they were a few months ago. Our freezer is full again.

The store was packed, though. Good mask compliance with no free noses.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on October 30, 2020, 12:59:04 PM
no free noses.

The free nose samples are why most people go though!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on October 30, 2020, 01:19:25 PM
no free noses.

The free nose samples are why most people go though!

Well played. Sadly, no free samples. Happily, no uncovered noses.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: BicycleB on October 31, 2020, 08:21:56 PM
:(  Yaíll are unfortunately on to something here. Today my favorite grocery featured a suddenly almost empty TP aisle and at least two people with their masks off while shopping.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 01, 2020, 05:29:01 AM
My favourite small grocery store has been low on paper towels but lots of toilet paper.  The only empty spot was the one on sale.

I went in for eggs (totally out) and left with cream (on sale), marmalade (on sale), chicken thighs (on sale), TP (on sale), a gorgeous cauliflower (on sale), old cheddar (on sale), and a steak and mushrooms (not on sale) plus of course the eggs.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 01, 2020, 08:42:22 AM
Boris Johnson is shutting down England starting Thursday for 4 weeks due to Covid-19. The news says we are 3 weeks behind England in how bad it will be for USA. They are worried about the hospitals not being able to handle the incoming sick people. Kind of weird though because they are keeping schools and colleges open. Who knows, that might change.

So that being said, stock up my friends while you can!

I am thinking about putting together a curbside order next week.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 01, 2020, 10:07:13 AM
I canít imagine there being much of a shutdown here, no matter what, but Iím am keeping things very well stocked because I donít want to go out in this mess. Plus, the election...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 01, 2020, 11:13:36 AM
Probably no shut downs but the news will scare everyone into running to the stores to wipe out inventory.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: ender on November 01, 2020, 11:17:27 AM
I've slowly stocked up on non-perishables since I like to have some on hand anyways.

I think it's likely people freak the heck out post election, regardless of what happens.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on November 01, 2020, 11:46:25 AM
And so it begins...

Todayís order about 1/2 of it has been canceled due to being out of stock. No snow storms or anything so I assume it has to be stocking up for the new record covid cases.

Things that were canceled
Milk vitamin d whole milk (for a recipe)
English muffins
Coke
Russet potatoes
Isopropyl alcohol (not surprised I have tried for months)
Breakfast sausage patties
Eggs
Ham steak
Whole carrots
Bar soap ( I have to use a certain brand due to allergies)

My wife has been trying to convince me to buy another freezer to stock up for the winter but I pointed out that everything has been in stock and that we could switch to weekly smaller orders for many things and keep the freezer space for meat and pre made meals.

Looks like I might have to eat crow :(

Put in an order with Walmart for the missing items we will see if they are out as well.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 01, 2020, 01:14:45 PM
I have several on line orders going. One from a grocery store curbside pick up and one from Walmart.

Walmart has rubbing alcohol: https://www.walmart.com/ip/2-Pack-Equate-70-Isopropyl-Alcohol-32-Oz/706238851

Buy $35 in goods and shipping is free.

You can buy shelf stable milk too: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Horizon-Organic-Whole-Shelf-Stable-Milk-8-Oz-12-Count/819219798
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on November 01, 2020, 05:14:11 PM
Thanks for the tip roadrunner, if I do not get ISO in the next month or so I will expand the search.


Went to pickup the order from Kroger, as mentioned above they canceled about 1/2 of it prior to pickup before and when I arrived most of the rest was canceled  so I received $16 worth of a $100 order. I did receive a random tub of mushrooms and 2 zucchiniís so a small win...


Walmart order was a bust as well except I was able to get milk, my soap and English muffins they subbed pumpkin spice for regular English muffins so they will be yummy as a treat but we normally go with plain to make breakfast sandwiches so not really fulfilling that purpose.

The person from Kroger said they were getting hit like at the beginning of the pandemic and the shelves were cleared out.

We are hitting record cases every few days in my state / area so maybe people are anticipating another shutdown or hunkering down fortunately we are pretty well set.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 02, 2020, 07:07:14 PM
I've been avoiding the news for more than a week now, and plan to continue until after Tuesday at least, perhaps longer, although I will look at election results.  What I see posted here recently probably explains my experiences today.

1) I did a small Instacart order from Sprouts because Sprouts doesn't jack up their prices for Instacart -- you get in store prices and sales with the exception of Friday - Sunday 72 hour sales.  The shopper went soon after opening and sent me a photo of the milk case half empty.  This was a produce + milk run, and the only thing she couldn't find besides my preferred milk (and back up choice) was kabocha squash.  Last Monday morning my preferred milk was also out -- that shopper sent a photo and the rest of the case was full.  I'm thinking Organic Valley Whole Grassmilk might not be restocked by Monday mornings.

2) I went to Costco, because they do jack up prices like crazy on Instacart.  I arrived a few minutes after opening to a parking lot full like a Saturday in December.  I parked where I usually do, second row from the back so I can pull through and avoid backing out when I leave (too many Costco near misses).  Walking to the doors, I realized there was a line to get in, something I haven't seen since June.  I'd already spent the gas to get there, so I stuck it out.  Line moved well, only stopping once, otherwise just moving slow and steady.  Inside was packed, but I didn't see anyone without a mask, and people were mostly trying to be polite in the aisles.  I loaded my cart with all barcodes visible so I could check out quickly.  The lines were long, but I'm sure they got longer since I checked out at 10:38 and most of the people around me didn't have really full carts.  Walking to my car there was a line of cars waiting to turn into the parking lot, and cars were circling and waiting even for the back row parking spots.

So, for the price jacking -- I decided to compare my receipt with what it would have been with Instacart.  My total was 230.10 before tax.  If I had used Instacart, my total before service fee and tip would have been $283.27 before tax -- that's $53.27 in markups (23%)!  With the 1.9% service fee and a 10% tip, it would have been $320.22 -- a difference of $86.99 compared to going by myself.  The trip took me 67 minutes, which included the drive to and from, parking, walking to the line (far from where I parked), waiting in the line, 35 minutes in the store, walking back to my car, loading my groceries, and driving home.  I bought meat (chuck roast, lamb, chicken, and bacon), eggs, lots of vegetables, coffee, mayo, almonds, and dog food (dog food was only item taxed).  In the cold room for eggs I heard someone ask an employee if he knew when they would be receiving TP, so they must have been out, which I haven't encountered at all since we started shopping again in June.  This trip I was in a rush, so I didn't go looking to see what else they were out of.

From reports on this thread last week or so, I decided to use some freezer meat and buy some fresh.  I'd hate to empty the freezer of meat by late December only to find shortages.

(As a reminder, I'm shopping for 4 adults, 2 of whom are active young men who are always hungry.)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 03, 2020, 04:56:59 AM
Did my curbside pick up yesterday. What really irks me is that they have 8 designated curbside parking spots with signs in front of each spot. No one pays attention and parks there anyway. There was only one open spot yesterday and the other times I went, it was pretty much the same issue. I wish they would put the spots in a less primo spot where people don't want to park. Or true curbside where you actually park in front of the store. I guess they can't do that due to it being a fire zone. UGH!

My order was missing a few things, none that were earth shattering. They advertised they had their brand disinfectant spray and I ordered a few cans but they had none when I picked my order up. Have not found Lysol or any brand disinfectant spray since maybe March.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on November 03, 2020, 06:58:10 AM
Spoke to my Costco brother yesterday. He said they're getting TP in every day, and selling out every day. If you need some, go early. I still have most of the last Costco pack i bought a month or so ago, so I'll skip it for now.

Also, as a general rule of thumb, Monday is the least restocked day of the week. Best to shop Tues-Thurs. if your schedule allows it. Another motivation to hit FIRE!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 03, 2020, 07:20:09 AM
Grocery store was all asses and elbows this weekend. I had to got to three for all my items. Luckily I have enough food at home for a few weeks if needed.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: BicycleB on November 03, 2020, 08:52:13 AM
There are moments when I feel like my brain is made of cold, slow moving molasses. This is one of them.

I finally caught up to the fact that the new shortages probably aren't just due to COVID precautions. They're from the same reason as some of ya'll on this thread - people taking precautions about the election aftermath.

Hmm. You know, it probably is better to prepared, even if odds of real problems are low. Having voted previously, I'm going to skip over to the grocery and see if I can pick up a few things.

ETA: Store was pretty well stocked. Notices up limiting paper goods to 2 per shopper per category, otherwise things in full swing. TP aisle 90% full instead of 90% empty.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: LaineyAZ on November 03, 2020, 04:37:27 PM
Went to Costco yesterday (Monday, day before election) in metro Phoenix just after they opened.  Busy, but not crazy.  Pallets of TP and paper towels were right by the entrance, and about 85% of shoppers were buying one or both, including us.  Also they've just installed Self check-out which we used and really liked - we only waited about 5 minutes in line before a machine opened up.

Otherwise looked like there was a normal amount of food and goods on the shelves.   Looking back over the past 9 months I think Costco has been the store that's adjusted the best to the pandemic - mandating masks and limiting the number of shoppers early, and no real big breaks in their supply chain. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 03, 2020, 04:44:35 PM
The news says garbage bags may be in short supply. UGH!

I am going to order some from Costco.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 03, 2020, 05:34:26 PM
The news says garbage bags may be in short supply. UGH!

I am going to order some from Costco.

A few years ago I bought a small waste can for $4 at Target.  It fits a plastic bag like you get from a store.  On the outside I added two adhesive hooks (upside down) I'd picked up at a thrift store (25Ę) to hold the bag handles.  We use the same size bags for the dog waste scoop thing.  I actually buy the bags because we use cloth at the grocery store rather than pay 15Ę each for their bags.  My last box was $25 for 500 bags, but since then I've found a way to get them for less.  These are black bags and are a little thicker than the cheapest bags.

I wonder what else might be in short supply?  It seems so random.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 03, 2020, 08:31:02 PM
I am down to my last 1/2 cup of dog food. So whether things get bad or not, doggie needs food and I will be heading to PetSmart. I have more food on hand than normal for sure. Prepping or prudence, or hoarding? Itís not spilled out of the cupboard so I say prepping vs hoarding.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Missy B on November 03, 2020, 09:35:02 PM
In August when things were normal I topped up on UHT almond milk and bought a couple of cases of vegan soup from Costco. Mostly that was about not having to go to Costco if its ugly. I already have other staples and can't store anything else unless I want to go for the 'bunker-chic' look in my apt.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on November 03, 2020, 10:50:31 PM
My grocery shopping loop looks like this:

99 Cents Only Store
Grocery Outlet
Costco

Sometimes I skip Costco if I'm well stocked on staples.
If I'm trying to stretch between trips I'll do a quick milk/produce run at Sprouts.

What these three places have in common is that you buy what they have, assuming the price is good. They fill the shelves with whatever they receive. Therefore, I am not used to seeing empty shelves when I shop. Regular grocery stores fill every slot with something specific, therefore, one is more likely to see empty or "sold out" spaces.

Because of the way I shop, I haven't really noticed any significant out of stocks. However, in the last few days, I've been trying to track down a specific med for my MIL. I've been into more CVS, RiteAid, and Walgreen's stores in three days than I've been in in three years. What I see there is scary. Empty slots, empty shelves, empty end caps. Unless a store was going out of business, I've never seen anything like it. I'm finding it to be very eerie.

I've been slowly working through my pantries, but now I'm wondering if that was a mistake.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 04, 2020, 01:58:02 AM
I am down to my last 1/2 cup of dog food. So whether things get bad or not, doggie needs food and I will be heading to PetSmart. I have more food on hand than normal for sure. Prepping or prudence, or hoarding? Itís not spilled out of the cupboard so I say prepping vs hoarding.

Just a thought for you. You can order dog food from Chewy and probably other companies too. I use chewy to get my prescription dog food. Costco sells dog food. Maybe Tractor Supply. Normally Chewy is very quick and I get the dog food in just a few days.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 04, 2020, 04:16:29 AM
In August when things were normal I topped up on UHT almond milk and bought a couple of cases of vegan soup from Costco. Mostly that was about not having to go to Costco if its ugly. I already have other staples and can't store anything else unless I want to go for the 'bunker-chic' look in my apt.

Missy B, have you thought of under the bed storage? There are a lot of rolly type bins that are for under bed storage that you could put non perishable foods into. I have also seen people use over the door cloth shoe organizer for various types of storage. You could put one in your coat closet and store canned items, spaghetti, cracker sleeves, spices, anything that fits! I even saw somebody store canned stuff under the foot rest on a recliner chair! Haha!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 04, 2020, 04:48:21 AM
@Roadrunner53 good suggestions! We use baskets in the space between the top of the cabinets and the ceiling and also the drawers of the dresser in the spare bedroom.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 04, 2020, 08:26:24 AM
I am down to my last 1/2 cup of dog food. So whether things get bad or not, doggie needs food and I will be heading to PetSmart. I have more food on hand than normal for sure. Prepping or prudence, or hoarding? Itís not spilled out of the cupboard so I say prepping vs hoarding.

We figured out we can buy a new bag of dog food when we open the bag already at home, as long as we store the unopened bag in the house (but we have to keep it in a back closet so the dogs don't stand guard over it). Dog doesn't care for kibble stored in the garage, even if the weather is merely warm and not hot -- it must go rancid more quickly even if the garage isn't stifling.

I hope PetsMart isn't busy and has what you need!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mountain mustache on November 04, 2020, 01:10:39 PM
In August when things were normal I topped up on UHT almond milk and bought a couple of cases of vegan soup from Costco. Mostly that was about not having to go to Costco if its ugly. I already have other staples and can't store anything else unless I want to go for the 'bunker-chic' look in my apt.

This made me laugh. I live in a 500sq ft apt, and worry about the "bunker-chic" look in my apt too. I managed to find a hidden corner to put a tall wire shelf in for extra pandemic storage, but I definitely am always wary of the food storage taking over all of my spare space.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 04, 2020, 02:37:28 PM
In August when things were normal I topped up on UHT almond milk and bought a couple of cases of vegan soup from Costco. Mostly that was about not having to go to Costco if its ugly. I already have other staples and can't store anything else unless I want to go for the 'bunker-chic' look in my apt.

This made me laugh. I live in a 500sq ft apt, and worry about the "bunker-chic" look in my apt too. I managed to find a hidden corner to put a tall wire shelf in for extra pandemic storage, but I definitely am always wary of the food storage taking over all of my spare space.

Under the bed, behind the paperbacks on shelves.  Carol Deppe has jars of dried beans on her shelves.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 04, 2020, 02:37:42 PM
In August when things were normal I topped up on UHT almond milk and bought a couple of cases of vegan soup from Costco. Mostly that was about not having to go to Costco if its ugly. I already have other staples and can't store anything else unless I want to go for the 'bunker-chic' look in my apt.

This made me laugh. I live in a 500sq ft apt, and worry about the "bunker-chic" look in my apt too. I managed to find a hidden corner to put a tall wire shelf in for extra pandemic storage, but I definitely am always wary of the food storage taking over all of my spare space.
We had "bunker-chic" going on here in March and April, as I was stocking up before our state locked down and also ordered things that arrived in early lockdown.  In addition to finding space for canned foods (which we had very little of before the pandemic) I was also looking to store an additional 14 5-gallon buckets of food.  As we've eaten through the buckets it's gotten easier, but I still have buckets stashed in my bedroom closet and behind furniture in the living room.  There are also odd spots in the house with stored food, such as the buffet in the dining room.  Finding space for "hoarded" (or what I called being prepared) toiletries and medications also required a declutter and some rearranging.  We don't have an attached garage and our garage gets blazing hot, so we can't store food out there.

Now there's no evidence of the stored food, although we still have far more than we did pre-pandemic.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dictionary Time on November 04, 2020, 02:53:32 PM
Is kitty litter a thing? Or have I just been very unlucky?  I struck out twice at Costco, once on a Walmart order, today at the aldi. Itís getting serious here as running out would be bad news. But I canít imagine what would be the root cause.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 04, 2020, 03:02:59 PM
Is kitty litter a thing? Or have I just been very unlucky?  I struck out twice at Costco, once on a Walmart order, today at the aldi. Itís getting serious here as running out would be bad news. But I canít imagine what would be the root cause.

I know nothing about kitty litter but I looked on Walmart.com and it seems there are tons of choices:
https://www.walmart.com/search/?query=kitty%20litter
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: TomTX on November 04, 2020, 04:17:59 PM
I actually just added a can of corn to my grocery order. LOL

What amazes me are canned potatoes.

I remember having canned vegetables (including potatoes) sometimes when camping. Peel off the label, open the can and place over the fire til it heats.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 04, 2020, 04:36:02 PM
I have stocked up on some things I am not proud of. I had a very sick dog who needed tons of pills every day.  I tried everything under the sun to disguise the pills. He would like certain things for a while and then, bleh, he would get sick of them. I was so desperate I even bought Spam! I have never bought spam in my lifetime. I ate it as a kid because it was the thing in my parents generation. I bought a bunch of cans and YUK but I will hang onto them for a while. I think if you fry it till it is super brown crispy it might taste okay. I may donate them. My poor baby doggie had to be put to sleep a week ago. So no more trying to figure out what he might like. I went thru every deli lunch meat, and too much other stuff to list. He was a sweet heart and I miss him very much. If you have a pet in your life, hug him/her because all they want is a little pat on the head and told how good they are. They are non judgemental, are your constant companions, and your best friend.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 04, 2020, 05:14:35 PM
Sending comfort to you. Itís so hard to lose a pet.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 04, 2020, 05:19:38 PM
Aww, sorry about your dog! Thatís hard, and itís been such a year of hard stuff!

Spam needs to be fried over an open campfire.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 04, 2020, 05:36:06 PM
I am so sorry for the loss of your sweet doggie!  We mourn them as much as we mourn our human family.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: nirodha on November 04, 2020, 06:01:14 PM
Cat litter - https://www.chewy.com/ - I'll never go back to buying in store.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: lthenderson on November 04, 2020, 06:12:20 PM
My condolences on the loss of your pet. I found peanut butter worked best when giving pills to my dog. The stickiness didn't allow him to cough the pill back out. We use Spam mixed with ground pork when making lumpia and a few other filipino dishes. The worst way to eat Spam is by itself no matter how you cook it, kind of like flour. It needs to be one ingredient with other ingredients.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on November 04, 2020, 06:56:06 PM
Speaking of pets and pills, is there a squeeze cheese shortage?

I once got my cat to take pills using Easy Cheese - and needed some again, but it has not been in stock at my local store my last 3 trips.  She's out of pills (got maybe half of them into her), so I don't need it anymore and haven't tried to find it online.

Seems like an odd thing to be out of.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 05, 2020, 02:53:12 AM
Thanks all for your kind words.

Believe me, I have tried everything to get pills down my sick dog. Cream cheese and chicken blended, sardines and cream cheese, peanutbutter, marshmallows, ham, deli roast beef, deli turkey, many cheeses, liverwurst, bolony and more I can't think of. He used to be a really good eater but I guess his illness just made him feel sick. The pills were very powerful cancer drugs and others added on top of that. So, his stomach was probably churning from it all.

We all do the best for our animals. Now I have one rickety old dog who will be 17 years old next month! UGH, why do they have to get old!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 05, 2020, 02:59:51 AM
Speaking of pets and pills, is there a squeeze cheese shortage?

I once got my cat to take pills using Easy Cheese - and needed some again, but it has not been in stock at my local store my last 3 trips.  She's out of pills (got maybe half of them into her), so I don't need it anymore and haven't tried to find it online.

Seems like an odd thing to be out of.

Amazon has it but some are pricey. Target has it for $3.99 a can if you order on line and $35 worth of products shipping is free.
Scroll about halfway down the page: https://www.target.com/s?searchTerm=easy+cheese
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 07, 2020, 04:51:49 PM
So ... I found out today that the Instacart markup for Costco using the Instacart app are twice as high as using the Costco website.  It makes sense, since you do have to have a Costco membership to use the Costco website.  But this doesn't seem to be widely known.  I don't love any markup, but on some items the Costco price with markup is still better than Sprouts without a markup, because of bulk pricing.

Also, I did an Instacart Sprouts order today, going in through the Sprouts website instead of the Instacart app -- and I was allowed to use the current $10 off $75 coupon, plus two other digital coupons, 75Ę off 3 avocados and $1 off Earth Balance (for the dairy allergic kid). I chose curbside pickup and there were no fees at all, and no tipping. Sprouts's in-house shopper did a much better job choosing produce (the order was 90% fresh produce) than any "full service" Instacart shopper has ever done. Unlike Target, nothing was missing. In store shoppers are actual employees, from what I understand, some stores use Instacart employees and some use their own. The text I received said a Sprouts Farmers Market Associate was shopping for me, so maybe it wasn't an Instacart employee.

I didn't buy anything to hoard from Sprouts, lol, but this week I did order TP (we have an old house and need paper that dissolves easily) and our preferred medium grain rice from Walmart. I ordered paper towels from Target. I don't want to hoard, but I also don't want to end up not having what we need. Oh, I also ordered meat from our local--ish grass-fed beef rancher, since he had rump roasts half price. That was a stock up.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on November 11, 2020, 06:55:34 AM
Yesterday, my province announced that we'll be returning to lockdown Thursday, with non-essential retail closed and essential stores limited to 25% capacity. Wednesday is a statutory holiday, so that left people with just a few hours on Tuesday to stock up. Atypically, I was out and about having my phone battery replaced, and noticed that store parking lots were absolute mayhem. It was a nice feeling to be able to drive right by the crowds and know that I had enough.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 11, 2020, 12:27:30 PM
I have a big kitchen.  On the lower cabinets in the "Pre-COVID" times, it held lots of party goods. We're not having a party anytime between now and next Spring, so I moved all the party goods into an upper cabinet that was hard to reach.  I now have so much available pandemic prepping space.  I'm doing a big shop tomorrow. We'll have a load of canned goods to get by with if things get too hairy.  Right now it was more starches and beans along with a big bottle of multivitamins. None of us really like canned fruits and veg though, so once it's back to normal I think we'll make a nice donation to the food pantry.

@Sun Hat that lockdown timing sounds terrible.  Congrats on being ready and prepared.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 11, 2020, 01:33:44 PM
I have a big kitchen.  On the lower cabinets in the "Pre-COVID" times, it held lots of party goods. We're not having a party anytime between now and next Spring, so I moved all the party goods into an upper cabinet that was hard to reach.  I now have so much available pandemic prepping space.  I'm doing a big shop tomorrow. We'll have a load of canned goods to get by with if things get too hairy.  Right now it was more starches and beans along with a big bottle of multivitamins. None of us really like canned fruits and veg though, so once it's back to normal I think we'll make a nice donation to the food pantry.

@Sun Hat that lockdown timing sounds terrible.  Congrats on being ready and prepared.

What kind of canned things are you getting? As far as fruit, I did buy some applesauce, pineapples, mandarin oranges. I am thinking of buying canned peaches. The mandarin oranges I plan to put on salads. Not a huge fan of them but they are Vitamin C. The only vegs in cans that I have on hand are green beans and corn. I could tolerate mixed veg if I put them in a soup or stew but never buy them. One other thing that is good is pickled beets and I got them from Walmart. Anyone else know of anything good in a can as far as fruits and veg? I prefer frozen but if we are stocking up there is only so much room in the freezer.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 11, 2020, 02:22:03 PM
Canned tomatoes for me, mostly. I do have some dehydrated mixed veggies that make good soup.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on November 11, 2020, 02:32:38 PM
Canned tomatoes for me, mostly. I do have some dehydrated mixed veggies that make good soup.

Yeah, the dehydrated veggies are good in soup. Otherwise, we only buy canned tomatoes and maybe beans. I guess salsa and olives would also technically count.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 11, 2020, 02:35:05 PM
If you take a daily multivitamin and have powdered fiber mix like Metamucil . . . is there really any reason to eat vegetables/fruit?  Serious question.  I like fruit for the flavour (and vegetables for textural variety), but if you're in a real survival situation is there any reason the above wouldn't work?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SquashingDebt on November 11, 2020, 02:46:24 PM
I went to the store today to finish up my pandemic "hoard".  It consists of an extra 4.5 square feet of shelf space in a pantry area where I used to store only mason jars.  My regular pantry is a bit more full too.  I'm now fully stocked with almost every dry good I can think of to make the sorts of recipes I like.  Now I'll switch to system of just replacing what I use up.  Living alone makes a lot of things about this pandemic harder (I miss hugs!), but it does make it easier to stock up on food.

I also bought the non-perishable food I'll need for my (solo) Thanksgiving dinner.  My first away from my family in my 34 years of life :(  My plan is to make all my favorite side dishes I usually make with my mom, and skip the turkey because that seems like a pain.  My only "fancy" cooking planned for the holiday is an apple pie.

My store was pretty normally stocked, except I saw a sign saying that boxed stuffing mix was limited to 4 per person (along with the sign about 2 cleaning products per person that's been there the whole pandemic).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 11, 2020, 03:10:18 PM
Canadian Tire finally got 500 ml canning jars in, so there are now 3 boxes (12 each) under my bed for next year, just in case.  Under my bed has turned out to be prime storage space.  My poor cat starts to go under, and has to reroute.  I have enough paper towel to get me through the winter, and enough TP to get me to January.  The freezer is nearly full.  I prefer fresh (meat, veg, fruit) but have enough frozen to get me through some bad weather (standard Canadian refrain, winter is coming, on the prairies it has already come) so the only things I really have to hit the grocery store for on a regular basis are eggs and cream, both of which will keep for a few weeks in the fridge.  As cases have gone up here I am really trying to limit being in buildings, so basically at this point it is the library, the grocery store, and the dentist.  There are a few things I need that I am trying to find online before I venture into a store for them.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 11, 2020, 03:29:56 PM
Please tell me what supplier you all use for dehydrated veggies. That is a good idea. I have the boxes of scalloped potatoes which comes in handy as a side dish.

I have been buying 3 dozen eggs each time I am down to the last dozen. Eggs keep a long time. Last week I went to the store and found Jumbo eggs for $1.79 a dozen which I thought was a bargain! Make sure you check the expiration dates. Some stores are sneaky and have old eggs to sell.

As far as not having turkey for Thanksgiving, SquashingDebt, maybe you could get some thick deli slices and warm them up with jarred gravy. It would taste pretty good and you could have a good amount of turkey to enjoy. No real cooking involved. Or buy a roasting chicken and 'pretend' it is turkey! LOL!

Yes, I have canned tomatoes and use them often. They are a must! Full of Vit. C too! I use them in so many things.

Metamucil is great for fiber but not sure if a vitamin pill is enough. But better than nothing I suppose if it was the end of the world and there was no food.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PMG on November 11, 2020, 03:57:39 PM
Weíre planning  to roast a couple chicken breasts for thanksgiving dinner. The sides really are what I want to eat but my spouse will want some meat. It seems silly to make soooo many sides for just two people. Iím not sure my spouse has ever had stuffing so I got a pack of stovetop. Got a can of cranberry sauce. Thatís enough to make it feel very holiday like for me.

Now for Christmas.  Iím hungry for melt in your mouth smoked ham. But not sure I can find one small enough?!  We just have a small freezer and only need so many leftovers.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 11, 2020, 04:22:50 PM
Costco today had no turkeys. I wanted to post a picture of their "out of stock" items. "Turkey" made the list. Costco today had 2 hams left.  We don't love ham, so I didn't get that.  I figure expensive Rib Eye roasts will still be around for xmas, and we might be in IL for that festivity so it doesn't make sense to panic and buy that yet.  It may be a very interesting Christmas ala Scrooge in America if not every house can have a Christmas ham that wants one.

I bought peaches and mixed fruit as well as pineapple.  I have no answer to the Metamucil question, but we have no fiber in the house. There seemed to be plenty of canned goods available at Costco in the regular varieties.  Our cereal bins are almost empty, but no one is eating cold cereal in the winter....so meh. It's all put away and there's still room for more. Chocolate syrup decadence? I got a big pack of Swiss Miss hot cocoa.  I figured it's tasty calories. $2.99 on super sale.  That's cheaper than powdered milk.

We're going to limit the sides to just mashed potatoes, jello salad (kids' favorite part), turkey, and green bean casserole.  I did buy stuffing, but don't know if we'll actually make more than what we put in the bird.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on November 11, 2020, 05:09:10 PM
Costco today had no turkeys. I wanted to post a picture of their "out of stock" items. "Turkey" made the list. Costco today had 2 hams left.  We don't love ham, so I didn't get that.  I figure expensive Rib Eye roasts will still be around for xmas, and we might be in IL for that festivity so it doesn't make sense to panic and buy that yet.  It may be a very interesting Christmas ala Scrooge in America if not every house can have a Christmas ham that wants one.

Well, shoot. I'd better try to get a turkey soon.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on November 11, 2020, 05:16:01 PM
@Roadrunner53 You asked about suppliers for dehydrated veggies:
For dehydrated mixed veg that are good in rice and soups, I buy them at a bulk food chain called Bulk Barn. They're dirt cheap.

For dehydrated shiitake mushrooms, which can be used in place of fresh mushrooms in any cooked recipe, I buy them in big packages in the Chinese / Asian section of Superstore my big supermarket, though they're also available at pretty much any Asian grocery store. FAR cheaper than fresh and have a very long shelf life. I generally use them in either rice dishes or to make lentil mushroom pate.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on November 11, 2020, 05:20:51 PM
@Roadrunner53 You asked about suppliers for dehydrated veggies:
For dehydrated mixed veg that are good in rice and soups, I buy them at a bulk food chain called Bulk Barn. They're dirt cheap.

For dehydrated shiitake mushrooms, which can be used in place of fresh mushrooms in any cooked recipe, I buy them in big packages in the Chinese / Asian section of Superstore my big supermarket, though they're also available at pretty much any Asian grocery store. FAR cheaper than fresh and have a very long shelf life. I generally use them in either rice dishes or to make lentil mushroom pate.

I ordered dehydrated vegetables, beans, and lentils from North Bay Trading (https://www.northbaytrading.com/) earlier this year. The quality has been very good.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 11, 2020, 07:04:29 PM
If you take a daily multivitamin and have powdered fiber mix like Metamucil . . . is there really any reason to eat vegetables/fruit?  Serious question.  I like fruit for the flavour (and vegetables for textural variety), but if you're in a real survival situation is there any reason the above wouldn't work?

I have beans for fiber. If I was truly desperate for veggies there are many edible plants. Clover is a edible, for instance.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 11, 2020, 07:09:19 PM
If you take a daily multivitamin and have powdered fiber mix like Metamucil . . . is there really any reason to eat vegetables/fruit?  Serious question.  I like fruit for the flavour (and vegetables for textural variety), but if you're in a real survival situation is there any reason the above wouldn't work?

I have beans for fiber. If I was truly desperate for veggies there are many edible plants. Clover is a edible, for instance.

I was doing a thought experiment for a long term survival scenario.

Oil lasts forever, protein powder (if vacuum sealed) seems to have a pretty long shelf life, there are plenty of shelf stable carbs.  Vegetables and fruit are a problem though . . . but if you could replace them with multivitamins and fiber then you could live a bland existence for an awful long time with minimal planning.  I don't see why it wouldn't provide you with the correct macro and micronutrients.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 11, 2020, 07:13:54 PM
If you take a daily multivitamin and have powdered fiber mix like Metamucil . . . is there really any reason to eat vegetables/fruit?  Serious question.  I like fruit for the flavour (and vegetables for textural variety), but if you're in a real survival situation is there any reason the above wouldn't work?

I have beans for fiber. If I was truly desperate for veggies there are many edible plants. Clover is a edible, for instance.

I was doing a thought experiment for a long term survival scenario.

Oil lasts forever, protein powder (if vacuum sealed) seems to have a pretty long shelf life, there are plenty of shelf stable carbs.  Vegetables and fruit are a problem though . . . but if you could replace them with multivitamins and fiber then you could live a bland existence for an awful long time with minimal planning.  I don't see why it wouldn't provide you with the correct macro and micronutrients.


Sprouts are good for fresh vegetables. Dry seeds, add water, and you are set.  So are fermented foods.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 11, 2020, 07:18:25 PM
If you take a daily multivitamin and have powdered fiber mix like Metamucil . . . is there really any reason to eat vegetables/fruit?  Serious question.  I like fruit for the flavour (and vegetables for textural variety), but if you're in a real survival situation is there any reason the above wouldn't work?

I have beans for fiber. If I was truly desperate for veggies there are many edible plants. Clover is a edible, for instance.

I was doing a thought experiment for a long term survival scenario.

Oil lasts forever, protein powder (if vacuum sealed) seems to have a pretty long shelf life, there are plenty of shelf stable carbs.  Vegetables and fruit are a problem though . . . but if you could replace them with multivitamins and fiber then you could live a bland existence for an awful long time with minimal planning.  I don't see why it wouldn't provide you with the correct macro and micronutrients.

I mean it would definitely help you evade deficiencies for a while. A valuable function.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: BicycleB on November 11, 2020, 07:26:04 PM
If you take a daily multivitamin and have powdered fiber mix like Metamucil . . . is there really any reason to eat vegetables/fruit?  Serious question.  I like fruit for the flavour (and vegetables for textural variety), but if you're in a real survival situation is there any reason the above wouldn't work?

I have beans for fiber. If I was truly desperate for veggies there are many edible plants. Clover is a edible, for instance.

I was doing a thought experiment for a long term survival scenario.

Oil lasts forever, protein powder (if vacuum sealed) seems to have a pretty long shelf life, there are plenty of shelf stable carbs.  Vegetables and fruit are a problem though . . . but if you could replace them with multivitamins and fiber then you could live a bland existence for an awful long time with minimal planning.  I don't see why it wouldn't provide you with the correct macro and micronutrients.

Maybe it does. But I don't think scientists have really proven that. It's hard to test the effect of generally eating "real foods" vs sets of nutrients.

A lot of people assert that nutrients are metabolized better when they come as part of whole foods. The idea that the various nutrients are really all we need, and that we do process them well their usual food substrates (if you will) is a hypothesis that was trendy for a while. Then it was trendy to point to long lifespans of people who eat lots of vegetables and whole foods instead of food products and isolated nutrients, saying that that "proves" whole foods are better. One variant of this line of thought is that most traditional cuisines have excellent combinations for health, better than "macros plus micros" so to speak.

You call the play. Based on what's available, I guess.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 12, 2020, 03:25:12 AM
@Roadrunner53 You asked about suppliers for dehydrated veggies:
For dehydrated mixed veg that are good in rice and soups, I buy them at a bulk food chain called Bulk Barn. They're dirt cheap.

For dehydrated shiitake mushrooms, which can be used in place of fresh mushrooms in any cooked recipe, I buy them in big packages in the Chinese / Asian section of Superstore my big supermarket, though they're also available at pretty much any Asian grocery store. FAR cheaper than fresh and have a very long shelf life. I generally use them in either rice dishes or to make lentil mushroom pate.

I ordered dehydrated vegetables, beans, and lentils from North Bay Trading (https://www.northbaytrading.com/) earlier this year. The quality has been very good.


Sun Hat looks like Bulk Barn is a Canadian store only. I am here in USA.

OtherJen, That is ironic you sent that link for North Bay Trading! I bought their Christmas Lima Beans and some soup mixes back a while ago and kind of forgot about that company. I just made a Christmas Lima Bean cold salad the other day and it was really good. I have some Spicy Southwestern Soup I might just throw in the crockpot today.

I looked at the dehydrated veggies and the mushrooms look interesting but expensive. I guess a little goes a long way. What veggies do you buy from them and do you recommend anything in particular?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on November 12, 2020, 05:33:38 AM

Oil lasts forever

Most vegetable oils will go rancid after 12-36 months. If you were to try living off of oil, protein powder, fiber supplements and multivitamins, you'd probably go a bit squirrely long before then though. Add some honey to your austere bunker plan so that you can taste something.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on November 12, 2020, 05:42:45 AM
@Roadrunner53 You asked about suppliers for dehydrated veggies:
For dehydrated mixed veg that are good in rice and soups, I buy them at a bulk food chain called Bulk Barn. They're dirt cheap.

For dehydrated shiitake mushrooms, which can be used in place of fresh mushrooms in any cooked recipe, I buy them in big packages in the Chinese / Asian section of Superstore my big supermarket, though they're also available at pretty much any Asian grocery store. FAR cheaper than fresh and have a very long shelf life. I generally use them in either rice dishes or to make lentil mushroom pate.

I ordered dehydrated vegetables, beans, and lentils from North Bay Trading (https://www.northbaytrading.com/) earlier this year. The quality has been very good.


Sun Hat looks like Bulk Barn is a Canadian store only. I am here in USA.

OtherJen, That is ironic you sent that link for North Bay Trading! I bought their Christmas Lima Beans and some soup mixes back a while ago and kind of forgot about that company. I just made a Christmas Lima Bean cold salad the other day and it was really good. I have some Spicy Southwestern Soup I might just throw in the crockpot today.

I looked at the dehydrated veggies and the mushrooms look interesting but expensive. I guess a little goes a long way. What veggies do you buy from them and do you recommend anything in particular?

I bought the air-dried mixed veggies. They seem a bit pricey, but I have celiac disease and canít trust that the food in public bulk bins is safe for me (last time I went to one, I watched someone take a flour scoop and go into other bins with it). If you donít have a food allergy, it would be worth checking out a local bulk food store.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: StarBright on November 12, 2020, 06:02:29 AM
So if anyone is interested in nutrient replacement powder just for stocking up, I recommend Huel.  I've had Huel once a day for chunks of the last year as a meal replacement and it hasn't hurt me (according to my bloodwork :) ).

They have flavors, but I prefer the unflavored and usually do a dropper or two of vanilla extract and some honey to make it lightly sweet. Stores for about 18 months unopened.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 12, 2020, 07:17:33 AM

Oil lasts forever

Most vegetable oils will go rancid after 12-36 months. If you were to try living off of oil, protein powder, fiber supplements and multivitamins, you'd probably go a bit squirrely long before then though. Add some honey to your austere bunker plan so that you can taste something.

Hmm.  I didn't think of the oil going rancid.  It probably does happen at some point.  I'm 100% certain that oils remain perfectly fine to use well past the expiry date listed on the container though.  I've used olive oil more than a year after it 'expired' and it tasted fine.  Same with coconut oil, although it was closer to two years after the expiration date.  Still tasted fine.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 12, 2020, 07:21:13 AM
I bought a frozen turkey breast last month, cuz I saw this coming, so I'm all set for Thanksgiving. I got cranberries last week in my Curbside Pickup order, too.

I'm going back to ordering the vegetable boxes from the co-op. They're a great deal. I bought several last spring and then didn't need to over the summer as I had quite a bit of garden produce over the summer, but I'm down to kale, spinach and peas at this point.

I like vegetables, and I'd rather do winter storage veg than live on vitamins and Metamucil.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on November 12, 2020, 07:30:45 AM

Oil lasts forever

Most vegetable oils will go rancid after 12-36 months. If you were to try living off of oil, protein powder, fiber supplements and multivitamins, you'd probably go a bit squirrely long before then though. Add some honey to your austere bunker plan so that you can taste something.

Hmm.  I didn't think of the oil going rancid.  It probably does happen at some point.  I'm 100% certain that oils remain perfectly fine to use well past the expiry date listed on the container though.  I've used olive oil more than a year after it 'expired' and it tasted fine.  Same with coconut oil, although it was closer to two years after the expiration date.  Still tasted fine.
Storage in a cool, dark place helps.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 12, 2020, 07:57:21 AM

Oil lasts forever

Most vegetable oils will go rancid after 12-36 months. If you were to try living off of oil, protein powder, fiber supplements and multivitamins, you'd probably go a bit squirrely long before then though. Add some honey to your austere bunker plan so that you can taste something.

Hmm.  I didn't think of the oil going rancid.  It probably does happen at some point.  I'm 100% certain that oils remain perfectly fine to use well past the expiry date listed on the container though.  I've used olive oil more than a year after it 'expired' and it tasted fine.  Same with coconut oil, although it was closer to two years after the expiration date.  Still tasted fine.

Instead of drinking oil, vitamins and metamucil, why not make pemmican?

"Pemmican was widely adopted as a high-energy food by Europeans involved in the fur trade and later by Arctic and Antarctic explorers, such as Captain Robert Bartlett, Ernest Shackleton, Richard E. Byrd, Fridtjof Nansen, Robert Falcon Scott, George W. DeLong and Roald Amundsen."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemmican

Many recipes can be found on the internet. Lots of beef, fat and fruits.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 12, 2020, 08:50:10 AM

Oil lasts forever

Most vegetable oils will go rancid after 12-36 months. If you were to try living off of oil, protein powder, fiber supplements and multivitamins, you'd probably go a bit squirrely long before then though. Add some honey to your austere bunker plan so that you can taste something.

Hmm.  I didn't think of the oil going rancid.  It probably does happen at some point.  I'm 100% certain that oils remain perfectly fine to use well past the expiry date listed on the container though.  I've used olive oil more than a year after it 'expired' and it tasted fine.  Same with coconut oil, although it was closer to two years after the expiration date.  Still tasted fine.

Instead of drinking oil, vitamins and metamucil, why not make pemmican?

"Pemmican was widely adopted as a high-energy food by Europeans involved in the fur trade and later by Arctic and Antarctic explorers, such as Captain Robert Bartlett, Ernest Shackleton, Richard E. Byrd, Fridtjof Nansen, Robert Falcon Scott, George W. DeLong and Roald Amundsen."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemmican

Many recipes can be found on the internet. Lots of beef, fat and fruits.

I grew up in a small northern community next to a rez.  I've got plenty of experience with pemmican in my life . . . which leads me to believe that drinking oil and vitamins with metamuscil will be about as tasty for less work.  :P
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 12, 2020, 02:40:47 PM
One of my local grocery stores has turkeys on sale for $0.49 cents a lb. I think there is a limit of 2 turkeys and in the past you had to buy some kind of a dollar amount minus the turkey to get it for that price. They do this every year and last year it was $0.39 a lb. I can't resist!







Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: lthenderson on November 13, 2020, 07:44:03 AM
I usually wait for the week after Thanksgiving to buy several deeply discounted turkeys to process in my smoker and freeze for a later date.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 13, 2020, 07:45:26 AM
I'm always disappointed - turkeys never go on clearance here!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 13, 2020, 07:49:12 AM
We buy cheap turkeys after every major holiday that people eat them.  Super versatile food.  It gets made into:

- White turkey chili
- Butter turkey (like butter chicken)
- Turkey stew
- Turkey curry
- Pulled turkey sandwiches (like pulled pork)
- Turkey barley soup
- Turkey pot pie


I mean, you can also just make a traditional turkey, which is fine . . . but there are so many other ways to eat it.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 13, 2020, 07:50:19 AM
mmmm-butter turkey.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on November 13, 2020, 08:49:40 AM

Oil lasts forever

Most vegetable oils will go rancid after 12-36 months. If you were to try living off of oil, protein powder, fiber supplements and multivitamins, you'd probably go a bit squirrely long before then though. Add some honey to your austere bunker plan so that you can taste something.
I have frozen coconut oil with good results. Never tried freezing any other types of oil.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Runrooster on November 13, 2020, 09:05:57 AM
My grocery store put canned beans and tomatoes on sale for $.34 each for the third time in 2 months, no limit this time.
I already have maybe 30 cans beans plus 12 tomatoes, so my Mom will have a fit if I buy more.
I also stocked up on eggs, remembering the previous shortage.  So they loss leader-ed those as well.

I talked to my supervisors at the tax job, and they said they expect the season to start on time. Our January clients are heavy on EIC, and they'll need the money this year even more.
They usually buy my dinner plus snacks so we have too much (junk) food in tax season.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 13, 2020, 10:35:26 AM
Not sure if I am frugal or foolish but I just bought another freezer. This one is smaller than the big one I have in the garage. It is 15.5 CF self defrosting. My big freezer is full up but I replace what I use up so there is never any extra space. I like to buy some extra turkeys when they are on sale and rib roasts, plus other things. My intent is not to fill the new freezer up but to use it for bargains and seasonal purchases. The other one I can't fit a sheet of paper in it!

I have been fighting the urge to buy a freezer for months thinking eventually my freezer would whittle down but that never happened! My Hub keeps it pretty ship shape and rotates the inventory so we are not tossing anything out due to old age.

I was totally shocked that delivery is tomorrow and free! However, I ordered it on line and automatically it added $49.80 delivery charges. The flyer I had said free local delivery. I live about 15 miles away from the store so wasn't sure if I was in their local delivery area. After I place the order I called them. Sure enough, the lady blamed a computer glitch...I wonder...and removed the shipping charge. So if any of you order an appliance on line and you believe you should get free shipping, call to find out why you are being charged.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: TomTX on November 13, 2020, 11:05:11 AM
I grew up in a small northern community next to a rez.  I've got plenty of experience with pemmican in my life . . . which leads me to believe that drinking oil and vitamins with metamuscil will be about as tasty for less work.  :P

Metamucil has all sorts of garbage mixed into it. Just get some plain psyllium husk.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 13, 2020, 11:30:08 AM
We used to have an extra freezer. Now the in laws have it.  I bought a 60" wide refrigerator/freezer combo.  It works really well (when it works, but that is a different story).  We also have a beverage center for drinks. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 13, 2020, 12:26:03 PM
We used to have an extra freezer. Now the in laws have it.  I bought a 60" wide refrigerator/freezer combo.  It works really well (when it works, but that is a different story).  We also have a beverage center for drinks.

I worked for a large food company for many years and we had walk in freezers and refrigerators galore. They were huge and I would die to have even a small version of a walk in refrigerator/freezer. I envy your 60" wide too! Is it a built in?

My Hub and I cook a lot and I keep a lot of food on hand even before the pandemic. Now, that we are trying stay home I have really added to the coffers. Almost to the point of no return!

I have to slow down on the purchasing. But I do feel good I have full freezers, refrigerators and cabinets full of food. Even my dog is all set!

What is your beverage center like? Not familiar with that.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 13, 2020, 01:09:33 PM
We used to have an extra freezer. Now the in laws have it.  I bought a 60" wide refrigerator/freezer combo.  It works really well (when it works, but that is a different story).  We also have a beverage center for drinks.

I worked for a large food company for many years and we had walk in freezers and refrigerators galore. They were huge and I would die to have even a small version of a walk in refrigerator/freezer. I envy your 60" wide too! Is it a built in?

What is your beverage center like? Not familiar with that.
It's a whirlpool - not built in, but looks it. One side is a 30" refrigerator, one side is a 30" freezer.  There is a fake grill kit that goes around it and makes it look built in. The refrigerator sprung a refrigerant leak at the 1 year and 2 month mark. It's been off and on for awhile.  I "think" they finally found the leak and fixed it.  Not what you want during COVID. The "Whirpool" emblems on the front come off with a bit of sticker remover, so everyone thinks it's some super fancy thing.
https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=h7L6eXUz&id=4173F16E984AA751D4112F925DD98B04FF198927&thid=OIP.h7L6eXUzb-QoY4jMaF64VgHaHa&mediaurl=https%3a%2f%2fs-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com%2foriginals%2f5a%2f35%2f10%2f5a3510d309e123c78dbec0777c2ddd89.jpg&exph=800&expw=800&q=whirlpool+sidekicks&simid=608030351453130036&ck=2F86A26C1DD660C7EEE9F45E6565777B&selectedIndex=45&FORM=IRPRST&ajaxhist=0 (https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=h7L6eXUz&id=4173F16E984AA751D4112F925DD98B04FF198927&thid=OIP.h7L6eXUzb-QoY4jMaF64VgHaHa&mediaurl=https%3a%2f%2fs-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com%2foriginals%2f5a%2f35%2f10%2f5a3510d309e123c78dbec0777c2ddd89.jpg&exph=800&expw=800&q=whirlpool+sidekicks&simid=608030351453130036&ck=2F86A26C1DD660C7EEE9F45E6565777B&selectedIndex=45&FORM=IRPRST&ajaxhist=0)
The beverage center is a fridge that goes under the counter.
https://www.compactappliance.com/avallon-beverage-coolers-beverage-appliances/ABR241GLH.html?source=msn-pa_ABR241SGLH!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no&source=msn_!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no!f&cvosrc=pla.bing.ABR241SGLH&cvosrc=ppc.bing.avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&matchtype=e&cvo_uniqueid=ABR241SGLH&utm_source=pla&utm_source=ppc&utm_medium=bing&utm_medium=bing&utm_term=ABR241SGLH&utm_term=avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&gclid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582&gclsrc=3p.ds&k_clickid=_kenshoo_clickid_&msclkid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582 (https://www.compactappliance.com/avallon-beverage-coolers-beverage-appliances/ABR241GLH.html?source=msn-pa_ABR241SGLH!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no&source=msn_!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no!f&cvosrc=pla.bing.ABR241SGLH&cvosrc=ppc.bing.avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&matchtype=e&cvo_uniqueid=ABR241SGLH&utm_source=pla&utm_source=ppc&utm_medium=bing&utm_medium=bing&utm_term=ABR241SGLH&utm_term=avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&gclid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582&gclsrc=3p.ds&k_clickid=_kenshoo_clickid_&msclkid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582)
When the big fridge broke, we made do with the little fridge and ice filled water bottles in the big fridge for items that didn't need perfect refrigeration (veggies and cans)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on November 13, 2020, 02:16:08 PM
Here we go again, grocery shopping the day after big statewide COVID press conferences. Aldi wasn't too poorly stocked this afternoon, but they were definitely running low on some things and are probably sold out of paper towels by now. The store wasn't as chaotic as it was on March 13 (the day after the statewide school shutdown announcement), but it was way more crowded than it was two weeks ago.

I grabbed canned pumpkin and fresh cranberries so I can at least make some proper Thanksgiving food in case those sell out.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 13, 2020, 02:24:22 PM
We used to have an extra freezer. Now the in laws have it.  I bought a 60" wide refrigerator/freezer combo.  It works really well (when it works, but that is a different story).  We also have a beverage center for drinks.

I worked for a large food company for many years and we had walk in freezers and refrigerators galore. They were huge and I would die to have even a small version of a walk in refrigerator/freezer. I envy your 60" wide too! Is it a built in?

What is your beverage center like? Not familiar with that.
It's a whirlpool - not built in, but looks it. One side is a 30" refrigerator, one side is a 30" freezer.  There is a fake grill kit that goes around it and makes it look built in. The refrigerator sprung a refrigerant leak at the 1 year and 2 month mark. It's been off and on for awhile.  I "think" they finally found the leak and fixed it.  Not what you want during COVID. The "Whirpool" emblems on the front come off with a bit of sticker remover, so everyone thinks it's some super fancy thing.
https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=h7L6eXUz&id=4173F16E984AA751D4112F925DD98B04FF198927&thid=OIP.h7L6eXUzb-QoY4jMaF64VgHaHa&mediaurl=https%3a%2f%2fs-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com%2foriginals%2f5a%2f35%2f10%2f5a3510d309e123c78dbec0777c2ddd89.jpg&exph=800&expw=800&q=whirlpool+sidekicks&simid=608030351453130036&ck=2F86A26C1DD660C7EEE9F45E6565777B&selectedIndex=45&FORM=IRPRST&ajaxhist=0 (https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=h7L6eXUz&id=4173F16E984AA751D4112F925DD98B04FF198927&thid=OIP.h7L6eXUzb-QoY4jMaF64VgHaHa&mediaurl=https%3a%2f%2fs-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com%2foriginals%2f5a%2f35%2f10%2f5a3510d309e123c78dbec0777c2ddd89.jpg&exph=800&expw=800&q=whirlpool+sidekicks&simid=608030351453130036&ck=2F86A26C1DD660C7EEE9F45E6565777B&selectedIndex=45&FORM=IRPRST&ajaxhist=0)
The beverage center is a fridge that goes under the counter.
https://www.compactappliance.com/avallon-beverage-coolers-beverage-appliances/ABR241GLH.html?source=msn-pa_ABR241SGLH!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no&source=msn_!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no!f&cvosrc=pla.bing.ABR241SGLH&cvosrc=ppc.bing.avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&matchtype=e&cvo_uniqueid=ABR241SGLH&utm_source=pla&utm_source=ppc&utm_medium=bing&utm_medium=bing&utm_term=ABR241SGLH&utm_term=avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&gclid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582&gclsrc=3p.ds&k_clickid=_kenshoo_clickid_&msclkid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582 (https://www.compactappliance.com/avallon-beverage-coolers-beverage-appliances/ABR241GLH.html?source=msn-pa_ABR241SGLH!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no&source=msn_!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no!f&cvosrc=pla.bing.ABR241SGLH&cvosrc=ppc.bing.avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&matchtype=e&cvo_uniqueid=ABR241SGLH&utm_source=pla&utm_source=ppc&utm_medium=bing&utm_medium=bing&utm_term=ABR241SGLH&utm_term=avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&gclid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582&gclsrc=3p.ds&k_clickid=_kenshoo_clickid_&msclkid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582)
When the big fridge broke, we made do with the little fridge and ice filled water bottles in the big fridge for items that didn't need perfect refrigeration (veggies and cans)

OMG, I LOVE the refrig/freezer! Gorgeous! I am jealous! I would need a new kitchen to fit that! My next life...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 13, 2020, 02:27:56 PM
We used to have an extra freezer. Now the in laws have it.  I bought a 60" wide refrigerator/freezer combo.  It works really well (when it works, but that is a different story).  We also have a beverage center for drinks.

I worked for a large food company for many years and we had walk in freezers and refrigerators galore. They were huge and I would die to have even a small version of a walk in refrigerator/freezer. I envy your 60" wide too! Is it a built in?

What is your beverage center like? Not familiar with that.
It's a whirlpool - not built in, but looks it. One side is a 30" refrigerator, one side is a 30" freezer.  There is a fake grill kit that goes around it and makes it look built in. The refrigerator sprung a refrigerant leak at the 1 year and 2 month mark. It's been off and on for awhile.  I "think" they finally found the leak and fixed it.  Not what you want during COVID. The "Whirpool" emblems on the front come off with a bit of sticker remover, so everyone thinks it's some super fancy thing.
https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=h7L6eXUz&id=4173F16E984AA751D4112F925DD98B04FF198927&thid=OIP.h7L6eXUzb-QoY4jMaF64VgHaHa&mediaurl=https%3a%2f%2fs-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com%2foriginals%2f5a%2f35%2f10%2f5a3510d309e123c78dbec0777c2ddd89.jpg&exph=800&expw=800&q=whirlpool+sidekicks&simid=608030351453130036&ck=2F86A26C1DD660C7EEE9F45E6565777B&selectedIndex=45&FORM=IRPRST&ajaxhist=0 (https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=h7L6eXUz&id=4173F16E984AA751D4112F925DD98B04FF198927&thid=OIP.h7L6eXUzb-QoY4jMaF64VgHaHa&mediaurl=https%3a%2f%2fs-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com%2foriginals%2f5a%2f35%2f10%2f5a3510d309e123c78dbec0777c2ddd89.jpg&exph=800&expw=800&q=whirlpool+sidekicks&simid=608030351453130036&ck=2F86A26C1DD660C7EEE9F45E6565777B&selectedIndex=45&FORM=IRPRST&ajaxhist=0)
The beverage center is a fridge that goes under the counter.
https://www.compactappliance.com/avallon-beverage-coolers-beverage-appliances/ABR241GLH.html?source=msn-pa_ABR241SGLH!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no&source=msn_!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no!f&cvosrc=pla.bing.ABR241SGLH&cvosrc=ppc.bing.avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&matchtype=e&cvo_uniqueid=ABR241SGLH&utm_source=pla&utm_source=ppc&utm_medium=bing&utm_medium=bing&utm_term=ABR241SGLH&utm_term=avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&gclid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582&gclsrc=3p.ds&k_clickid=_kenshoo_clickid_&msclkid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582 (https://www.compactappliance.com/avallon-beverage-coolers-beverage-appliances/ABR241GLH.html?source=msn-pa_ABR241SGLH!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no&source=msn_!c53672146!a4729119540!kavalon%20beverage%20center%20images!me!dc!no!f&cvosrc=pla.bing.ABR241SGLH&cvosrc=ppc.bing.avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_cid=53672146&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_crid=11479484405&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&cvo_adgroup=4729119540&matchtype=e&cvo_uniqueid=ABR241SGLH&utm_source=pla&utm_source=ppc&utm_medium=bing&utm_medium=bing&utm_term=ABR241SGLH&utm_term=avalon%20beverage%20center%20images&gclid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582&gclsrc=3p.ds&k_clickid=_kenshoo_clickid_&msclkid=385e4fc6103f1bea9da01068f74b4582)
When the big fridge broke, we made do with the little fridge and ice filled water bottles in the big fridge for items that didn't need perfect refrigeration (veggies and cans)

OMG, I LOVE the refrig/freezer! Gorgeous! I am jealous! I would need a new kitchen to fit that! My next life...
It's not mustachian, but yes, it required a new kitchen to fit it.  Appliances are cheaper than cabinets....hence we have two dishwashers as well. LOL.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: StarBright on November 13, 2020, 02:28:47 PM
Here we go again, grocery shopping the day after big statewide COVID press conferences. Aldi wasn't too poorly stocked this afternoon, but they were definitely running low on some things and are probably sold out of paper towels by now. The store wasn't as chaotic as it was on March 13 (the day after the statewide school shutdown announcement), but it was way more crowded than it was two weeks ago.

I grabbed canned pumpkin and fresh cranberries so I can at least make some proper Thanksgiving food in case those sell out.

We live in the same corner of the world. I feel like panic shopping in NW OH and SE MI is like a badge of honor? I was blown away the first time we had a snowstorm. The pandemic has topped that and then some. All my friends are sending me pictures of empty shelves. And I'm sort of like, how did y'all run out of TP since the last round of stocking up?!

We have been using Kroger pick up since March and I'm pretty pleased with. We did stop buying our meat there because it was too hit or miss with curbside. We've been buying meat from a local butcher with curbside pick up and that has worked nicely.

Good idea to buy the thanksgiving stuff though!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on November 13, 2020, 04:01:21 PM
Our pantry and closets are so stuffed that I'd feel bad stocking up more...if I do, I totally will have to hide it from my husband, ha!  He just reorganized everything...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 13, 2020, 04:16:52 PM
We bought 30lbs of TVP because why not
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 13, 2020, 04:19:04 PM
What's TVP?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 13, 2020, 04:28:04 PM
Textured vegetable protein
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 13, 2020, 04:57:04 PM
Our pantry and closets are so stuffed that I'd feel bad stocking up more...if I do, I totally will have to hide it from my husband, ha!  He just reorganized everything...

I have stocked up to the moon and have got to stop. I think I am part squirrel gathering nuts for the harsh winter to come!

MudPuppy how do you use your TVP? I bought some a long time ago and never used it and then threw it out. I know it has the texture of ground meat. Do you put it into anything that calls for ground hamburger meat?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 13, 2020, 05:02:38 PM
I bought some ground beef type and some grilled chicken slices type.

The ground beef type I use in shepherds pie, chili, Bulgogi wraps, tacos, added to spaghetti sauce, sloppy joes, stuffed cabbage rolls, cheeseburger macaroni...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on November 14, 2020, 06:10:56 AM
I bought some ground beef type and some grilled chicken slices type.

The ground beef type I use in shepherds pie, chili, Bulgogi wraps, tacos, added to spaghetti sauce, sloppy joes, stuffed cabbage rolls, cheeseburger macaroni...

I use mine in a similar way. The trick is to adjust your recipes to add the umami that meat would normally contribute. My mom will use 3/4 TVP and 1/4 ground beef in recipes to ensure that it still has a "beefy" flavour. I just add spices.

I'm not sure what the recommended shelf life is for TVP, but I'm sure that I've used 10 year old TVP that I had left in my mom's cupboard before moving out, and it was as perfectly good.

Being a fairly lazy cook, my favorite use of TVP is to add a handful to a jar of tomato sauce, heat it and add to pasta for a well-rounded meal.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on November 14, 2020, 06:36:29 AM
Iíve never tried cooking with TVP, but you all have piqued my interest. It would be nice to cut back further on the amount of ground meat I several favorite dishes, and husband is increasingly willing to reduce meat or go meatless for some meals (last night, we got take-out from the local vegan burger joint at his request).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 14, 2020, 06:40:07 AM
I use mine in a similar way. The trick is to adjust your recipes to add the umami that meat would normally contribute. My mom will use 3/4 TVP and 1/4 ground beef in recipes to ensure that it still has a "beefy" flavour. I just add spices.

I'm not sure what the recommended shelf life is for TVP, but I'm sure that I've used 10 year old TVP that I had left in my mom's cupboard before moving out, and it was as perfectly good.


I am also not really vegetarian, so I add a bit of better than bouillon to it when I rehydrate.  Shelf life on an unopened container is 20 years if I recall correctly. Long shelf life is why I bought it. I donít have a place for a deep freeze, but I do have underbed storage in the guest room.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: coppertop on November 14, 2020, 08:38:38 AM
Where did you all buy your TVP?  Local stores don't carry it any more, and I did order 1/2 lb. on Amazon but believe I paid too much for it. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 14, 2020, 08:50:51 AM
Here is some https://hoosierhillfarm.com/hoosier-hill-farm-textured-vegetable-protein-tvp-Bulk-Size-25lbs..html
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 14, 2020, 08:53:47 AM
My new freezer arrived about half an hour ago! It is so nice! 15.5 CF! Tomorrow I will get my 49 cent per lb. turkeys and stow them away in the new freezer! YIPPIE!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on November 14, 2020, 09:55:19 AM
My new freezer arrived about half an hour ago! It is so nice! 15.5 CF! Tomorrow I will get my 49 cent per lb. turkeys and stow them away in the new freezer! YIPPIE!

You probably got the last one on the planet!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 14, 2020, 10:46:59 AM
I got it thru PC Richards. It is a Frigidaire and it seems to be a popular model at many stores but I did have a hard time finding it in my area. Sears wanted $75 to deliver and PC Richards delivered for free and in two days time! Was a perfect purchase. They called several times to let me know delivery window. The deliver guy called twice this morning to give me a heads up on delivery time. One of the best purchasing experiences in a long, long time! Price was right, painless shopping and quick delivery.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 14, 2020, 11:34:32 AM
I hope I'm not making a mistake, but I'm resisting stocking up like I did in March. I topped up are meat, rice, and paper towels (and mostly I use paper towels for patting dry meat), but I'm not buying canned goods or other dry staples. I'd like to add more chicken breast and a nice roast for Christmas, but right now I don't have room. Also, the pandemic has taught me how little canned food my family will tolerate. Canned tomatoes are fine (but I can't base meals on the because I'm allergic to tomatoes). Canned beans get a pass in chili or salads, but not by themselves (I already knew this one). Canned pineapple and peaches are fine, as is jarred applesauce. They'd rather not eat vegetables if they come from a can -- even corn. Jarred salsa is fine.

We decided against taking an upright freezer in August. We also emptied our garage fridge/freezer, so all we have out there now is the 8.7 cubic foot manual defrost chest freezer. We still have the refrigerator, so I suppose we could plug it back in and use it.

I saw turkeys at the regional chain earlier this week, but it wasn't a full display like it usually would be. Last time I went to Aldi was more than a month ago (10/10) and I was surprised to see they already had turkeys and hams. We don't want a turkey or ham, so no big deal. I honestly have no idea what I'll be cooking for Thanksgiving. I'm honestly thinking maybe we'll make pizza or tacos.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Channel-Z on November 14, 2020, 06:32:26 PM
Friday morning was busier than usual, but it could also be people buying Thanksgiving-related items. The only re-hoarding I've seen is the paper goods, such as the paper towels, the toilet paper.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: TartanTallulah on November 15, 2020, 12:48:31 AM
I managed to run out of coffee capsules last week. The internet obviously realised, and sent a discount code for a retailer I've used before. I also had paper "spend £X and get £Y off your bill" vouchers for a store I don't normally use that stocks good own brand coffee capsules. I now have 550 capsules. I use two a day and my husband uses one or two a week. We're sorted for a long quarantine.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 15, 2020, 07:13:19 AM
What is a coffee capsule?  My coffee comes from beans.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 15, 2020, 09:50:02 AM
Just got back from curbside pickup at the grocery store. Got my two turkeys and two spiral hams all on sale! Stocked up on the other usual stuff. Store parking lot at 9:20 am was getting full! Glad I got there early, then picked up a few bottles of wine and rushed home! Now, I am going to hunker down for a few weeks!

My two turkey's and one ham went into the new freezer!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 15, 2020, 10:27:18 AM
The parking lot at my neighborhood IGA was pretty full when we walked by at 8 AM, and itís not usually.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 15, 2020, 10:32:24 AM
I would suggest that if any of you plan to get any bargain turkeys, shop early. I have a feeling people are going to wipe everything out with this virus. They may have turkeys, but you might not like the size. I got two that were about 15 lbs. each and just what I wanted. But if I had waited too long the only ones left might have been 20# ones or tiny ones.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on November 15, 2020, 10:51:51 AM
I would suggest that if any of you plan to get any bargain turkeys, shop early. I have a feeling people are going to wipe everything out with this virus. They may have turkeys, but you might not like the size. I got two that were about 15 lbs. each and just what I wanted. But if I had waited too long the only ones left might have been 20# ones or tiny ones.

I was so excited that turkeys were finally on sale again (as expected this time of year, of course).  Yesterday was my normal shopping day - at 8am all they had were 22+ lb turkeys, which was more than I wanted.  They also didnít have any of the sale ground sirloin, or any spinach (??? what ???).  The problem with shopping so early is they arenít always fully stocked.  I popped back in today around 9:30, and got a 15lb turkey - they had the full range of sizes (plus lots of ground beef out, and the spinach back).  Whew.

I considered getting another turkey, but I assume theyíll be on sale again in December, so Iím holding off.  Iím just 1 person, so Iím not so focused on stocking up.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 15, 2020, 11:43:50 AM
NotJen, If you shop at Costco, they have these fantastic cooked turkey breasts vacuum sealed. I bought one about a month ago and it is approaching expiration. The Hub cut it in half and we each had a slice of it and it is OMG so good. It is boneless and a nice big breast. A beautiful hunk of meat! We cut it in half, vac sealed it and will freeze the two hunks for later on. This could be a great option for you! You will find this turkey breast in by the packaged meats like (refrigerated) deli meats I think. Not in the fresh meat area.

I was super excited today too getting my bargain turkeys and ham! Now, I will be on the lookout for Prime Rib Roasts! Sometimes they are on sale for $5.99-$6.99 a lb. I usually buy 4 and then squirrel them away in the freezer. Then we have them every couple of months.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Catbert on November 15, 2020, 12:25:55 PM
What is a coffee capsule?  My coffee comes from beans.

I'm guessing for use in a Keurig or similar machine.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on November 15, 2020, 01:22:55 PM
Just got back from curbside pickup at the grocery store. Got my two turkeys and two spiral hams all on sale! Stocked up on the other usual stuff. Store parking lot at 9:20 am was getting full! Glad I got there early, then picked up a few bottles of wine and rushed home! Now, I am going to hunker down for a few weeks!

My two turkey's and one ham went into the new freezer!

I'm jealous! I just picked up my order and none of the meat was in stock. I didn't go into the store to see if it was just the items that I ordered, but I suspect that the meat section would be pretty bare. I don't normally eat much meat, but I admit to being disappointed, as I had been planning to bbq today. Normally I like bbq tofu, but when I had been looking forward to steak, I expect it to taste like a let down.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 15, 2020, 04:50:02 PM
Sun Hat, so sorry on your bummer grocery experience! Just keep trying. I have been stocking up little by little since March. I have a good amount of things but it took time. We are eating it and replacing as the inventory starts to deplete. They predicted it was going to be really bad this fall and sure enough, it is getting terrible. I just want to stay away from the stores as much as possible. I bring baby wipes saturated with alcohol into the stores and wipe the cart handle, open the freezer doors with the wipes. Get out new wipes when I am back in my car and wipe down my hands. My dog gets groomed every six weeks and after I drop him off, I swing by an IGA store. They are very cautious and take your temp as you enter and squirt hand sanitizer into your hands. I pick up veggies and other things but it is an expensive upscale little store that caters to an upscale clientele. It comes in handy because it is close to my house but not really good to shop there all the time. Limited inventory there. It is a very small store. But, I'd rather play it safe as much as possible! Curbside works for me. I have a friend that is very picky and will not do curbside. She has to pick out her meat and fresh veggies. I am not that fussy. If I get something that is nasty, I will call the store and complain and they will return my money. Most stuff is packaged in plastic bags so, not seeing the problem letting someone shop for me! Wish, when I worked, curbside was available to me! It would have been so wonderful to have an extra hour every week not to shop!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 15, 2020, 05:58:54 PM
Reading what others are writing in this thread, and also checking with the media in terms of Covid cases rising, I'm pretty sure I've decided to plug the garage refrigerator back in. I think we need to go back to the March/April/May strategy of shopping less frequently. I want to have room for the things that last longer, like eggs, carrots, ultra pasteurized milk, etc. I also plan to order 40# of grass-fed ground beef in early December, and don't have freezer space for it currently.

I did a small Aldi order this morning so I could order yogurt for an upset tummy. DH has been wanting sparkling water, so I ordered two packs of their canned plain sparkling water, and my shopper could only find one available. I wonder if it has to do with the aluminum can shortage.

I do prefer to pick out my produce because I'm fussy about it, but I'm making do with what's chosen for me. I just make sure to prep as much of it as I can the day I get it, so I can be aware of soft spots, etc. I also include notes so the shopper knows I want them to check for freshness. It doesn't always work, but it's worth a try.

I think it was here in the MMM forums where I saw the suggestion last year to buy the Kirkland turkey breast for Thanksgiving. It was really good (for turkey). I'm pretty sure we're going to shake things up this year, however. For us, it's not going to feel like Thanksgiving in the same way, so why serve the same foods? I'm leaning heavily toward making pizza.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 16, 2020, 02:45:53 AM
K_in_the_Kitchen, I think you are wise in everything you said. Less trips to the store is my goal. Less exposure to crowds. In reality, there doesn't even have to be crowds. Just one Covid virus hanging around on handles, grocery carts can infect you.
Pizza sounds really good to me for any occasion! Just last week I made a home made dough and made my own pizza. It was a pesto, chicken pizza with mozzarella. I plan to make more pizza's and some calzones.

When I do curbside, there is no way to put in any comments on anything. You choose an item, quantity and that is it. I wish there was, but I am sure it would be too time consuming for them.

Where do you get 40 lbs. of ground meat?

My friend lives in MI and she tells me the stores are limiting things again, here in the north east I am hearing the same.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on November 16, 2020, 07:51:04 AM
Rancho Gordo finally has more beans in stock this morning (they got wiped out of many varieties early in the pandemic), so I've got 9lbs on the way (to get free shipping).  These beans are so good, I don't mind hoarding them, and potentially having to move with some in tow next year.

NotJen, If you shop at Costco, they have these fantastic cooked turkey breasts vacuum sealed.

I think I prefer the whole turkey - I like having a carcass to make stock out of, and plenty of meat to stick in the freezer for various recipes.  Plus my gravy was quite successful last time (and I'm not a gravy person).  I want to cook it up soon, but I'm going to wait to see how Thanksgiving pans out, in case I'm home (current plans are to visit BF's parents, a 5hr drive away, but I'm kind of hoping he changes his mind).


I've also never been in a Costco. (https://cdn-0.emojis.wiki/emoji-pics-lf/apple/face-with-open-mouth-apple.png)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 16, 2020, 10:05:57 AM
K_in_the_Kitchen, I think you are wise in everything you said. Less trips to the store is my goal. Less exposure to crowds. In reality, there doesn't even have to be crowds. Just one Covid virus hanging around on handles, grocery carts can infect you.
Pizza sounds really good to me for any occasion! Just last week I made a home made dough and made my own pizza. It was a pesto, chicken pizza with mozzarella. I plan to make more pizza's and some calzones.

When I do curbside, there is no way to put in any comments on anything. You choose an item, quantity and that is it. I wish there was, but I am sure it would be too time consuming for them.

Where do you get 40 lbs. of ground meat?

My friend lives in MI and she tells me the stores are limiting things again, here in the north east I am hearing the same.

You are so right that the risk is there even if the crowds aren't! Around here unfortunately, the crowds are usually there, making it even riskier. I know we're fighting pandemic fatigue, along with a fair amount of innumeracy. I've heard more than one person say that they didn't get the virus when they shopped in the spring and that it's just as safe as it was then. But of course, with a much higher infection rate, the number of potentially infected people at any place is now higher.

Pesto chicken pizza sounds delicious! Since I'm allergic to tomatoes and to nuts I can't have basic red sauce or pesto (unless I make it nut and seed free), I make a pizza sauce for myself using kalamata olives and olive oil. I usually keep it simple and top it with mozzarella and veggies. I also like to use olive oil as a base for a pizza topped with thinly sliced potatoes along with some prosciutto.

Well, DH has expressed a preference to not have pizza. He suggested steak.

I do curbside with Sprouts. They use Instacart as their platform, but if I go through the Sprouts website it's better for me. Instacart allows the comments/notes. The downside to going through the Sprouts website is not having direct contact with the shopper. Some notes make sense, like if you want greenish-yellow bananas, but a lot of the notes I feel like I shouldn't have to to make. I shouldn't have to tell a shopper to check for cracked eggs or to check freshness dates.

I order my grass-fed ground beef from a small family ranch several hours from my home. The price has gone up to $7.19 per pound, which is just a little higher than it was in April. Buying grass-fed beef and pasture raised pork is one of the things we prefer, even though it's much more expensive. One motivation I had for us to reach FI was to be able to buy the meat I wanted, within reason -- we don't buy grass-fed steak because it's too expensive, and we mostly stick to ground or roasts. I also watch for sales; I just bought 20 grass-fed rump roasts because they were on sale for $4.39 per pound.

I'm still trying to stay prudent in terms of my hoarding stocking up. I think we need another case of salsa, one of applesauce, and a couple of cases of canned peaches, as those are all items we've gone through at a quick pace. My boys have gone though 30+ jars of applesauce (at 46 ounces each) and at least 4 cases of peaches. I'd like more chicken breast, not because I love it but because it's cheap and easy and we can't eat beef all the time. I was also hoping Progresso lentil soup would go on sale, but I don't think they have any incentive to drop it down to 99Ę this year. My oldest takes a can of the lentil soup for lunch when he works.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 16, 2020, 10:48:45 AM
LOTS of stuff out of stock for my Giant Eagle order today, including milk and eggs.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on November 16, 2020, 10:55:40 AM
I would suggest that if any of you plan to get any bargain turkeys, shop early. I have a feeling people are going to wipe everything out with this virus. They may have turkeys, but you might not like the size. I got two that were about 15 lbs. each and just what I wanted. But if I had waited too long the only ones left might have been 20# ones or tiny ones.
I went yesterday and searched high and low for a 12 lb turkey - we don't need a 22 lb turkey, thanks.  Ended up buying the slightly more expensive butterball.  Cannot fit another turkey in our spare freezer, so that's all we've got.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on November 16, 2020, 10:58:57 AM
Yeah, we are probably going to try and go back to the less frequent shopping also...we never manage to go more than a week and a half.  Lately, I've been shopping weekly.  I go early on Sunday morning (7:30 am), and there are rarely more than 6-10 people in the store at that time.  Downside: not everything is stocked then.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: StarBright on November 16, 2020, 12:16:54 PM
LOTS of stuff out of stock for my Giant Eagle order today, including milk and eggs.

The scuzzlebutt  on our town FB page yesterday was that the wait for grocery pick up exceeded three hours and folks were only getting about 40% of their orders. Michigan shut down schools (and maybe restaurants?) on Saturday night though which I think panicked our corner of Ohio.

I picked up Saturday morning and got 95% of my order and didn't have to wait at all.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: FINate on November 16, 2020, 02:39:32 PM
Last month we built up a stash of TP. Nothing crazy, hopefully just about enough to get us though next summer ... that is, if the kids would stop spinning it like the Wheel of Fortune, lol.

Stocked up on a few staples as well, like bulk active dry yeast, pasta, and rice. Though part of this is just normal shopping so we're not frequently running to the store.

Also have 1/2 pasture raised pig and 1/2 grass fed beef on order, so ~300 lbs of meat for the chest freezer. Though this wasn't prompted by COVID, we've been wanting to source better meat for a while, but didn't because of our pending move. We now live in a place with great small scale local meat producers so we decided to go for it. But I'll admit, it's nice to know we'll have a freezer full of meat just in case.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on November 16, 2020, 04:14:22 PM
Did a curbside @ Kroger today no eggs, no turkey, no turkey legs, no hazelnut coffee the majority of everything else was substituted for a different item or brand.

Going to try again for a turkey, eggs and turkey legs later this week. If not I told the wife I guess we will just have thanksgiving sides and some of the rotisserie chicken thighs we put away this summer.

Guess I need to start paying better attention when we are getting low on stuff again let myself slip a bit.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 16, 2020, 04:37:10 PM
I just realized I am out of tampons....from March. There better damn well be tampons at Costco tomorrow morning.

Rant over.

Back to other hoarding.  I had good luck at the grocery store today, but I wasn't buying meat or cleaning products.  DH is mostly plant based, so we've been doing a lot more plant-based purchases.  Every single thing I wanted on the list was there except the Cheese Whiz. 

Why Cheese Whiz? I am doing a charcuterie Xmas house tomorrow.  It will have to be habanero pineapple salsa vegan cream cheese for the glue instead.  DH will be able to eat the walls and door. LOL.  The roof of salami and cheese will be for me with Boursin snow will be for me.  Mushroom snowmen will be for him.  :-)  It's give and take in our house.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 16, 2020, 04:38:52 PM
Yeah, we are probably going to try and go back to the less frequent shopping also...we never manage to go more than a week and a half.  Lately, I've been shopping weekly.  I go early on Sunday morning (7:30 am), and there are rarely more than 6-10 people in the store at that time.  Downside: not everything is stocked then.

We managed every 2 - 3 weeks March - June, but it took a lot of planning plus the chest freezer and garage refrigerator. All we were getting was produce, milk, and eggs. Fresh produce was the hardest part in terms of spreading out the shopping.

Checking Instacart, all my stores show delivery slots available today. I had wanted to do a big Costco stockup in person, so I may try to do that tonight (less busy in evening usually), as my last in-person shop. But I might go ahead and order instead. I'd like everything in place pre-Thanksgiving because I expect a major spike after. We're going to hunker down. I know the kids aren't thrilled because they were hoping for some loosening of rules, but we just can't.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 16, 2020, 04:44:54 PM
Just did a curbside Sunday but also realized I am out of a small list of things. I also want to pick up two more turkeys and two turkey breasts for the freezer. How can I resist when the whole turkeys are 49 cents a lb.? The turkey breasts are $1.29 a lb. that is pretty good too! I have a list of other mundane things to add to the list.

I am doing another curbside pick up tomorrow! OMG! Take my car keys away from me! LOL!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on November 16, 2020, 04:59:46 PM
Yeah, we are probably going to try and go back to the less frequent shopping also...we never manage to go more than a week and a half.  Lately, I've been shopping weekly.  I go early on Sunday morning (7:30 am), and there are rarely more than 6-10 people in the store at that time.  Downside: not everything is stocked then.

We managed every 2 - 3 weeks March - June, but it took a lot of planning plus the chest freezer and garage refrigerator. All we were getting was produce, milk, and eggs. Fresh produce was the hardest part in terms of spreading out the shopping.

Checking Instacart, all my stores show delivery slots available today. I had wanted to do a big Costco stockup in person, so I may try to do that tonight (less busy in evening usually), as my last in-person shop. But I might go ahead and order instead. I'd like everything in place pre-Thanksgiving because I expect a major spike after. We're going to hunker down. I know the kids aren't thrilled because they were hoping for some loosening of rules, but we just can't.
The hardest thing for us is always milk and eggs, because we get produce delivery from 2 places each week.  I found that I'd go to the store for milk - we'd need 2 gallons for 2 weeks, but all the milk they had would expire before 2 weeks were up, and we don't have room to freeze it.  The exception is Costco.  So, I'm okay with every 10 days, TBH.

I sort of stocked up on GF pasta this weekend (6 boxes), and got some spare TP.  But 6 boxes of pasta is only 6 weeks.  So I will buy some more this weekend.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 17, 2020, 03:22:32 AM
Try these boxed milks:

https://www.boxed.com/product/4217/horizon-organic-lowfat-milk-18-x-8-oz.-plain

https://www.amazon.com/parmalat-milk/s?k=parmalat+milk

I use the Horizion milk and for us, it is really good! We don't use much milk so this comes in very handy to use in recipes, mashed potatoes. It would be good to use for cereal because the container has 8 ounces and basically no waste.

You might be able to buy fresh milk plus stretch it by using the boxed milk for cooking, cereal.

You can also buy the 32 oz size of other brands. It is shelf stable for a long time.

Check your area to see if there is a farm where you can stop by and buy their eggs. You might find a great resource and help the farmers out too.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SailingOnASmallSailboat on November 17, 2020, 05:54:12 AM
I just realized I am out of tampons....from March. There better damn well be tampons at Costco tomorrow morning.

Rant over.

Back to other hoarding.  I had good luck at the grocery store today, but I wasn't buying meat or cleaning products.  DH is mostly plant based, so we've been doing a lot more plant-based purchases.  Every single thing I wanted on the list was there except the Cheese Whiz. 

Why Cheese Whiz? I am doing a charcuterie Xmas house tomorrow.  It will have to be habanero pineapple salsa vegan cream cheese for the glue instead.  DH will be able to eat the walls and door. LOL.  The roof of salami and cheese will be for me with Boursin snow will be for me.  Mushroom snowmen will be for him.  :-)  It's give and take in our house.

Not meaning to hijack a thread here, but if you're not familiar with a Diva Cup (there are lots of brands) it's a life changer. I wish I'd known about them 35 years ago.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 17, 2020, 06:25:43 AM
I just realized I am out of tampons....from March. There better damn well be tampons at Costco tomorrow morning.

Rant over.

Back to other hoarding.  I had good luck at the grocery store today, but I wasn't buying meat or cleaning products.  DH is mostly plant based, so we've been doing a lot more plant-based purchases.  Every single thing I wanted on the list was there except the Cheese Whiz. 

Why Cheese Whiz? I am doing a charcuterie Xmas house tomorrow.  It will have to be habanero pineapple salsa vegan cream cheese for the glue instead.  DH will be able to eat the walls and door. LOL.  The roof of salami and cheese will be for me with Boursin snow will be for me.  Mushroom snowmen will be for him.  :-)  It's give and take in our house.

Not meaning to hijack a thread here, but if you're not familiar with a Diva Cup (there are lots of brands) it's a life changer. I wish I'd known about them 35 years ago.
I can't get over the ugh factor.  I know it's the more responsible solution. It's probably also a good pandemic idea.  I'm kind of hoping this is the last box of tampons I will every need....Old age and all!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: honeybbq on November 17, 2020, 09:57:36 AM
I just bought 4 new board games (on sale) from the Amazon sale.

With us moving back to lockdown here in WA, and the crappy rainy weather, I feel like we are going to go through alllll of these quickly.

We have lots of board games already... but gotta keep the kids interested/entertained. At least it's quality family time, right?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on November 17, 2020, 10:19:35 AM
@FINate, if the kids are using too much TP, try flattening the roll before you put it into the dispenser.  It rolls less easily that way.

Case numbers are skyrocketing here, (and we're back into lockdown), so I have stocked up a bit more in my smaller town (there are empty spots on shelves again) and debating about going to Costco in the nearby big city, but getting more and more hesitant about that.  I had read not long ago that in one of their stores, there were very poor Covid compliance measures, so I don't know know that I want to take the chance.  Plus, I don't want to stand outside in a long line at -5C.  Might have to order the dog her favorite bones for delivery.  All else can be substituted.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 17, 2020, 10:23:39 AM
I think I won't actually go inside a store again until I've got my shots, so I'm extremely happy about my "hoarding".

The little neighborhood bar and grill across the street from me is closed today because the employees are in quarantine. Ask me how shocked I am...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 17, 2020, 10:49:21 AM

The hardest thing for us is always milk and eggs, because we get produce delivery from 2 places each week.  I found that I'd go to the store for milk - we'd need 2 gallons for 2 weeks, but all the milk they had would expire before 2 weeks were up, and we don't have room to freeze it.  The exception is Costco.  So, I'm okay with every 10 days, TBH.

I sort of stocked up on GF pasta this weekend (6 boxes), and got some spare TP.  But 6 boxes of pasta is only 6 weeks.  So I will buy some more this weekend.

I've found that eggs last at least a month past the sell by date -- I used to check them with floating, but since then I read that if an egg is bad we'll smell it, so with old eggs I break them one at a a time and sniff for freshness.

For milk, we started buying ultra pasteurized milk during the pandemic. I was freezing a gallon of pasteurized milk here and there, but it takes up so much space. I have room in the garage fridge for enough pasteurized milk to last a month, about 3 gallons stored as 6 ultra pasteurized half gallons.

Thanks for mentioning the pasta! We could use more of the Tinkyada/Pasta Joy white rice spaghetti. The health food store that carries it is rarely busy, as well. But there are no online or curbside orders. Still, it should be safe to do a quick stop in for the rice spaghetti and bacon. We'd given up bacon, but started eating liver regularly and bacon makes it so much better.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: FINate on November 17, 2020, 11:00:05 AM
@FINate, if the kids are using too much TP, try flattening the roll before you put it into the dispenser.  It rolls less easily that way.

Good idea. Thanks!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Imma on November 17, 2020, 11:00:57 AM

The hardest thing for us is always milk and eggs, because we get produce delivery from 2 places each week.  I found that I'd go to the store for milk - we'd need 2 gallons for 2 weeks, but all the milk they had would expire before 2 weeks were up, and we don't have room to freeze it.  The exception is Costco.  So, I'm okay with every 10 days, TBH.

I sort of stocked up on GF pasta this weekend (6 boxes), and got some spare TP.  But 6 boxes of pasta is only 6 weeks.  So I will buy some more this weekend.

I've found that eggs last at least a month past the sell by date -- I used to check them with floating, but since then I read that if an egg is bad we'll smell it, so with old eggs I break them one at a a time and sniff for freshness.

You clearly have never smelled a rotten egg before!  Trust me, the floating method is better. Rotten eggs have a disgusting smell and it will linger for a long, long time.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 17, 2020, 11:36:02 AM
Yeah, you wonít have to sniff to see if an egg is bad. LOL

I havenít had a bad egg in years and years though.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on November 17, 2020, 12:43:12 PM
It's more that we go through so many eggs, it's hard to be able to fit them in the fridge.  For the amount of produce in our fridge each week...we just are space limited.  I could go back to eating oatmeal, but I'm not the biggest egg eater.  I eat one a day.  I found myself counting them this morning...if the kids don't eat eggs, we'll make it until Sunday.  For awhile, I'd added eggs to my weekly Thursday produce box (local farmer's eggs).  But then after COVID, so many people added them to their weekly subscription that they were permanently sold out.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 17, 2020, 12:56:28 PM
Just did another curbside pick up today. Got two more bargain turkeys and 5 chuck roasts on sale. Using one chuck roast for dinner tonight and next week a turkey. I am turkied out now. They do take up a ton of room in the freezer. But I will have turkeys every 3-4 months to use up this stash and next year start over again when Thanksgiving rolls around again. I always use the Reynolds turkey cooking bags and have perfect results every time.

Parking lots were pretty full and I went out around 9:30 am. It is a Tuesday! Where did all those people come from? Are people stocking up for the pandemic or for Thanksgiving?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Imma on November 17, 2020, 01:08:15 PM
It's more that we go through so many eggs, it's hard to be able to fit them in the fridge.  For the amount of produce in our fridge each week...we just are space limited.  I could go back to eating oatmeal, but I'm not the biggest egg eater.  I eat one a day.  I found myself counting them this morning...if the kids don't eat eggs, we'll make it until Sunday.  For awhile, I'd added eggs to my weekly Thursday produce box (local farmer's eggs).  But then after COVID, so many people added them to their weekly subscription that they were permanently sold out.

You don't have to keep eggs in the fridge. They will just last longer if you do, but it seems that's not the issue. You could put half of the eggs you buy in the fridge and keep the ones you're going to eat first in the cupboard.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on November 17, 2020, 01:12:10 PM
Just did another curbside pick up today. Got two more bargain turkeys and 5 chuck roasts on sale. Using one chuck roast for dinner tonight and next week a turkey. I am turkied out now. They do take up a ton of room in the freezer. But I will have turkeys every 3-4 months to use up this stash and next year start over again when Thanksgiving rolls around again. I always use the Reynolds turkey cooking bags and have perfect results every time.

Parking lots were pretty full and I went out around 9:30 am. It is a Tuesday! Where did all those people come from? Are people stocking up for the pandemic or for Thanksgiving?

Both. My grocery shopping time is Friday morning and now I'm hoping I can get a turkey at all.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: jrhampt on November 17, 2020, 01:12:40 PM
You do actually have to refrigerate eggs in the US, I believe.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Imma on November 17, 2020, 01:45:14 PM
You do actually have to refrigerate eggs in the US, I believe.

Huh, what makes American eggs different than other eggs? Maybe there are laws that demand eggs are refrigerated while in transport / in the shop? (That's not the case in my country BTW). But you don't have other chickens than we do, right?

Source: grew up on a farm. Any given moment we had at least 100 eggs on the shelf (in the coolest place in the house). We wrote the laying date on the egg. In my country the legal expery date for uncooled eggs is 28 days after laying. If you cool them, they last longer. During hot summers they don't last that long.

I usually put eggs in the fridge because it's a convenient place but whenever the fridge is full it's the first thing I take out.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 17, 2020, 01:56:54 PM
You do actually have to refrigerate eggs in the US, I believe.

Huh, what makes American eggs different than other eggs? Maybe there are laws that demand eggs are refrigerated while in transport / in the shop? (That's not the case in my country BTW). But you don't have other chickens than we do, right?

Source: grew up on a farm. Any given moment we had at least 100 eggs on the shelf (in the coolest place in the house). We wrote the laying date on the egg. In my country the legal expery date for uncooled eggs is 28 days after laying. If you cool them, they last longer. During hot summers they don't last that long.

I usually put eggs in the fridge because it's a convenient place but whenever the fridge is full it's the first thing I take out.

They actually are different.

Eggs in the US and Canada are washed with chemicals to prevent salmonella . . . but this washing leaves the egg shell somewhat pourous which allows bacteria to enter the egg if any touches the shell after teh washing.  Other countries don't do this, so it's more difficult for bacteria to enter the egg but they have a marginally higher chance of having salmonella on the outside of the egg.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: ChickenStash on November 17, 2020, 02:00:54 PM
You do actually have to refrigerate eggs in the US, I believe.

Huh, what makes American eggs different than other eggs? Maybe there are laws that demand eggs are refrigerated while in transport / in the shop? (That's not the case in my country BTW). But you don't have other chickens than we do, right?

Source: grew up on a farm. Any given moment we had at least 100 eggs on the shelf (in the coolest place in the house). We wrote the laying date on the egg. In my country the legal expery date for uncooled eggs is 28 days after laying. If you cool them, they last longer. During hot summers they don't last that long.

I usually put eggs in the fridge because it's a convenient place but whenever the fridge is full it's the first thing I take out.

https://www.businessinsider.com/why-europeans-dont-refrigerate-their-eggs-2018-4

Short answer: Different processing methods. In the US, chickens are not required to be vaccinated for salmonella so they wash the eggs, instead, which removes the cuticle that would prevent nasties from growing at room temp. Europeans tend to vaccinate for salmonella and leave the cuticle on to prevent room temp bacterial growths. The cuticle, though, causes issues when refrigerating with condensation so it isn't recommended.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Imma on November 17, 2020, 03:17:41 PM
This is very good to know @ChickenStash and @GuitarStv . I had no idea. Yes, chickens are generally vaccinated against salmonella in the EU. It's been standard practice for as long as I can remember. And I'm pretty sure washing eggs with anything is not legal because it makes the egg porous.

So, don't put American eggs outside of the fridge!!!  Unless they come from your own or your neighbour's backyard.

Getting salmonella from eggs is extremely rare though. And I say this as someone who was hospitalized with a salmonella infection for a week after my idiot ex cut chicken and salad on the same cutting board - I take salmonella very seriously. But salmonella is only present on less than 0,5% of eggs here and you can only get a salmonella infection from an egg when the bacteria is transferred from the outside of the egg to the egg itself, and then the egg is eaten raw. If you want to be on the safe side, put raw eggs in 60C water for a few minutes to kill off salmonella. The egg itself will still be raw.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 17, 2020, 05:14:30 PM
You clearly have never smelled a rotten egg before!  Trust me, the floating method is better. Rotten eggs have a disgusting smell and it will linger for a long, long time.

Actually, I have.  The reason I do it this way is because sometimes eggs float and are still good.  Indeed, I've never had a month old floating egg actually be rotten. Or one a month past the sell by date, which may have been in my house for 6 - 8 weeks.  Honestly, I don't bother to test them for "floatiness" until they're at least a month past the sell by date. Not that eggs are usually in the house that long, but when Aldi puts them on sale at 49Ę a dozen (pre-pandemic, of course) I take the whole family with me and we each buy the limit (usually 4 dozen).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 17, 2020, 05:42:30 PM
Eldest and I went to Costco this afternoon.  The parking lot was crazy, but it wasn't terrible inside.  We're surmising that most people aren't bringing an entire group of people with them.  There wasn't a line to get in, but the person checking memberships cards was using a clicker to keep track of occupancy.

We grabbed two carts and did a stock up.  We got 2 bags of dog food even though we have 1 unopened bag already.  I'm hoping with the much cooler temperatures the big dog won't get fussy about old food.  We bought 2 jugs of All Free and Clear because it's what we use and it was on sale (limit was 2).  We bought some veggies for the week, but they were out of both the organic and artisan bags of romaine.  They were out of baking potatoes (I didn't need them).  No eggplant.  Broccoli looked terrible.  Other than buying pears, we avoided the fruit area since we didn't need any.  We bought two packages of the b/s chicken breasts, two bags of frozen grass-fed beef patties, a bag of frozen wild salmon filets, and canned tuna.  Bought 10 dozen eggs, 3 gallons of almond milk (in the half gallon cartons), 3 gallons of ultra pasteurized whole milk (again, in the half gallon cartons).  We bought salted butter, and unsalted butter to make ghee.  6 containers of Chobani yogurt because it was on sale for $2.99.  Also got olive oil, ketchup, honey, coffee, salt, vanilla extract (price keeps dropping), kalamata olives, corn tortillas, tortilla chips, a jug of Dawn, and deodorant for the men.

At the door Costco indicated they were out of toilet tissue and paper towels, disinfecting wipes, vinegar (which I wanted because we clean the coffee maker with it), bleach, masks, sanitizer, and a few other things.  They were low on stock of chicken, but that may have been in part because they had a case devoted to turkeys.  I only saw organic turkeys, not regular.  From a distance, the beef and pork area looked well stocked, but I don't know if they had all cuts.  Bakery area looked full of all sorts of breads and desserts.

I don't think of it as hoarding, but I do now have 5 unopened jugs of laundry detergent, and 4 of Dawn.

Tomorrow I'm going to the regional grocery chain for two standing rib roasts (Thanksgiving and Christmas -- my pizza idea was rejected), and then that's it, we're planning to stay out of the stores until we're vaccinated.  We'll use Instacart for pickup at Sprouts, and Instacart for delivery from other stores.  I want to go to Aldi to stock up on a few things, but we'll probably place that as an order since the markup at Aldi is low.  Aldi is the one store during this pandemic where I've consistently seen poor Covid measure compliance.  They stopped disinfecting carts early on and rarely have wipes to do it yourself, they don't enforce wearing masks, and they continue to give you the cart handled by the previous customer without disinfecting it.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 17, 2020, 07:07:02 PM
I have a minimum spend for welcome reward bonus on a new card. I think I might stuck up on shelf stable items to do so. Accepting all ideas, if you have them!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 17, 2020, 07:48:54 PM
I have a minimum spend for welcome reward bonus on a new cx. I think I might stuck up on shelf stable items to do so. Accepting all ideas, if you have them!

What kinds of foods do you eat?  I learned from the first round of lockdowns that a) shortages never got so desperate that I couldn't get produce, eggs, and milk (although I had to pay more), and b) my family really dislikes canned vegetables.  So this time around I haven't bought any canned vegetables at all.  I bought a lot of sugar when it was hard to get, then found we used almost none of it.  Now that it's cold my son will oatmeal and thus use more brown sugar, but I donated the powdered sugar figuring maybe a family could use it for holiday baking.  I bought far too many old fashioned oats and donated those to the food bank months ago.

The shelf stable items I plan to stock up/already stocked up on this time around are peanut butter, salsa, applesauce, canned peaches, rice, pinto beans, olive oil, honey, coffee, tuna, Honest Earth mashed potatoes, and salt.  I may end up needing quick oats but my son says he has about 75% of a 5 gallon bucket left.  I'd like to stock up on Progresso lentil soup for my son if I can find a good price.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 17, 2020, 08:00:16 PM
Is anyone thinking ahead to holiday shortages?  Today at Costco I bought the big tin of Walker's shortbread for us to have during the 12 days of Christmas, and a bag of caramels for stockings (I have so many food allergies I jump when I find something I can have).

I'd already been thinking I should buy stocking candy now, and any ingredients needed for fudge.  We keep our holiday treats simple -- frosted cut out sugar cookies for Christmas Eve night and Christmas Day, gluten free vegan pumpkin pie for my sons, homemade fantasy fudge, stocking candy (just a few things), candy canes from a local candy maker, the shortbread cookies to have with tea or cocoa throughout the 12 days, and a King's cake on Epiphany (Rosca de Reyes).

For Christmas supper, I'll be buying a standing rib roast this week and freezing it.  If I can get fresh rosemary I will -- maybe I can just get a plant and keep it alive until I need it.  I already have pumpkin and the gluten free pie crusts.  I need marshmallow fluff for the fudge, but have the evaporated milk.  I have everything for the cookies.

I definitely need to get the stocking candy, and soon.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 18, 2020, 02:26:35 AM
K_in_the_kitchen, How much per lb. are you seeing the rib roasts costing? I have not seen any advertised yet. I did a curbside but then popped into another store for about 10 minutes but did not see any rib roasts displayed.

Over the last few months, as far as shelf stable things, I stocked up on various pasta's and jarred sauces. I had multiple jars break when I ordered them from Walmart or Target and had a major disaster thru Amazon. So, now that I do curb service, I will order 6 or 8 jars at a time and no breakage. Glass jars are totally bad news when ordering on line. I do not get why they don't take any caution on packing glass jars safely. I have had a box full of jars with little padding. The jars all smash into each other and half of them break. I have also ordered canned things and that is pretty much a horror show too. The cans are packed the same way and smash into each other. Then I get ugly dented cans that look like they were dug out of a bombed out grocery store.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: rantk81 on November 18, 2020, 06:38:27 AM
I'm soooo over this pandemic shopping "experience".

I ordered TP a couple days ago... now I get a notification that it is "back ordered" with a mid December estimated delivery date.  Paper towels are out of stock.  I haven't been able to buy lysol concentrate since January.  I usually buy one bottle of rubbing alcohol about once every 5 years, for minor cleaning of electronics.  Haven't been able to get that either.

who would have thought that a respiratory virus would cause people to have to shit their brains out repeatedly, to the tune of needing to clear the stores of toilet paper for an entire year.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 18, 2020, 06:44:19 AM
We eat meat quite lightly, and rarely eat pastas or regular bread. I already buy our rice, beans, oats in bulk. I recently bought a triple amount of TVP than we usually buy. I guess all that leaves is canned fruits, canned tomato products, spices/condiments, shelf stable milk, maybe some extra raisins.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Tigerpine on November 18, 2020, 07:39:49 AM
https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/reviewedcom/2020/11/17/where-buy-toilet-paper-still-stock-amazon-walmart-and-more/6329228002/

Apparently the great TP run of 2020 has begun again in places.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 18, 2020, 07:40:56 AM
I'm soooo over this pandemic shopping "experience".

I ordered TP a couple days ago... now I get a notification that it is "back ordered" with a mid December estimated delivery date.  Paper towels are out of stock.  I haven't been able to buy lysol concentrate since January.  I usually buy one bottle of rubbing alcohol about once every 5 years, for minor cleaning of electronics.  Haven't been able to get that either.

who would have thought that a respiratory virus would cause people to have to shit their brains out repeatedly, to the tune of needing to clear the stores of toilet paper for an entire year.

You made me laugh but none of this is funny! I went to the Walmart website and see only one brand that they will ship. All the others you have to do a pick up. I also checked Costco and toilet paper has limited choices and none of their brand of paper towels. Here we go again!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 18, 2020, 08:43:47 AM
I think people had gotten back to buying tp in smaller quantities and now the are stocking up because who wants to go into the stores for the next weeks/months. Not me, for sure.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Khaetra on November 18, 2020, 09:04:04 AM
https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/reviewedcom/2020/11/17/where-buy-toilet-paper-still-stock-amazon-walmart-and-more/6329228002/

Apparently the great TP run of 2020 has begun again in places.

I had to make a run to Walmart and the entire aisle of paper products was bare.  No tp/paper towels/kleenex/napkins.  I didn't make it to the cleaning supplies but the shelf that usually has bleach was empty as well.  I have plenty of everything (I restocked early) but it does seem we're in for more shortages.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on November 18, 2020, 09:40:53 AM
@K_in_the_kitchen, you make me want to weep with your egg prices.  Here in Canada, I pay 3.29 for a dozen/8.50 for 30, and they are never on sale.  I'm curious what your Costco vanilla costs.  The last time I looked here, a few months ago, it was 30 some dollars for whatever the size was, maybe 1/2 litre.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 18, 2020, 09:58:36 AM
I just bought 2 dozen jumbo eggs and they were $1.69 a dozen. A few week earlier, I bought 3 dozen Jumbo eggs at another store and they were $1.79 a dozen. The expiration dates vary on all the cartons so I will use the ones to expire earliest first and so on. Some are good till January. There are all different prices of eggs in the stores depending on name brands. These are regular grocery stores, not big box stores.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 18, 2020, 10:05:51 AM
@K_in_the_kitchen, you make me want to weep with your egg prices.  Here in Canada, I pay 3.29 for a dozen/8.50 for 30, and they are never on sale.  I'm curious what your Costco vanilla costs.  The last time I looked here, a few months ago, it was 30 some dollars for whatever the size was, maybe 1/2 litre.

That looks pretty typical for Ontario egg prices too (not sure where in Canada you are).  Sometimes eggs are on sale, it is almost always the store brand. And almost never extra large or double yolk.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 18, 2020, 10:19:18 AM
K_in_the_kitchen, How much per lb. are you seeing the rib roasts costing? I have not seen any advertised yet. I did a curbside but then popped into another store for about 10 minutes but did not see any rib roasts displayed.

Over the last few months, as far as shelf stable things, I stocked up on various pasta's and jarred sauces. I had multiple jars break when I ordered them from Walmart or Target and had a major disaster thru Amazon. So, now that I do curb service, I will order 6 or 8 jars at a time and no breakage. Glass jars are totally bad news when ordering on line. I do not get why they don't take any caution on packing glass jars safely. I have had a box full of jars with little padding. The jars all smash into each other and half of them break. I have also ordered canned things and that is pretty much a horror show too. The cans are packed the same way and smash into each other. Then I get ugly dented cans that look like they were dug out of a bombed out grocery store.

They went on sale today for $4.99 per pound for choice grade.  I'v never bought one before, but my dad says it's the lowest price I'm likely to see.  He's been making one each Christmas for the past 13 years (before that it was turkey and we all prefer the switch to the beef roast).

I've had the same experience ordering food in jars and cans online.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 18, 2020, 10:28:24 AM
@K_in_the_kitchen, you make me want to weep with your egg prices.  Here in Canada, I pay 3.29 for a dozen/8.50 for 30, and they are never on sale.  I'm curious what your Costco vanilla costs.  The last time I looked here, a few months ago, it was 30 some dollars for whatever the size was, maybe 1/2 litre.

For the 10 dozen eggs at Costco I paid $1.68 USD per dozen.  I haven't seen 49Ę per dozen eggs since 2018, I think, although last year Aldi had eggs at 59Ę per dozen a couple of times.

The vanilla extract was $21.99 USD for 16 ounces.  A year ago it was $34.99, then we saw it drop to $29.99, and then $24.99 this summer.  I was telling my son that it was $6.99 and $8.99 5- 6 years ago.  In 2012 I paid $22.42 for half a pound of Madagascar bourbon vanilla beans.  Current price on those is $167, but a year ago it was over $200 for 1/4 pound.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 18, 2020, 10:59:16 AM
K_in_the_kitchen, How much per lb. are you seeing the rib roasts costing? I have not seen any advertised yet. I did a curbside but then popped into another store for about 10 minutes but did not see any rib roasts displayed.

Over the last few months, as far as shelf stable things, I stocked up on various pasta's and jarred sauces. I had multiple jars break when I ordered them from Walmart or Target and had a major disaster thru Amazon. So, now that I do curb service, I will order 6 or 8 jars at a time and no breakage. Glass jars are totally bad news when ordering on line. I do not get why they don't take any caution on packing glass jars safely. I have had a box full of jars with little padding. The jars all smash into each other and half of them break. I have also ordered canned things and that is pretty much a horror show too. The cans are packed the same way and smash into each other. Then I get ugly dented cans that look like they were dug out of a bombed out grocery store.

They went on sale today for $4.99 per pound for choice grade.  I'v never bought one before, but my dad says it's the lowest price I'm likely to see.  He's been making one each Christmas for the past 13 years (before that it was turkey and we all prefer the switch to the beef roast).

I've had the same experience ordering food in jars and cans online.

Yes, $4.99 is the lowest price and is fantastic! You should pick up a few for the freezer! I am hoping for $5.99 or $6.99 a lb. If I find $4.99 I will do cartwheels!

Here is the recipe I use and it is a fool proof recipe every time and no matter what size roast I have it seems to work the same. I don't use the seasoning in the recipe. My Hub mixes up a coffee rub, lots of garlic and ties fresh rosemary to it. The cooking method is awesome!

https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a18012/paula-deens-famous-foolproof-rib-roast-recipe/
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Catbert on November 18, 2020, 11:52:02 AM
Costco trip this morning.  This particular Costco recently started opening at 9:00 rather than 10:00 (not just for seniors).  I think people haven't figured this out so...no line to get in.  Easy parking.  Store not toocrowded.  Short line at checkout.  I didn't need any TP, papertowels or wipes so I don't know if they were in stock.  I was able to get yeast which I haven't seen there since the start of the pandemic. 

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Queen Frugal on November 18, 2020, 12:19:02 PM
I did my grocery shopping today and the store seemed completely normal. Plenty of turkeys. Plenty of toilet paper. Plenty of everything. Our local hospital was featured in the paper today and they are planning on a 500% increase in hospitalizations between now and 12/1 - and they are already at 80% capacity. Cases are skyrocketing. But panic buying is not happening so far.

Since moving into a house with more storage space, and since living through the first round of panic buying, I settled on stocking up on 3 months worth of nonperishable staples that I normally use. I'm set if things get nasty - for 3 months anyway. Meanwhile, I'm planning on decreasing my weekly shopping trip to bi-weekly shopping until it feels safer. I'll miss out on some fresh fruits and veggies but I figure in the short run it's better for my health than catching COVID.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MudPuppy on November 18, 2020, 12:37:12 PM
Might not even miss too much! When Iím doing biweekly, I eat the quick spoil things like lettuce and banana the first week and plan for things like carrots, cabbage, apples, spaghetti squash that last longer the second week.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 18, 2020, 12:56:42 PM
Carrots and cabbage seem a wise investment. I just found a cabbage steak recipe that you roast in the oven and brush it with olive oil salt, pepper, garlic. Roast in 400F oven for 20 minutes then turn and cook for another 20 minutes. I also made a nice chopped cabbage, onion, tomato casserole type thing cooked in a skillet and served with parmesan cheese. Another recipe with maple carrots roasted in the oven. Toss the cut carrot sticks in olive oil, salt, maple syrup, cayenne pepper. Roast in oven 400F around 20 minutes. Carrots and cabbage last a long time in the fridge as MudPuppy said. Good idea on eating fragile veggies first then eat the hardier veggies 2nd week.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 18, 2020, 01:03:13 PM

Yes, $4.99 is the lowest price and is fantastic! You should pick up a few for the freezer! I am hoping for $5.99 or $6.99 a lb. If I find $4.99 I will do cartwheels!

Here is the recipe I use and it is a fool proof recipe every time and no matter what size roast I have it seems to work the same. I don't use the seasoning in the recipe. My Hub mixes up a coffee rub, lots of garlic and ties fresh rosemary to it. The cooking method is awesome!

https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a18012/paula-deens-famous-foolproof-rib-roast-recipe/

Thanks for the recipe/cooking directions!  They look similar to what my dad gave me.

I was able to get 4 roasts in the 6 - 9# range.  Limit was supposed to be 25#, but I know from experience they are more about the spirit of the guidelines than any absolute rule.  If I'd tried to buy 8 5# roasts, they might have said something.  I think I ended up with 28# total.

I also bought 3 pork butt roasts because they were 99Ę/#, which is the lowest I've seen in more than a year.  Sometimes we buy pastured pork, but in pandemic times I take what I can get, when I can get it (except for ground beef).  Once everything is in the freezer I'll see how much room I have left -- I may have to wait to make the ground beef order.

As for the store, they were stocked on most things except toiler paper, paper towels, disinfecting wipes, hand sanitizer, and Lysol.  What small amount of toilet paper and paper towels they had were limited to one per person.  They did have bleach.  I looked at the turkeys and didn't see anything smaller than 19#.  I bought the last on sale package of tri-tip -- I only wanted one for today.  It's a small one but fine for us.  They did have b/s chicken breast for 99Ę/#, which again is the lowest I've seen in more than a year, but I didn't buy any because I don't think I have room -- I have about 30# out in the freezer.  But I'll reconsider once I have the roasts frozen, because we can eat chicken just as easily as we can eat beef.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 18, 2020, 01:06:02 PM
Carrots and cabbage seem a wise investment. I just found a cabbage steak recipe that you roast in the oven and brush it with olive oil salt, pepper, garlic. Roast in 400F oven for 20 minutes then turn and cook for another 20 minutes. I also made a nice chopped cabbage, onion, tomato casserole type thing cooked in a skillet and served with parmesan cheese. Another recipe with maple carrots roasted in the oven. Toss the cut carrot sticks in olive oil, salt, maple syrup, cayenne pepper. Roast in oven 400F around 20 minutes. Carrots and cabbage last a long time in the fridge as MudPuppy said. Good idea on eating fragile veggies first then eat the hardier veggies 2nd week.

The cabbage steak sounds yummy!

I also find that cabbage and carrots last a long time, and even broccoli does, especially if I prep it first and store it with paper towels to absorb any lingering moisture.  If we find really fresh romaine hearts they can last two weeks as well.  Overall most of my produce lasts longer if I prep it and store it well.  I also buy some produce purposely underripe, like pears and avocados, so they are good the second week.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 18, 2020, 01:22:02 PM
K_in_the_kitchen, what part of the country are you in? I am on the east coast. I just looked at the store flyer for one store that is effective tomorrow and I see Rib Roasts at $7.99 a lb. There are a few more stores in my area and sales start tomorrow. I will have to see what their prices are.  You really got yourself some bargains and are very well stocked up! Good for you!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 18, 2020, 02:27:13 PM
K_in_the_kitchen, what part of the country are you in? I am on the east coast. I just looked at the store flyer for one store that is effective tomorrow and I see Rib Roasts at $7.99 a lb. There are a few more stores in my area and sales start tomorrow. I will have to see what their prices are.  You really got yourself some bargains and are very well stocked up! Good for you!

I'm on the west coast.  I was surprised by the good meat prices all around at this store, since usually they only have one really great sale item.  But they had the standing ribeye roasts, the pork butt, the b/s chicken breasts, Butterball turkeys at 99Ę/# and Jennie-O turkeys at 49Ę/# -- all were advertised as lowest prices of the year.  Another lowest price of the year was wild caught lobster tails at $6.99 each (5 oz.), which is good for our side of the country.  Flap meat at $3.99/#, unseasoned or marinated, is also listed at lowest price of the year, but it has been that price several times this year.  Not false advertising, but not as uncommon as the other prices.  Even the breakfast sausage links my kid likes were at their lowest in a very long time, at 99Ę for the 8 oz. package.  I didn't buy those, since he's old enough to have to buy his own treat foods and the rest of us don't eat them.

I have room to freeze more meat, so I have decide a) if I want to, and b) what to get.  The b/s chicken breast @ 99Ę/# is probably a no-brainer.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on November 18, 2020, 03:45:48 PM
@K_in_the_kitchen, you make me want to weep with your egg prices.  Here in Canada, I pay 3.29 for a dozen/8.50 for 30, and they are never on sale.  I'm curious what your Costco vanilla costs.  The last time I looked here, a few months ago, it was 30 some dollars for whatever the size was, maybe 1/2 litre.

For the 10 dozen eggs at Costco I paid $1.68 USD per dozen.  I haven't seen 49Ę per dozen eggs since 2018, I think, although last year Aldi had eggs at 59Ę per dozen a couple of times.

The vanilla extract was $21.99 USD for 16 ounces.  A year ago it was $34.99, then we saw it drop to $29.99, and then $24.99 this summer.  I was telling my son that it was $6.99 and $8.99 5- 6 years ago.  In 2012 I paid $22.42 for half a pound of Madagascar bourbon vanilla beans.  Current price on those is $167, but a year ago it was over $200 for 1/4 pound.

I remember the 8.99 vanilla.  It lasted for years, then when I next needed it and saw the $30 price, my eyes almost popped out of my head.  Now I just use Mexican blend; itís good enough.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Tris Prior on November 18, 2020, 03:55:24 PM
I'm soooo over this pandemic shopping "experience".

I ordered TP a couple days ago... now I get a notification that it is "back ordered" with a mid December estimated delivery date.  Paper towels are out of stock. 

I'm in Chicago too and was able to order a 24-pack of TP and a 6-pack of paper towels from Target. I was pretty surprised that they had it!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 18, 2020, 04:53:42 PM
Vanilla seems to be something that depends on the crops. Years ago, when I worked in R&D, we used a certain vanilla flavor in a food product and the source was from Madagascar. There were some devastating storm damage to the crops so what was left was primo and the price skyrocketed. Food manufacturers try to use the best ingredients but the cheapest to keep product prices low. We scrambled for about a month or so to try to find a replacement that was similar to the flavor we were using.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: geekette on November 18, 2020, 05:17:25 PM
@K_in_the_kitchen, you make me want to weep with your egg prices.  Here in Canada, I pay 3.29 for a dozen/8.50 for 30, and they are never on sale. 
For the 10 dozen eggs at Costco I paid $1.68 USD per dozen.  I haven't seen 49Ę per dozen eggs since 2018, I think, although last year Aldi had eggs at 59Ę per dozen a couple of times.
I just checked our local Wally World - eggs are .77 for 18.  That's kinda nuts. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 18, 2020, 06:19:44 PM
Vanilla seems to be something that depends on the crops. Years ago, when I worked in R&D, we used a certain vanilla flavor in a food product and the source was from Madagascar. There were some devastating storm damage to the crops so what was left was primo and the price skyrocketed. Food manufacturers try to use the best ingredients but the cheapest to keep product prices low. We scrambled for about a month or so to try to find a replacement that was similar to the flavor we were using.

I read awhile ago that it was a combination of crops destroyed by storms and manufacturers switching from artificial vanilla to real vanilla because of consumer demand.  Plus the high demand had growers picking beans unripe to avoid theft, and I guess those beans then didn't reach high quality.  I think the crop damage was the most important factor, but I also don't see prices going back to where they were before because of consumer demand.

For decades, we would drive to apple country and buy heirloom varieties dirt cheap.  Our favorite was Arkansas Blacks, and each year we'd head up around Halloween and buy them for $15-$20 a bushel.  But heirlooms got popular, some of the apple sheds were profiled in the newspaper and on TV news, and next thing we knew they were selling Arkansas Blacks for $4 per pound minimum.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 18, 2020, 08:59:26 PM
I went to Aldi tonight, which should be my final foray into groceries stores until I'm vaccinated.  It was busy, but since I almost never go in the evening, I would assume it was pretty normal for 5:30 p.m.  It wasn't packed.  I didn't see any obvious shortages, although toilet paper and paper towels were limited to one per person. Any turkeys I could see were huge.  Certain canned items are still limited to 4 per person, but they've been that way since March.

My main reason for going was to pick out stocking candy.  I wanted to do it in person so I could see ingredients (I have a wheat and dairy allergic child and one with celiac disease).  I kind of went all out because it feels right for this year.  I also bought peanut butter applesauce, salsa, canned peaches, canned pineapple, milk, cookies for the Feast of Saint Nicholas, BBQ sauce, white wine vinegar, plain sparkling water, decorations for Christmas cookies, facial tissue, zipper bags for freezing meats, a few other things I can't recall, and I'll admit it -- a puffer coat and two holiday sweaters for one of my dogs.

I decided not to go back to the other grocery store to buy more meat.  We're fine with what we have, and I didn't have time.  I wanted to finish all my shopping today so I can get a Covid test in 14 days and feel clear about it.  Actually, I may get tested tomorrow when I get my flu shot, but it won't tell me anything definitive about my exposure in the past two weeks.  My county just really wants everyone to get tested regularly.

Covid tests in two weeks, isolate until we get results, and then we plan to visit MIL outside, socially distant, with masks on.  It won't be Thanksgiving, and it won't be Christmas, but we really want to see her and this seems the safest way.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 22, 2020, 05:08:33 AM
Okay, one little glitch in my supplies. I have the shelf stable 8 ounce boxes of milk. I think I bought 3 cases of it at different times and now the first batch has only one week left. So, I am in the process of freezing them. I experimented with two of the boxes and  made the box top a 'tent' shape on top to give it some room for expansion. Then put the two boxes into a ziplock and froze them. They froze perfectly and did not explode out of the boxes. So, now I will freeze the others that have a short shelf life. When I plan to use them I will take them out of the freezer and refrigerate the night before and next day shake them to make sure they have not separated.

So, my friends, check some of your expiration dates on your food! Waste not, want not!

I am also not finding any decent prices on rib roasts! Prices are higher this year. I hope they go down soon!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: kite on November 22, 2020, 07:55:17 AM
I canít bring myself to stock up.  The ďuse it up, wear it out, make it do, do withoutĒ refrain along with Christianity was drilled into me.  Knowing that so many in my community are reliant on food banks just to make it through the week, Iíd be deeply ashamed of myself if I had food on hand that we couldnít possibly be eating for several weeks or even months when others need it now. As a Christian, I feel like this is precisely what Jesus was talking about when he lambasted those of us going around with more than one coat while we see people who have none.  Even for those who are
I donít mean for this to come across as judging anyone else, itís only my interpretation of what Iíve been taught.  My very dear friend is a Latter Day Saint and it was instilled into her the importance of maintaining a well stocked pantry.  And I respect what she was taught despite not agreeing or adhering to it myself.  Depending on where you live and your family & transportation situation, it might be entirely reasonable to buy a few months worth of beans or tuna or whatever.
As a mustachian, I again come down on the side of not keeping excesses on hand.  For one, physical inventory costs money to store and maintain and it doesnít increase in value except on very rare occasions.  Consumables deteriorate. In my view, the money is better left in the market.  My personal experience living through hurricanes & other weather related extended power outages confirms this.
As a typical citizen of the world, dabbling in amateur epidemiology like everyone else, Iím also weighing the risk of exposure to others in the stores & such; mulling over whether the risk is worse right this minute versus how it will be two weeks or two months from now.  Itís really bad right this moment in my county, so I donít want to set foot into any store unless it is essential. Is it essential to buy food today that we donít yet need?  Again, it turns out, the answer is ďnoĒ.
 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 22, 2020, 10:00:54 AM
I'm doing large infrequent shops.  My main grocery store is in a high density area so I use the priority hour (yes I'm eligible).  I went this morning at 7:15 and am good for 2 weeks plus.  I am fine with eating the most perishable vegetables and fruits first,  it's better to have a slightly boring menu than shop more often.  We are in the lull between Thanksgiving and Christmas, everything was in stock.   Yes, toilet paper, paper towel, and yeast were plentiful.

We are supposed to get 15 cm or so of snow today and tomorrow, I was surprised when the store wasn't busy at 8:30
when I finished my shopping.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: ixtap on November 22, 2020, 10:04:26 AM
I canít bring myself to stock up.  The ďuse it up, wear it out, make it do, do withoutĒ refrain along with Christianity was drilled into me.  Knowing that so many in my community are reliant on food banks just to make it through the week, Iíd be deeply ashamed of myself if I had food on hand that we couldnít possibly be eating for several weeks or even months when others need it now. As a Christian, I feel like this is precisely what Jesus was talking about when he lambasted those of us going around with more than one coat while we see people who have none.  Even for those who are
I donít mean for this to come across as judging anyone else, itís only my interpretation of what Iíve been taught.  My very dear friend is a Latter Day Saint and it was instilled into her the importance of maintaining a well stocked pantry.  And I respect what she was taught despite not agreeing or adhering to it myself.  Depending on where you live and your family & transportation situation, it might be entirely reasonable to buy a few months worth of beans or tuna or whatever.
As a mustachian, I again come down on the side of not keeping excesses on hand.  For one, physical inventory costs money to store and maintain and it doesnít increase in value except on very rare occasions.  Consumables deteriorate. In my view, the money is better left in the market.  My personal experience living through hurricanes & other weather related extended power outages confirms this.
As a typical citizen of the world, dabbling in amateur epidemiology like everyone else, Iím also weighing the risk of exposure to others in the stores & such; mulling over whether the risk is worse right this minute versus how it will be two weeks or two months from now.  Itís really bad right this moment in my county, so I donít want to set foot into any store unless it is essential. Is it essential to buy food today that we donít yet need?  Again, it turns out, the answer is ďnoĒ.
 

I have given several months' worth of grocery bills to the local food bank.

On the other hand, my extra stores just mean if something happens at the end of two week restock and I can't get to the store, we can still eat *something*.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Imma on November 22, 2020, 10:05:05 AM
@kite obviously this is something you have thought about quite a bit so a random forum member isn't going to change your mind. But I don't think stocking up is not the Christian thing to do. There are several texts in the Bible that could be interpreted as supportive or non-supportive of stocking up. But there are a few things to keep in mind:

- unlike in the Biblical age, there is no actual shortage of food. There is still more food in the world than people can eat. Just not everyone can afford to buy it. The food in your pantry is not stolen from anyone's mouth. Of course it would be extremely unchristian to keep food in your pantry just for you when there's a food shortage. To make sure other people can have food, too, you can donate food or money to charities like foodbanks and churches that give out food parcels. I do and I'm sure many on this thread do.

- In my country, there's one grocery store for every 3500 people. Say half of them regularly shop. That means every store theoretically has 1750 customers. If they all turn up twice a week like many people did pre-pandemic, that means the traffic in the store is 3500/week. If everyone reduced that to one weekly shop, there'd be only 1750 people per week per store. If people only buy food once every two weeks, there'd be only 875 customers a week! When the store is filled to normal capacity, there's a fair chance of transmission of viruses. When the shops are filled to 25% of capacity, people have way more space to implement social distancing, staff (generally minimum wage workers from underpriviliged groups) can do their work while not coming too close to customers, and staff have more time to properly clean the shop and carts. So every time you don't set foot in the shop you're actually making a massive difference in reducing traffic to the store.

- Of course it makes no financial sense to keep a warehouse full of food. But I don't think most people on this thread keep such insane amounts of food. Personally, I live in an old small house (800 square ft) and it comes with a built-in pantry and that's filled, like it always is. I come from a rural background and was taught to always keep food on hand by my grandparents who lived through WWII. They didn't starve but lived through hard times and one grandparent was completely dependant on produce from a tiny garden and charity. They always kept a small stockpile of non-perishables like coffee, tea, salt and sugar. Part of my pantry is canned food that I grew myself. A reasonable stockpile of food doesn't actually take up that much space. I think my pantry is 20 square ft and at any point in time there's maybe Ä50-100 worth of food in there. And these days empty shelves aren't exactly unusual, a while back the whole produce, dairy and meat aisles were empty for days. During the first lockdown I was very happy with the flour and yeast in my pantry because they were unavailable for months.

I feel that exactly because I'm in the privileged position of working from home and having enough money, I shouldn't be a burden on society by venturing out more than I need to be. Every time I don't go to a shop, other people there are safer simply because there are fewer people there. Some people will have to go to the store frequently simply because they can't afford to do one big shop in one go, they may rely on that day's tips to get some reduced food at the end of the day. I have most of my groceries delivered and I have started to tip a higher amount than I used to do too. I'm in the vulnerable group as well, but I'd rather avoid the special opening hours. I'm 30 and I don't look disabled. I'm quite private about my health and I don't want to get into an argument in front of the grocery store at 7am.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Michael in ABQ on November 22, 2020, 10:28:07 AM
Due to current public health orders all stores are now limited to a max of 75 people, even a huge store like Costco. Multiple grocery store have been shut down if they have more than 4 employees test positive, which isn't that much if you're talking about a Walmart Supercenter with a few hundred employees. I got in line at Costco yesterday at 9:45 (they normally open at 10:00). I didn't get inside until  about 11:00 as there was probably 300-350 people in line. They also limited entry to one person per household so a couple shopping together wouldn't take up one of those 75 spots. I bought pretty much our normal every two weeks worth of stuff. We've got six kids so we buy the box of 15 dozen eggs, usually 6-8 gallons of milk, TP, diapers, baby wipes, produce, etc. It was actually quite nice having the store mostly empty. I normally go about twice as fast as everyone else in the grocery store and am usually slowed down by the crowds.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 22, 2020, 10:39:09 AM
Due to current public health orders all stores are now limited to a max of 75 people, even a huge store like Costco. Multiple grocery store have been shut down if they have more than 4 employees test positive, which isn't that much if you're talking about a Walmart Supercenter with a few hundred employees. I got in line at Costco yesterday at 9:45 (they normally open at 10:00). I didn't get inside until  about 11:00 as there was probably 300-350 people in line. They also limited entry to one person per household so a couple shopping together wouldn't take up one of those 75 spots. I bought pretty much our normal every two weeks worth of stuff. We've got six kids so we buy the box of 15 dozen eggs, usually 6-8 gallons of milk, TP, diapers, baby wipes, produce, etc. It was actually quite nice having the store mostly empty. I normally go about twice as fast as everyone else in the grocery store and am usually slowed down by the crowds.

Michael ABQ what state are you in! Don't like what I hear but thank you for sharing the information! That is unbelievable to have this happen in our lifetimes!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 22, 2020, 11:05:58 AM
I believe that New Mexico is requiring stores to shut if they have a certain number of employees who test positive.

I feel like when we stay out of the store because we are stocked up we are leaving spots open for other people and we are lowering to risk of taking up hospital space. We donate to several food programs... itís kind of our thing!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 22, 2020, 02:35:28 PM
Due to current public health orders all stores are now limited to a max of 75 people, even a huge store like Costco. Multiple grocery store have been shut down if they have more than 4 employees test positive, which isn't that much if you're talking about a Walmart Supercenter with a few hundred employees. I got in line at Costco yesterday at 9:45 (they normally open at 10:00). I didn't get inside until  about 11:00 as there was probably 300-350 people in line. They also limited entry to one person per household so a couple shopping together wouldn't take up one of those 75 spots. I bought pretty much our normal every two weeks worth of stuff. We've got six kids so we buy the box of 15 dozen eggs, usually 6-8 gallons of milk, TP, diapers, baby wipes, produce, etc. It was actually quite nice having the store mostly empty. I normally go about twice as fast as everyone else in the grocery store and am usually slowed down by the crowds.

Michael ABQ what state are you in! Don't like what I hear but thank you for sharing the information! That is unbelievable to have this happen in our lifetimes!

Grocery stores here have maximums.  And lines if you go at a busy time.  Makes perfect sense to lower store density in response to an air-borne virus.  We are all masking.  Ottawa's case numbers are slowly coming down.  And winter is here (it's snowing right now, 15 cm expected).

No limits on anything when I shopped this morning, but right now nothing is sold out.  My one Costco shop this fall had a TP limit, but of course one Costco package is a huge amount of TP!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 22, 2020, 03:13:59 PM
Well, I am glad I am stocked up with nearly everything and don't have to go out for a while!

I have a Misfits vegetable order coming on Tuesday.

When I do a curbside pick up I get enough for several weeks. I have been very pleased with the service.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 22, 2020, 05:04:28 PM
Well, I am glad I am stocked up with nearly everything and don't have to go out for a while!

I have a Misfits vegetable order coming on Tuesday.

When I do a curbside pick up I get enough for several weeks. I have been very pleased with the service.

I'm glad we're stocked and ready to go as well.  I don't plan to do curbside again until early December.  I wish we had more fruit and more lettuce, but we have what we have.  There's only enough lettuce for 3 salads, but we have plenty of tomatoes, avocados, carrots, and cucumber.  Salads don't have to have lettuce.  We have some apples and bananas, but the guys go through apples and bananas like there's no tomorrow.  Still, we have canned peaches, canned pineapple, and jarred applesauce, plus there is some frozen fruit.  We have fresh pears too, but they won't eat those (more for me and DH!).

I do wish I'd picked up a 25# bag of local oranges -- I think I'll send my son tomorrow.  It was decided that if any in person shopping needs to be done, he'll do it.  I'll call to make sure they have them available, and if they do I'll send him with exact change so he can be in and out in under 5 minutes.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 23, 2020, 06:35:24 AM
I was just on the Costco website and looked to see what the situation was with the Kirkland toilet paper and there is a notice that there will be none available till December 31st and then January 1st they will reevaluate the situation. Seems it is being sold at the stores but is probably flying off the shelves. They also had no paper towels on rolls.

I looked at Walmart and very little toilet paper they will ship, mostly in store or pick up only purchases. Same with paper towels.

Here we go again!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Michael in ABQ on November 23, 2020, 09:43:30 AM
Due to current public health orders all stores are now limited to a max of 75 people, even a huge store like Costco. Multiple grocery store have been shut down if they have more than 4 employees test positive, which isn't that much if you're talking about a Walmart Supercenter with a few hundred employees. I got in line at Costco yesterday at 9:45 (they normally open at 10:00). I didn't get inside until  about 11:00 as there was probably 300-350 people in line. They also limited entry to one person per household so a couple shopping together wouldn't take up one of those 75 spots. I bought pretty much our normal every two weeks worth of stuff. We've got six kids so we buy the box of 15 dozen eggs, usually 6-8 gallons of milk, TP, diapers, baby wipes, produce, etc. It was actually quite nice having the store mostly empty. I normally go about twice as fast as everyone else in the grocery store and am usually slowed down by the crowds.

Michael ABQ what state are you in! Don't like what I hear but thank you for sharing the information! That is unbelievable to have this happen in our lifetimes!

New Mexico. ABQ = Albuquerque.

I didn't see the paper towels at Costco (my wife didn't see any the last time she went to a different one a week or two ago). However there was the normal supply of TP and everything else. No signs about any limits - though I imagine someone with a cart full of TP would probably be asked to put most of it back.

I went to a Walmart Neighborhood Market this morning. I had to wait for about 10 seconds before someone walked out of the store. It felt about as crowded as normal, maybe a bit less. But then again 75 people in a 40,000 SF store vs. 75 people in a Walmart Supercenter or Costco that are typically 150,000+ SF. There was a lot more restocking going on than normal it seemed, but plenty of everything on the shelves.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 23, 2020, 11:09:19 AM
Target still has some paper towel brands they'll ship -- I ordered some last month and again today.  We have an old house with finicky old pipes, and had to switch to rapid dissolving toilet paper, so getting what we need is harder, but we're good for awhile.  I actually use washable cloth wipes most of the time (urine only), which is no big deal to me since we used cloth diapers on my kids.  If for some reason I need to use paper tissue (again, urine only), I put the tissue in a ziplock bag (reused from food) and dispose of it every couple of days.  That's a habit I got into when we had a camper van with a tiny black waste holding tank, as keeping the tissue out let us go twice as long without dumping the black waste.  The cost to take care of these pipes is high (we had to hydro jet last time) and replacement will be costly, so the longer we can make them last, the better.

Kid got oranges and grapefruit yesterday -- $13.50 for 25# of Valencia oranges (too early for navels) and 8# of oro sweet grapefruit.  The oranges were $10 and that price is down from last year.  He said he was the only one in the little store and the cashier was behind huge amounts of plexiglass the entire time he was in there.  Oranges will likely be our go-to fruit for the next several months, since they're local, cheap, and keep longer than a lot of other fruits.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 24, 2020, 07:29:31 AM
Got my first Misfits box yesterday. It came one day early and I am guessing due to the holiday. I ordered the large box and price is $35. All organic veggies. Shipping was $4.50. I added a few extras to the order called 'add ons' which were packages of mushroom. The veggies came nice and cold. Very fresh and as far as being misfits, I didn't really see much of a problem. This actually was not my first Misfits box. I used to subscribe but back then you had no choice in what you received. I am really thrilled with what I got. I have my account set up to receive a box every two weeks. I got so much, I am sure this will last about two weeks. I have to use up the fragile veggies first.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Tigerpine on November 24, 2020, 10:33:43 AM
We went to Costco yesterday, and it looked pretty much normal except for the TP.  All they had was the store brand, and it although there was plenty there, it wasn't as chocked full of the stuff as normal.  Everything else seemed to be fully stocked.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: kite on November 27, 2020, 09:53:47 AM
@Imma 
Thanks for your thoughts.  You are right, I've thought a lot about this. 
The notion that if you buy 2x as much as normal and then have to shop only half as frequently, thus limiting everyone's exposure has some merit.  In reality, it happens a little differently. Perishables perish, so we still need to go out and buy (or get deliveries) week after week.  But the problem turns out to be human nature.
If a store gets 20 items of a given product, and a customer buys all 20, there are 19 customers who will do without. We all recognize the guy who bought 20 as a hoarder and we call him names.  he might even feel a little guilty. If a different store likewise gets 20 and five customers each buy 4, there are 15 customers who do without.  We don't instantly recognize the five as hoarders because the 'normal' amount to purchase was 4. None of the five feel any guilt.  But the net result is nearly the same.  The 19 and the 15 who couldn't get their product will go from store to store (exponentially increasing everyone's exposure) trying to find what they want. The more times they get to a store and don't find it, the more inclined they are to overbuy when they finally land on the thing they want. You can scale this up to understand how those of us who are wealthy manage to wreck the planet and hurt the poor often without realizing it.  Normative cues have reinforced in our minds that it's perfectly acceptable behavior.  We buy more stuff than we need.  We use our power to hoard it and leave the poor folks scrambling and fighting over what is left. A good chunk of our excess just gets wasted and goes in a landfill, all because we overbuy unnecessarily.  I think most of us are like the "five" in my hypothetical story. This is how humans managed to create a toilet paper shortage.  This is how we drove up the price of rubbing alcohol & sanitizing wipes.  None of which does anything to protect a person from Covid as it turns out.  Visiting multiple stores, however, most certainly increases exposure to the virus in our communities.   
Retailers try to stop people from buying all 20 or even buying merely 4, because they want happy customers.  So if 20 people can each buy 1, it's all good, right?  Partly.  Having seen that Costco limited a shopper to only 1 pack of toilet paper, some shoppers who did get their 1 package are going to come back day after day and buy again and again.  Others are going to buy 1 at Costco, and then hit ShopRite, Aldi, IGA & WallMart for more. They go on social media and share either their frustration or news of their 'score' and the frenzy just keeps going, getting amplified.
I'm not judging any one particular family for stockpiling.  Folks may live too far for weekly or bi-weekly shopping trips. They may genuinely be 'off grid' or some such thing.  But for someone like me who lives in a county with 375,000 people and at least a dozen stores, stocking up doesn't help, it hurts.  I'm still heading out to the store to buy milk & spinach and bananas next week and the week after and the week after.  So laying in a few months supply of non-perishables doesn't save me any trips.  It likely would require that someone else take multiple trips.  That someone else is almost certainly much poorer than me. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 27, 2020, 10:18:07 AM
I think it takes better planning on your part, because you donít actually have to buy perishables every week. The few things that will actually perish in a week can be used quickly, and then you can switch the perishables that have a longer life.

I havenít been inside a grocery store since the last part of September and I do a grocery pickup every 10 days to 2 weeks. We continue to have fine supply of perishables - dairy products, eggs, fruits and vegetables. I do order larger sizes of things than I bought in the Before Times.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on November 27, 2020, 10:35:42 AM
At the beginning of the pandemic, we did a good job of shopping every 10 to 14 days.  I mentioned that basically, we run out of eggs and milk. What helps us is that we get produce delivery 2x a week.

Eventually things calmed down, and we got into the habit of once a week (Sunday morning), so less stocking up.  Once a month trips to Costco for a few things we only get there.

Now that we are back up there in cases, we are trying to go less often again.  I will have to go again on Sunday, though, because the produce boxes are on vacation this week.

You don't need to necessarily get perishables weekly.  Basically, even when we didn't get the boxes, we start the week eating the things that go bad first.  By the end of the 10 days to 2 weeks - sure, you are eating a lot of apples and oranges, carrots and celery, frozen green beans and broccoli, and lentil soups with onions and canned tomatoes.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on November 27, 2020, 10:43:46 AM
I can't get greens to last longer than about 9 days, so I go to the store every 9-10 days.

Sure, I could (and would) go without fresh greens for a while if something happened, but right now I'm choosing not to do that.  So, I don't stock up a lot either since I know I'll be going to the store in 9 days.  I am also only 1 person, so certain things last longer, and I can just do without if I find something out of stock - I eat a wide variety, but buy certain things out of habit (to make shopping and planning easier).

I have not noticed any food shortages at my local grocery lately (I haven't walked down the paper goods aisle in several months, so don't know about that).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 27, 2020, 11:21:33 AM
Not everyone is going from store to store to scoop up all the toilet paper and other things in the store. I have been stocking up since March adding a few extras every week.  I now have a nice stockpile of things and do curbside every few weeks and just started getting Misfits vegetables/fruits thru subscription service. I order some food items on line too. We are in the age group that if we get the virus, we may not recover easily or at all. So, staying out of the stores as much as possible is my goal. I have also ordered meat from different places in bulk which is the way they sell it. That includes 12 lbs. of ground beef, 10 lbs. of meatloaf mix, 10 lbs. of hamburgers, 12 lbs. of pork burgers. These all went into the freezer among other things. Some of us plan ahead but are not swarming the stores for this stuff.

I now have a good dough recipe to make my own pizza dough, one less thing to buy, but make at home.

Here is something I do during the winter months when tomatoes are not so great. I buy jarred roasted red peppers and cut them up on the lettuce. It is tasty and nice red color. Doesn't taste like tomatoes but is flavorful and has eye appeal.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Missy B on November 27, 2020, 11:38:30 AM
@Imma 
Thanks for your thoughts.  You are right, I've thought a lot about this. 
The notion that if you buy 2x as much as normal and then have to shop only half as frequently, thus limiting everyone's exposure has some merit.  In reality, it happens a little differently. Perishables perish, so we still need to go out and buy (or get deliveries) week after week.  But the problem turns out to be human nature.
If a store gets 20 items of a given product, and a customer buys all 20, there are 19 customers who will do without. We all recognize the guy who bought 20 as a hoarder and we call him names.  he might even feel a little guilty. If a different store likewise gets 20 and five customers each buy 4, there are 15 customers who do without.  We don't instantly recognize the five as hoarders because the 'normal' amount to purchase was 4. None of the five feel any guilt.  But the net result is nearly the same. The 19 and the 15 who couldn't get their product will go from store to store (exponentially increasing everyone's exposure) trying to find what they want. The more times they get to a store and don't find it, the more inclined they are to overbuy when they finally land on the thing they want. You can scale this up to understand how those of us who are wealthy manage to wreck the planet and hurt the poor often without realizing it.  Normative cues have reinforced in our minds that it's perfectly acceptable behavior.  We buy more stuff than we need.  We use our power to hoard it and leave the poor folks scrambling and fighting over what is left. A good chunk of our excess just gets wasted and goes in a landfill, all because we overbuy unnecessarily.  I think most of us are like the "five" in my hypothetical story. This is how humans managed to create a toilet paper shortage.  This is how we drove up the price of rubbing alcohol & sanitizing wipes.  None of which does anything to protect a person from Covid as it turns out.  Visiting multiple stores, however, most certainly increases exposure to the virus in our communities.   

This. Although I'm less worried about the increased risk of virus exposure, (which is still minimal if you are following protocols) than the damage to people in the community who are less resourced. Basically, they are treated as if they aren't part of the community at all.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: birdie55 on November 27, 2020, 11:43:25 AM
I have done exactly what Roadrunner described. 

I have always kept a stocked pantry but I increased my stock in late February when I saw possible shutdowns coming.

When things got back to normal in the later spring and during the summer, I stocked up again.  Every time I went to Costco, I bought 3 or 4 different meats, cheeses, grains, pasta, canned foods etc. 

I am in my late 60s and live alone, so while I don't need a lot of food, I have plenty to wait out the current virus spike.  I don't plan on going into a store until after the New Year, and maybe later. 

When my fresh vegetables and fruits are gone, I can switch to frozen or canned. 

I do grow lettuce, chard and kale in the winter and many more vegetables in the summer.  I also have mandarins that I will be picking soon. 

It's really just planning ahead, not hoarding. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 27, 2020, 12:00:48 PM
Yes, birdie55 and I are doing many of the same things. We all heard early in the year that the virus was going to get worse in the fall. We all had plenty of time to stock up slowly. Right now Costco is not selling the toilet paper I normally order for about 6 weeks and that also includes the paper towels. I am stocked up. Who knows what else might be hard to come by. It doesn't hurt to stock up. I just tried to order my dogs prescription dog food from the normal pet supply company and they were out! I was able to get it elsewhere but who knows what will happen next time. I also needed to order a prescription for my dog and it seems to be unavailable at all the big pharmacies that sell pet medicines. I had to call the Vet today and have to get the drug made from a compound pharmacy in New Jersey. This drug is made by a large, well known company, but for whatever reason, they have stopped producing it for a period of time. It is a heart med. so not a good idea to just not give it to the dog.

So, we all have to do what makes us comfortable. If you are like me, you stock up. Some people are not worried and will shop 3 times a week if need be.

I also bought eleven 50# bags of driveway salt on top of the 9 bags we had here. I ordered it in late August. I didn't want to face a shortage of that either. Some winters we get a lot of ice, others not so much. Since I am not a psychic I just buy it to be on the safe side. Plus, prices are lower in August!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 27, 2020, 02:06:27 PM
Holy crap.

How long is your driveway that you need 550 lbs of salt?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 27, 2020, 02:09:33 PM
Yeah, Iíve already bought ice melt for the winter, too.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 27, 2020, 02:26:50 PM
Holy crap.

How long is your driveway that you need 550 lbs of salt?

That is very Torontonian.  ;-)   I can think of years when that would not have lasted the winter.  11 bags = 11 snowfalls, if you have a long walkway to your garage or the street.  I used to buy the bags of sand with just a bit of salt in them, for the sake of my plants.  The township would plow and salt several times during a good storm.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 27, 2020, 02:30:39 PM
Holy crap.

How long is your driveway that you need 550 lbs of salt?

We won't need all the salt with one storm! It will be used over the course of the winter and it isn't just our long driveway, it is sidewalks too. Some winters we have half our stash left over, other winters we have only a few bags left. We mostly salt the top flat portion of our driveway because the incline melts with the sun. We have it plowed but it ices up. It approximately 80 feet long and there is a second smaller driveway that can fit about 3 pick up trucks behind each other. The top of the driveway could fit 5 cars easily. We only have a pick up truck and a car.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 27, 2020, 04:42:06 PM
Holy crap.

How long is your driveway that you need 550 lbs of salt?

That is very Torontonian.  ;-)   I can think of years when that would not have lasted the winter.  11 bags = 11 snowfalls, if you have a long walkway to your garage or the street.  I used to buy the bags of sand with just a bit of salt in them, for the sake of my plants.  The township would plow and salt several times during a good storm.

I lived for most of my childhood in a small community about an 8 hr drive north of Timmins.  Ice doesn't work well to melt snow when it's below -30C.  We used these newfangled devices called 'shovels' for the snow and gravel for the ice.  Our driveway was about 100 ft long with a much shorter.

The idea of dumping hundreds of lbs of salt on the ground every year strikes me as pretty hard on the environment.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 27, 2020, 04:56:53 PM
Holy crap.

How long is your driveway that you need 550 lbs of salt?

That is very Torontonian.  ;-)   I can think of years when that would not have lasted the winter.  11 bags = 11 snowfalls, if you have a long walkway to your garage or the street.  I used to buy the bags of sand with just a bit of salt in them, for the sake of my plants.  The township would plow and salt several times during a good storm.

I lived for most of my childhood in a small community about an 8 hr drive north of Timmins.  Ice doesn't work well to melt snow when it's below -30C.  We used these newfangled devices called 'shovels' for the snow and gravel for the ice.  Our driveway was about 100 ft long with a much shorter.

The idea of dumping hundreds of lbs of salt on the ground every year strikes me as pretty hard on the environment.

Yeah at -30C sand is definitely the preferred choice.  I guess OP lives in an area that is the right temp for salt.  I know my Canadian Tire near last-house sold more salt than sand, but I prefered sand since it gave so much better traction after clearing snow.  The straight salt was better when we had freezing rain though, since salt on a cm or 2 of solid ice isn't much help.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 27, 2020, 05:32:00 PM
From what I've read, right now most of the so-called shortages aren't shortages because of supply, but rather it is retailers purposely holding stock back.  They say it's in order to help avoid empty shelves, but I can't help but think the practice increases store traffic, which benefits them.  Once we returned to stores in June we never saw a packed store.  Even packed Costco parking lots didn't equal a packed store.  People changed how they are shopping and less foot traffic means fewer impulse purchases.  I also think holding back stock spurs people to buy more because they perceive a shortage.

The way I'm stocking up now is how I've stocked up for decades.  When I find a good price of something we use regularly, I stock up for a certain amount of time -- 3 months is usually good for many items, as the sales cycle around.  For meats I buy what I have room for.  I've purchased toilet paper in bulk from Amazon for years now -- my order history shows my first bulk purchase of TP in 2007.  I always buy grains, flours, and legumes in bulk, mostly using Azure Standard and Costco.  I always buy butter in bulk, and the big jugs of olive oil from Costco.  If anything right now, I'm stocking up more carefully and with far more regard to the shopper who may come after me, since we're still well stocked on most things.

The only thing I've done differently is purchase more canned/jarred food than usual.  Most stores have had limits in place since March, so I'm never wiping a store out.  There are some items I purchase cases of, such as canned peaches, canned pineapple, and jarred salsa, but I would do that anyway, pandemic or not (and I can't even buy cases of peaches or pineapple right now).  This fall I haven't stocked up on any canned food other than applesauce, peanut butter, and salsa, and by stocked up I mean I bought 10 jars of applesauce (of which my son has eaten 4 jars in the past two weeks), 4 jars of peanut butter, and 4 jars of salsa.  I haven't ordered any more TP because we're fine on that.  I did order paper towels (I never used paper towels when we didn't eat meat).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 28, 2020, 03:53:04 AM
The ice melt I bought in August was $17.98 per 50# bag. Right now the same bag is $29.98 per bag. $12.00 more per bag!

This is what the ice melt says:

Product Overview
MELT Environmentally-Friendly Blend Ice Melter ("MELT EB") provides a greener, yet equally effective, deicing alternative to more harmful melting agents. When used as directed, MELT EB will not harm grass, wood, concrete, metals or other vegetation and is safer for pets, children and the environment. MELT EB exhibits the following properties: ANTI-CORROSION FORMULA: Enhanced with CMA (calcium magnesium acetate), an environmentally benign deicing agent, MELT EB ice melter delivers fast and effective results without damaging metal surfaces, such as the exteriors of cars, trucks and other equipment. FAST ACTING: MELT EB goes to work immediately upon contact with snow and ice to accelerate the deicing and melting process. Pre-treating surfaces with MELT EB will also prevent ice and snow from accumulating. LONG LASTING: MELT EB time-relaxed formula stays on the surface area longer for added protection and better control of the freeze/thaw cycle. SAFER TO HANDLE: When used as directed, MELT EB will not dry out or irritate the skin and can be safely and easily dispensed without requiring the use of protective clothing. NON-TRACKING: When properly dispensed, MELT EB will not track onto your homeís floors or carpets, so you can safely tread your footwear onto any treated surface without worry of damage to your shoes or your home.
Eco, pet and kid-friendly
Enhanced with CMA (calcium magnesium acetate) for safe, fast and effective results
Color-coated crystals help to visually measure and dispense the right amount
Convenient re-sealable bag for easy storage and extended shelf-life
Long lasting, time-relaxed formula provides superior traction control, will not harm grass, wood, concrete, metals or other vegetation
Easy to disperse
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 28, 2020, 07:24:33 AM
Cool!  I was unaware that there were benign chemical de-icers for sale.  The city of Toronto uses ass tons of salt every winter . . . leading to the streams and rivers in the GTA measuring higher salinity than sea water from most of Dec-Feb.  Does nothing good for my bike, but it's tough thinking what it's doing to the animals that live around and in the water.  :(
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 28, 2020, 07:47:34 AM
From what I've read, right now most of the so-called shortages aren't shortages because of supply, but rather it is retailers purposely holding stock back.  They say it's in order to help avoid empty shelves, but I can't help but think the practice increases store traffic, which benefits them.  Once we returned to stores in June we never saw a packed store.  Even packed Costco parking lots didn't equal a packed store.  People changed how they are shopping and less foot traffic means fewer impulse purchases.  I also think holding back stock spurs people to buy more because they perceive a shortage.

The way I'm stocking up now is how I've stocked up for decades.  When I find a good price of something we use regularly, I stock up for a certain amount of time -- 3 months is usually good for many items, as the sales cycle around.  For meats I buy what I have room for.  I've purchased toilet paper in bulk from Amazon for years now -- my order history shows my first bulk purchase of TP in 2007.  I always buy grains, flours, and legumes in bulk, mostly using Azure Standard and Costco.  I always buy butter in bulk, and the big jugs of olive oil from Costco.  If anything right now, I'm stocking up more carefully and with far more regard to the shopper who may come after me, since we're still well stocked on most things.

The only thing I've done differently is purchase more canned/jarred food than usual.  Most stores have had limits in place since March, so I'm never wiping a store out.  There are some items I purchase cases of, such as canned peaches, canned pineapple, and jarred salsa, but I would do that anyway, pandemic or not (and I can't even buy cases of peaches or pineapple right now).  This fall I haven't stocked up on any canned food other than applesauce, peanut butter, and salsa, and by stocked up I mean I bought 10 jars of applesauce (of which my son has eaten 4 jars in the past two weeks), 4 jars of peanut butter, and 4 jars of salsa.  I haven't ordered any more TP because we're fine on that.  I did order paper towels (I never used paper towels when we didn't eat meat).

K in the kitchen, thanks for that tip on Azure Standard. I just checked them out and it is a great website!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 28, 2020, 08:00:59 AM
Cool!  I was unaware that there were benign chemical de-icers for sale.  The city of Toronto uses ass tons of salt every winter . . . leading to the streams and rivers in the GTA measuring higher salinity than sea water from most of Dec-Feb.  Does nothing good for my bike, but it's tough thinking what it's doing to the animals that live around and in the water.  :(

Correction, I did not buy 11 bags of ice melt, I have a total of 11 bags now with what we had and what I bought. That should last the entire winter...we hope! We have pets so the type of ice melt was important to us.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on November 28, 2020, 08:32:43 AM
To my frustration, the more I stock up, the more my family eats!  We really cannot go more than ten days without a grocery run. I bought 6 gallons of milk a week ago and we are down to 1.5 gallons, which will take us to Monday or Tuesday at the latest.  The eating schedule goes something like this:
- days 1-3, eat all the snack food
- days 4-6, turn up nose at leftovers, eat all frozen entrees
- days 7-9, cereal and milk, bread and Nutella
- day 10: We're out of milk! We're out of bread! There's nothing good to eat-- Moooooooooommm!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 28, 2020, 09:34:37 AM
Hey, I generally order groceries when the wine gets low...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: TomTX on November 28, 2020, 09:53:06 AM
@Imma 
 This is how humans managed to create a toilet paper shortage. 

No. The primary cause of the TP shortage was the shutdowns/WFH. There was plenty of commercial/industrial TP available because people weren't using bathrooms at work/school/restaurants nearly as much.

Quote
This is how we drove up the price of rubbing alcohol & sanitizing wipes.  None of which does anything to protect a person from Covid as it turns out. 

Fomite transfer seems to be a small chance compared to airborne - but that's WITH all the washing hands and sterilize all the things all the time.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 28, 2020, 10:01:11 AM
To my frustration, the more I stock up, the more my family eats!  We really cannot go more than ten days without a grocery run. I bought 6 gallons of milk a week ago and we are down to 1.5 gallons, which will take us to Monday or Tuesday at the latest.  The eating schedule goes something like this:
- days 1-3, eat all the snack food
- days 4-6, turn up nose at leftovers, eat all frozen entrees
- days 7-9, cereal and milk, bread and Nutella
- day 10: We're out of milk! We're out of bread! There's nothing good to eat-- Moooooooooommm!

How many kids are you feeding! Time to suggest good old water or have a giant container of ice tea on hand. As far as leftovers go, maybe if you could reinvent the use of the leftovers. When I have meatloaf and there are a few slices left, I throw it into spaghetti sauce to make meat chunks or meaty sauce and put over spaghetti. If you have leftover chicken pieces, maybe you could throw together a hodge podge of chicken rice, mixed veggies with some cream of chicken soup and a splash of milk and some cheese to make a casserole. If you have some kind of hamburger meat you could make poor mans beef stroganoff. make a creamy sauce like cream of mushroom soup, the ground beef with some sautťed onions, chopped up carrots then add some sour cream. Add mixture to egg noodles or noodles of your choice.

If you have a bread machine, consider making bread but even if you don't, there are some simple recipes to make great bread. I have made this recipe (without my bread maker) in this video and it is really easy and good: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUO4BWNeR_8  You might be able to find a bread machine at a local thrift store, craigslist, ebay.

Maybe you can get your kids to put Nutella on apples, pears, graham crackers or only let them have it as a special treat. I have never eaten it myself but hear it is very delish! One more addiction I don't need!

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on November 28, 2020, 03:12:24 PM
To my frustration, the more I stock up, the more my family eats!  We really cannot go more than ten days without a grocery run. I bought 6 gallons of milk a week ago and we are down to 1.5 gallons, which will take us to Monday or Tuesday at the latest.  The eating schedule goes something like this:
- days 1-3, eat all the snack food
- days 4-6, turn up nose at leftovers, eat all frozen entrees
- days 7-9, cereal and milk, bread and Nutella
- day 10: We're out of milk! We're out of bread! There's nothing good to eat-- Moooooooooommm!
Sigh.  I feel you.

Quote
No. The primary cause of the TP shortage was the shutdowns/WFH. There was plenty of commercial/industrial TP available because people weren't using bathrooms at work/school/restaurants nearly as much.

Yep.  I still have the industrial TP I bought in April.  Also, this gem, purchased for my teenager for his birthday.  I'm saving it.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on November 28, 2020, 05:16:33 PM
To my frustration, the more I stock up, the more my family eats!  We really cannot go more than ten days without a grocery run. I bought 6 gallons of milk a week ago and we are down to 1.5 gallons, which will take us to Monday or Tuesday at the latest.  The eating schedule goes something like this:
- days 1-3, eat all the snack food
- days 4-6, turn up nose at leftovers, eat all frozen entrees
- days 7-9, cereal and milk, bread and Nutella
- day 10: We're out of milk! We're out of bread! There's nothing good to eat-- Moooooooooommm!

How many kids are you feeding! Time to suggest good old water or have a giant container of ice tea on hand. As far as leftovers go, maybe if you could reinvent the use of the leftovers. When I have meatloaf and there are a few slices left, I throw it into spaghetti sauce to make meat chunks or meaty sauce and put over spaghetti. If you have leftover chicken pieces, maybe you could throw together a hodge podge of chicken rice, mixed veggies with some cream of chicken soup and a splash of milk and some cheese to make a casserole. If you have some kind of hamburger meat you could make poor mans beef stroganoff. make a creamy sauce like cream of mushroom soup, the ground beef with some sautťed onions, chopped up carrots then add some sour cream. Add mixture to egg noodles or noodles of your choice.

If you have a bread machine, consider making bread but even if you don't, there are some simple recipes to make great bread. I have made this recipe (without my bread maker) in this video and it is really easy and good: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUO4BWNeR_8  You might be able to find a bread machine at a local thrift store, craigslist, ebay.

Maybe you can get your kids to put Nutella on apples, pears, graham crackers or only let them have it as a special treat. I have never eaten it myself but hear it is very delish! One more addiction I don't need!

Thanks for the excellent advice, @Roadrunner53! (as usual)

Just three kids, but they're all big eaters and growing like weeds.  Plus I will admit that Mr. Poundwise and I are not completely blameless either, idly grazing all day.

I actually do try to recycle food a bit... today's dinner is leftover pork loin made into fried rice... but somehow the kids find fault with food that is not at the peak of perfection. I am usually a good cook so they have gotten spoiled. Well, they will just have to get by! Also I did quite a bit of bread baking earlier this year (use my Kitchenaid mixer to knead) but I grew fatigued. Fresh baked bread vanishes even faster than storebought! :D

I will probably encourage more water drinking. Since we aren't sending them to school with packed lunches any more, I can save the single serve milk boxes for morning coffee, which is the only "emergency" which requires a milk run.



Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 28, 2020, 05:52:43 PM
Pound wise-I have three too, and itís the same deal. Amazingly the cucumbers and celery are the last to go. LOL. We have shelf stable milk I pour into the gallons....if I show them the shelf stable box they donít like it and it tastes funny. In the gallons-it passes. Sometimes presentation counts.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Villanelle on November 28, 2020, 06:13:48 PM
To my frustration, the more I stock up, the more my family eats!  We really cannot go more than ten days without a grocery run. I bought 6 gallons of milk a week ago and we are down to 1.5 gallons, which will take us to Monday or Tuesday at the latest.  The eating schedule goes something like this:
- days 1-3, eat all the snack food
- days 4-6, turn up nose at leftovers, eat all frozen entrees
- days 7-9, cereal and milk, bread and Nutella
- day 10: We're out of milk! We're out of bread! There's nothing good to eat-- Moooooooooommm!

Shelf stable and/or powered milk?  Freeze some bread? 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 29, 2020, 03:49:59 AM
Poundwise, you sound like a good cook and the kids are used to very good foods. I have a few more suggestions. First of all, maybe you could get your kids involved in cooking the original meal and then get them to help you reinvent the leftovers. If they are involved and challenged, they may take an interest in eating 'their' invention. You could make suggestions for them to look up recipes on the internet and maybe keep a 3 ring binder of the 'new' foods. Maybe even make a game of it and have them decide if it was a 1-5 star dinner. Ask them if they would like that meal again and flag it as a winner if they like it. Plus, if they get involved in making a dinner, they may see that it is time consuming and thought has to go into it.

Then there could be a 'kids make dinner night'. Where they could make dinner for the family. I have no idea on what simple meals your kids would be capable of but there must be lots of things they could do with a little supervision. Look for children's cook books, there are lots and lots of them out there.

Another idea as far as reinventing foods, is pizza. Maybe you could save some of the more valuable leftovers such as meat and freeze till you have enough to put on a pizza or calzone. Sauce and cheese 'hide' things and also enhance flavors. Throw in some Italian spices.

Another option is to take a ride sometime to see cars lined up for people receiving donations of food. Seeing how desperate people are, should shame your kids and be glad they have food on the table.

Lastly, in the olden days kids were told they had two choices for dinner. (1) Take it or (2) leave it. An empty growling stomach makes option (1) a winner!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 29, 2020, 04:12:34 AM
I learned to bake bread in 4H when I was 10, so that is not a job that is out of reach for kids.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on November 29, 2020, 09:58:32 AM
I was thinking I was going to need some TP in the next few weeks. Alas, when I did my Thanksgiving shop at Costco, they were completely out.

Yesterday, i was purging some things from the garage and noticed a whole Costco pack of Charmin on the shelf, hooray! It seems June or July Dicey had the same thought. I was pretty sure I had moved that bundle into the indoor storage places and that's what we were currently using. I'm so happy to be wrong. I think we're set until spring! I also love having you guys to share this happy news with, lol!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on November 29, 2020, 10:09:25 AM
I was thinking I was going to need some TP in the next few weeks. Alas, when I did my Thanksgiving shop at Costco, they were completely out.

Yesterday, i was purging some things from the garage and noticed a whole Costco pack of Charmin on the shelf, hooray! It seems June or July Dicey had the same thought. I was pretty sure I had moved that bundle into the indoor storage places and that's what we were currently using. I'm so happy to be wrong. I think we're set until spring! I also love having you guys to share this happy news with, lol!

Like the old saying goes, a roll in the hand is worth ten in the store.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on November 29, 2020, 11:57:53 AM
To my frustration, the more I stock up, the more my family eats!  We really cannot go more than ten days without a grocery run. I bought 6 gallons of milk a week ago and we are down to 1.5 gallons, which will take us to Monday or Tuesday at the latest.  The eating schedule goes something like this:
- days 1-3, eat all the snack food
- days 4-6, turn up nose at leftovers, eat all frozen entrees
- days 7-9, cereal and milk, bread and Nutella
- day 10: We're out of milk! We're out of bread! There's nothing good to eat-- Moooooooooommm!

Maybe you could show our kids what rationing looked like during WWII?  We watched The 1940s House with our boys years ago, and they really got a sense of how limited food was.  Not that food is limited now, so much as we all need to do our part to prevent the spread of Covid, which means staying away from stores as much as possible.

I suppose I'll come across as a mean mom, but at some point in the past I decided I wasn't going to let the kids control the food situation.  The strategy has served me well during the pandemic, because they're already used to the rules.

I buy very little that would count as snacks.  Pretty much fresh fruit and vegetables, tortilla chips (eaten with Aldi salsa at $1.18 per jar), and granola bars for taking to school or work (back when they could take their classes in person).  I knew from the beginning of the pandemic that we'd need to figure out the fruit situation, since my oldest would easily eat 5+ servings of fresh fruit daily (competitive athlete).  I decided to bring in canned peaches, canned pineapple (for the youngest), and jarred applesauce.  They don't love these things as much as fresh fruit, but they're making do.  The oldest has also had to stop eating raw vegetables as a snack, but we do our best to make sure there is a big salad everyday, which we've managed even when getting produce every 2-3 weeks.  Romaine lettuce is surprisingly hardy, often lasting 2 weeks, and we also make cabbage salads, carrot salads, etc.  I buy a reasonable amount of tortillas chips and when they're gone, they're gone.  The boys can make popcorn if they want, and if they say it's too much work then I figure they aren't really hungry.  In the past, when they were ravenous adolescents, I also used a "fill them with carbs" strategy, which basically meant since I knew I was serving plenty of nutritious food with more than adequate produce and protein, I would offer cheap carbs to fill the constantly hungry bellies.  Most of the time this was as simple as making rice in the rice cooker and keeping it available all day.  My boys douse rice in olive oil and can eat it in huge quantities (which is why I use cheap white rice, since they eat so much rice the arsenic content would be a big concern if it was all brown rice).

We've had to work on the leftovers situation, as my youngest is fussy about them.  Not all leftovers, but he doesn't care for leftover vegetables and he often refuses leftover soup, which makes zero sense since most soups tastes better the next day.  He does fine with leftover meat and leftover rice.  I do reinvent leftovers on a regular basis -- just yesterday I used the leftover sautťed cabbage and bacon to make an egg casserole, adding in plain frozen hashbrowns.  But my youngest wouldn't eat this meal even if it was made fresh, so I saved it for a meal he wasn't home for.  Once or twice a week we have a leftovers night and pretty much indulge him by giving him the leftovers he likes best.  I've never purchased frozen entrees, so that's not an option if they don't like leftovers.  If they really don't want what we're having they have to do the work to make something else, including clean up.  Now that they are young adults, DH has more than once pointed out to them that they're free to pick up fast food, using their own cash and riding their bikes.  Not surprisingly, the've never made that choice.  Food they don't love but which has been paid for and prepared by someone else is preferable to paying for their own food or washing extra dishes.

I don't allow unlimited cereal and milk.  I buy enough to last and that's it.  I had to make a rule they can't have cereal as a snack or for more than one meal.  My youngest can't drink milk as a beverage unless it's clear we have enough to not run out.  Kids who are getting plenty of good food don't need milk as a beverage (or any caloric beverages).  If they run out of cereal, they make do until the next time we get groceries.  There are other breakfast options such as eggs or oatmeal.  As for bread, both boys eat gluten free bread, and there were issues with wasted bread, so I won't buy it anymore.  They can use corn tortillas.  (I bake regular bread when DH and I eat it, but it's rare now.)

For us, being out of certain foods isn't a reason to go shopping.  When my boys were younger I would make sure we could stretch the shopping time.  If we were out of cereal I would make cornmeal mush, bake muffins, make granola, etc. for breakfasts.  A common meal as we approached needing to get groceries was lentil casserole, sweet potatoes, and cabbage salad, because it combined pantry staples like lentils and rice with long lasting produce like onions, sweet potatoes, and cabbage.  I've tried to teach them that there's plenty of food in the house even if it isn't their favorite foods.  We talk about it, too -- they know DH and I eat foods that aren't our favorites, too.

I'm not saying my kids don't have food preferences or get fussy and sulky about food -- they do.  And maybe it's easier for us in that they never got used to seeing other kids with snack foods because they were homeschooled throughout.  I'm not unwilling to make easy accommodations for them (youngest doesn't like tomato sauce on pasta, so I serve them separately, things like that), but I won't cook entirely different meals.  They get the snacks we have and if they can't ration themselves they can make popcorn.  They've never had frozen entrees, so that's not something they default to. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on November 29, 2020, 12:09:49 PM
When my kids were school aged, I bought one snack food/week and it was divided up in baggies with their names on them. They could eat it all at once or make it last, but woe unto she who dipped into her sisterís share!

There was always popcorn, and I baked an awful lot of muffins.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 29, 2020, 04:47:15 PM
This doesn't have anything to do with food but if any of you are interested in subscribing to Hulu they have a great deal going on and I think it is only for one more day. You can get the basic service, unfortunately with commercials (limited) for $1.99 a month for one year. The commercials irk me to no end but you don't get 75 of them in a row. There are a few and then they return you to the show. For $1.99, it is a pretty good deal. I just signed up. I am a former subscriber and was eligible to get this price as well as newbies. Don't forget, this is only good for maybe one more day. I think it is a Black Friday deal thing.

I am not selling this and not affiliate with Hulu!

Since we are cooped up and winter is upon us, it might be something to enjoy.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on November 29, 2020, 04:49:41 PM
This doesn't have anything to do with food but if any of you are interested in subscribing to Hulu they have a great deal going on and I think it is only for one more day. You can get the basic service, unfortunately with commercials (limited) for $1.99 a month for one year. The commercials irk me to no end but you don't get 75 of them in a row. There are a few and then they return you to the show. For $1.99, it is a pretty good deal. I just signed up. I am a former subscriber and was eligible to get this price as well as newbies. Don't forget, this is only good for maybe one more day. I think it is a Black Friday deal thing.

I am not selling this and not affiliate with Hulu!

Since we are cooped up and winter is upon us, it might be something to enjoy.

Nice! Weíre already subscribers, but this is a great deal for someone looking to try it out. Weíre happy with the service.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: geekette on November 29, 2020, 04:56:09 PM
What does Hulu offer?  We have an OTA DVR (with auto commercial skip), and Netflix.  Is there a lot on Hulu that's not stuff you can get OTA?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: hooplady on November 29, 2020, 08:47:12 PM
Hopefully I haven't been "hoarding" but I've definitely been stocking up a bit on some products lately - bleach, TP, cereal, etc. For the last few months I've depended on Target delivery for many of my staples but suddenly they aren't available for shipping. Danggit I need my chickpeas to make hummus!! Had to switch to in-store pickup, or perhaps they will bring it to my car with the Target app.

For produce, I try to split with a neighbor for salad greens and such...but lately we've been going to Aldi on the same day! Must coordinate better!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Blue Skies on November 30, 2020, 04:32:50 AM
Ugh, yes.  I don't order a lot of groceries from Target, but there were a few things that I liked to get from there.  Now they are all unavailable for shipping to my zip code.  Irritating.  Some of the things I got from there because they don't carry them in the stores around here either, so it was my only way to get it.  I will survive.  Just not as happily.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 30, 2020, 04:44:30 AM
hooplady, if you are a Costco member you can buy chickpeas on line for $7.49 an 8 pack. They will charge you $3 shipping unless you meet the minimum order. I am not sure, but I think $75 might be the minimum. Walmart has lots of dried garbanzo beans and some canned varieties. Be prepared for dented up cans from Walmart.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on November 30, 2020, 05:53:19 AM
hooplady, if you are a Costco member you can buy chickpeas on line for $7.49 an 8 pack. They will charge you $3 shipping unless you meet the minimum order. I am not sure, but I think $75 might be the minimum. Walmart has lots of dried garbanzo beans and some canned varieties. Be prepared for dented up cans from Walmart.
Ha! Last Costco trip, I grabbed a shrink wrapped 8-pack of black beans on (lazy) impulse. Every damn can is dented. Meh, we'll use them up fast enough and it's a bigger waste of resources to return them, but grrrr.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 30, 2020, 06:07:15 AM
Anytime I order cans from Walmart or Target they come dented. Walmart is number one the worst when it comes to securely packaging items. Target is a close second. Heaven forbid if you order something like spaghetti sauce in a glass jar! I have had total glass shards and goopy sauce at the bottom of the box. I now load up when I do curbside to avoid disaster.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 30, 2020, 07:06:03 AM
DH became vegan a couple months ago. I still have a huge amount of meats in my freezer. DS went away to college and did Nutrisystem 2 months ago and lost 23 pounds while away. He ordered another month last night.

I need to get rid of some meat to make room for the frozen Nutrisystem that is coming this month. My neighbors are almost all vegetarians. Upper crust first world pandemic problems for sure.

Iím about ready to post on my local Choose FI group to get rid of the extra meats.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on November 30, 2020, 07:37:24 AM
couponvan, you may already be aware of this but if not, you can buy Nutrisystem gift cards for $79.99 and the value is $100.

I personally have never bought them but have seen them offered.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on November 30, 2020, 10:28:48 AM
This fall, I tried water-bath canning beets without pickling them when a friend told me that they did it all the time when she was a kid, but unfortunately they've all gone off. Most of the seals are still intact, but they've gone murky and I'm not interested in risking botulism. I'll be throwing out all 30l 10 L today.  Pity.

On the plus side, the various vegetables that I dried for the first time have stored very well and have been making a great addition to soups.

You win some, you lose some! I count myself s fortunate to have a full enough pantry and bank account that the loss of the beets is more of an experiment gone wrong than a hardship.

Edit to update: It turns out that I had canned less beets than I had thought, but EEEEEEEEEW, where they ever gross when I opened them up! I'll be taking the official advice when it comes to canning from now on!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: birdie55 on November 30, 2020, 10:40:55 AM
Sunhat,
According to the National Center for Home Food Preservation, beets need to be pressure canned.  Bummer about your loss. 

https://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_04/beets.html
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: hooplady on November 30, 2020, 10:48:49 AM
hooplady, if you are a Costco member you can buy chickpeas on line for $7.49 an 8 pack. They will charge you $3 shipping unless you meet the minimum order. I am not sure, but I think $75 might be the minimum. Walmart has lots of dried garbanzo beans and some canned varieties. Be prepared for dented up cans from Walmart.
Thanks! Not a Costco member right now, tried Walmart and there were few available for shipping and most were crazy expensive. I'm thinking retailers in general have changed their shipping schemes to allow for holiday madness. Actually ordered something in glass jars a few weeks ago from Wal-mart and they arrived intact...I was pleasantly surprised!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on November 30, 2020, 11:12:07 AM
This fall, I tried water-bath canning beets without pickling them when a friend told me that they did it all the time when she was a kid, but unfortunately they've all gone off. Most of the seals are still intact, but they've gone murky and I'm not interested in risking botulism. I'll be throwing out all 30l today.  Pity.

On the plus side, the various vegetables that I dried for the first time have stored very well and have been making a great addition to soups.

You win some, you lose some! I count myself s fortunate to have a full enough pantry and bank account that the loss of the beets is more of an experiment gone wrong than a hardship.

Yeah, for most vegetables you either have to pickle them to bring down the pH or pressure-can them because the natural acid level isn't high enough to prevent microbial growth. That's a sad loss!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: couponvan on November 30, 2020, 11:54:18 AM
couponvan, you may already be aware of this but if not, you can buy Nutrisystem gift cards for $79.99 and the value is $100.

I personally have never bought them but have seen them offered.
Yes, they come from Costco this way.  It works out to about $300/month, which is cheaper than the college meal plan that was offered, but still more than what a reasonable cost/self control would be.  It was nice he didn't really have to go to the grocery store other than for some minor fresh produce of which they have an open air market to buy from.  It reduced his temptation. 

At home, we have way to many crap snacks around that make it hard to control.  I know I should do better - but we went through the whole if we die from COVID routine.  LOL. Now we're more on the we need to be healthier in case we catch it fence, but we have two really skinny teenagers in the house who don't need low calorie.

OK - back to pandemic hoarding....
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on November 30, 2020, 02:56:42 PM
Quote
I lived for most of my childhood in a small community about an 8 hr drive north of Timmins.

I'm a bit of a map nerd, so I looked that up.  Holy cow, that's...um...north.

Our challenge is the amount the teenaged boy can eat...and the fact that he's the only one who can eat that way.  We noticed a few weeks ago that DS2 was getting a tiny bit chubby.  Didn't really think anything of it, because our kids basically would "chub up" for a week or two right before sprouting up.

Then he didn't sprout up like we expected...we came to realize that every time the teenager wanted a snack, he also wanted a snack.  Our snacks are generally less healthy now than 6 years ago when DS1 was this age...I was a lot stricter and we weren't all stuck together 24-7 in COVID-land.  Neither kid is getting as much exercise as normal (though we do stuff as a family and make them get exercise every day.)  I mean, on a normal school day, DS2 would play before school, morning recess, lunch recess, and after school program.  School lunches and snacks are super healthy.

So, we reverted back a bit to our old ways of ... you know, dessert night is Tuesday and Friday.  Yes, you can have nutella on toast for breakfast, but only 3 days a week.  Thirsty?  Have some water.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: hooplady on November 30, 2020, 04:42:57 PM
Chickpea crisis averted, may have strayed slightly into the realm of hoarding. Target pickup went smoothly, so much so that I needed to kill time and ended up making a quick stop at Aldi (was trying to avoid visiting a store at all but oh well). Four cans at Target for $.59, and since there are currently no limits at Aldi (had been 4 per customer for a while), got a full dozen for $.50 each. Stocked up on garlic too.

Already flush with tahini so my hummus habit should be handled for several weeks.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Villanelle on November 30, 2020, 05:22:51 PM
Quote
I lived for most of my childhood in a small community about an 8 hr drive north of Timmins.

I'm a bit of a map nerd, so I looked that up.  Holy cow, that's...um...north.

Our challenge is the amount the teenaged boy can eat...and the fact that he's the only one who can eat that way.  We noticed a few weeks ago that DS2 was getting a tiny bit chubby.  Didn't really think anything of it, because our kids basically would "chub up" for a week or two right before sprouting up.

Then he didn't sprout up like we expected...we came to realize that every time the teenager wanted a snack, he also wanted a snack.  Our snacks are generally less healthy now than 6 years ago when DS1 was this age...I was a lot stricter and we weren't all stuck together 24-7 in COVID-land.  Neither kid is getting as much exercise as normal (though we do stuff as a family and make them get exercise every day.)  I mean, on a normal school day, DS2 would play before school, morning recess, lunch recess, and after school program.  School lunches and snacks are super healthy.

So, we reverted back a bit to our old ways of ... you know, dessert night is Tuesday and Friday.  Yes, you can have nutella on toast for breakfast, but only 3 days a week.  Thirsty?  Have some water.

Covid has seen us develop a significat flavored water habit.  I'm okay with this because it's still essentially healthy, though it does cost more than tap water.  But I'm much happier drinking something with flavor.  Might this help satisfy the thirsty kids?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on November 30, 2020, 07:43:34 PM
@birdie55  , @OtherJen
I knew the guidance but still took a chance when a friend said that her parents just boiled the heck out of them when water-bath canning them plain when she was a kid. I'm normally a fervent rule-follower, but got a nerd's rush trying to see if I could boil my way around the guidelines. I won't be making that mistake again! Fastidious rule-following may not be adventurous, but it would have saved me a really gross afternoon of draining beet sludge!

(That friend is something of a superhero, but I'm not willing to get food poisoning to try to get her botulism-induced superpowers!)

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 01, 2020, 02:47:22 AM
Chickpea crisis averted, may have strayed slightly into the realm of hoarding. Target pickup went smoothly, so much so that I needed to kill time and ended up making a quick stop at Aldi (was trying to avoid visiting a store at all but oh well). Four cans at Target for $.59, and since there are currently no limits at Aldi (had been 4 per customer for a while), got a full dozen for $.50 each. Stocked up on garlic too.

Already flush with tahini so my hummus habit should be handled for several weeks.

hooplady, can you post your recipe for hummus? I buy chickpeas with that intention and then just don't. It is a bit out of my element but would like to try because when I buy it, already made, I do like it!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 01, 2020, 02:58:06 AM
@birdie55  , @OtherJen
I knew the guidance but still took a chance when a friend said that her parents just boiled the heck out of them when water-bath canning them plain when she was a kid. I'm normally a fervent rule-follower, but got a nerd's rush trying to see if I could boil my way around the guidelines. I won't be making that mistake again! Fastidious rule-following may not be adventurous, but it would have saved me a really gross afternoon of draining beet sludge!

(That friend is something of a superhero, but I'm not willing to get food poisoning to try to get her botulism-induced superpowers!)

Sun Hat, my Mom was an avid canner and she canned everything you can imagine and never had issues. She had a Ball canning book and followed the instructions to the letter. That was her bible. She would be in the kitchen, in August, with boiling pots of water and would can late into the evening hours. It was her pride and joy. She also won about 10 different ribbons at a local country fair for various canned items one summer. My advice is to pick up a Ball canning book! No shame in what you did because you learned from it...we all learn the hard way it seems! Buy your friend a copy of the Ball book too before she kills someone!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: lthenderson on December 01, 2020, 07:25:49 AM
We buy dried chickpeas in bulk because they have always been plentiful, even during this pandemic and they don't have any extra things like preservatives. I then bring them to a boil for two minutes and let soak for a half hour, then bring to a boil again and hot pack into canning jars and pressure can them. I think we can get a bag of dried chickpeas for under $1.50 and that makes 6-8 pints of canned chickpeas.

When we are ready for hummus, we just open a jar and dump the contents into our blender along with our favorite ingredients. Usually lots of garlic, a squeeze of lemon, roasted red peppers, a couple spoonful of tahini, salt and some olive oil.  Blend thoroughly and enjoy.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: hooplady on December 01, 2020, 09:19:12 AM
hooplady, can you post your recipe for hummus? I buy chickpeas with that intention and then just don't. It is a bit out of my element but would like to try because when I buy it, already made, I do like it!
It's one of those things that I've been making forever so I don't measure most of the ingredients but here's my best guesstimate.

Two 15-oz cans of chickpeas/garbanzos. Drain and reserve the liquid from one can, add back as much as needed to bring to consistency of your liking.
1/4 -1/2 cup tahini
4-5 garlic cloves (note - I like it pretty garlicky!)
1/2 tsp salt
2 Tbl olive oil
splash of lemon juice

Whomp it all together. I finally splurged on a Blendtec but in the past I've used a regular blender or a food processor. Heck, when I first started I was taught to make it by hand, smashing the chickpeas with a glass jar; this creates a very lumpy hummus which is how I prefer it, I find most Americanized versions to be too runny. Hope you like it!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: hooplady on December 01, 2020, 09:24:55 AM
We buy dried chickpeas in bulk because they have always been plentiful, even during this pandemic and they don't have any extra things like preservatives. I then bring them to a boil for two minutes and let soak for a half hour, then bring to a boil again and hot pack into canning jars and pressure can them. I think we can get a bag of dried chickpeas for under $1.50 and that makes 6-8 pints of canned chickpeas.

When we are ready for hummus, we just open a jar and dump the contents into our blender along with our favorite ingredients. Usually lots of garlic, a squeeze of lemon, roasted red peppers, a couple spoonful of tahini, salt and some olive oil.  Blend thoroughly and enjoy.
Yep, that's basically it except for the red peppers - I have used them as a garnish occasionally. I actually got some dried chickpeas too...tried cooking them from scratch once before and they were awful, I think I didn't add enough salt.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 01, 2020, 09:32:17 AM
Thanks hooplady, I wrote it down and would make it asap but alas, I have no tahini. So, that is on my list to buy! Thank you!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: lthenderson on December 01, 2020, 09:56:31 AM
We buy dried chickpeas in bulk because they have always been plentiful, even during this pandemic and they don't have any extra things like preservatives. I then bring them to a boil for two minutes and let soak for a half hour, then bring to a boil again and hot pack into canning jars and pressure can them. I think we can get a bag of dried chickpeas for under $1.50 and that makes 6-8 pints of canned chickpeas.

When we are ready for hummus, we just open a jar and dump the contents into our blender along with our favorite ingredients. Usually lots of garlic, a squeeze of lemon, roasted red peppers, a couple spoonful of tahini, salt and some olive oil.  Blend thoroughly and enjoy.
Yep, that's basically it except for the red peppers - I have used them as a garnish occasionally. I actually got some dried chickpeas too...tried cooking them from scratch once before and they were awful, I think I didn't add enough salt.

They take a lot to cook down from scratch I would imagine. After boiling and soaking mine, I process them at 10 lbs of pressure for 90 minutes which would equate to a whole lot of boiling. I have never added anything salt or otherwise to the jars that I can them in but I do add salt with other ingredients when turning them into hummus.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PMG on December 01, 2020, 12:25:21 PM
I make hummus from dried beans regularly.  I havenít noticed them taking more time than other dried beans. Usually I cook up 1.5-2.5 pounds and process it all in to hummus then I freeze it in 8-16 ounce containers. Easy to pull out the day before a long day and have lunch to go.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GreenSheep on December 01, 2020, 01:30:52 PM
Thanks hooplady, I wrote it down and would make it asap but alas, I have no tahini. So, that is on my list to buy! Thank you!

If you have a food processor and some sesame seeds (or if sesame seeds are easier to get than tahini), toss the sesame seeds into the food processor, blend them till smooth, and now you have tahini! Just like making nut butter. It could take several minutes and some pausing to scrape down the sides, depending on your machine, but it's an easy one-ingredient food!

Bonus: No need to clean the food processor after making sticky, gooey tahini if you're just going to make hummus right away!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: mm1970 on December 01, 2020, 02:25:49 PM
Chickpea crisis averted, may have strayed slightly into the realm of hoarding. Target pickup went smoothly, so much so that I needed to kill time and ended up making a quick stop at Aldi (was trying to avoid visiting a store at all but oh well). Four cans at Target for $.59, and since there are currently no limits at Aldi (had been 4 per customer for a while), got a full dozen for $.50 each. Stocked up on garlic too.

Already flush with tahini so my hummus habit should be handled for several weeks.

hooplady, can you post your recipe for hummus? I buy chickpeas with that intention and then just don't. It is a bit out of my element but would like to try because when I buy it, already made, I do like it!
@Roadrunner53

https://www.food.com/amp/recipe/cooks-illustrated-restaurant-style-hummus-380146

This is my favorite hummus recipe.  Easily can use dried chickpeas that you cook first.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 04, 2020, 01:09:12 PM
Still searching for Prime rib roasts. All I can find is PR roasts that are $12.99 a lb! Last year they were $5.99-$7.99 a lb.

Anyone having any luck finding sales?

The virus is really ramping up, anyone finding empty shelves in the stores? I am planning on a curbside grocery run maybe next week. I could put it off longer though.

I had an eye doc appointment yesterday but I cancelled it a few days before hand. I am just not comfortable to have the doc so close to my face doing the exam. Put it off till February. UGH, who knows how bad the virus will be by then.

Here is a good one! My shelf stable 8 oz. milks were on the verge of expiring so I froze them. Worked out perfectly. Last night I decided I needed two of them to make a sauce. I didn't plan this till the last minute and wanted the milk defrosted. So, I threw them in the microwave and set it for one minute. Well, that was a bad idea! Within a few seconds, the microwave was sparking and the containers were had charred edges then a fire started on the parchment paper I had in the microwave! I am shrieking a little hearing the popping then the fire. I opened the door and took out the milks then the parchment that was on fire and threw it in the sink! DUH to me, the containers are made of layers of some kind of plastic and aluminum material.  I knew this but totally forgot. So, lesson learned! Take it from me, defrost in warm water or take out to thaw earlier! Hahahaha! Thank goodness the microwave didn't conk out and I am even more thankful that I didn't leave the room like I have done a thousand times before when I start the microwave!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Michael in ABQ on December 04, 2020, 02:30:36 PM
My wife went grocery shopping this morning. She stopped at Costco to get gas (no line for a change). At 8:15 there was already a line of 100ish people lined up for what I believe is their early opening at 9:00 for seniors - regular opening is 10:00.

She went to another grocery store and there were some limits on things like 2 milks (we normally go through 4-5 gallons a week). She noted that almost all the frozen vegetables were sold out. Some of the more expensive organic brands were still in stock and a few less desirable things like collard greens. But regular peans, corn, green beans, etc. were basically all gone.

Our state (New Mexico) has been on a new lockdown for about two weeks as cases and deaths have increased about 5-8x in the last month or so. This despite having some of the most restrictive public health measures in the country since March. Grocery stores, even huge ones like Costco or a Walmart Supercenter, are now limited to 75 people max. And if more than 4 employees test positive for COVID they shut the store down for two weeks. Obviously with hundreds of employees that doesn't take much and in some cities where there are only 4-5 grocery stores to begin with, having 1-2 shut down and limiting the rest to 75 means lines out the door for an hour or more. My last trip to a Costco to stock-up two weeks ago was an hour and 15 minutes in line and they were only allowing one person per household - i.e. no parents with kids, no couples, just one per household so they could get a full 75 paying customers in at a time.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Villanelle on December 04, 2020, 03:11:56 PM
My wife went grocery shopping this morning. She stopped at Costco to get gas (no line for a change). At 8:15 there was already a line of 100ish people lined up for what I believe is their early opening at 9:00 for seniors - regular opening is 10:00.

She went to another grocery store and there were some limits on things like 2 milks (we normally go through 4-5 gallons a week). She noted that almost all the frozen vegetables were sold out. Some of the more expensive organic brands were still in stock and a few less desirable things like collard greens. But regular peans, corn, green beans, etc. were basically all gone.

Our state (New Mexico) has been on a new lockdown for about two weeks as cases and deaths have increased about 5-8x in the last month or so. This despite having some of the most restrictive public health measures in the country since March. Grocery stores, even huge ones like Costco or a Walmart Supercenter, are now limited to 75 people max. And if more than 4 employees test positive for COVID they shut the store down for two weeks. Obviously with hundreds of employees that doesn't take much and in some cities where there are only 4-5 grocery stores to begin with, having 1-2 shut down and limiting the rest to 75 means lines out the door for an hour or more. My last trip to a Costco to stock-up two weeks ago was an hour and 15 minutes in line and they were only allowing one person per household - i.e. no parents with kids, no couples, just one per household so they could get a full 75 paying customers in at a time.


Do you have Amazon Fresh available in your area?  It seems like it would be well worth it to avoid all that.  In my HCOL area, my very unscientific research with a very small sample size showed Fresh is actually cheaper for me than my local grocery store, or probably about the same once I add the tip in Fresh. 

There are very rarely limits on items.  I'm regularly buying produce and meat with no issues.  There were a few weeks in the very early days that meat was hard to come buy (random items, and often the expensive organic varieties were pretty much always available).  Mine even has toilet paper and paper towels currently available, several options. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 04, 2020, 03:24:33 PM
Still searching for Prime rib roasts. All I can find is PR roasts that are $12.99 a lb! Last year they were $5.99-$7.99 a lb.

Anyone having any luck finding sales?

The virus is really ramping up, anyone finding empty shelves in the stores? I am planning on a curbside grocery run maybe next week. I could put it off longer though.

I had an eye doc appointment yesterday but I cancelled it a few days before hand. I am just not comfortable to have the doc so close to my face doing the exam. Put it off till February. UGH, who knows how bad the virus will be by then.

Here is a good one! My shelf stable 8 oz. milks were on the verge of expiring so I froze them. Worked out perfectly. Last night I decided I needed two of them to make a sauce. I didn't plan this till the last minute and wanted the milk defrosted. So, I threw them in the microwave and set it for one minute. Well, that was a bad idea! Within a few seconds, the microwave was sparking and the containers were had charred edges then a fire started on the parchment paper I had in the microwave! I am shrieking a little hearing the popping then the fire. I opened the door and took out the milks then the parchment that was on fire and threw it in the sink! DUH to me, the containers are made of layers of some kind of plastic and aluminum material.  I knew this but totally forgot. So, lesson learned! Take it from me, defrost in warm water or take out to thaw earlier! Hahahaha! Thank goodness the microwave didn't conk out and I am even more thankful that I didn't leave the room like I have done a thousand times before when I start the microwave!

I haven't seen prime rib roasts as low as I found them before Thanksgiving, which was $4.99/#.  I bought 4 but never made it back for more.  Thanks for the tip on the Paula Dean cooking method -- we had a perfectly medium rare roast.  This week our Sprouts has the prime rib roasts for $8.99/#, which is more than I'm willing to pay since I still have 3 in the freezer.

Same grocer who had the $4.99 prime rib roast has choice beef chuck shoulder roasts for $2.99/# this week, another "lowest price of the year" and one I don't see often.  I'd have to go into the store to get that price, however -- it's $5.19/# using Instacart.  And I can't be sure they'll actually have it in stock.

I was planning a curbside pickup for mid-week, but Sprouts sent out a $10 coupon so I might do it Sunday (last day of coupon).  I'd need to place the order soon though -- usually I can get a slot within a couple of hours and already the earliest is middle of the day tomorrow.  I could easily wait though, and see if they send out another coupon.

DH managed to get his eye exam in October.  Mine isn't due until February, but I probably won't go until I've been vaccinated.  Out of the 4 of us, I'm the only one who managed to get to the dentist this year.  My 6 month exam was cancelled in March, and I went sometime this summer (time is lost on me right now).  All 3 guys decided not to go in May, then procrastinated over the summer and now they don't feel safe going.  DH had a coworker exposed at a different dentist last week.  He'd overheard them talking about a potluck, and sure enough this week he got the call that he'd been exposed and needs to quarantine.

I'm glad the microwaved milk fire wasn't any worse!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on December 04, 2020, 03:27:06 PM
I am reaping the benefits of my previous pandemic hoarding. ;-)

I went into Aldi towards the end of October, and Iím not going into the grocery store again until Iíve been vaccinated. We do pick up from Giant Eagle, and a produce box from the local coop.

GE was out of a lot of weird things last week but had reasonable substitutions. Scott tp was on sale and I ordered a 12 pack because weíd just finished one off, and they did have that.

When I buy a rib roast I get it from my neighborhood IGA. Alas, Iím not going in there (or anywhere else - theyíve been very good, really.)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 04, 2020, 04:16:19 PM
I'm battling anxiety regarding locks downs, safety, and food/paper goods shortages.  I keep telling myself we're fine, we have plenty of food, enough toilet paper and paper towels, etc. and I still find myself wanting to stock up.  I guess mostly I want that $2.99/# chuck roast, as I can see a long winter season (not in weather, just in how we feel) and beef stew sounds incredibly comforting.  But we don't have to have it.  Chances are our area of the state will go into a major lockdown Sunday, limiting all retail to 20% capacity, even the "essential businesses" like grocery stores.  I imagine the grocery stores are crazy busy today.

(I think the anxiety will abate some once we do get the order to go into a stay at home order, as I'll know for 3 weeks there's no reason to obsessively doom-scroll about it.)

I did a Costco order Wednesday, and they were still out of heavy cream.  I'm displeased about this, as I use it in our holiday cooking, and they have the Horizon brand which only has added gellan gum instead of polysorbate whatever and carrageenan.  I'd prefer Trader Joe's heavy cream most of all (no additives at all), but that store is far too crowded even with them supposedly adhering to reduced occupancy.  Aldi is also out of cream.

Target just cancelled a paper towel order I made two weeks ago.  I'm hoping they don't cancel my toilet paper order -- we really need to use the septic/sewer safe TP that dissolves easily and won't clog pipes.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 04, 2020, 04:17:33 PM
I am reaping the benefits of my previous pandemic hoarding. ;-)

I went into Aldi towards the end of October, and Iím not going into the grocery store again until Iíve been vaccinated. We do pick up from Giant Eagle, and a produce box from the local coop.

GE was out of a lot of weird things last week but had reasonable substitutions. Scott tp was on sale and I ordered a 12 pack because weíd just finished one off, and they did have that.

When I buy a rib roast I get it from my neighborhood IGA. Alas, Iím not going in there (or anywhere else - theyíve been very good, really.)

It's good to read this, Cranky, because I know I shouldn't go into a grocery store again until I've been vaccinated as well.  No sale is really worth getting Covid for.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on December 04, 2020, 06:49:20 PM
Grocery stores, even huge ones like Costco or a Walmart Supercenter, are now limited to 75 people max. And if more than 4 employees test positive for COVID they shut the store down for two weeks. Obviously with hundreds of employees that doesn't take much and in some cities where there are only 4-5 grocery stores to begin with, having 1-2 shut down and limiting the rest to 75 means lines out the door for an hour or more. My last trip to a Costco to stock-up two weeks ago was an hour and 15 minutes in line and they were only allowing one person per household - i.e. no parents with kids, no couples, just one per household so they could get a full 75 paying customers in at a time.

That sounds awful. The Costcos up here don't have the 75 person limit, and the limit is two people per household (though I have started to do two trips per visit, that is, I fill up one cart, check out, then do it again so that we have only one person exposed.)  I haven't been there for a few weeks because both nearby Costcos are now in areas exceeding 6% positivity rates.

Are there any food deliveries or farm shares in your area?  We get a Misfits box every two weeks, and I'm thinking of getting milk deliveries (which also deliver other fresh goods such as eggs, OJ, sausage, fresh bagels and cream cheese.) Not the cheapest option, but we can afford it for a few months and it will save us trips to the store.

The kids continue to be snacking scourges. At least hybrid school has started up again so they are out of the house a couple of times a weeks (and school lunch is free to every child in New York State for now, it's great).  Ordinarily we don't eat so much frozen or prepared food, but my time is disrupted a lot with remote schooling and volunteer work.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on December 04, 2020, 08:35:40 PM
The virus is really ramping up, anyone finding empty shelves in the stores? I am planning on a curbside grocery run maybe next week. I could put it off longer though.

I did my usual shop on Thursday morning, and I didn't see any empty shelves, even though things are ramping up in my area.  Meat was full, baking products were full, lots of everything (except cucumbers, shrug -- oh, and the one flavor of wet cat food my cat will eat).  The TP aisle was sparse, but there were still big packs available in several different brands.

I'm still shopping in person because my store is never crowded in the mornings.

I am trying out a Misfits box next week, thanks to a Black Friday 50% discount.  I haven't worked out how much more expensive it is than my normal veggie purchases, but they do seem to have some things right now that my local store doesn't.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 05, 2020, 03:50:22 AM
I don't know about all of you, but many times I buy a bag of potatoes and next thing I know they are soft, wrinkled and growing legs. If they are firm, I will cut off the uglies and use them. Once they are too far gone they go in the trash. I hate throwing them out but never seem to be able to keep on top of the tater situation. I was on Youtube and this woman demonstrated how you can freeze taters. What she did was have a big pot of boiling water on the stovetop. Then, into a basket she could lower into the pot of water she cut up the taters into 1/2 inch squares. She did about 2 lbs. per batch. She dropped the diced taters into the boiling water (in the basket) and waited till the water came back to a boil then timed it for 2 minutes. After that, she dropped the basket into a pot of cold water to quickly cool down the taters. Then after a minute or so, let the basket drain. She would cut up an onion into dices and a pepper into dices and add them to the ziplock with the potatoes. She would remove as much air as possible from the bag then put in the freezer. She said she would make potatoes O'Brian with them. She lets them defrost overnight in the ziplock in the fridge. Boiling the taters stops the enzyme activity which can cause the potatoes to turn brown while frozen.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fz5Zj2SOMpg

I have some taters that are in need of either eating or freezing so I might give this method a try.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 05, 2020, 04:07:26 AM
Poundwise, I am also getting Misfits. I like it so much more now that I can pick and choose what I want. I am not a big fan of kale or zucchini or many squashes and in the beginning you had no choice but to get the 'mystery box' of veggies and fruits. I tried to think outside the box on the kale and unusual stuff that I never buy but it got old and I still wasn't liking kale or squash all that much. Now that I can choose what goes in the box, it is really great. I get the Madness box every two weeks and I did have to throw one thing out due to not realizing it would go bad so quick. Now I know and will be aware of that. But other than that, I am using it all up and actually, have very little left and my next delivery isn't till next week. So, onto the frozen veggies.

WOW, K_in_the_kitchen $2.99 for chuck roast!!! I would figure out a way to grab up a few of those to stick in the freezer!

Glad the Paula Deen cooking method for prime rib came out for you! We have used it for years and for us, it is the only one we will use. The Hub sometimes puts a coffee rub on the outside and always sticks garlic into it. Now, if I can only find some of these prime ribs without breaking the bank!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on December 05, 2020, 05:42:57 AM
I have some taters that are in need of either eating or freezing so I might give this method a try.

I used to freeze potatoes when I had a lot from my CSA, or when one was too big for the individual serving I wanted.  Just parboil or even par-cook in the microwave, and freeze  - cut to whatever size you want to use later.  Iíve also frozen a tray of mashed potatoes, which heats up well in the oven.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on December 05, 2020, 07:33:14 AM
I don't know about all of you, but many times I buy a bag of potatoes and next thing I know they are soft, wrinkled and growing legs. If they are firm, I will cut off the uglies and use them. Once they are too far gone they go in the trash. I hate throwing them out but never seem to be able to keep on top of the tater situation.

Do you store onions in the same location as your potatoes? Since I found a separate location, my potatoes last longer (though they still occasionally go bad). Many also say that storing an apple with your potatoes helps a lot; I may have tried it in the past but probably let the apple go bad and stopped.  Has to do with plant hormones.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on December 05, 2020, 07:42:53 AM
Poundwise, I am also getting Misfits. I like it so much more now that I can pick and choose what I want. I am not a big fan of kale or zucchini or many squashes and in the beginning you had no choice but to get the 'mystery box' of veggies and fruits. I tried to think outside the box on the kale and unusual stuff that I never buy but it got old and I still wasn't liking kale or squash all that much. Now that I can choose what goes in the box, it is really great. I get the Madness box every two weeks and I did have to throw one thing out due to not realizing it would go bad so quick. Now I know and will be aware of that. But other than that, I am using it all up and actually, have very little left and my next delivery isn't till next week. So, onto the frozen veggies.

Same!  It was the jicamas that broke me down.  We tried one and didn't like it... I think we ended up throwing out three jicamas which is wasteful. With kale, I do a very good winter greens soup from Annie Somerville's Field of Greens cookbook.
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5150aca3e4b0b73e823496d6/t/51c38482e4b09752bb438325/1371767938079/WinterGreensSoup+%281%29.pdf
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 05, 2020, 07:58:18 AM
I don't know about all of you, but many times I buy a bag of potatoes and next thing I know they are soft, wrinkled and growing legs. If they are firm, I will cut off the uglies and use them. Once they are too far gone they go in the trash. I hate throwing them out but never seem to be able to keep on top of the tater situation.

Do you store onions in the same location as your potatoes? Since I found a separate location, my potatoes last longer (though they still occasionally go bad). Many also say that storing an apple with your potatoes helps a lot; I may have tried it in the past but probably let the apple go bad and stopped.  Has to do with plant hormones.

Yes, potatoes and onions are in close proximity. Really have no where else to store them. I will try an apple. My luck it will rot and attract fruit flies!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on December 05, 2020, 08:12:24 AM
@Roadrunner53 Yeah, the onions are ruining your potatoes.  Is it possible you could hang the onions from a hook somewhere farther from the potatoes?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 05, 2020, 08:18:47 AM
@Roadrunner53 Yeah, the onions are ruining your potatoes.  Is it possible you could hang the onions from a hook somewhere farther from the potatoes?

Mmmm, will have to think about that!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on December 05, 2020, 11:35:38 AM
I don't know about all of you, but many times I buy a bag of potatoes and next thing I know they are soft, wrinkled and growing legs. If they are firm, I will cut off the uglies and use them. Once they are too far gone they go in the trash. I hate throwing them out but never seem to be able to keep on top of the tater situation. I was on Youtube and this woman demonstrated how you can freeze taters. What she did was have a big pot of boiling water on the stovetop. Then, into a basket she could lower into the pot of water she cut up the taters into 1/2 inch squares. She did about 2 lbs. per batch. She dropped the diced taters into the boiling water (in the basket) and waited till the water came back to a boil then timed it for 2 minutes. After that, she dropped the basket into a pot of cold water to quickly cool down the taters. Then after a minute or so, let the basket drain. She would cut up an onion into dices and a pepper into dices and add them to the ziplock with the potatoes. She would remove as much air as possible from the bag then put in the freezer. She said she would make potatoes O'Brian with them. She lets them defrost overnight in the ziplock in the fridge. Boiling the taters stops the enzyme activity which can cause the potatoes to turn brown while frozen.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fz5Zj2SOMpg

I have some taters that are in need of either eating or freezing so I might give this method a try.
That is what we do with potatoes. We use the fresh ones for a while and as they start getting a little older and we think they are nearing the peak we cut them up and thrown them into boiling water for 2 mins, into an ice bath then vacuum pack them and into the freezer they go. (FYI do not vacuum pack with onions the onions and garlic are not able to be vacuum packed unless cooked)

We use them for breakfast skillets or in the oven with EVOO and some spices.


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Title: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on December 05, 2020, 12:00:07 PM
This weeks theme - the Grocery gods giveth and the grocery gods taketh. Blessed be the grocery gods.

 Kroger curbside has been pretty good most of the time but seems like the grocery stores are getting pummeled in my area probably due to record deaths, record case counts and non essential things getting capacity cut back.

This weeks order I received most of what I ordered (even paper towels) but the quality was horrible.

Celery was soft like rubber and had mold / rot all over it, romaine lettuce was black and rotting and 2 of the 4 cans I ordered had a huge dents in the side like someone had stomped the side of them.

Called the store and they said sorry, we would be happy to replace them or refund but you have to go into the store and to customer service. I thought about it but it was under $4 so it did not seem worth the risk / effort.

Upon reviewing my receipt to see how if it was worth going in I noticed they did not charge me for the ~ $12 worth of  chuck roast.

ó- still in need of celery for batch cooking today Kroger was out 2 days and I do not trust that I will get decent celery so placed an order with Walmart.

Was able to get everything I needed and when I got home i noticed there was a 5 lb bag of oranges that I did not order or pay for. Called them and they said I could keep them.

Blessed be the grocery gods


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Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 05, 2020, 12:33:55 PM
the_fixer I am surprised that they wouldn't refund you over the phone. I have had issues with things delivered to my house thru Peapod division of Stop & Shop and they have always refunded me. You should call again later in the day and get someone else on the phone. Or ask for a manager. It does make you wonder if things are flying off the shelves, how you could get rotten veggies! Seems it would be fresh as could be. The one time I was totally disgusted is when I got ground meat and it was brown and red. It had an old smell to it too. I am totally convinced that they took old meat and mixed it with new and sold it to me. I was not going to eat that meat no way, no how! I called them up and told them exactly what I thought about it and was promptly refunded. I also order veggies from Misfits and have ordered from Imperfect foods. I have had many mishaps with Imperfect foods. Missing items, boxes delivered a day late in the summer and the meat was warm. I called them up, complained and they were so good and refunded me too. They were having growing pains I think. The delivery service is a well known one and for some reason they just didn't care that the package had perishables and just decided to deliver when it suited them. Imperfect foods selects the delivery day and the delivery company is supposed to abide by it. They must have crabbed to them because my packages started arriving on the correct date and no warm stuff. This of course was during the summer when temps went to 90 degrees for days on end. Ice packs only last so long!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 05, 2020, 01:54:08 PM
This weeks theme - the Grocery gods giveth and the grocery gods taketh. Blessed be the grocery gods.

 Kroger curbside has been pretty good most of the time but seems like the grocery stores are getting pummeled in my area probably due to record deaths, record case counts and non essential things getting capacity cut back.

This weeks order I received most of what I ordered (even paper towels) but the quality was horrible.

Celery was soft like rubber and had mold / rot all over it, romaine lettuce was black and rotting and 2 of the 4 cans I ordered had a huge dents in the side like someone had stomped the side of them.

Called the store and they said sorry, we would be happy to replace them or refund but you have to go into the store and to customer service. I thought about it but it was under $4 so it did not seem worth the risk / effort.

Upon reviewing my receipt to see how if it was worth going in I noticed they did not charge me for the ~ $12 worth of  chuck roast.

ó- still in need of celery for batch cooking today Kroger was out 2 days and I do not trust that I will get decent celery so placed an order with Walmart.

Was able to get everything I needed and when I got home i noticed there was a 5 lb bag of oranges that I did not order or pay for. Called them and they said I could keep them.

Blessed be the grocery gods


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

In the early months of the pandemic we ordered our produce from a local business, which is a combination produce wholesaler / deli sandwich shop / prepped produce and meal kit company.  During the pandemic they added in retail produce (not prepped) and then other perishables and staples.  Without a doubt, the produce was fresher than what we could buy at the grocery store in non-pandemic times.  Once we returned to going to stores I was surprised by the lower quality of produce during the pandemic, which has been even worse when someone else is choosing for us.

The local place is more expensive, but we may very well return to them if produce goes farther downhill this winter.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on December 05, 2020, 01:56:48 PM
the_fixer I am surprised that they wouldn't refund you over the phone. I have had issues with things delivered to my house thru Peapod division of Stop & Shop and they have always refunded me. You should call again later in the day and get someone else on the phone. Or ask for a manager.

I am sure if I persisted or asked to speak to a manager they would have done it over the phone. I know they did it a few years back when I arrived at home to find my steak and salmon did not make it back to the cart while being bagged.

With everything that is going on in the world it just did not seem worth pushing the issue.


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Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on December 05, 2020, 01:58:12 PM
This weeks theme - the Grocery gods giveth and the grocery gods taketh. Blessed be the grocery gods.

 Kroger curbside has been pretty good most of the time but seems like the grocery stores are getting pummeled in my area probably due to record deaths, record case counts and non essential things getting capacity cut back.

This weeks order I received most of what I ordered (even paper towels) but the quality was horrible.

Celery was soft like rubber and had mold / rot all over it, romaine lettuce was black and rotting and 2 of the 4 cans I ordered had a huge dents in the side like someone had stomped the side of them.

Called the store and they said sorry, we would be happy to replace them or refund but you have to go into the store and to customer service. I thought about it but it was under $4 so it did not seem worth the risk / effort.

Upon reviewing my receipt to see how if it was worth going in I noticed they did not charge me for the ~ $12 worth of  chuck roast.

ó- still in need of celery for batch cooking today Kroger was out 2 days and I do not trust that I will get decent celery so placed an order with Walmart.

Was able to get everything I needed and when I got home i noticed there was a 5 lb bag of oranges that I did not order or pay for. Called them and they said I could keep them.

Blessed be the grocery gods


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

In the early months of the pandemic we ordered our produce from a local business, which is a combination produce wholesaler / deli sandwich shop / prepped produce and meal kit company.  During the pandemic they added in retail produce (not prepped) and then other perishables and staples.  Without a doubt, the produce was fresher than what we could buy at the grocery store in non-pandemic times.  Once we returned to going to stores I was surprised by the lower quality of produce during the pandemic, which has been even worse when someone else is choosing for us.

The local place is more expensive, but we may very well return to them if produce goes farther downhill this winter.
Good to know, I will have to see if I can find a place like that but not really sure where to look.


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Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 05, 2020, 04:24:20 PM
Poundwise, I am also getting Misfits. I like it so much more now that I can pick and choose what I want. I am not a big fan of kale or zucchini or many squashes and in the beginning you had no choice but to get the 'mystery box' of veggies and fruits. I tried to think outside the box on the kale and unusual stuff that I never buy but it got old and I still wasn't liking kale or squash all that much. Now that I can choose what goes in the box, it is really great. I get the Madness box every two weeks and I did have to throw one thing out due to not realizing it would go bad so quick. Now I know and will be aware of that. But other than that, I am using it all up and actually, have very little left and my next delivery isn't till next week. So, onto the frozen veggies.

WOW, K_in_the_kitchen $2.99 for chuck roast!!! I would figure out a way to grab up a few of those to stick in the freezer!

Glad the Paula Deen cooking method for prime rib came out for you! We have used it for years and for us, it is the only one we will use. The Hub sometimes puts a coffee rub on the outside and always sticks garlic into it. Now, if I can only find some of these prime ribs without breaking the bank!

We bought 14 roasts, for a total of 32# (they weren't that big) / $94.  After I wrapped and bagged them I realized I could have bought twice as many and still fit them into the freezer.

I wasn't going to go out, but I really wanted these roasts.  So I doubled masked, took my hand sanitizer, and told myself I wouldn't stay if there was a long line to get in or if it was crowded.  DH offered to come with but I didn't see any reason to have two of us go.  No line, and while it wasn't empty, it wasn't Saturday busy, either.  It was easy to stay socially distant, and I was able to get out in under 30 minutes (a threshold I've seen referenced).  There was plenty of meat in the cases, although I didn't look to check varieties.  TP and paper towels were sparse, but not non-existent.  I didn't go down every aisle, but I didn't see any obvious empty spots.  Oh, except for lard -- no lard.  It's tamale making season, so I suppose that's why, but I was a bit bummed.  DH did a Whole30 in November and I was thinking we'd fry our annual New Year's Eve tacos in lard since he isn't eating corn oil.

They even had 91% isopropyl alcohol, which the guys use for bike maintenance and electronics.  I saw hand sanitizer and disinfecting wipes, but I didn't need any.  They had heavy cream (with polysorbate 80, but at this point I give in).  And I remembered to get mineral oil for the cutting boards so I wouldn't have to pay outrageous online prices.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MustacheExplorer on December 07, 2020, 02:53:31 PM
Anytime I order cans from Walmart or Target they come dented. Walmart is number one the worst when it comes to securely packaging items. Target is a close second. Heaven forbid if you order something like spaghetti sauce in a glass jar! I have had total glass shards and goopy sauce at the bottom of the box. I now load up when I do curbside to avoid disaster.

I think Walmart ships cans that are already dented.  I usually  have to go through a few cans to find an undented one on the shelves inside the store.  I don't understand why that is.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 07, 2020, 02:59:40 PM
MustacheExplorer, In my case, they just throw a bunch of cans in the bottom of the box with one air filled tiny pillow. No cardboard to protect anything, no dividers, no attempt at all to try to protect anything. Just one big box of cans smashing into each other for their long journey. When they arrive it looks like they shoveled them out of a bombed out building. Fortunately, I am stocked up and when I need more stuff, I will get it thru curbside shopping or Costco. Costco sells the cans in six packs or 8 packs bundled together so they are not smashing around in the box.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GreenSheep on December 07, 2020, 03:49:07 PM
Meanwhile, I've ordered pillows from Amazon a couple of times recently, and they came packed in a big box with... air pillows. So that my pillows... don't break on the way here...?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on December 07, 2020, 04:22:41 PM
I was forced to return some broken pillows just the other day.  They bounced around too much in the box.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: MyAlterEgoIsTaller on December 07, 2020, 05:08:20 PM
Yesterday I got an Amazon package that had 2 big stickers on the box saying that it could not be shipped by airplane, due to containing lithium batteries. It was my order if yarn and vitamins. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 07, 2020, 07:26:26 PM
My regional chain is doing another "lowest prices of the year" sale on meat.

Beef Rib Rib-Eye Roast Bone-in (Standing Rib Roast) $4.99/#
Whole Trip Tip, Trimmed $3.99/#
Bone-in NY Steak $3.99/#
Pork Shoulder Butt 99Ę/#
B/S Chicken Breast 99Ę/#

But ... none of these are marked "Choice" in the ad.  Indeed, inside the ad the have Choice Beef Rib Bone-In Rib-Eye Roast for $8.99/#.  So these aren't exactly the lowest prices if they aren't Choice, because we've had these prices for Choice beef in the past year.  It is the lowest price for pork butt and b/s chicken breast.

I don't think it's enough to tempt me into the store.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on December 07, 2020, 07:31:18 PM
MustacheExplorer, In my case, they just throw a bunch of cans in the bottom of the box with one air filled tiny pillow. No cardboard to protect anything, no dividers, no attempt at all to try to protect anything. Just one big box of cans smashing into each other for their long journey. When they arrive it looks like they shoveled them out of a bombed out building. Fortunately, I am stocked up and when I need more stuff, I will get it thru curbside shopping or Costco. Costco sells the cans in six packs or 8 packs bundled together so they are not smashing around in the box.
I think I mentioned upthread that I recently bought an eight-pack of black beans at Costco and every damn can was dented. I just grabbed a random case when I was there and never imagined what horrors the shrink wrap and cardboard were hiding. I could return them, but the waste would be ridiculous. We'll just make a concerted effort to use them up, which is of course, the opposite of why I bought them.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on December 07, 2020, 08:29:48 PM
I learned from volunteering at a food bank that dented cans are okay as long as the dent isnít so long or deep that it comes to a point at the ends or as long as the sealed area isnít dented.  These are more likely to cause tiny holes that allow air in and can cause bacteria to grow.  A modest, shallow dent on the side isnít likely to be harmful.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sibley on December 07, 2020, 08:52:15 PM
I was curious and checked. Last grocery store trip was mid October. Since then, I've gone to the little corner store type place about every 2 weeks for milk, and once to the local butcher for a turkey. I do need to go to the store before Christmas, because I'm getting chocolate for some gifts. I plan to restock at that point, then hopefully ride it out til February. Or March. We'll see.

I have been going to the pet store regularly, but I have determined that the cat has a problem with fish! Trial and error requires frequent trips. I should be able to stock up now.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on December 07, 2020, 11:48:45 PM
I learned from volunteering at a food bank that dented cans are okay as long as the dent isnít so long or deep that it comes to a point at the ends or as long as the sealed area isnít dented.  These are more likely to cause tiny holes that allow air in and can cause bacteria to grow.  A modest, shallow dent on the side isnít likely to be harmful.
The hyperbole was in response to...hyperbole. My intent in purchasing them was to keep them on hand as back up food, not something to be consumed quickly. Also, some of the dents are on the rims, not the sides of the cans, ergo, IMO, more likely to be problematic. Instead of a little convenience food splurge, I have eight dented cans. Well, seven now.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PMG on December 08, 2020, 05:39:59 AM
Iíve had a good experience ordering a huge variety of food stuff from target and a little bit from Walmart. I try not to order glass but the couple times I have it came intact. Someone upthread mentioned that quite a few target staples arenít available for shipping right now. Thatís hurting me too!  Iím hoping itís not a permanent change. We donít have any pick up options locally and being able to supplement grocery trips with target orders is really helpful. We also find some nice variety there that we canít buy locally.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 08, 2020, 05:50:34 AM
Iíve had a good experience ordering a huge variety of food stuff from target and a little bit from Walmart. I try not to order glass but the couple times I have it came intact. Someone upthread mentioned that quite a few target staples arenít available for shipping right now. Thatís hurting me too!  Iím hoping itís not a permanent change. We donít have any pick up options locally and being able to supplement grocery trips with target orders is really helpful. We also find some nice variety there that we canít buy locally.

Boxed is a pretty good place to order from too. Mostly bulk type purchases. https://www.boxed.com/
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SquashingDebt on December 08, 2020, 06:22:18 AM
I learned from volunteering at a food bank that dented cans are okay as long as the dent isnít so long or deep that it comes to a point at the ends or as long as the sealed area isnít dented.  These are more likely to cause tiny holes that allow air in and can cause bacteria to grow.  A modest, shallow dent on the side isnít likely to be harmful.

That's helpful to know!  What do you mean by "sealed area"?  The edges where the top meets the sides?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on December 08, 2020, 09:40:48 AM
I learned from volunteering at a food bank that dented cans are okay as long as the dent isnít so long or deep that it comes to a point at the ends or as long as the sealed area isnít dented.  These are more likely to cause tiny holes that allow air in and can cause bacteria to grow.  A modest, shallow dent on the side isnít likely to be harmful.



That's helpful to know!  What do you mean by "sealed area"?  The edges where the top meets the sides?

Yes, the rims.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 09, 2020, 04:15:13 PM
So, tomorrow starts a new sale at one of our grocery stores and Prime Rib Roast is on sale for $4.99 a lb! I plan to pick up around 4 of them so we can eat them during the year. They seem to be on sale only once a year so now is the time to get a few to tuck away.

I have a curbside grocery order in at another store and will swing by the other store to pick up the prime ribs and a few other things on sale. Really don't want to go into the store but they don't have curbside. I am going early so there should not be many people in the store. I want to get in and out as fast as possible! I will be armed with my alcohol wipes!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on December 09, 2020, 04:35:01 PM
Rib roasts go on sale here at Easter, too.

Not going in any stores here.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 09, 2020, 06:06:35 PM
So, tomorrow starts a new sale at one of our grocery stores and Prime Rib Roast is on sale for $4.99 a lb! I plan to pick up around 4 of them so we can eat them during the year. They seem to be on sale only once a year so now is the time to get a few to tuck away.

I have a curbside grocery order in at another store and will swing by the other store to pick up the prime ribs and a few other things on sale. Really don't want to go into the store but they don't have curbside. I am going early so there should not be many people in the store. I want to get in and out as fast as possible! I will be armed with my alcohol wipes!

Woohoo! I'm so glad for you that you finally found the roasts at a good price!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 09, 2020, 06:16:08 PM
Rib roasts go on sale here at Easter, too.

Not going in any stores here.

Same here, I do expect them to go on sale at Easter.  But unless I've been fully vaccinated including the necessary waiting periods, I won't be going into the store to buy them.  With a fairly early Easter in 2021 and a huge population, I'm not holding my breath.  While I'm glad I got chuck roast for $2.99 last week, I've decided not to look at the sales ads anymore, except for Sprouts if I'm ordering that week.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 10, 2020, 09:35:28 AM
Got my Prime Rib Roasts. Bought 4 of them. They were nice looking but not as big as I had hoped. They only had 5+ and under. No 6 or 7 lb. ones. Today was the first day of the sale and I was early to the store. They didn't seem in any hurry to fill the meat counter with various sizes. Oh, well, will be some good eating!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on December 10, 2020, 11:57:27 AM
For future reference, Iíd ask at the meat department for a larger roast if thatís what youíre looking for. They are used to people wanting a specific size for holidays.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 10, 2020, 12:25:27 PM
For future reference, Iíd ask at the meat department for a larger roast if thatís what youíre looking for. They are used to people wanting a specific size for holidays.

Yes, this is true but I wanted to get in and out of there as quickly as possible.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Villanelle on December 10, 2020, 03:13:27 PM
For future reference, Iíd ask at the meat department for a larger roast if thatís what youíre looking for. They are used to people wanting a specific size for holidays.

Yes, this is true but I wanted to get in and out of there as quickly as possible.
  Pre-Covid, I've called ahead and asked them if they had a certain size of a certain cut available.  They were willing to set it aside for me for a short while to give me time to come in.  Did this with a large beef tenderloin one year.  It was a size (very large) they didn't usually cut, but they had the larger pieces so they set them aside for me to pick up. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 11, 2020, 01:44:40 PM
hooplady, can you post your recipe for hummus? I buy chickpeas with that intention and then just don't. It is a bit out of my element but would like to try because when I buy it, already made, I do like it!
It's one of those things that I've been making forever so I don't measure most of the ingredients but here's my best guesstimate.

Two 15-oz cans of chickpeas/garbanzos. Drain and reserve the liquid from one can, add back as much as needed to bring to consistency of your liking.
1/4 -1/2 cup tahini
4-5 garlic cloves (note - I like it pretty garlicky!)
1/2 tsp salt
2 Tbl olive oil
splash of lemon juice

Whomp it all together. I finally splurged on a Blendtec but in the past I've used a regular blender or a food processor. Heck, when I first started I was taught to make it by hand, smashing the chickpeas with a glass jar; this creates a very lumpy hummus which is how I prefer it, I find most Americanized versions to be too runny. Hope you like it!

Hooplady just made your hummus recipe and it came out very good! Thank you! Finally got the Tahini yesterday. Now my question is does tahini need refrigeration? My can says nothing about refrigeration so I assume it is like peanut butter and doesn't need it.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Aegishjalmur on December 11, 2020, 07:04:57 PM
A trick we learned for making really creamy hummus(Either from canned or dried chick peas)- Boil the chick peas until you can remove the skins, then blend them.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GuitarStv on December 11, 2020, 07:18:35 PM
A trick we learned for making really creamy hummus(Either from canned or dried chick peas)- Boil the chick peas until you can remove the skins, then blend them.

Protip:  Blend into hummus while the chickpeas are still boiling hot and you don't need to remove the skins.  Makes very smooth hummus.  If you wait until they cool, the skins kill the smoothness.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GreenSheep on December 12, 2020, 07:23:12 AM
A trick we learned for making really creamy hummus(Either from canned or dried chick peas)- Boil the chick peas until you can remove the skins, then blend them.

Protip:  Blend into hummus while the chickpeas are still boiling hot and you don't need to remove the skins.  Makes very smooth hummus.  If you wait until they cool, the skins kill the smoothness.

Another "creamy hummus" tip I learned from chef Dreena Burton: Add a few ice cubes at the very end of blending. Seems crazy, but it works.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: OtherJen on December 12, 2020, 07:51:00 AM
Yesterday was the first time that I have ever seen a complete absence of paper towels at Costco. Aldi only had a few two-roll packs. Apparently paper towels are the trendy paper product for hoarding this fall.

Food seemed to be in good supply at both stores, though, except for the lack of rotisserie chickens at Costco at 11 am on a weekday.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on December 12, 2020, 07:58:18 AM
A trick we learned for making really creamy hummus(Either from canned or dried chick peas)- Boil the chick peas until you can remove the skins, then blend them.

Protip:  Blend into hummus while the chickpeas are still boiling hot and you don't need to remove the skins.  Makes very smooth hummus.  If you wait until they cool, the skins kill the smoothness.

Another "creamy hummus" tip I learned from chef Dreena Burton: Add a few ice cubes at the very end of blending. Seems crazy, but it works.
That probably works better if you have a really good blender... I'll show myself out.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: GreenSheep on December 12, 2020, 08:42:40 AM
A trick we learned for making really creamy hummus(Either from canned or dried chick peas)- Boil the chick peas until you can remove the skins, then blend them.

Protip:  Blend into hummus while the chickpeas are still boiling hot and you don't need to remove the skins.  Makes very smooth hummus.  If you wait until they cool, the skins kill the smoothness.

Another "creamy hummus" tip I learned from chef Dreena Burton: Add a few ice cubes at the very end of blending. Seems crazy, but it works.
That probably works better if you have a really good blender... I'll show myself out.

Maybe I should have said "at the end of processing," since I use a food processor. Even though I have a Vitamix (now I'll be the one showing myself out), I find that hummus just works better for me in the food processor, even in the $25 one I had before the current fancy-pants one (which was a gift... okay, I'm leaving...).
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: hooplady on December 12, 2020, 08:50:25 AM
Hooplady just made your hummus recipe and it came out very good! Thank you! Finally got the Tahini yesterday. Now my question is does tahini need refrigeration? My can says nothing about refrigeration so I assume it is like peanut butter and doesn't need it.
Glad you liked it Roadrunner! I don't refrigerate my tahini, too hard to use when cold.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 12, 2020, 09:41:42 AM
I did refrigerate my tahini but will take it out. I can imagine it will be hard to handle.

I used my ninja blender container and used canned chickpeas. I didn't even notice any skins when I poured them out of the cans! They looked very smooth. Once blended, I never saw any skins either.

I may add cayenne pepper next time to jazz it up.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Imma on December 12, 2020, 10:39:04 AM
We are facing a steep increase in Covid cases where I live, combined with empty shelves in stores because of supply chain issues - farmers are blocking distribution centers because they feel they don't get paid enough for their products. I know the farmers are right about that and I support them, it's very painful to see many farmers going under while supermarkets make even bigger profits than they normally do. They have been blocking locations on and off for a year. But with Christmas and Covid coming up I feel this is a big risk. There's talk about a stricter lockdown which in itself already causes an increase in hoarding, and this may increase hoarding even more, and all those people in stores are great for the virus.

We talked about how ethical keeping supplies on hand is. So just for clarity: I don't support panic buying and clearing out shelves. I do believe in keeping at least a couple of weeks of food on hand, bought over a longer period of time during which there are no shortages, and in donating food or money to those who are food insecure. Especially with Christmas coming up. I've been donating money to various charities and my Christmas card to a friend who uses the food bank will include a gift card to a supermarket.  I am staying home myself and not going into any stores.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on December 12, 2020, 07:39:50 PM
They have been blocking locations on and off for a year.

Wow, Imma, I had no idea that farmers were protesting in Europe! Farmers' protests in India are big news here, but I had missed rumblings from Europe.

A local story forecasted a 5-7% increase in vegetable prices here next year, partly because of COVID, and partly because of climate change. The idea makes me shudder, as produce is already quite expensive here. I fear that it's going to put healthy eating even further out of reach of a lot of people. I already grow a vegetable garden at home, but whenever I read about supply chain issues and steep price increases, I get a fear response in my gut that tells me to move to the country so that I can have a bigger garden and grow enough to give to family and food banks. It's not an entirely rational feeling, since I have no experience in agriculture beyond a few years of tending a backyard plot.

Does anyone else have "back to the land" instincts when reading bad news?

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Imma on December 13, 2020, 05:44:31 AM
They have been blocking locations on and off for a year.

Wow, Imma, I had no idea that farmers were protesting in Europe! Farmers' protests in India are big news here, but I had missed rumblings from Europe.

A local story forecasted a 5-7% increase in vegetable prices here next year, partly because of COVID, and partly because of climate change. The idea makes me shudder, as produce is already quite expensive here. I fear that it's going to put healthy eating even further out of reach of a lot of people. I already grow a vegetable garden at home, but whenever I read about supply chain issues and steep price increases, I get a fear response in my gut that tells me to move to the country so that I can have a bigger garden and grow enough to give to family and food banks. It's not an entirely rational feeling, since I have no experience in agriculture beyond a few years of tending a backyard plot.

Does anyone else have "back to the land" instincts when reading bad news?

The farmers protests have been going on for a while in the Netherlands, even pre-pandemic. They're pissed off at supermarkets because they don't pay enough and abuse their power, and they're angry at the government because of new environmental policy. That policy is necessary and I completely support it but it's unfair to ask farmers to pay the bill.

I'm from a rural background, my family used to farm, so I totally get your back to the land feelings. I've always felt that, but land is extremely expensive here so it's not happening. I already have a veggie patch.

In my country, produce, meat and dairy are all extremely cheap. We are very good at growing lots of food and it's a big export product. But feeding out entire continent is damaging our air and soil, so something needs to be done. In the past, farmers were pressured by the government and banks to expand, expand, expand, which caused lower and lower prices and bigger loans. Many farmers feel backed into a corner by government regulations, banks and supermarkets. My family was lucky to walk away with empty hands instead of debts after farming at that farm for a century.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Queen Frugal on December 13, 2020, 10:04:26 AM

Does anyone else have "back to the land" instincts when reading bad news?

I occasionally yearn to grow my own but I have tried gardening and determined I like the idea of gardening way more than I like actual gardening. Come summer, I want to be out hiking or traveling. Not tending a garden.

Luckily I do like cooking.

At the beginning of the pandemic, I did a lot of stocking up when prices were at a premium and supplies were low. I felt like I was going to waste a lot more money buying food with the pandemic. I bought a deep freeze and some storage buckets so I could buy more things in bulk.

Over the summer, I casually continued to stock up until I had roughly a 3 month supply of non-perishables.

I am pleasantly surprised that now I am saving money and TIME buying food. I am shopping in person but only every two weeks. I have never managed to wait two weeks before grocery store visits as I can't figure out how to make produce last that long. But now that I have done it and become use to it, it's fine. It's comfortable. It's normal.

I am saving money by buying many staples with long shelf life in bulk and also stocking up on items with a long shelf life while they are on sale. In the past, I bought things only as I needed them. Now that I am all stocked up, I am seeing a big difference in my grocery bill. It's great!

We are such creatures of habit when it comes to eating. I love knowing how other people shop, cook, and eat. It helps me think outside of the box. Love this forum for getting a glimpse of all of your food consumption habits.

A few years ago, I was staying in a hostel in Costa Rica. I loved watching what other travelers cooked and ate. The girl who I remember best was maybe 18, all on her own from Germany. She said she didn't have any money but she wanted to see the world so she ate cheap. She only ate once a day. The first night she arrived she was tired and hadn't gone shopping so she ate 1/2 a bag of boiled rice. Just rice. And ate every bite. The next day she boiled 3 potatoes and a head of broccoli. I try to keep her habits in mind when shopping and eating, but changing my own habits has still been hard.

Pandemic has helped with that. A sliver of a silver lining.



Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on December 13, 2020, 10:36:19 AM
@Sun Hat, I understand your fear, but there are a lot easier ways to deal with it than buying a rural property!  With the money you would save from such a purchase alone (actual property cost, transaction fees, survey fees, maintenance costs etc.), you can buy LOTS of food.  Plus, if you buy through CSAs, you're helping already rural folks stay on the land and make an income.  Eating in-season produce goes a long way to saving money too.  Buy meat directly from farmers, same for eggs.  I live in the same area as you, and there are many options out there beyond grocery stores.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on December 13, 2020, 11:38:01 AM
@SunnyDays

Ooh, I know that it doesn't make sense! I'm not likely to actually do it for a variety of reasons, but the temptation remains! I thought that the readers of this thread would understand the disconnect between reason and fear-based decision making. I'm confident that society will continue to function - but I also remember that my grandmother felt rich during the Great Depression when her very, very cash-poor farming family was able to feed themselves and others. There's something to owning the means of production.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 13, 2020, 01:24:42 PM
Sun Hat, maybe you could find room on your current property to put in a green house to grow things in the winter months.

My grandparents had a farm in KY and lived a very rustic life. Outhouse, no running water. They had to pull water out of the well in buckets. To me it was a horrid life but they managed to raise 6 children. One thing I was told by my Mom is that they had a root cellar and stored stuff in there. I have no idea how that works but here is an article I found on alternative root cellar ideas: https://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/10/root-cellar-alternatives.html

If you were to buy a large quantity from a farm, maybe you could use some of the above methods in the article to store the veggies.

There are some people I watch on Youtube that have farm and grow most of their food. They freeze, can foods, dehydrate foods and now they are into freeze drying foods. They bought a small freeze dryer. The shelf life of freeze dried foods is the longest of most methods. These people have a lot of video's and are very interesting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Z56JFObqI

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on December 13, 2020, 01:53:23 PM
We are at our ďnew houseĒ now and will be here for a month, so of course we need a zillion things. I got to try two new Curbside pickups!

Target was very smooth and I will definitely use that again for household items.

HyVee has a great operation where they take the assembled orders to a sort of outbuilding and you drive up there to collect them. There was a steady stream of cars when we went, so they are clearly doing a brisk pickup business.

It was a little different from my usual store, which requires you to approve every substitution. HyVee let me check ďany substitutionĒ and then you got the lowest price, which was great. Iíll do that again, too - probably tomorrow. LOL We keep thinking of things we need.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 13, 2020, 02:26:29 PM
Sun Hat, maybe you could find room on your current property to put in a green house to grow things in the winter months.

My grandparents had a farm in KY and lived a very rustic life. Outhouse, no running water. They had to pull water out of the well in buckets. To me it was a horrid life but they managed to raise 6 children. One thing I was told by my Mom is that they had a root cellar and stored stuff in there. I have no idea how that works but here is an article I found on alternative root cellar ideas: https://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/10/root-cellar-alternatives.html

If you were to buy a large quantity from a farm, maybe you could use some of the above methods in the article to store the veggies.

There are some people I watch on Youtube that have farm and grow most of their food. They freeze, can foods, dehydrate foods and now they are into freeze drying foods. They bought a small freeze dryer. The shelf life of freeze dried foods is the longest of most methods. These people have a lot of video's and are very interesting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Z56JFObqI

While I disagree with the DeVraes family's attempt to trademark the term "Urban Homestead", I do admire what they've done with their 1/5 acre home lot in Pasadena, CA (1/10 acre as garden plot).  They grow thousands of pounds of produce annually -- in 2010 (the last year they kept meticulous count) they grew 7000 pounds of organic produce (over 400 varieties), collected more than 200 eggs, and collected between 25-50 pounds of honey --  they were eating a vegetarian diet for under $2 per person per day, or $60 per month per person for an organic, whole foods diet (not one made low in cost by purchasing highly processed foods for pennies on the dollar playing the grocery game).  Of course, they were putting major work effort into obtaining their food.

https://urbanhomestead.org/about/

The DeVraes family, and other urban and suburban homesteaders show that growing significant food can happen without owning a farm.  I have a friend who before she moved had made significant progress on making her own .23 acre suburban home plot a food growing powerhouse.  In addition to garden beds to put edible landscaping everywhere she could, following the adage that any plant you water should provide you with something useful (food, herbs, flowers).  She put in a lot of perennial berry bushes, fruit trees, etc.  But she loved to go out and garden every morning.  I'm not able to make myself like gardening.  I would do if it I had to, but I don't have to. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on December 13, 2020, 02:59:48 PM
Thanks for the links @Roadrunner53 and @K_in_the_kitchen !

I've long been inspired by urban homesteading and urban agriculture ideas, and my small lot already has 3 apple trees, raspberry canes, 2 (still tiny) saskatoon bushes, 40 strawberry plants, herbs, 2 rhubarbs and 150 square feet of raised vegetable beds. I used to have about twice the area in vegetable beds, but in 2019 took some apart to make more room to play with my dog. I may worry about long term food security, but it takes second place to playtime with my furry pal.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 13, 2020, 03:30:34 PM
Another thing that I discovered this summer is that scallions (green onions) can be regrown by saving the root! I would place the roots in shallow water and eventually when the roots got a little bigger would plant them. I had the most beautiful scallions and I am sure these could be grown inside too. I just don't have the appropriate amount of space or windows to do that but I sure wish I did. I love scallions and they grew tall and strong. I was so annoyed that I had to finally do away with my little container of them. All I used was potting mix and used a small translucent Rubbermaid container that I popped holes in the bottom. They seem to like full sun but when we got some bad storms, I moved the container closer to the house and under the awning where it got very little direct sunlight. But still did fantastic! I had a good size rosemary plant that I couldn't bear to chuck out so I brought it inside. I have it under a fluorescent light in the kitchen and it seems to be doing good so far.

There are other veggies you can grow from the roots but I didn't get into that...yet!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on December 13, 2020, 03:57:53 PM
Another thing that I discovered this summer is that scallions (green onions) can be regrown by saving the root! I would place the roots in shallow water and eventually when the roots got a little bigger would plant them. I had the most beautiful scallions and I am sure these could be grown inside too.

Yes, I do this whenever I buy green onions - I just keep them on the windowsill.  It worked a lot better with my CSA onions.  The ones from the store don't work out as well for me.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on December 13, 2020, 05:46:02 PM
But really, 75 cents worth of onion sets will keep you in green onions for a year.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 14, 2020, 06:11:43 AM
Hooplady just made your hummus recipe and it came out very good! Thank you! Finally got the Tahini yesterday. Now my question is does tahini need refrigeration? My can says nothing about refrigeration so I assume it is like peanut butter and doesn't need it.
Glad you liked it Roadrunner! I don't refrigerate my tahini, too hard to use when cold.

hooplady, can you tell me the brand of Tahini that you like best? I bought Joyva brand. I know nothing about tahini and what to look for. Also, what do you like to use to dip? Crackers, celery, carrots? I had these sesame crackers from Costco and really delish but might like something healthier like veggies.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on December 14, 2020, 07:11:03 AM
@Queen Frugal, do you follow The Frugal Girl blog? She's a kindred spirit. 

Love the tale of the intrepid young traveler!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: hooplady on December 15, 2020, 09:46:46 AM
hooplady, can you tell me the brand of Tahini that you like best? I bought Joyva brand. I know nothing about tahini and what to look for. Also, what do you like to use to dip? Crackers, celery, carrots? I had these sesame crackers from Costco and really delish but might like something healthier like veggies.
I use Joyva when it's all I can get; my favorite is Ziyad which is usually available locally. Target had a brand called Pepperwood Organics that was good but I haven't been able to get it lately. Ideally I use fresh pita from a local bakery but since COVID I've been doing plain saltine crackers. When I take it to a group function I often include carrot sticks, red and yellow pepper slices and celery. Now that I've stocked up on flour and yeast (stocked up, not hoarded!) my goal is to learn how to bake pita at home.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 15, 2020, 10:00:09 AM
Now that I've stocked up on flour and yeast (stocked up, not hoarded!) my goal is to learn how to bake pita at home.

Homemade pita is so good!  I hadn't really had much pita until a Mediterranean restaurant opened in a nearby city in the early 1990s.  They had the best mujadarah, but even better, they would bring basket after basket of just baked pita to the table -- we broke young adults would sometimes go and order a bowl of lentil soup just to get the bread.  They aren't in business anymore, which is sad, and since then I've never been to a restaurant that makes its own pita.  Somehow receiving commercially made pita wrapped in plastic wrap just isn't the same.

However, I've been able to recreate pita at home almost as long, thanks to a book I bought in 1993 to go along with a gifted bread machine.  It's called Bread Machine Baking Perfect Every Time, by Laura Brody and her mom Millie, and I have the first edition.  The bread machine is used to make the dough, but you roll the pita by hand and bake it in the oven.  I use a cast iron griddle as a "baking stone".  The pita puff beautifully and split open as expected.  I'm sure there are pita recipes available for free online.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: NotJen on December 15, 2020, 10:27:11 AM
Did my usual grocery shop yesterday - no shortages noted.  Cleaning supplies are even back in stock, and there were several brands of Lysol-type wipes available.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SailingOnASmallSailboat on December 15, 2020, 10:33:49 AM
hooplady, can you tell me the brand of Tahini that you like best? I bought Joyva brand. I know nothing about tahini and what to look for. Also, what do you like to use to dip? Crackers, celery, carrots? I had these sesame crackers from Costco and really delish but might like something healthier like veggies.
I use Joyva when it's all I can get; my favorite is Ziyad which is usually available locally. Target had a brand called Pepperwood Organics that was good but I haven't been able to get it lately. Ideally I use fresh pita from a local bakery but since COVID I've been doing plain saltine crackers. When I take it to a group function I often include carrot sticks, red and yellow pepper slices and celery. Now that I've stocked up on flour and yeast (stocked up, not hoarded!) my goal is to learn how to bake pita at home.

I did this video a long time ago (!!!) but the information still stands. Making pita bread by hand is lovely and easy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mc2B9l_aPuk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mc2B9l_aPuk)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 17, 2020, 06:31:35 AM
Making a hodge podge cabbage soup while it snows right now. I used some leftover meatloaf in it. I also added fire roasted Rotel tomatoes, other canned tomatoes, onions, cayenne pepper, chicken broth, sliced peppers, taco seasoning.

The snow is coming down hard and should keep snowing till 11 am the weather people are saying.

Glad I have plenty of supplies!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Queen Frugal on December 17, 2020, 08:52:12 AM
@Queen Frugal, do you follow The Frugal Girl blog? She's a kindred spirit. 

Love the tale of the intrepid young traveler!

Thanks Dicey! I'm checking her blog out now.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 17, 2020, 09:10:13 AM
Just had a bowl of my soup and OMG, I was a bit heavy handed on the cayenne! I have turned into a fire breathing dragon!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on December 17, 2020, 10:24:12 AM
Just had a bowl of my soup and OMG, I was a bit heavy handed on the cayenne! I have turned into a fire breathing dragon!

Then you can turn the heat off and save even more!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on December 17, 2020, 11:11:25 AM
Got our first milk delivery this week!! Not very Mustachian ($10/month delivery fee, and the milk is more expensive so I calculate this luxury will cost us $25/month).  But it is pretty cool to get the milk in old fashioned glass bottles. It tastes creamier too-- not homogenized.

But it served its purpose in that we didn't have to go grocery shopping this week. Now we have a better chance of "eating down our pantry".

Of course, since this is the year of food storage failures for us, this week somebody unplugged our garage fridge and all the frozen food thawed, though it didn't spoil...
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Michael in ABQ on December 17, 2020, 12:05:35 PM
Our governor finally lifted the completely arbitrary limit of 75 people in grocery stores and other big box retailers and made it in-line with everything else at 25% capacity. So Costco, Home Depot, or a Walmart Supercenter went from 75 customers to 300-500. The hour-long lines at every grocery store instantly vanished. Maybe the thought of having some elderly person die from standing in the cold to buy a gallon of milk was finally enough to change her mind. Now we can finally make another trip to Costco and not have to stand outside for an hour - or pay the 20% Instacart markup + their fee.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: stoaX on December 17, 2020, 12:15:18 PM
Did my usual grocery shop yesterday - no shortages noted.  Cleaning supplies are even back in stock, and there were several brands of Lysol-type wipes available.

Same here today in the suburbs of Charlotte. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 18, 2020, 04:36:31 AM
So since I have abundant supplies of most everything, my goal is to stay at home for the rest of the month without going anywhere. Today will be day 3. If I make it, it will be 16 days this month and the earliest I plan to go out is January 5th. My dog will be groomed some day the first week of January. If I make it till Jan. 5th, that will be 21 days at home.

I have Misfits veggies that are delivered every two weeks. If need be, I can do a Peapod grocery delivery to my house and we have a liquor store that delivers. Today, I have the Post Office picking up a package so I don't have to go and wait in line. I have also ordered frozen burgers from Costco that are due to arrive today. I am doing everything I can to avoid being around people and getting Covid.

Since the Hub and I don't work anymore, it is easy to stay home. I know people with kids and jobs would finding staying home impossible. Some people just hate staying home but I am the opposite. I don't mind at all. But I don't like having to hunker down due to the virus. It is such a worry to go anywhere.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: lthenderson on December 18, 2020, 09:02:46 AM
Our governor finally lifted the completely arbitrary limit of 75 people in grocery stores and other big box retailers and made it in-line with everything else at 25% capacity. So Costco, Home Depot, or a Walmart Supercenter went from 75 customers to 300-500. The hour-long lines at every grocery store instantly vanished. Maybe the thought of having some elderly person die from standing in the cold to buy a gallon of milk was finally enough to change her mind. Now we can finally make another trip to Costco and not have to stand outside for an hour - or pay the 20% Instacart markup + their fee.

This bogles my mind. Since the beginning, we have had no capacity limits on entering grocery stores and as far as I'm aware, no mass outbreaks as a result. Stores don't seem to be good passers of the virus since close contact is limited generally to seconds as you pass each other in the aisles.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Michael in ABQ on December 18, 2020, 03:10:03 PM
Our governor finally lifted the completely arbitrary limit of 75 people in grocery stores and other big box retailers and made it in-line with everything else at 25% capacity. So Costco, Home Depot, or a Walmart Supercenter went from 75 customers to 300-500. The hour-long lines at every grocery store instantly vanished. Maybe the thought of having some elderly person die from standing in the cold to buy a gallon of milk was finally enough to change her mind. Now we can finally make another trip to Costco and not have to stand outside for an hour - or pay the 20% Instacart markup + their fee.

This bogles my mind. Since the beginning, we have had no capacity limits on entering grocery stores and as far as I'm aware, no mass outbreaks as a result. Stores don't seem to be good passers of the virus since close contact is limited generally to seconds as you pass each other in the aisles.

Yes, it was a completely arbitrary and capricious move. Our church was limited to 25% capacity which meant about 175 people sitting or standing in a large open room of perhaps 10,000 SF for about an hour. Yet somehow a 150,000 SF Costco can only have 75 customers plus employees in 15x the space? Made no sense and I'm amazed it took almost a month for her to finally reverse course. Honestly if not for the cold weather I'm not sure if she would have.

There's been a lot of arbitrary limits imposed throughout the pandemic. Some states decided you could have 50 people in a restaurant but only 10 in church. Or that 1,000 people standing outside to protest is ok but 100 people standing outside to watch a musician is not.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Queen Frugal on December 19, 2020, 07:00:21 AM
I did my two week grocery shopping trip yesterday. No shortages. The elderly checker who I see all the time was decked out in a mask, face shield, and gloves, all behind her plexiglass. I had to ask her a question. She couldn't hear me. It was a good reminder of just how rough some people have it right now.

What will our new normal look like when the pandemic is over? The last two times I went grocery shopping I have been quietly annoyed with other customers violating my personal space - which is now 6 feet! Is this feeling going to be hard wired into my brain for years to come? I hope not.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 20, 2020, 05:32:01 AM
Anyone have any good tips on keeping fragile vegetables longer in the fridge without going limp?

Does anyone vacuum pack their lettuce in vac seal containers? I usually wrap my fragile lettuce (not head lettuce) in damp paper towels with mixed results. I try to use it up but sometimes time gets away from me and don't get around to using the lettuce and it gets wimped out. GRRRR!!!

Looking for ways to improve storage of lettuce!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SquashingDebt on December 20, 2020, 05:45:01 AM
Anyone have any good tips on keeping fragile vegetables longer in the fridge without going limp?

Does anyone vacuum pack their lettuce in vac seal containers? I usually wrap my fragile lettuce (not head lettuce) in damp paper towels with mixed results. I try to use it up but sometimes time gets away from me and don't get around to using the lettuce and it gets wimped out. GRRRR!!!

Looking for ways to improve storage of lettuce!

I think the easiest way to improve storage of lettuce is adjusting which types of lettuce you buy (when you intend to store them).  Iceberg and romaine will last quite a long time, of course.  There's also new types of lettuce being sold in the plastic clamshells that's more like those two in texture, as opposed to baby greens.  I've found that it lasts quite a long time too. 

This is the product that's available in my neck of the woods, and I'm specifically talking about the top 2 products on the page:  https://www.littleleaffarms.com/our-products/

If you want to get even more flexible/creative, you could explore sometimes substituting chicory or radicchio for lettuce.  One of the main selling points of them is that they store well in the winter.  There's a nice salad demonstration on YouTube if you search for the video titled "COOKING: Radicchio Salad with Jason Salvo".
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 20, 2020, 06:24:34 AM
I have been getting Misfits vegetables every other week and there are different types of lettuce offered each time. I steer clear of the Romaine due to the frequent problems the stores have had with e-coli. They have not offered head lettuce lately so I have been choosing the red leaf lettuce and some other similarly fragile types of lettuce.

I have been wrapping the lettuce in damp paper towels and I tried putting that into zip lock bags. I have also used mesh bags. Sometimes I think the plastic bags are a bad environment for the lettuce and the mesh bags allow the paper towels to dry out. Have not tried paper towels/lettuce in foil. I have seen people vacuum pack lettuce but not sure of the results.

I did watch the Jason Salvo video. Good information.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on December 20, 2020, 02:21:24 PM
I always buy leaf lettuce and it will keep for weeks with this process:  shake out as much water as possible when you get it home (let it sit upright in the sink for a while for more to drip out), then wrap only the bottom third in one half size paper towel and put into a plastic bag (a dry one).  Change the paper towel every 2 or 3 days.   Iíve kept mine in both the crisper and on a shelf and donít notice a difference in longevity.  Assuming you are using the lettuce gradually, there shouldnít be any rot.  If it gets witty, just put it in a bowl of water in the fridge for a few hours and itís good as new.  But then you have to start the whole process over again once itís wet.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 20, 2020, 02:35:48 PM
I always buy leaf lettuce and it will keep for weeks with this process:  shake out as much water as possible when you get it home (let it sit upright in the sink for a while for more to drip out), then wrap only the bottom third in one half size paper towel and put into a plastic bag (a dry one).  Change the paper towel every 2 or 3 days.   Iíve kept mine in both the crisper and on a shelf and donít notice a difference in longevity.  Assuming you are using the lettuce gradually, there shouldnít be any rot.  If it gets witty, just put it in a bowl of water in the fridge for a few hours and itís good as new.  But then you have to start the whole process over again once itís wet.

I have Misfits delivery coming this Tuesday. I will try your method. Thank you!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 20, 2020, 04:43:14 PM
Anyone have any good tips on keeping fragile vegetables longer in the fridge without going limp?

Does anyone vacuum pack their lettuce in vac seal containers? I usually wrap my fragile lettuce (not head lettuce) in damp paper towels with mixed results. I try to use it up but sometimes time gets away from me and don't get around to using the lettuce and it gets wimped out. GRRRR!!!

Looking for ways to improve storage of lettuce!

I do a variety of things.  We find romaine lettuce keeps longest (1-2 weeks), and that it's better to risk to drying out slightly over being too moist, since we can rehydrate limp lettuce leaves but can't do anything if they get slimy.  Any prepped lettuce (washed/spun/chopped or just washed/dried leaves) get put in a container with a dry paper towel or a clean, dry linen napkin.  I use a paper towel or linen napkin in a variety of produce storage situations.  I peel carrots, chopped of the ends, then store them with a paper towel, changed every couple of days as it gets wet.  Same with clean and sliced zucchini, or cut bell pepper strips.  I can get several more usable days from produce if I clean it well (removing any soft spots), dry it, and prep it before storing with a paper towel, and then changing out the paper towel when it can't absorb more moisture.

Mostly I just try to make the more fragile produce first, and save the sturdier lettuces, cabbage, carrots, etc. for the second week.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on December 20, 2020, 05:31:09 PM
I usually wash the lettuce and then wrap it in a clean dish towel and put that into a loose plastic bag. It lasts about two weeks, but we donít use much lettuce in the winter. I use kale or spinach when I want something green.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: TomTX on December 20, 2020, 07:51:28 PM
I fail to see the point of peeling carrots. The skin is quite thin and edible.

I also don't peel potatoes. Or sweet potatoes. Washing them? Sure.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on December 21, 2020, 01:52:41 AM
Look for Mrs. Meyer's green bags. They're great for extending the lives of all types of produce.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 21, 2020, 08:25:24 AM
I fail to see the point of peeling carrots. The skin is quite thin and edible.

I also don't peel potatoes. Or sweet potatoes. Washing them? Sure.

I peel carrots depending on their use.  There are some dishes where the carrots look better if they've been peeled.  Peels are saved for stock, os there's no waste.  I also find my carrots last far longer if I peel them and store them with a paper towel.

I peel potatoes on the advice of my doctor, because I form kidney stones easily.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: TomTX on December 21, 2020, 05:21:18 PM
How long are you storing peeled carrots? Unpeeled mine are usually fine for at least a couple months  (though if they are still around by then I do shave off the little roots they usually sprout by then)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Caoineag on December 22, 2020, 08:50:28 AM
How long are you storing peeled carrots? Unpeeled mine are usually fine for at least a couple months  (though if they are still around by then I do shave off the little roots they usually sprout by then)

Yeah I was wondering that too. Maybe she is somewhere hot and humid? My carrots last longer than potatoes and aren't refrigerated. That's the nice thing about root vegetables, they last forever and prefer cool to cold so no refrigeration required.

Cucumbers are our biggest risk. They bruise easily, they require an exact temperature for optimum shelf life and we usually use them in small quantities. We tend to do the English cucumbers when we want them to last a little longer. My second one I have to keep an eye on is cauliflower. As long as we eat regular veggie trays we are good but otherwise we need to prep and freeze it to extend its shelf life. Cauliflower patties are a tasty way to use up excess cauliflower about to go bad.

Green cabbage is great as a second week vegetable. Mushrooms and bell peppers can be prepped and frozen for recipes so they hold up well too.

I basically meal plan to use up the fragile fresh, freeze what can be frozen if we aren't getting to it in time and then use cabbage, onion and root vegetables in the second week along with what I froze or already have frozen (peas, corn, green beans and broccoli tend to be bought frozen). Kale can make it to the second week if frozen for soups otherwise red and green cabbage are the second week green leafies.

Our biggest problem with 2 week grocery runs is space for all the fresh veggies, not eating them up in time. We actually waste less produce with biweekly grocery runs versus weekly. With weekly you usually have something left and that will get buried and forgotten.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on December 22, 2020, 10:12:15 AM
How long are you storing peeled carrots? Unpeeled mine are usually fine for at least a couple months  (though if they are still around by then I do shave off the little roots they usually sprout by then)

I find that conventionally grown carrots do keep for months, but organic carrots don't.  I usually buy 6# of organic carrots from Costco.  I don't mind shaving off the roots, but with the organic carrots the roots also get some sort of black moldy stuff, and the ends shrivel and mold.  So I peel the organic carrots to store, and get at least a month that way.  It works for me.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Villanelle on December 22, 2020, 10:35:38 AM
Huh.  I didn't know carrots would do better not refrigerated. My mom kept them in the fridge, so I do to, but that might explain why they get rather... flaccid fairly quickly.  Thanks, all!

I continue to get all of our groceries via Amazon Fresh, which has priced out to be slightly cheaper (but then I add a tip, so probably about the same) as shopping at my local grocery story.  (I live in a very expensive area.)  Initially, I was worried about the produce, fearing I'd get the bruised bananas if I weren't digging through the pile myself, but that hasn't been the case at all.  I typically order once a week. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on December 22, 2020, 10:37:39 AM
Okay, I am totally blown away! I placed an online order for some very mundane items thru Walmart. Just a tad over $35 and just enough to satisfy the minimum requirement to get free shipping. A short while later, I got a confirmation of the order and it said it would be delivered today! Approx. 2 1/2 hours later I got a text and also an email saying it was delivered. In the email there was a picture of the bags on my front door step. It was FREE delivery thru Door Dash thru Walmart.

Unfortunately, my Walmart is a dinky store and doesn't carry much for grocery items. Mostly shelf stable stuff. If it was a Super Walmart I would be in heaven to have such quick delivery service!

My friend in another state just had the same experience a few days ago on a small kitchen appliance. It wasn't as quick but same day.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on December 22, 2020, 10:46:52 AM
With our numbers going higher and a 28 day lockdown starting on boxing day, I am trying to hit the grocery store even less often.  This morning I bought 3 bags of frozen veg as well as a few fresh.  Lots of eggs, cream, etc.  Meat mostly went into the freezer.

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: TomTX on December 22, 2020, 02:42:50 PM
How long are you storing peeled carrots? Unpeeled mine are usually fine for at least a couple months  (though if they are still around by then I do shave off the little roots they usually sprout by then)

I find that conventionally grown carrots do keep for months, but organic carrots don't.  I usually buy 6# of organic carrots from Costco.  I don't mind shaving off the roots, but with the organic carrots the roots also get some sort of black moldy stuff, and the ends shrivel and mold.  So I peel the organic carrots to store, and get at least a month that way.  It works for me.

I get the organic carrots, either at Costco or HEB.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SquashingDebt on December 22, 2020, 04:38:06 PM
I get organic carrots from a local farm and they last for 6+ months sometimes, although there's sometimes a bit of mold to cut off around the top of the carrot.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 02, 2021, 06:34:49 AM
I have not been out of the house in 18 days to go anywhere! I expect to go out possibly on Thursday which will make it 23 days of staying home.

My supplies are holding up very nicely and I have to say I haven't made too much of dent into my mini warehouse. Since Thanksgiving I have used one turkey and one spiral ham. They are big and took up room. Today we are having a prime rib so that will free up some space too. The paper supplies are hanging in there. Normally I buy TP and paper towels from Costco and they have not had them for at least a month or more (their brand). The notice said they would reevaluate the situation January 2021. Have checked and still nothing on the website.

I am trying Butcher Box subscription. I received my first box a few days ago. Have not tried the meat yet. Can't say it is low cost but staying away from the virus is number one on my list. I also have a Misfits subscription I get every two weeks. This has proved to be the missing link for me as far as fresh veggies. It also is not perfect. I get the box where I choose my items rather than receiving a surprise box. I can't always get what I want but I manage to get enough fresh veggies to fill in the gaps for two weeks. I prefer to pick my own veggies rather than get things I don't really want. I have frozen veggies too.

Soon, I will do a curbside grocery store order. I really don't need much. But this is when I can buy more frozen things and other fresh veggies I can't seem to get thru Misfits. I also need bottled water for my coffee maker. Our water is very hard and ruins every coffee maker we have ever had till we started using bottled water. Does anyone use a Brita water jug/filter for hard water?

That sprial ham gave us a lot of meals! We had ham dinners, pea soup, ham for breakfast, Fettucine Alfredo with ham. Used the bone for the pea soup. Was quite a bargain. Approx 11 lb. ham for $1.99 a lb.

How is eveyone doing on their supplies?

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on January 02, 2021, 06:06:49 PM
I have not been out of the house in 18 days to go anywhere! I expect to go out possibly on Thursday which will make it 23 days of staying home.

My supplies are holding up very nicely and I have to say I haven't made too much of dent into my mini warehouse. Since Thanksgiving I have used one turkey and one spiral ham. They are big and took up room. Today we are having a prime rib so that will free up some space too. The paper supplies are hanging in there. Normally I buy TP and paper towels from Costco and they have not had them for at least a month or more (their brand). The notice said they would reevaluate the situation January 2021. Have checked and still nothing on the website.

I am trying Butcher Box subscription. I received my first box a few days ago. Have not tried the meat yet. Can't say it is low cost but staying away from the virus is number one on my list. I also have a Misfits subscription I get every two weeks. This has proved to be the missing link for me as far as fresh veggies. It also is not perfect. I get the box where I choose my items rather than receiving a surprise box. I can't always get what I want but I manage to get enough fresh veggies to fill in the gaps for two weeks. I prefer to pick my own veggies rather than get things I don't really want. I have frozen veggies too.

Soon, I will do a curbside grocery store order. I really don't need much. But this is when I can buy more frozen things and other fresh veggies I can't seem to get thru Misfits. I also need bottled water for my coffee maker. Our water is very hard and ruins every coffee maker we have ever had till we started using bottled water. Does anyone use a Brita water jug/filter for hard water?

That sprial ham gave us a lot of meals! We had ham dinners, pea soup, ham for breakfast, Fettucine Alfredo with ham. Used the bone for the pea soup. Was quite a bargain. Approx 11 lb. ham for $1.99 a lb.

How is eveyone doing on their supplies?

My last day inside a store was 12/5, and other than walking in the neighborhood and going for a drive with DH earlier this week, I've been home.  In that time, I've gotten Costco once, Aldi once (small order), and Walmart twice.  Walmart was a first for us in terms of using Instacart, and I won't do it again if I don't have to.  But they had vegan ice cream at a good price for my dairy allergic kid, along with the best eggnog we could find (it shouldn't be so hard to avoid artificial flavors).  Even more than that, they had RV rapid dissolving toilet paper and no limits, so my shopper brought me 4 packs of 8.  I'm hoping when we need TP again Walmart will have it available to order like they did last summer.  I didn't use Walmart for produce, so we're going to need either Costco delivery or Sprouts curbside very soon.  Misfits sounds interesting, and I wonder if it would help with things like ordering cucumbers and them arriving a day shy of spoiling.

I'll be interested to hear your Butcher Box review.  I've considered it in the past, but stuck with our in-state 100% grass-fed beef from a rancher I've been a customer of for 12 years now.  He doesn't have the same variety, however.

We have hard water and use a Berkey water filter system.  From what I understand it removes some minerals but not all, specifically it removes sedimentary minerals and chloride, but only reduces high levels of ionic minerals.  We still end up with mineral deposits in the pan we use to boil water for tea, and in the coffee maker.  DH takes care of these every couple of weeks using white vinegar, which we were finally able to get again from Aldi.

I envy you the spiral ham!  We didn't buy one because I have one kid who hates ham, so we didn't have it for a holiday meal.  But with all the meals you listed I feel like we missed out!.

Our freezers are still plenty full, as is the pantry.  Really, other than being low on fresh produce and eggs, we're doing really well.  I used my Vitamix yesterday to grind popcorn for cornmeal mush -- the difference compared to using store cornmeal was amazing.  I have some brown rice in the fridge we aren't going through fast enough, so I'll be grinding it for rice porridge.  I finally put my foot down with the college kids and told them I don't want to buy expensive processed breakfast cereal anymore.  It was an okay concession early in the pandemic, but it went on far too long.  Eliminating the cereal will also bring down the grocery bill by eliminating the need for almond milk and reducing dairy milk expenditures.  I'll make homemade oat milk for smoothies.

Honestly, I think we went through a transition with food and meals during the past almost 10 months and have come out the other side now.  Our diet is more like it was a decade ago, which is both simpler and healthier.  I'm no longer catering to picky eaters -- they can feed themselves and if they don't like what I buy they can buy something else with their own income.  And by "they" I really just mean the one who is surer picky with a penchant for junk food -- kids #1 pretty much eats what I make and one the rare occasion he doesn't care for something he eats the rest of the meal and heats up some baked beans.  I've learned that even in a pandemic we mostly don't love canned foods, but also that canned tomatoes are super handy to have on hand -- I've been making a 30 minute chili for the guys that is just canned beans, canned tomatoes with chiles, and chili powder, and they love it.  We had a pantry moth infestation a couple of months ago and lost the grains and legumes that weren't in gamma sealed buckets, and I was reminded how much simpler it is to have just a few grains and legumes -- a long and medium grain rice, pinto beans, red lentils, quick and old fashioned oats, flour, and popcorn.  I didn't replace any of the other beans or grains, and we had more than a dozen jars of them.  I have plans to simplify even more in 2021.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PMG on January 02, 2021, 06:44:42 PM
I wouldn't count on Misfits not delivering cucumbers the day they need eaten. We've only done a couple boxes but have learned to expect that half of it needs eaten promptly. We're doing one this week after quitting them in March/April. We're hoping they (and shipping services) have been able to adjust to demand and things are slowing down after the holiday rush.  Caveat, we live very rurally so ship time to us is 1-2 days, in metro areas it may be same day or 1 day. Bonus: They had quinoa as an add on for $1.99 a pound which is a pretty good price and we're almost out so I ordered quite a bit.

Target has also started shipping some food items that they had paused over the holidays so I've got an order of dry goods coming from them.  Between the two I hope to delay an in person trip until we need eggs. 

We're also settling in to some good food routines and learning both simple staples and more complex fun things.  We joke (a bit sadly) that the restaurants need us more than we need them.

We also started a cooking club with 4 other households. We are working our way though a regionally famous cookbook and meet bi-monthly to finish cooking and eat together (online). It's been a good balance of challenging and fun to actually do work together with other people!  It's lead to a vibrant ongoing group chat. Definitely a bright part of my winter.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on January 02, 2021, 07:29:04 PM
I, OTOH, have started Phase 1 of a staged move to another state, and feel like I am starting allll over with pantry stocking. Ugh.

The good news is that we have a larger freezer here and Iím more comfortable going into the store because I can rely on everyone to wear a mask. The bad news is that we have more people in the house and it seems like food just evaporates.

It does make me really appreciate the convenience of a well stocked pantry, though. Itís pretty annoying to keep discovering that I donít have some ingredient. Itís a process, for sure!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 03, 2021, 05:50:47 AM
It is just the Hub and I so the spiral ham did go a long way. It was so extremely good! What kills me is that I bought mine for $1.99 a lb. and right now they are on a further reduced sale for $1.29 a lb. I am sure they are trying to get rid of them. But since I am not shopping or doing curbside for almost a week or more, I am sure that 'bargain' will be long gone. I did buy two spiral hams when they were first offered at Thansgiving. I froze one, so down the road we will pull that out. I still have 3 more bargain turkeys in the freezer. They were either $0.49 or $0.59 per lb.

I also stock up on 3 dozen eggs everytime I do curbside. It is pretty crazy but Jumbo eggs were only $1.69 a dozen compared to other sized eggs being much more! I am like...jumbo is bigger and should be priced higher! However, I read somewhere that jumbo egg are less desired! For me they are super desirable! They are bigger, so more egg, they are cheaper and they last as long as other eggs. Win, win, win!

Placed an order for a vacuum sealer. I currently have a very nice one but it has a quirk I don't like. It requires that you feed the vac bag into the machine and then it sucks about 2 inches in before it will seal. I have no control on the size seal I want. I found a machine on Amazon that might be what I want. I want to seal up my grains and rice, pasta. I started to do it on my current machine but it became an annoying task. This new machine was only $39.99 so will give it a whirl and see how it goes.

Misfits is not exactly 'perfect'. For instance, I have not been able to get head lettuce. The lettuce they typically offer is loose leaf or a fragile red leaf lettuce. Sometimes you don't get a lot of it. Sometimes the package is bigger. You might not be able to get normal cukes. They might offer mini cukes or English cukes. You can only select one. For instance, if you pick mini cukes, you might get six but you cannot choose that twice to get 12. I order the biggest box and get it every two weeks. They allow you to pick 14 items. They can be various fruits and veggies. Then, there are add ons. Such as mushrooms, baby spinach, mixed salad greens. They offer a variety of grains. One week I bought a jar of olives. I usually buy two cartons of mushrooms and saute them and put in the freezer. I do that every two weeks and am building a little stock. With those add ons, you are not restricted on quantity, however, you are charged extra for each item. The prices aren't too bad. I typically add on a few things. I have not been all that pleased with the tomatoes. Sometimes they are a little squishy or split from damage or a little shriviled. What I like to do in the winter anyway is to chop up jarred roasted red bell peppers into the lettuce. They are flavorful and bright red to give the salad eye appeal.

Butcher box is 'interesting'. Right now, I am doing the custom box which is $149 every two months. For first time customers they gave me $10 off. I picked the items I wanted. There are two size boxes and the other one I think is $270. Then there are, what I call, surprise boxes. You choose type of suprise box you want, like a 'beef' box or a 'chicken and pork' box and there are others. These surprise boxes are $139.  With my order, I got 'free bacon for life'. One 10 oz package. Plus, free shipping for life. The surprise boxes can be fun if you are open minded and just figure you will find recipes for what you receive. Nothing is odd ball at all. Ground beef, chicken breasts, ribs, steaks, stew meat, beef roasts, pork roasts, pork chops, whole chickens, chicken thighs, chicken legs, pork ribs, salmon filets. Also, whole turkey and I am guessing mostly at Thanksgiving. I think they have add ons too. So you pick out what you want in the package deal, then move on to adding more things at an additional price if you so choose. The meat came in an insulated box and was frozen hard as a rock. Very pleased with that. You can also alternate on how often you receive delivery. The one thing that I do notice is that the roasts are not huge sized so for some families, that might not be ideal. My Hub and I cook as if there were 4 people in the house because we love leftovers and like the fact that we have another meal we can just warm up. Or, freeze for a later date.

Oh, K-in-the-kitchen, so sorry you didn't buy a spiral ham! Don't deny yourself again! Get something else for that picky kid, pizza, hamburgers, hot dogs and have that ham next time! You never know, picky kid might try it and like it at some point!

Any of you making bread at home? I have tried one bread recipe I found on youtube and it is easy and good. I am interested in making grinder rolls or hoagie rolls depending on where in USA you are. The Hub and I will make some meatballs soon and I am looking for a grinder roll recipe. If anyone has an easy recipe, I would be interested. Here is the youtube demo on the bread recipe. It starts at the 2 min 17 second mark. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUO4BWNeR_8   This married couple bought a homestead and raise farm animals and grow veggies. They freeze, can, dehydrate and are now freeze drying things. They offer a lot of tips in their videos. I thoroughly enjoy watching them demonstrate their homestead skills.

Had the prime rib last night and if any of you like rare prime rib cooked perfectly every time, use Paula Dean's recipe: https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a18012/paula-deens-famous-foolproof-rib-roast-recipe/
We have cooked various sizes 5-10 lbs. and every one has come out perfect! The Hub puts together a coffee rub seasoning and puts it on the outside of the meat and then, with strings, attaches fresh rosemary to the top.

On another note of hunkering down, the Hub and I watched two Sylvestor Stallone movies the last coupld of days. Creed and Creed II. Very entertaining and no one had to wear masks in these movies! We have one more Sylvestor Stallone movie we want to watch and that is Rocky Balboa. I hope today to watch that.

Well, Happy New Year to all!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: K_in_the_kitchen on January 03, 2021, 08:40:47 AM
Any of you making bread at home? I have tried one bread recipe I found on youtube and it is easy and good. I am interested in making grinder rolls or hoagie rolls depending on where in USA you are. The Hub and I will make some meatballs soon and I am looking for a grinder roll recipe. If anyone has an easy recipe, I would be interested. Here is the youtube demo on the bread recipe. It starts at the 2 min 17 second mark. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUO4BWNeR_8   This married couple bought a homestead and raise farm animals and grow veggies. They freeze, can, dehydrate and are now freeze drying things. They offer a lot of tips in their videos. I thoroughly enjoy watching them demonstrate their homestead skills.

Had the prime rib last night and if any of you like rare prime rib cooked perfectly every time, use Paula Dean's recipe: https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a18012/paula-deens-famous-foolproof-rib-roast-recipe/
We have cooked various sizes 5-10 lbs. and every one has come out perfect! The Hub puts together a coffee rub seasoning and puts it on the outside of the meat and then, with strings, attaches fresh rosemary to the top.

This time of year I bake soft sourdough sandwich loaves as our daily bread (I don't bake it daily).  It's the most perfect soft sourdough loaf recipe I've ever tried. https://beautythatmoves.typepad.com/beauty_that_moves/2018/06/i-worked-in-an-italian-restaurant-for-six-years-in-the-early-2000s-in-that-time-a-grand-total-of-one-person-came-in-with-sp.html (https://beautythatmoves.typepad.com/beauty_that_moves/2018/06/i-worked-in-an-italian-restaurant-for-six-years-in-the-early-2000s-in-that-time-a-grand-total-of-one-person-came-in-with-sp.html)

I've baked no knead bread off and on for years.  It's particularly nice to break off a piece of dough and use it for pizza.  But I also have a nice bread machine pizza dough recipe I like.  And then there's a super fast pizza dough from This Pilgrim Life that's also quite good when I want pizza in a hurry.  You make the dough, prep your sauce and toppings, and then the dough is ready to roll and use.  https://www.thispilgrimlife.com/simple-thin-crust-pizza-dough/ (https://www.thispilgrimlife.com/simple-thin-crust-pizza-dough/)

There are a few really quick yeasted recipes I use sometimes, which I like because they're faster than no knead dough.  One is a "Cuban" bread recipe from the Tightwad Gazette, another is one hour French bread from This Pilgrim Life https://www.thispilgrimlife.com/one-hour-french-bread/ (https://www.thispilgrimlife.com/one-hour-french-bread/), and I adore the one hour soft dinner rolls recipes from my Kitchen Aid mixer book.  Those rolls are perfect!

I used the Paula Dean method again for our Christmas Day prime rib, this time using a 9 pound roast.  Just like before, I checked after 2 hours and my roast was at 120įF already.  I think it's due to have an electric oven and it being rather new, so the seals are good.  I planned for it to possibly be ready sooner, so it was fine for us.  I make a rub with garlic powder, onion powder, salt, and dried rosemary.  I whirl all of that together in the blender until the rosemary is powdered with everything else, then I put it into a bowl and add olive oil to make a paste.  We're getting better garlic and rosemary flavors than when I used fresh.  It really is the most foolproof recipe for standing rib roast -- thanks for sharing it!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on January 03, 2021, 11:04:23 AM
The grocery store weíve been getting curbside pickup here offers an assortment of ďmeat bundlesĒ that are very reasonably priced. Iím thinking about doing that to stock the freezer.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 03, 2021, 11:30:22 AM
The grocery store weíve been getting curbside pickup here offers an assortment of ďmeat bundlesĒ that are very reasonably priced. Iím thinking about doing that to stock the freezer.

One of our smaller grocery stores tried doing that a few years ago in the summer and it must not have been popular at the time because they don't offer it anymore. Now, would be the time with the pandemic to offer bundles! Good idea!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Villanelle on January 03, 2021, 01:36:39 PM
We are, again, facing down a move.  It will likely be in April.  Normally at this point I'm very actively eating down the pantry, but I hesitate to do that.  It's a local move for a change, so we can  dump the contents of the freezer into a cooler and have it back in the freezer at the new home in about an hour, so I suppose that's not so bad.  And if we have to pack up boxes of pasta and canned tomatoes and extra olive oil, I suppose that's not so bad, though it's more to deal with. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Cranky on January 03, 2021, 04:50:41 PM
I would totally move my pantry locally.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on January 03, 2021, 09:19:44 PM
I would totally move my pantry locally.

I moved my pantry semi-locally (about 100 km each way)
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 04, 2021, 02:50:33 AM
Thanks, K-in-the-kitchen for the recipes!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 05, 2021, 05:54:30 AM
Rutabaga/turnip story:

In my Misfits box I received 2 huge rutabagas and around 3 medium turnips. I had tossed a bunch of ideas of what to do with them but in the end just decided to make up a mashed tater type recipe.

So, I peeled these suckers and cut into chunks. Boiled them in salted water while trying to watch a movie. I was afraid of boil over so was getting up every so often to check out the situation. Water took forever to get to a boil due to the low temp. I kept jacking up the temp little by little...I think it took me an hour to get them to a point when I could easily put a fork thru them. That done, I put the lid on the pot and let it sit maybe half an hour off the heat just because they were not quite the right texture.

I drained them and proceeded to mash them. Added butter...mash, mash...salt, pepper. Flavor was eh. So, I am thinking now what! So, I added some shredded cheese and stirred it up. Still a bit eh but figured I had done enough damage and to leave it be.

We had it for dinner as a potato substitute. Was okay but nothing I would ever crave. The next day I had a little more and still just ho hum.

Now I still had about 4 cups left. I was on the verge of throwing them out or trying to think of what to do with them. So, what I did was add an egg to it, some brown sugar, cinnamon and a couple cups of bisquick mix. Mixed it all by hand and then plopped 6 blobs onto a baking sheet and baked them up.

I let them cool and cut one in half and put some butter on it. OMG! It was sooo good! Kind of reminded me of spice cake, banana cake, zucchini bread. Mostly the moist texture was what reminded me of those.

Due to the moistness, I refrigerated the rest of them. The Hub loved it! So rather than tossing it, it was reinvented! Yay, no wasted food!

Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 05, 2021, 06:07:39 AM
I seem to have over stocked on some items and it is biting me in the butt a little. One of the things I stocked up on was sour cream. Love the stuff but apparently we are not going thru it fast enough and recently had to throw some out that was expired. I would like to know what to do with extra sour cream. Either recipes or someway to keep it frozen.

Mashed potatoes with sour cream and freezing them?





Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on January 05, 2021, 06:26:36 AM
I would like to know what to do with extra sour cream. Either recipes or someway to keep it frozen.

Mashed potatoes with sour cream and freezing them?

Sour cream is a decadent addition to muffins or quick breads when substituted for the same volume of milk or water. Frozen muffins are a great treat to have on hand.

I bet that you could freeze sour cream into cubes in an ice cube tray to later thaw and incorporate into mashed potatoes or baked goods. Even if it seperates a bit while thawing, it shouldn't impact the taste once mixed in.

@Roadrunner53 Have you tried mashing rutabaga with carrot? The sweetness if the carrot pairs sooooo well with the earthiness of the rutabaga. With some butter, salt and pepper, it's a family favorite!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 05, 2021, 07:01:52 AM
I would like to know what to do with extra sour cream. Either recipes or someway to keep it frozen.

Mashed potatoes with sour cream and freezing them?

Sour cream is a decadent addition to muffins or quick breads when substituted for the same volume of milk or water. Frozen muffins are a great treat to have on hand.

I bet that you could freeze sour cream into cubes in an ice cube tray to later thaw and incorporate into mashed potatoes or baked goods. Even if it seperates a bit while thawing, it shouldn't impact the taste once mixed in.

@Roadrunner53 Have you tried mashing rutabaga with carrot? The sweetness if the carrot pairs sooooo well with the earthiness of the rutabaga. With some butter, salt and pepper, it's a family favorite!

No, did not use carrots but good idea! I have not given up on rutabagas. They are a new adventure for me. Not sure if the turnips conflicted with the flavor of the rutabagas.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PMG on January 05, 2021, 07:27:40 AM
I don't worry much about the expiration date on sour cream unless it's opened. 
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 05, 2021, 07:41:17 AM
I don't worry much about the expiration date on sour cream unless it's opened.

I don't worry too much either but my Hub is fanatical on expiration dates. I have told him a million times the stuff doesn't automatically rot on the expiration date but he remains a non believer. I worked at a food company for 18 years and we did shelf life studies on food. Most of the products I worked on exceeded the shelf life and we did determine, over time, the flavors diminished, texture wasn't stellar and sending the samples to be analyzed showed the nutritional aspects were not as good as the freshly made product. We had the products tested in our microbiology department before we would consume these products.

The Hub gets so agitated when these items are expired, I just go along with it and toss the stuff out. UGH! He won't eat the stuff and it makes me feel like I am some kind of a rabid racoon eating out of a dumpster! LOL!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PMG on January 05, 2021, 07:48:04 AM
ooh.. yeah... understand. My eastern european spouse eats sour cream on everything. Pancakes, stir fry, salad, soup... I've made brownies with sour cream baked in, they were rich and delicious.  Sugar cookies. Those would be freezable, too. You could thin it down a bit and use it in place of buttermilk in pancakes or baking.  Or maybe use it in a creamy soup?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 05, 2021, 08:19:25 AM
ooh.. yeah... understand. My eastern european spouse eats sour cream on everything. Pancakes, stir fry, salad, soup... I've made brownies with sour cream baked in, they were rich and delicious.  Sugar cookies. Those would be freezable, too. You could thin it down a bit and use it in place of buttermilk in pancakes or baking.  Or maybe use it in a creamy soup?

Soup is an interesting idea! I have used in beef stroganoff, baked taters, mashed taters, tacos, onion dip, on top of chili. I try to stay away from sweets but those ideas are great too!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: the_fixer on January 05, 2021, 08:37:15 AM
I seem to have over stocked on some items and it is biting me in the butt a little. One of the things I stocked up on was sour cream. Love the stuff but apparently we are not going thru it fast enough and recently had to throw some out that was expired. I would like to know what to do with extra sour cream. Either recipes or someway to keep it frozen.

Mashed potatoes with sour cream and freezing them?
Beef stroganoff?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 05, 2021, 08:44:56 AM
I seem to have over stocked on some items and it is biting me in the butt a little. One of the things I stocked up on was sour cream. Love the stuff but apparently we are not going thru it fast enough and recently had to throw some out that was expired. I would like to know what to do with extra sour cream. Either recipes or someway to keep it frozen.

Mashed potatoes with sour cream and freezing them?
Beef stroganoff?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Poor mans beef stroganoff: https://www.justapinch.com/recipes/main-course/pasta/poor-mans-beef-stroganoff.html
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on January 05, 2021, 09:23:16 AM
... I try to stay away from sweets but those ideas are great too!

My grandma always kept a few tins of sweets in her freezer ready for last minute company. Since you're probably not getting a lot of drop-in visits these days, what about dropping off little parcels of sweets to friends on Valentine's day?

@K_in_the_kitchen Thanks for those bread recipes! I made the french bread yesterday and was really impressed with how well it turned out for such a quick recipe. The ease and taste don't bode well for my waistline, which has only been held in check by how long it takes to make bread.

I had to cancel my credit card the other day after some fraudulent activity and will have to wait 7-10 days for a new one to arrive.  I feel lucky to have plenty of everything on hand so that I won't have to go in to a store to shop with my debit card. The fraud was the same day that I gave my credit card number over the phone to a clerk at a small shop for curbside pickup, so I'd suggest learning from my carelessness.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 05, 2021, 09:34:39 AM
... I try to stay away from sweets but those ideas are great too!

My grandma always kept a few tins of sweets in her freezer ready for last minute company. Since you're probably not getting a lot of drop-in visits these days, what about dropping off little parcels of sweets to friends on Valentine's day?

@K_in_the_kitchen Thanks for those bread recipes! I made the french bread yesterday and was really impressed with how well it turned out for such a quick recipe. The ease and taste don't bode well for my waistline, which has only been held in check by how long it takes to make bread.

I had to cancel my credit card the other day after some fraudulent activity and will have to wait 7-10 days for a new one to arrive.  I feel lucky to have plenty of everything on hand so that I won't have to go in to a store to shop with my debit card. The fraud was the same day that I gave my credit card number over the phone to a clerk at a small shop for curbside pickup, so I'd suggest learning from my carelessness.

Sun Hat sorry you had fraudlent activity on your card. I have had it happen numerous times. I am questioning why your CC company is making you wait so long to replace yours? I have had replacement in 24 hours time with no delivery charge at all. Oh, I did reread your post and you are using a debit card. If I were you, I would rethink using a debit card and switch to a credit card. This is a quote from the article I will post: The real difference between a debit card and a credit card when it comes to fraud is in how you get your money back. When a fraudulent transaction occurs on your credit card, you have lost no money. You can report the fraud, get a credit on your statement, and the issue will never affect your bank account.

https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/credit-cards/credit-card-vs-debit-card-safer-online-purchases
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on January 05, 2021, 10:18:50 AM
"....... a rabid racoon eating out of a dumpster."  Thanks for my morning giggle, Roadrunner!  I eat things modestly past the expiry date all the time, even mayo, and no ill effects so far.  I mean sour cream is already sour, right?

I second mashing carrots with rutabagas.  This is the only way I've ever eaten them.  It's best with generous amounts of butter.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: RetiredAt63 on January 05, 2021, 12:58:24 PM
Expiry dates - i am about to open the last carton of egg nog.  It is theoretically expired, but not opened and consistently refrigerated means I figure it will be fine.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Sun Hat on January 05, 2021, 01:32:55 PM
... I try to stay away from sweets but those ideas are great too!

My grandma always kept a few tins of sweets in her freezer ready for last minute company. Since you're probably not getting a lot of drop-in visits these days, what about dropping off little parcels of sweets to friends on Valentine's day?

@K_in_the_kitchen Thanks for those bread recipes! I made the french bread yesterday and was really impressed with how well it turned out for such a quick recipe. The ease and taste don't bode well for my waistline, which has only been held in check by how long it takes to make bread.

I had to cancel my credit card the other day after some fraudulent activity and will have to wait 7-10 days for a new one to arrive.  I feel lucky to have plenty of everything on hand so that I won't have to go in to a store to shop with my debit card. The fraud was the same day that I gave my credit card number over the phone to a clerk at a small shop for curbside pickup, so I'd suggest learning from my carelessness.

Sun Hat sorry you had fraudlent activity on your card. I have had it happen numerous times. I am questioning why your CC company is making you wait so long to replace yours? I have had replacement in 24 hours time with no delivery charge at all. Oh, I did reread your post and you are using a debit card. If I were you, I would rethink using a debit card and switch to a credit card. This is a quote from the article I will post: The real difference between a debit card and a credit card when it comes to fraud is in how you get your money back. When a fraudulent transaction occurs on your credit card, you have lost no money. You can report the fraud, get a credit on your statement, and the issue will never affect your bank account.

https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/credit-cards/credit-card-vs-debit-card-safer-online-purchases

It actually was my credit card that I cancelled. I hardly use my debit card at all, but will if I have to make a purchase before my new CC arrives. I'm not too sure why it's going to take 7-10 days to send me the card, but I presume that they'll send it by regular post from another province, and that can take a week these days now that Canada Post is all backed up with the extra volume of mail from online shopping. I have had replacement cards sent out overnight in the past, but I didn't ask about faster delivery, so they didn't offer. I do love shopping with my CC, as I know that it's in their best interest to keep me as a customer (because of the $$ they get from retailers, and because I carry no debt so am no risk), so they always refund fraudulent purchases made on my account.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: lthenderson on January 05, 2021, 04:12:25 PM
I'm pretty sure the last time I got a replacement credit card it took about a week to receive it unless I wanted to pay for overnight. I'm guessing the days of free overnight replacements are disappearing. That is why I always have two credit cards so I always have a spare while waiting.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PMG on January 05, 2021, 04:37:06 PM
@Roadrunner53 Thought of you this evening when I made this cornbread casserole recipe (https://www.feastingathome.com/cornbread-casserole/#tasty-recipes-31706) that calls for a cup of sour cream.  I didn't follow the recipe exactly, for example I used some rather sour homemade kefir instead of sour cream, no chiles, and about half the cheese and I was pretty heavy on the veg and light on the meat, and I used leftover Christmas ham from the freezer... (Is it even the same recipe anymore?) but it was pretty tasty. I was worried that my spouse would be unenthused by a casserole but his first words were "OMG, This corn quiche is delicious."
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Poundwise on January 06, 2021, 07:21:19 PM
Rutabaga/turnip story:

Now I still had about 4 cups left. I was on the verge of throwing them out or trying to think of what to do with them. So, what I did was add an egg to it, some brown sugar, cinnamon and a couple cups of bisquick mix. Mixed it all by hand and then plopped 6 blobs onto a baking sheet and baked them up.

I let them cool and cut one in half and put some butter on it. OMG! It was sooo good! Kind of reminded me of spice cake, banana cake, zucchini bread. Mostly the moist texture was what reminded me of those.

Due to the moistness, I refrigerated the rest of them. The Hub loved it! So rather than tossing it, it was reinvented! Yay, no wasted food!

Thank you!!! I am literally rolling in rutabagas and turnips from the same source! I keep trying to sneak them into stews and soups, and each time my family detects them and picks them out with looks of disgust.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: SunnyDays on January 06, 2021, 09:31:24 PM
Rutabaga/turnip story:

Now I still had about 4 cups left. I was on the verge of throwing them out or trying to think of what to do with them. So, what I did was add an egg to it, some brown sugar, cinnamon and a couple cups of bisquick mix. Mixed it all by hand and then plopped 6 blobs onto a baking sheet and baked them up.

I let them cool and cut one in half and put some butter on it. OMG! It was sooo good! Kind of reminded me of spice cake, banana cake, zucchini bread. Mostly the moist texture was what reminded me of those.

Due to the moistness, I refrigerated the rest of them. The Hub loved it! So rather than tossing it, it was reinvented! Yay, no wasted food!

Thank you!!! I am literally rolling in rutabagas and turnips from the same source! I keep trying to sneak them into stews and soups, and each time my family detects them and picks them out with looks of disgust.

Purťe them first.  Thatíll teach those fussy eaters!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Hadilly on January 06, 2021, 09:34:49 PM
PMG: thank you for the corn casserole link. I made it tonight with a couple of modifications. No cheese, doubled the veggies and also added ham, purťed some of the corn with the liquid for moistness and threw in a bit of buttermilk. Very tasty! 4/5 of us enjoyed it and that is a pretty good result for a new recipe in my household.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Dicey on January 07, 2021, 02:25:09 AM
PMG: thank you for the corn casserole link. I made it tonight with a couple of modifications. No cheese, doubled the veggies and also added ham, purťed some of the corn with the liquid for moistness and threw in a bit of buttermilk. Very tasty! 4/5 of us enjoyed it and that is a pretty good result for a new recipe in my household.
You guys crack me up! So many substitutions. So mustachian!  I followed the link. I have everything for that recipe and the Mexican Slaw, except for red pepper. I'm sure I can think of something I can substitute... Thanks!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 07, 2021, 05:29:03 AM
So today I am doing a curbside pickup. I also couldn't resist and selected another spiral ham that was on sale for $1.29 lb. With this ham I am going to have the hub strip off all the meat. We will save the bone for pea soup and freeze that. We will make packages out of the ham and vac seal them. Scraps and other parts will be used for the soup. Slices will be used for various dinners. It is precooked so will make some nice dinners and breakfasts! I seriously cannot believe I am buying this ham but...the whole ham is only $12-ish so how can you beat that?
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 07, 2021, 10:57:33 AM
GRRR!!! Picked up my curbside order and they were out of the ham! Oh, well! LOL! Hope whoever got the last of them enjoys them!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PMG on January 07, 2021, 01:50:38 PM
PMG: thank you for the corn casserole link. I made it tonight with a couple of modifications. No cheese, doubled the veggies and also added ham, purťed some of the corn with the liquid for moistness and threw in a bit of buttermilk. Very tasty! 4/5 of us enjoyed it and that is a pretty good result for a new recipe in my household.
You guys crack me up! So many substitutions. So mustachian!  I followed the link. I have everything for that recipe and the Mexican Slaw, except for red pepper. I'm sure I can think of something I can substitute... Thanks!

I hadn't paid attention to that Mexican slaw recipe, but it's on my list now.  We like cabbage salads and they've been a staple this winter when we're not shopping often! We have another favorite one dish "mexican" quinoa recipe coming up on our plan that would also be a good companion for the slaw.
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 07, 2021, 02:33:35 PM
PMG: thank you for the corn casserole link. I made it tonight with a couple of modifications. No cheese, doubled the veggies and also added ham, purťed some of the corn with the liquid for moistness and threw in a bit of buttermilk. Very tasty! 4/5 of us enjoyed it and that is a pretty good result for a new recipe in my household.
You guys crack me up! So many substitutions. So mustachian!  I followed the link. I have everything for that recipe and the Mexican Slaw, except for red pepper. I'm sure I can think of something I can substitute... Thanks!

I hadn't paid attention to that Mexican slaw recipe, but it's on my list now.  We like cabbage salads and they've been a staple this winter when we're not shopping often! We have another favorite one dish "mexican" quinoa recipe coming up on our plan that would also be a good companion for the slaw.

Can someone post the mexican slaw recipe? I must have missed it!
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: PMG on January 07, 2021, 04:36:20 PM
Here ya go!  It was linked somewhere inside the cornbread casserole recipe. https://www.feastingathome.com/mexican-slaw/
Title: Re: Pandemic hoarding
Post by: Roadrunner53 on January 08, 2021, 07:11:33 AM
Thanks!