Author Topic: Pandemic hoarding  (Read 60171 times)

Sibley

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #650 on: December 07, 2020, 08:52:15 PM »
I was curious and checked. Last grocery store trip was mid October. Since then, I've gone to the little corner store type place about every 2 weeks for milk, and once to the local butcher for a turkey. I do need to go to the store before Christmas, because I'm getting chocolate for some gifts. I plan to restock at that point, then hopefully ride it out til February. Or March. We'll see.

I have been going to the pet store regularly, but I have determined that the cat has a problem with fish! Trial and error requires frequent trips. I should be able to stock up now.

Dicey

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #651 on: December 07, 2020, 11:48:45 PM »
I learned from volunteering at a food bank that dented cans are okay as long as the dent isnít so long or deep that it comes to a point at the ends or as long as the sealed area isnít dented.  These are more likely to cause tiny holes that allow air in and can cause bacteria to grow.  A modest, shallow dent on the side isnít likely to be harmful.
The hyperbole was in response to...hyperbole. My intent in purchasing them was to keep them on hand as back up food, not something to be consumed quickly. Also, some of the dents are on the rims, not the sides of the cans, ergo, IMO, more likely to be problematic. Instead of a little convenience food splurge, I have eight dented cans. Well, seven now.

PMG

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #652 on: December 08, 2020, 05:39:59 AM »
Iíve had a good experience ordering a huge variety of food stuff from target and a little bit from Walmart. I try not to order glass but the couple times I have it came intact. Someone upthread mentioned that quite a few target staples arenít available for shipping right now. Thatís hurting me too!  Iím hoping itís not a permanent change. We donít have any pick up options locally and being able to supplement grocery trips with target orders is really helpful. We also find some nice variety there that we canít buy locally.


Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #653 on: December 08, 2020, 05:50:34 AM »
Iíve had a good experience ordering a huge variety of food stuff from target and a little bit from Walmart. I try not to order glass but the couple times I have it came intact. Someone upthread mentioned that quite a few target staples arenít available for shipping right now. Thatís hurting me too!  Iím hoping itís not a permanent change. We donít have any pick up options locally and being able to supplement grocery trips with target orders is really helpful. We also find some nice variety there that we canít buy locally.

Boxed is a pretty good place to order from too. Mostly bulk type purchases. https://www.boxed.com/

SquashingDebt

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #654 on: December 08, 2020, 06:22:18 AM »
I learned from volunteering at a food bank that dented cans are okay as long as the dent isnít so long or deep that it comes to a point at the ends or as long as the sealed area isnít dented.  These are more likely to cause tiny holes that allow air in and can cause bacteria to grow.  A modest, shallow dent on the side isnít likely to be harmful.

That's helpful to know!  What do you mean by "sealed area"?  The edges where the top meets the sides?

SunnyDays

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #655 on: December 08, 2020, 09:40:48 AM »
I learned from volunteering at a food bank that dented cans are okay as long as the dent isnít so long or deep that it comes to a point at the ends or as long as the sealed area isnít dented.  These are more likely to cause tiny holes that allow air in and can cause bacteria to grow.  A modest, shallow dent on the side isnít likely to be harmful.



That's helpful to know!  What do you mean by "sealed area"?  The edges where the top meets the sides?

Yes, the rims.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #656 on: December 09, 2020, 04:15:13 PM »
So, tomorrow starts a new sale at one of our grocery stores and Prime Rib Roast is on sale for $4.99 a lb! I plan to pick up around 4 of them so we can eat them during the year. They seem to be on sale only once a year so now is the time to get a few to tuck away.

I have a curbside grocery order in at another store and will swing by the other store to pick up the prime ribs and a few other things on sale. Really don't want to go into the store but they don't have curbside. I am going early so there should not be many people in the store. I want to get in and out as fast as possible! I will be armed with my alcohol wipes!

Cranky

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #657 on: December 09, 2020, 04:35:01 PM »
Rib roasts go on sale here at Easter, too.

Not going in any stores here.

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #658 on: December 09, 2020, 06:06:35 PM »
So, tomorrow starts a new sale at one of our grocery stores and Prime Rib Roast is on sale for $4.99 a lb! I plan to pick up around 4 of them so we can eat them during the year. They seem to be on sale only once a year so now is the time to get a few to tuck away.

I have a curbside grocery order in at another store and will swing by the other store to pick up the prime ribs and a few other things on sale. Really don't want to go into the store but they don't have curbside. I am going early so there should not be many people in the store. I want to get in and out as fast as possible! I will be armed with my alcohol wipes!

Woohoo! I'm so glad for you that you finally found the roasts at a good price!

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #659 on: December 09, 2020, 06:16:08 PM »
Rib roasts go on sale here at Easter, too.

Not going in any stores here.

Same here, I do expect them to go on sale at Easter.  But unless I've been fully vaccinated including the necessary waiting periods, I won't be going into the store to buy them.  With a fairly early Easter in 2021 and a huge population, I'm not holding my breath.  While I'm glad I got chuck roast for $2.99 last week, I've decided not to look at the sales ads anymore, except for Sprouts if I'm ordering that week.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #660 on: December 10, 2020, 09:35:28 AM »
Got my Prime Rib Roasts. Bought 4 of them. They were nice looking but not as big as I had hoped. They only had 5+ and under. No 6 or 7 lb. ones. Today was the first day of the sale and I was early to the store. They didn't seem in any hurry to fill the meat counter with various sizes. Oh, well, will be some good eating!

Cranky

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #661 on: December 10, 2020, 11:57:27 AM »
For future reference, Iíd ask at the meat department for a larger roast if thatís what youíre looking for. They are used to people wanting a specific size for holidays.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #662 on: December 10, 2020, 12:25:27 PM »
For future reference, Iíd ask at the meat department for a larger roast if thatís what youíre looking for. They are used to people wanting a specific size for holidays.

Yes, this is true but I wanted to get in and out of there as quickly as possible.

Villanelle

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #663 on: December 10, 2020, 03:13:27 PM »
For future reference, Iíd ask at the meat department for a larger roast if thatís what youíre looking for. They are used to people wanting a specific size for holidays.

Yes, this is true but I wanted to get in and out of there as quickly as possible.
  Pre-Covid, I've called ahead and asked them if they had a certain size of a certain cut available.  They were willing to set it aside for me for a short while to give me time to come in.  Did this with a large beef tenderloin one year.  It was a size (very large) they didn't usually cut, but they had the larger pieces so they set them aside for me to pick up. 

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #664 on: December 11, 2020, 01:44:40 PM »
hooplady, can you post your recipe for hummus? I buy chickpeas with that intention and then just don't. It is a bit out of my element but would like to try because when I buy it, already made, I do like it!
It's one of those things that I've been making forever so I don't measure most of the ingredients but here's my best guesstimate.

Two 15-oz cans of chickpeas/garbanzos. Drain and reserve the liquid from one can, add back as much as needed to bring to consistency of your liking.
1/4 -1/2 cup tahini
4-5 garlic cloves (note - I like it pretty garlicky!)
1/2 tsp salt
2 Tbl olive oil
splash of lemon juice

Whomp it all together. I finally splurged on a Blendtec but in the past I've used a regular blender or a food processor. Heck, when I first started I was taught to make it by hand, smashing the chickpeas with a glass jar; this creates a very lumpy hummus which is how I prefer it, I find most Americanized versions to be too runny. Hope you like it!

Hooplady just made your hummus recipe and it came out very good! Thank you! Finally got the Tahini yesterday. Now my question is does tahini need refrigeration? My can says nothing about refrigeration so I assume it is like peanut butter and doesn't need it.

Aegishjalmur

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #665 on: December 11, 2020, 07:04:57 PM »
A trick we learned for making really creamy hummus(Either from canned or dried chick peas)- Boil the chick peas until you can remove the skins, then blend them.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2020, 07:07:33 PM by Aegishjalmur »

GuitarStv

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #666 on: December 11, 2020, 07:18:35 PM »
A trick we learned for making really creamy hummus(Either from canned or dried chick peas)- Boil the chick peas until you can remove the skins, then blend them.

Protip:  Blend into hummus while the chickpeas are still boiling hot and you don't need to remove the skins.  Makes very smooth hummus.  If you wait until they cool, the skins kill the smoothness.

GreenSheep

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #667 on: December 12, 2020, 07:23:12 AM »
A trick we learned for making really creamy hummus(Either from canned or dried chick peas)- Boil the chick peas until you can remove the skins, then blend them.

Protip:  Blend into hummus while the chickpeas are still boiling hot and you don't need to remove the skins.  Makes very smooth hummus.  If you wait until they cool, the skins kill the smoothness.

Another "creamy hummus" tip I learned from chef Dreena Burton: Add a few ice cubes at the very end of blending. Seems crazy, but it works.

OtherJen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #668 on: December 12, 2020, 07:51:00 AM »
Yesterday was the first time that I have ever seen a complete absence of paper towels at Costco. Aldi only had a few two-roll packs. Apparently paper towels are the trendy paper product for hoarding this fall.

Food seemed to be in good supply at both stores, though, except for the lack of rotisserie chickens at Costco at 11 am on a weekday.

Dicey

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #669 on: December 12, 2020, 07:58:18 AM »
A trick we learned for making really creamy hummus(Either from canned or dried chick peas)- Boil the chick peas until you can remove the skins, then blend them.

Protip:  Blend into hummus while the chickpeas are still boiling hot and you don't need to remove the skins.  Makes very smooth hummus.  If you wait until they cool, the skins kill the smoothness.

Another "creamy hummus" tip I learned from chef Dreena Burton: Add a few ice cubes at the very end of blending. Seems crazy, but it works.
That probably works better if you have a really good blender... I'll show myself out.

GreenSheep

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #670 on: December 12, 2020, 08:42:40 AM »
A trick we learned for making really creamy hummus(Either from canned or dried chick peas)- Boil the chick peas until you can remove the skins, then blend them.

Protip:  Blend into hummus while the chickpeas are still boiling hot and you don't need to remove the skins.  Makes very smooth hummus.  If you wait until they cool, the skins kill the smoothness.

Another "creamy hummus" tip I learned from chef Dreena Burton: Add a few ice cubes at the very end of blending. Seems crazy, but it works.
That probably works better if you have a really good blender... I'll show myself out.

Maybe I should have said "at the end of processing," since I use a food processor. Even though I have a Vitamix (now I'll be the one showing myself out), I find that hummus just works better for me in the food processor, even in the $25 one I had before the current fancy-pants one (which was a gift... okay, I'm leaving...).

hooplady

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #671 on: December 12, 2020, 08:50:25 AM »
Hooplady just made your hummus recipe and it came out very good! Thank you! Finally got the Tahini yesterday. Now my question is does tahini need refrigeration? My can says nothing about refrigeration so I assume it is like peanut butter and doesn't need it.
Glad you liked it Roadrunner! I don't refrigerate my tahini, too hard to use when cold.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #672 on: December 12, 2020, 09:41:42 AM »
I did refrigerate my tahini but will take it out. I can imagine it will be hard to handle.

I used my ninja blender container and used canned chickpeas. I didn't even notice any skins when I poured them out of the cans! They looked very smooth. Once blended, I never saw any skins either.

I may add cayenne pepper next time to jazz it up.

Imma

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #673 on: December 12, 2020, 10:39:04 AM »
We are facing a steep increase in Covid cases where I live, combined with empty shelves in stores because of supply chain issues - farmers are blocking distribution centers because they feel they don't get paid enough for their products. I know the farmers are right about that and I support them, it's very painful to see many farmers going under while supermarkets make even bigger profits than they normally do. They have been blocking locations on and off for a year. But with Christmas and Covid coming up I feel this is a big risk. There's talk about a stricter lockdown which in itself already causes an increase in hoarding, and this may increase hoarding even more, and all those people in stores are great for the virus.

We talked about how ethical keeping supplies on hand is. So just for clarity: I don't support panic buying and clearing out shelves. I do believe in keeping at least a couple of weeks of food on hand, bought over a longer period of time during which there are no shortages, and in donating food or money to those who are food insecure. Especially with Christmas coming up. I've been donating money to various charities and my Christmas card to a friend who uses the food bank will include a gift card to a supermarket.  I am staying home myself and not going into any stores.

Sun Hat

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #674 on: December 12, 2020, 07:39:50 PM »
They have been blocking locations on and off for a year.

Wow, Imma, I had no idea that farmers were protesting in Europe! Farmers' protests in India are big news here, but I had missed rumblings from Europe.

A local story forecasted a 5-7% increase in vegetable prices here next year, partly because of COVID, and partly because of climate change. The idea makes me shudder, as produce is already quite expensive here. I fear that it's going to put healthy eating even further out of reach of a lot of people. I already grow a vegetable garden at home, but whenever I read about supply chain issues and steep price increases, I get a fear response in my gut that tells me to move to the country so that I can have a bigger garden and grow enough to give to family and food banks. It's not an entirely rational feeling, since I have no experience in agriculture beyond a few years of tending a backyard plot.

Does anyone else have "back to the land" instincts when reading bad news?


Imma

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #675 on: December 13, 2020, 05:44:31 AM »
They have been blocking locations on and off for a year.

Wow, Imma, I had no idea that farmers were protesting in Europe! Farmers' protests in India are big news here, but I had missed rumblings from Europe.

A local story forecasted a 5-7% increase in vegetable prices here next year, partly because of COVID, and partly because of climate change. The idea makes me shudder, as produce is already quite expensive here. I fear that it's going to put healthy eating even further out of reach of a lot of people. I already grow a vegetable garden at home, but whenever I read about supply chain issues and steep price increases, I get a fear response in my gut that tells me to move to the country so that I can have a bigger garden and grow enough to give to family and food banks. It's not an entirely rational feeling, since I have no experience in agriculture beyond a few years of tending a backyard plot.

Does anyone else have "back to the land" instincts when reading bad news?

The farmers protests have been going on for a while in the Netherlands, even pre-pandemic. They're pissed off at supermarkets because they don't pay enough and abuse their power, and they're angry at the government because of new environmental policy. That policy is necessary and I completely support it but it's unfair to ask farmers to pay the bill.

I'm from a rural background, my family used to farm, so I totally get your back to the land feelings. I've always felt that, but land is extremely expensive here so it's not happening. I already have a veggie patch.

In my country, produce, meat and dairy are all extremely cheap. We are very good at growing lots of food and it's a big export product. But feeding out entire continent is damaging our air and soil, so something needs to be done. In the past, farmers were pressured by the government and banks to expand, expand, expand, which caused lower and lower prices and bigger loans. Many farmers feel backed into a corner by government regulations, banks and supermarkets. My family was lucky to walk away with empty hands instead of debts after farming at that farm for a century.

Queen Frugal

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #676 on: December 13, 2020, 10:04:26 AM »

Does anyone else have "back to the land" instincts when reading bad news?

I occasionally yearn to grow my own but I have tried gardening and determined I like the idea of gardening way more than I like actual gardening. Come summer, I want to be out hiking or traveling. Not tending a garden.

Luckily I do like cooking.

At the beginning of the pandemic, I did a lot of stocking up when prices were at a premium and supplies were low. I felt like I was going to waste a lot more money buying food with the pandemic. I bought a deep freeze and some storage buckets so I could buy more things in bulk.

Over the summer, I casually continued to stock up until I had roughly a 3 month supply of non-perishables.

I am pleasantly surprised that now I am saving money and TIME buying food. I am shopping in person but only every two weeks. I have never managed to wait two weeks before grocery store visits as I can't figure out how to make produce last that long. But now that I have done it and become use to it, it's fine. It's comfortable. It's normal.

I am saving money by buying many staples with long shelf life in bulk and also stocking up on items with a long shelf life while they are on sale. In the past, I bought things only as I needed them. Now that I am all stocked up, I am seeing a big difference in my grocery bill. It's great!

We are such creatures of habit when it comes to eating. I love knowing how other people shop, cook, and eat. It helps me think outside of the box. Love this forum for getting a glimpse of all of your food consumption habits.

A few years ago, I was staying in a hostel in Costa Rica. I loved watching what other travelers cooked and ate. The girl who I remember best was maybe 18, all on her own from Germany. She said she didn't have any money but she wanted to see the world so she ate cheap. She only ate once a day. The first night she arrived she was tired and hadn't gone shopping so she ate 1/2 a bag of boiled rice. Just rice. And ate every bite. The next day she boiled 3 potatoes and a head of broccoli. I try to keep her habits in mind when shopping and eating, but changing my own habits has still been hard.

Pandemic has helped with that. A sliver of a silver lining.




SunnyDays

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #677 on: December 13, 2020, 10:36:19 AM »
@Sun Hat, I understand your fear, but there are a lot easier ways to deal with it than buying a rural property!  With the money you would save from such a purchase alone (actual property cost, transaction fees, survey fees, maintenance costs etc.), you can buy LOTS of food.  Plus, if you buy through CSAs, you're helping already rural folks stay on the land and make an income.  Eating in-season produce goes a long way to saving money too.  Buy meat directly from farmers, same for eggs.  I live in the same area as you, and there are many options out there beyond grocery stores.

Sun Hat

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #678 on: December 13, 2020, 11:38:01 AM »
@SunnyDays

Ooh, I know that it doesn't make sense! I'm not likely to actually do it for a variety of reasons, but the temptation remains! I thought that the readers of this thread would understand the disconnect between reason and fear-based decision making. I'm confident that society will continue to function - but I also remember that my grandmother felt rich during the Great Depression when her very, very cash-poor farming family was able to feed themselves and others. There's something to owning the means of production.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #679 on: December 13, 2020, 01:24:42 PM »
Sun Hat, maybe you could find room on your current property to put in a green house to grow things in the winter months.

My grandparents had a farm in KY and lived a very rustic life. Outhouse, no running water. They had to pull water out of the well in buckets. To me it was a horrid life but they managed to raise 6 children. One thing I was told by my Mom is that they had a root cellar and stored stuff in there. I have no idea how that works but here is an article I found on alternative root cellar ideas: https://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/10/root-cellar-alternatives.html

If you were to buy a large quantity from a farm, maybe you could use some of the above methods in the article to store the veggies.

There are some people I watch on Youtube that have farm and grow most of their food. They freeze, can foods, dehydrate foods and now they are into freeze drying foods. They bought a small freeze dryer. The shelf life of freeze dried foods is the longest of most methods. These people have a lot of video's and are very interesting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Z56JFObqI


Cranky

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #680 on: December 13, 2020, 01:53:23 PM »
We are at our ďnew houseĒ now and will be here for a month, so of course we need a zillion things. I got to try two new Curbside pickups!

Target was very smooth and I will definitely use that again for household items.

HyVee has a great operation where they take the assembled orders to a sort of outbuilding and you drive up there to collect them. There was a steady stream of cars when we went, so they are clearly doing a brisk pickup business.

It was a little different from my usual store, which requires you to approve every substitution. HyVee let me check ďany substitutionĒ and then you got the lowest price, which was great. Iíll do that again, too - probably tomorrow. LOL We keep thinking of things we need.

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #681 on: December 13, 2020, 02:26:29 PM »
Sun Hat, maybe you could find room on your current property to put in a green house to grow things in the winter months.

My grandparents had a farm in KY and lived a very rustic life. Outhouse, no running water. They had to pull water out of the well in buckets. To me it was a horrid life but they managed to raise 6 children. One thing I was told by my Mom is that they had a root cellar and stored stuff in there. I have no idea how that works but here is an article I found on alternative root cellar ideas: https://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2015/10/root-cellar-alternatives.html

If you were to buy a large quantity from a farm, maybe you could use some of the above methods in the article to store the veggies.

There are some people I watch on Youtube that have farm and grow most of their food. They freeze, can foods, dehydrate foods and now they are into freeze drying foods. They bought a small freeze dryer. The shelf life of freeze dried foods is the longest of most methods. These people have a lot of video's and are very interesting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2Z56JFObqI

While I disagree with the DeVraes family's attempt to trademark the term "Urban Homestead", I do admire what they've done with their 1/5 acre home lot in Pasadena, CA (1/10 acre as garden plot).  They grow thousands of pounds of produce annually -- in 2010 (the last year they kept meticulous count) they grew 7000 pounds of organic produce (over 400 varieties), collected more than 200 eggs, and collected between 25-50 pounds of honey --  they were eating a vegetarian diet for under $2 per person per day, or $60 per month per person for an organic, whole foods diet (not one made low in cost by purchasing highly processed foods for pennies on the dollar playing the grocery game).  Of course, they were putting major work effort into obtaining their food.

https://urbanhomestead.org/about/

The DeVraes family, and other urban and suburban homesteaders show that growing significant food can happen without owning a farm.  I have a friend who before she moved had made significant progress on making her own .23 acre suburban home plot a food growing powerhouse.  In addition to garden beds to put edible landscaping everywhere she could, following the adage that any plant you water should provide you with something useful (food, herbs, flowers).  She put in a lot of perennial berry bushes, fruit trees, etc.  But she loved to go out and garden every morning.  I'm not able to make myself like gardening.  I would do if it I had to, but I don't have to. 

Sun Hat

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #682 on: December 13, 2020, 02:59:48 PM »
Thanks for the links @Roadrunner53 and @K_in_the_kitchen !

I've long been inspired by urban homesteading and urban agriculture ideas, and my small lot already has 3 apple trees, raspberry canes, 2 (still tiny) saskatoon bushes, 40 strawberry plants, herbs, 2 rhubarbs and 150 square feet of raised vegetable beds. I used to have about twice the area in vegetable beds, but in 2019 took some apart to make more room to play with my dog. I may worry about long term food security, but it takes second place to playtime with my furry pal.


Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #683 on: December 13, 2020, 03:30:34 PM »
Another thing that I discovered this summer is that scallions (green onions) can be regrown by saving the root! I would place the roots in shallow water and eventually when the roots got a little bigger would plant them. I had the most beautiful scallions and I am sure these could be grown inside too. I just don't have the appropriate amount of space or windows to do that but I sure wish I did. I love scallions and they grew tall and strong. I was so annoyed that I had to finally do away with my little container of them. All I used was potting mix and used a small translucent Rubbermaid container that I popped holes in the bottom. They seem to like full sun but when we got some bad storms, I moved the container closer to the house and under the awning where it got very little direct sunlight. But still did fantastic! I had a good size rosemary plant that I couldn't bear to chuck out so I brought it inside. I have it under a fluorescent light in the kitchen and it seems to be doing good so far.

There are other veggies you can grow from the roots but I didn't get into that...yet!

NotJen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #684 on: December 13, 2020, 03:57:53 PM »
Another thing that I discovered this summer is that scallions (green onions) can be regrown by saving the root! I would place the roots in shallow water and eventually when the roots got a little bigger would plant them. I had the most beautiful scallions and I am sure these could be grown inside too.

Yes, I do this whenever I buy green onions - I just keep them on the windowsill.  It worked a lot better with my CSA onions.  The ones from the store don't work out as well for me.

Cranky

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #685 on: December 13, 2020, 05:46:02 PM »
But really, 75 cents worth of onion sets will keep you in green onions for a year.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #686 on: December 14, 2020, 06:11:43 AM »
Hooplady just made your hummus recipe and it came out very good! Thank you! Finally got the Tahini yesterday. Now my question is does tahini need refrigeration? My can says nothing about refrigeration so I assume it is like peanut butter and doesn't need it.
Glad you liked it Roadrunner! I don't refrigerate my tahini, too hard to use when cold.

hooplady, can you tell me the brand of Tahini that you like best? I bought Joyva brand. I know nothing about tahini and what to look for. Also, what do you like to use to dip? Crackers, celery, carrots? I had these sesame crackers from Costco and really delish but might like something healthier like veggies.

Dicey

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #687 on: December 14, 2020, 07:11:03 AM »
@Queen Frugal, do you follow The Frugal Girl blog? She's a kindred spirit. 

Love the tale of the intrepid young traveler!

hooplady

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #688 on: December 15, 2020, 09:46:46 AM »
hooplady, can you tell me the brand of Tahini that you like best? I bought Joyva brand. I know nothing about tahini and what to look for. Also, what do you like to use to dip? Crackers, celery, carrots? I had these sesame crackers from Costco and really delish but might like something healthier like veggies.
I use Joyva when it's all I can get; my favorite is Ziyad which is usually available locally. Target had a brand called Pepperwood Organics that was good but I haven't been able to get it lately. Ideally I use fresh pita from a local bakery but since COVID I've been doing plain saltine crackers. When I take it to a group function I often include carrot sticks, red and yellow pepper slices and celery. Now that I've stocked up on flour and yeast (stocked up, not hoarded!) my goal is to learn how to bake pita at home.

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #689 on: December 15, 2020, 10:00:09 AM »
Now that I've stocked up on flour and yeast (stocked up, not hoarded!) my goal is to learn how to bake pita at home.

Homemade pita is so good!  I hadn't really had much pita until a Mediterranean restaurant opened in a nearby city in the early 1990s.  They had the best mujadarah, but even better, they would bring basket after basket of just baked pita to the table -- we broke young adults would sometimes go and order a bowl of lentil soup just to get the bread.  They aren't in business anymore, which is sad, and since then I've never been to a restaurant that makes its own pita.  Somehow receiving commercially made pita wrapped in plastic wrap just isn't the same.

However, I've been able to recreate pita at home almost as long, thanks to a book I bought in 1993 to go along with a gifted bread machine.  It's called Bread Machine Baking Perfect Every Time, by Laura Brody and her mom Millie, and I have the first edition.  The bread machine is used to make the dough, but you roll the pita by hand and bake it in the oven.  I use a cast iron griddle as a "baking stone".  The pita puff beautifully and split open as expected.  I'm sure there are pita recipes available for free online.

NotJen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #690 on: December 15, 2020, 10:27:11 AM »
Did my usual grocery shop yesterday - no shortages noted.  Cleaning supplies are even back in stock, and there were several brands of Lysol-type wipes available.

SailingOnASmallSailboat

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #691 on: December 15, 2020, 10:33:49 AM »
hooplady, can you tell me the brand of Tahini that you like best? I bought Joyva brand. I know nothing about tahini and what to look for. Also, what do you like to use to dip? Crackers, celery, carrots? I had these sesame crackers from Costco and really delish but might like something healthier like veggies.
I use Joyva when it's all I can get; my favorite is Ziyad which is usually available locally. Target had a brand called Pepperwood Organics that was good but I haven't been able to get it lately. Ideally I use fresh pita from a local bakery but since COVID I've been doing plain saltine crackers. When I take it to a group function I often include carrot sticks, red and yellow pepper slices and celery. Now that I've stocked up on flour and yeast (stocked up, not hoarded!) my goal is to learn how to bake pita at home.

I did this video a long time ago (!!!) but the information still stands. Making pita bread by hand is lovely and easy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mc2B9l_aPuk

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #692 on: December 17, 2020, 06:31:35 AM »
Making a hodge podge cabbage soup while it snows right now. I used some leftover meatloaf in it. I also added fire roasted Rotel tomatoes, other canned tomatoes, onions, cayenne pepper, chicken broth, sliced peppers, taco seasoning.

The snow is coming down hard and should keep snowing till 11 am the weather people are saying.

Glad I have plenty of supplies!

Queen Frugal

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #693 on: December 17, 2020, 08:52:12 AM »
@Queen Frugal, do you follow The Frugal Girl blog? She's a kindred spirit. 

Love the tale of the intrepid young traveler!

Thanks Dicey! I'm checking her blog out now.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #694 on: December 17, 2020, 09:10:13 AM »
Just had a bowl of my soup and OMG, I was a bit heavy handed on the cayenne! I have turned into a fire breathing dragon!

SunnyDays

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #695 on: December 17, 2020, 10:24:12 AM »
Just had a bowl of my soup and OMG, I was a bit heavy handed on the cayenne! I have turned into a fire breathing dragon!

Then you can turn the heat off and save even more!

Poundwise

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #696 on: December 17, 2020, 11:11:25 AM »
Got our first milk delivery this week!! Not very Mustachian ($10/month delivery fee, and the milk is more expensive so I calculate this luxury will cost us $25/month).  But it is pretty cool to get the milk in old fashioned glass bottles. It tastes creamier too-- not homogenized.

But it served its purpose in that we didn't have to go grocery shopping this week. Now we have a better chance of "eating down our pantry".

Of course, since this is the year of food storage failures for us, this week somebody unplugged our garage fridge and all the frozen food thawed, though it didn't spoil...

Michael in ABQ

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #697 on: December 17, 2020, 12:05:35 PM »
Our governor finally lifted the completely arbitrary limit of 75 people in grocery stores and other big box retailers and made it in-line with everything else at 25% capacity. So Costco, Home Depot, or a Walmart Supercenter went from 75 customers to 300-500. The hour-long lines at every grocery store instantly vanished. Maybe the thought of having some elderly person die from standing in the cold to buy a gallon of milk was finally enough to change her mind. Now we can finally make another trip to Costco and not have to stand outside for an hour - or pay the 20% Instacart markup + their fee.

stoaX

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #698 on: December 17, 2020, 12:15:18 PM »
Did my usual grocery shop yesterday - no shortages noted.  Cleaning supplies are even back in stock, and there were several brands of Lysol-type wipes available.

Same here today in the suburbs of Charlotte. 

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #699 on: December 18, 2020, 04:36:31 AM »
So since I have abundant supplies of most everything, my goal is to stay at home for the rest of the month without going anywhere. Today will be day 3. If I make it, it will be 16 days this month and the earliest I plan to go out is January 5th. My dog will be groomed some day the first week of January. If I make it till Jan. 5th, that will be 21 days at home.

I have Misfits veggies that are delivered every two weeks. If need be, I can do a Peapod grocery delivery to my house and we have a liquor store that delivers. Today, I have the Post Office picking up a package so I don't have to go and wait in line. I have also ordered frozen burgers from Costco that are due to arrive today. I am doing everything I can to avoid being around people and getting Covid.

Since the Hub and I don't work anymore, it is easy to stay home. I know people with kids and jobs would finding staying home impossible. Some people just hate staying home but I am the opposite. I don't mind at all. But I don't like having to hunker down due to the virus. It is such a worry to go anywhere.