Author Topic: Pandemic hoarding  (Read 59093 times)

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #500 on: November 17, 2020, 12:56:28 PM »
Just did another curbside pick up today. Got two more bargain turkeys and 5 chuck roasts on sale. Using one chuck roast for dinner tonight and next week a turkey. I am turkied out now. They do take up a ton of room in the freezer. But I will have turkeys every 3-4 months to use up this stash and next year start over again when Thanksgiving rolls around again. I always use the Reynolds turkey cooking bags and have perfect results every time.

Parking lots were pretty full and I went out around 9:30 am. It is a Tuesday! Where did all those people come from? Are people stocking up for the pandemic or for Thanksgiving?

Imma

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #501 on: November 17, 2020, 01:08:15 PM »
It's more that we go through so many eggs, it's hard to be able to fit them in the fridge.  For the amount of produce in our fridge each week...we just are space limited.  I could go back to eating oatmeal, but I'm not the biggest egg eater.  I eat one a day.  I found myself counting them this morning...if the kids don't eat eggs, we'll make it until Sunday.  For awhile, I'd added eggs to my weekly Thursday produce box (local farmer's eggs).  But then after COVID, so many people added them to their weekly subscription that they were permanently sold out.

You don't have to keep eggs in the fridge. They will just last longer if you do, but it seems that's not the issue. You could put half of the eggs you buy in the fridge and keep the ones you're going to eat first in the cupboard.

OtherJen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #502 on: November 17, 2020, 01:12:10 PM »
Just did another curbside pick up today. Got two more bargain turkeys and 5 chuck roasts on sale. Using one chuck roast for dinner tonight and next week a turkey. I am turkied out now. They do take up a ton of room in the freezer. But I will have turkeys every 3-4 months to use up this stash and next year start over again when Thanksgiving rolls around again. I always use the Reynolds turkey cooking bags and have perfect results every time.

Parking lots were pretty full and I went out around 9:30 am. It is a Tuesday! Where did all those people come from? Are people stocking up for the pandemic or for Thanksgiving?

Both. My grocery shopping time is Friday morning and now I'm hoping I can get a turkey at all.

jrhampt

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #503 on: November 17, 2020, 01:12:40 PM »
You do actually have to refrigerate eggs in the US, I believe.

Imma

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #504 on: November 17, 2020, 01:45:14 PM »
You do actually have to refrigerate eggs in the US, I believe.

Huh, what makes American eggs different than other eggs? Maybe there are laws that demand eggs are refrigerated while in transport / in the shop? (That's not the case in my country BTW). But you don't have other chickens than we do, right?

Source: grew up on a farm. Any given moment we had at least 100 eggs on the shelf (in the coolest place in the house). We wrote the laying date on the egg. In my country the legal expery date for uncooled eggs is 28 days after laying. If you cool them, they last longer. During hot summers they don't last that long.

I usually put eggs in the fridge because it's a convenient place but whenever the fridge is full it's the first thing I take out.

GuitarStv

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #505 on: November 17, 2020, 01:56:54 PM »
You do actually have to refrigerate eggs in the US, I believe.

Huh, what makes American eggs different than other eggs? Maybe there are laws that demand eggs are refrigerated while in transport / in the shop? (That's not the case in my country BTW). But you don't have other chickens than we do, right?

Source: grew up on a farm. Any given moment we had at least 100 eggs on the shelf (in the coolest place in the house). We wrote the laying date on the egg. In my country the legal expery date for uncooled eggs is 28 days after laying. If you cool them, they last longer. During hot summers they don't last that long.

I usually put eggs in the fridge because it's a convenient place but whenever the fridge is full it's the first thing I take out.

They actually are different.

Eggs in the US and Canada are washed with chemicals to prevent salmonella . . . but this washing leaves the egg shell somewhat pourous which allows bacteria to enter the egg if any touches the shell after teh washing.  Other countries don't do this, so it's more difficult for bacteria to enter the egg but they have a marginally higher chance of having salmonella on the outside of the egg.

ChickenStash

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #506 on: November 17, 2020, 02:00:54 PM »
You do actually have to refrigerate eggs in the US, I believe.

Huh, what makes American eggs different than other eggs? Maybe there are laws that demand eggs are refrigerated while in transport / in the shop? (That's not the case in my country BTW). But you don't have other chickens than we do, right?

Source: grew up on a farm. Any given moment we had at least 100 eggs on the shelf (in the coolest place in the house). We wrote the laying date on the egg. In my country the legal expery date for uncooled eggs is 28 days after laying. If you cool them, they last longer. During hot summers they don't last that long.

I usually put eggs in the fridge because it's a convenient place but whenever the fridge is full it's the first thing I take out.

https://www.businessinsider.com/why-europeans-dont-refrigerate-their-eggs-2018-4

Short answer: Different processing methods. In the US, chickens are not required to be vaccinated for salmonella so they wash the eggs, instead, which removes the cuticle that would prevent nasties from growing at room temp. Europeans tend to vaccinate for salmonella and leave the cuticle on to prevent room temp bacterial growths. The cuticle, though, causes issues when refrigerating with condensation so it isn't recommended.


Imma

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #507 on: November 17, 2020, 03:17:41 PM »
This is very good to know @ChickenStash and @GuitarStv . I had no idea. Yes, chickens are generally vaccinated against salmonella in the EU. It's been standard practice for as long as I can remember. And I'm pretty sure washing eggs with anything is not legal because it makes the egg porous.

So, don't put American eggs outside of the fridge!!!  Unless they come from your own or your neighbour's backyard.

Getting salmonella from eggs is extremely rare though. And I say this as someone who was hospitalized with a salmonella infection for a week after my idiot ex cut chicken and salad on the same cutting board - I take salmonella very seriously. But salmonella is only present on less than 0,5% of eggs here and you can only get a salmonella infection from an egg when the bacteria is transferred from the outside of the egg to the egg itself, and then the egg is eaten raw. If you want to be on the safe side, put raw eggs in 60C water for a few minutes to kill off salmonella. The egg itself will still be raw.

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #508 on: November 17, 2020, 05:14:30 PM »
You clearly have never smelled a rotten egg before!  Trust me, the floating method is better. Rotten eggs have a disgusting smell and it will linger for a long, long time.

Actually, I have.  The reason I do it this way is because sometimes eggs float and are still good.  Indeed, I've never had a month old floating egg actually be rotten. Or one a month past the sell by date, which may have been in my house for 6 - 8 weeks.  Honestly, I don't bother to test them for "floatiness" until they're at least a month past the sell by date. Not that eggs are usually in the house that long, but when Aldi puts them on sale at 49Ę a dozen (pre-pandemic, of course) I take the whole family with me and we each buy the limit (usually 4 dozen).

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #509 on: November 17, 2020, 05:42:30 PM »
Eldest and I went to Costco this afternoon.  The parking lot was crazy, but it wasn't terrible inside.  We're surmising that most people aren't bringing an entire group of people with them.  There wasn't a line to get in, but the person checking memberships cards was using a clicker to keep track of occupancy.

We grabbed two carts and did a stock up.  We got 2 bags of dog food even though we have 1 unopened bag already.  I'm hoping with the much cooler temperatures the big dog won't get fussy about old food.  We bought 2 jugs of All Free and Clear because it's what we use and it was on sale (limit was 2).  We bought some veggies for the week, but they were out of both the organic and artisan bags of romaine.  They were out of baking potatoes (I didn't need them).  No eggplant.  Broccoli looked terrible.  Other than buying pears, we avoided the fruit area since we didn't need any.  We bought two packages of the b/s chicken breasts, two bags of frozen grass-fed beef patties, a bag of frozen wild salmon filets, and canned tuna.  Bought 10 dozen eggs, 3 gallons of almond milk (in the half gallon cartons), 3 gallons of ultra pasteurized whole milk (again, in the half gallon cartons).  We bought salted butter, and unsalted butter to make ghee.  6 containers of Chobani yogurt because it was on sale for $2.99.  Also got olive oil, ketchup, honey, coffee, salt, vanilla extract (price keeps dropping), kalamata olives, corn tortillas, tortilla chips, a jug of Dawn, and deodorant for the men.

At the door Costco indicated they were out of toilet tissue and paper towels, disinfecting wipes, vinegar (which I wanted because we clean the coffee maker with it), bleach, masks, sanitizer, and a few other things.  They were low on stock of chicken, but that may have been in part because they had a case devoted to turkeys.  I only saw organic turkeys, not regular.  From a distance, the beef and pork area looked well stocked, but I don't know if they had all cuts.  Bakery area looked full of all sorts of breads and desserts.

I don't think of it as hoarding, but I do now have 5 unopened jugs of laundry detergent, and 4 of Dawn.

Tomorrow I'm going to the regional grocery chain for two standing rib roasts (Thanksgiving and Christmas -- my pizza idea was rejected), and then that's it, we're planning to stay out of the stores until we're vaccinated.  We'll use Instacart for pickup at Sprouts, and Instacart for delivery from other stores.  I want to go to Aldi to stock up on a few things, but we'll probably place that as an order since the markup at Aldi is low.  Aldi is the one store during this pandemic where I've consistently seen poor Covid measure compliance.  They stopped disinfecting carts early on and rarely have wipes to do it yourself, they don't enforce wearing masks, and they continue to give you the cart handled by the previous customer without disinfecting it.

MudPuppy

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #510 on: November 17, 2020, 07:07:02 PM »
I have a minimum spend for welcome reward bonus on a new card. I think I might stuck up on shelf stable items to do so. Accepting all ideas, if you have them!
« Last Edit: November 18, 2020, 08:54:50 AM by MudPuppy »

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #511 on: November 17, 2020, 07:48:54 PM »
I have a minimum spend for welcome reward bonus on a new cx. I think I might stuck up on shelf stable items to do so. Accepting all ideas, if you have them!

What kinds of foods do you eat?  I learned from the first round of lockdowns that a) shortages never got so desperate that I couldn't get produce, eggs, and milk (although I had to pay more), and b) my family really dislikes canned vegetables.  So this time around I haven't bought any canned vegetables at all.  I bought a lot of sugar when it was hard to get, then found we used almost none of it.  Now that it's cold my son will oatmeal and thus use more brown sugar, but I donated the powdered sugar figuring maybe a family could use it for holiday baking.  I bought far too many old fashioned oats and donated those to the food bank months ago.

The shelf stable items I plan to stock up/already stocked up on this time around are peanut butter, salsa, applesauce, canned peaches, rice, pinto beans, olive oil, honey, coffee, tuna, Honest Earth mashed potatoes, and salt.  I may end up needing quick oats but my son says he has about 75% of a 5 gallon bucket left.  I'd like to stock up on Progresso lentil soup for my son if I can find a good price.

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #512 on: November 17, 2020, 08:00:16 PM »
Is anyone thinking ahead to holiday shortages?  Today at Costco I bought the big tin of Walker's shortbread for us to have during the 12 days of Christmas, and a bag of caramels for stockings (I have so many food allergies I jump when I find something I can have).

I'd already been thinking I should buy stocking candy now, and any ingredients needed for fudge.  We keep our holiday treats simple -- frosted cut out sugar cookies for Christmas Eve night and Christmas Day, gluten free vegan pumpkin pie for my sons, homemade fantasy fudge, stocking candy (just a few things), candy canes from a local candy maker, the shortbread cookies to have with tea or cocoa throughout the 12 days, and a King's cake on Epiphany (Rosca de Reyes).

For Christmas supper, I'll be buying a standing rib roast this week and freezing it.  If I can get fresh rosemary I will -- maybe I can just get a plant and keep it alive until I need it.  I already have pumpkin and the gluten free pie crusts.  I need marshmallow fluff for the fudge, but have the evaporated milk.  I have everything for the cookies.

I definitely need to get the stocking candy, and soon.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #513 on: November 18, 2020, 02:26:35 AM »
K_in_the_kitchen, How much per lb. are you seeing the rib roasts costing? I have not seen any advertised yet. I did a curbside but then popped into another store for about 10 minutes but did not see any rib roasts displayed.

Over the last few months, as far as shelf stable things, I stocked up on various pasta's and jarred sauces. I had multiple jars break when I ordered them from Walmart or Target and had a major disaster thru Amazon. So, now that I do curb service, I will order 6 or 8 jars at a time and no breakage. Glass jars are totally bad news when ordering on line. I do not get why they don't take any caution on packing glass jars safely. I have had a box full of jars with little padding. The jars all smash into each other and half of them break. I have also ordered canned things and that is pretty much a horror show too. The cans are packed the same way and smash into each other. Then I get ugly dented cans that look like they were dug out of a bombed out grocery store.


rantk81

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #514 on: November 18, 2020, 06:38:27 AM »
I'm soooo over this pandemic shopping "experience".

I ordered TP a couple days ago... now I get a notification that it is "back ordered" with a mid December estimated delivery date.  Paper towels are out of stock.  I haven't been able to buy lysol concentrate since January.  I usually buy one bottle of rubbing alcohol about once every 5 years, for minor cleaning of electronics.  Haven't been able to get that either.

who would have thought that a respiratory virus would cause people to have to shit their brains out repeatedly, to the tune of needing to clear the stores of toilet paper for an entire year.

MudPuppy

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #515 on: November 18, 2020, 06:44:19 AM »
We eat meat quite lightly, and rarely eat pastas or regular bread. I already buy our rice, beans, oats in bulk. I recently bought a triple amount of TVP than we usually buy. I guess all that leaves is canned fruits, canned tomato products, spices/condiments, shelf stable milk, maybe some extra raisins.

Tigerpine

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #516 on: November 18, 2020, 07:39:49 AM »

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #517 on: November 18, 2020, 07:40:56 AM »
I'm soooo over this pandemic shopping "experience".

I ordered TP a couple days ago... now I get a notification that it is "back ordered" with a mid December estimated delivery date.  Paper towels are out of stock.  I haven't been able to buy lysol concentrate since January.  I usually buy one bottle of rubbing alcohol about once every 5 years, for minor cleaning of electronics.  Haven't been able to get that either.

who would have thought that a respiratory virus would cause people to have to shit their brains out repeatedly, to the tune of needing to clear the stores of toilet paper for an entire year.

You made me laugh but none of this is funny! I went to the Walmart website and see only one brand that they will ship. All the others you have to do a pick up. I also checked Costco and toilet paper has limited choices and none of their brand of paper towels. Here we go again!

Cranky

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #518 on: November 18, 2020, 08:43:47 AM »
I think people had gotten back to buying tp in smaller quantities and now the are stocking up because who wants to go into the stores for the next weeks/months. Not me, for sure.

Khaetra

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #519 on: November 18, 2020, 09:04:04 AM »
https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/reviewedcom/2020/11/17/where-buy-toilet-paper-still-stock-amazon-walmart-and-more/6329228002/

Apparently the great TP run of 2020 has begun again in places.

I had to make a run to Walmart and the entire aisle of paper products was bare.  No tp/paper towels/kleenex/napkins.  I didn't make it to the cleaning supplies but the shelf that usually has bleach was empty as well.  I have plenty of everything (I restocked early) but it does seem we're in for more shortages.

SunnyDays

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #520 on: November 18, 2020, 09:40:53 AM »
@K_in_the_kitchen, you make me want to weep with your egg prices.  Here in Canada, I pay 3.29 for a dozen/8.50 for 30, and they are never on sale.  I'm curious what your Costco vanilla costs.  The last time I looked here, a few months ago, it was 30 some dollars for whatever the size was, maybe 1/2 litre.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #521 on: November 18, 2020, 09:58:36 AM »
I just bought 2 dozen jumbo eggs and they were $1.69 a dozen. A few week earlier, I bought 3 dozen Jumbo eggs at another store and they were $1.79 a dozen. The expiration dates vary on all the cartons so I will use the ones to expire earliest first and so on. Some are good till January. There are all different prices of eggs in the stores depending on name brands. These are regular grocery stores, not big box stores.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #522 on: November 18, 2020, 10:05:51 AM »
@K_in_the_kitchen, you make me want to weep with your egg prices.  Here in Canada, I pay 3.29 for a dozen/8.50 for 30, and they are never on sale.  I'm curious what your Costco vanilla costs.  The last time I looked here, a few months ago, it was 30 some dollars for whatever the size was, maybe 1/2 litre.

That looks pretty typical for Ontario egg prices too (not sure where in Canada you are).  Sometimes eggs are on sale, it is almost always the store brand. And almost never extra large or double yolk.

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #523 on: November 18, 2020, 10:19:18 AM »
K_in_the_kitchen, How much per lb. are you seeing the rib roasts costing? I have not seen any advertised yet. I did a curbside but then popped into another store for about 10 minutes but did not see any rib roasts displayed.

Over the last few months, as far as shelf stable things, I stocked up on various pasta's and jarred sauces. I had multiple jars break when I ordered them from Walmart or Target and had a major disaster thru Amazon. So, now that I do curb service, I will order 6 or 8 jars at a time and no breakage. Glass jars are totally bad news when ordering on line. I do not get why they don't take any caution on packing glass jars safely. I have had a box full of jars with little padding. The jars all smash into each other and half of them break. I have also ordered canned things and that is pretty much a horror show too. The cans are packed the same way and smash into each other. Then I get ugly dented cans that look like they were dug out of a bombed out grocery store.

They went on sale today for $4.99 per pound for choice grade.  I'v never bought one before, but my dad says it's the lowest price I'm likely to see.  He's been making one each Christmas for the past 13 years (before that it was turkey and we all prefer the switch to the beef roast).

I've had the same experience ordering food in jars and cans online.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2020, 10:44:29 AM by K_in_the_kitchen »

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #524 on: November 18, 2020, 10:28:24 AM »
@K_in_the_kitchen, you make me want to weep with your egg prices.  Here in Canada, I pay 3.29 for a dozen/8.50 for 30, and they are never on sale.  I'm curious what your Costco vanilla costs.  The last time I looked here, a few months ago, it was 30 some dollars for whatever the size was, maybe 1/2 litre.

For the 10 dozen eggs at Costco I paid $1.68 USD per dozen.  I haven't seen 49Ę per dozen eggs since 2018, I think, although last year Aldi had eggs at 59Ę per dozen a couple of times.

The vanilla extract was $21.99 USD for 16 ounces.  A year ago it was $34.99, then we saw it drop to $29.99, and then $24.99 this summer.  I was telling my son that it was $6.99 and $8.99 5- 6 years ago.  In 2012 I paid $22.42 for half a pound of Madagascar bourbon vanilla beans.  Current price on those is $167, but a year ago it was over $200 for 1/4 pound.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #525 on: November 18, 2020, 10:59:16 AM »
K_in_the_kitchen, How much per lb. are you seeing the rib roasts costing? I have not seen any advertised yet. I did a curbside but then popped into another store for about 10 minutes but did not see any rib roasts displayed.

Over the last few months, as far as shelf stable things, I stocked up on various pasta's and jarred sauces. I had multiple jars break when I ordered them from Walmart or Target and had a major disaster thru Amazon. So, now that I do curb service, I will order 6 or 8 jars at a time and no breakage. Glass jars are totally bad news when ordering on line. I do not get why they don't take any caution on packing glass jars safely. I have had a box full of jars with little padding. The jars all smash into each other and half of them break. I have also ordered canned things and that is pretty much a horror show too. The cans are packed the same way and smash into each other. Then I get ugly dented cans that look like they were dug out of a bombed out grocery store.

They went on sale today for $4.99 per pound for choice grade.  I'v never bought one before, but my dad says it's the lowest price I'm likely to see.  He's been making one each Christmas for the past 13 years (before that it was turkey and we all prefer the switch to the beef roast).

I've had the same experience ordering food in jars and cans online.

Yes, $4.99 is the lowest price and is fantastic! You should pick up a few for the freezer! I am hoping for $5.99 or $6.99 a lb. If I find $4.99 I will do cartwheels!

Here is the recipe I use and it is a fool proof recipe every time and no matter what size roast I have it seems to work the same. I don't use the seasoning in the recipe. My Hub mixes up a coffee rub, lots of garlic and ties fresh rosemary to it. The cooking method is awesome!

https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a18012/paula-deens-famous-foolproof-rib-roast-recipe/
« Last Edit: November 18, 2020, 11:02:34 AM by Roadrunner53 »

Catbert

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #526 on: November 18, 2020, 11:52:02 AM »
Costco trip this morning.  This particular Costco recently started opening at 9:00 rather than 10:00 (not just for seniors).  I think people haven't figured this out so...no line to get in.  Easy parking.  Store not toocrowded.  Short line at checkout.  I didn't need any TP, papertowels or wipes so I don't know if they were in stock.  I was able to get yeast which I haven't seen there since the start of the pandemic. 


Queen Frugal

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #527 on: November 18, 2020, 12:19:02 PM »
I did my grocery shopping today and the store seemed completely normal. Plenty of turkeys. Plenty of toilet paper. Plenty of everything. Our local hospital was featured in the paper today and they are planning on a 500% increase in hospitalizations between now and 12/1 - and they are already at 80% capacity. Cases are skyrocketing. But panic buying is not happening so far.

Since moving into a house with more storage space, and since living through the first round of panic buying, I settled on stocking up on 3 months worth of nonperishable staples that I normally use. I'm set if things get nasty - for 3 months anyway. Meanwhile, I'm planning on decreasing my weekly shopping trip to bi-weekly shopping until it feels safer. I'll miss out on some fresh fruits and veggies but I figure in the short run it's better for my health than catching COVID.

MudPuppy

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #528 on: November 18, 2020, 12:37:12 PM »
Might not even miss too much! When Iím doing biweekly, I eat the quick spoil things like lettuce and banana the first week and plan for things like carrots, cabbage, apples, spaghetti squash that last longer the second week.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #529 on: November 18, 2020, 12:56:42 PM »
Carrots and cabbage seem a wise investment. I just found a cabbage steak recipe that you roast in the oven and brush it with olive oil salt, pepper, garlic. Roast in 400F oven for 20 minutes then turn and cook for another 20 minutes. I also made a nice chopped cabbage, onion, tomato casserole type thing cooked in a skillet and served with parmesan cheese. Another recipe with maple carrots roasted in the oven. Toss the cut carrot sticks in olive oil, salt, maple syrup, cayenne pepper. Roast in oven 400F around 20 minutes. Carrots and cabbage last a long time in the fridge as MudPuppy said. Good idea on eating fragile veggies first then eat the hardier veggies 2nd week.

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #530 on: November 18, 2020, 01:03:13 PM »

Yes, $4.99 is the lowest price and is fantastic! You should pick up a few for the freezer! I am hoping for $5.99 or $6.99 a lb. If I find $4.99 I will do cartwheels!

Here is the recipe I use and it is a fool proof recipe every time and no matter what size roast I have it seems to work the same. I don't use the seasoning in the recipe. My Hub mixes up a coffee rub, lots of garlic and ties fresh rosemary to it. The cooking method is awesome!

https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a18012/paula-deens-famous-foolproof-rib-roast-recipe/

Thanks for the recipe/cooking directions!  They look similar to what my dad gave me.

I was able to get 4 roasts in the 6 - 9# range.  Limit was supposed to be 25#, but I know from experience they are more about the spirit of the guidelines than any absolute rule.  If I'd tried to buy 8 5# roasts, they might have said something.  I think I ended up with 28# total.

I also bought 3 pork butt roasts because they were 99Ę/#, which is the lowest I've seen in more than a year.  Sometimes we buy pastured pork, but in pandemic times I take what I can get, when I can get it (except for ground beef).  Once everything is in the freezer I'll see how much room I have left -- I may have to wait to make the ground beef order.

As for the store, they were stocked on most things except toiler paper, paper towels, disinfecting wipes, hand sanitizer, and Lysol.  What small amount of toilet paper and paper towels they had were limited to one per person.  They did have bleach.  I looked at the turkeys and didn't see anything smaller than 19#.  I bought the last on sale package of tri-tip -- I only wanted one for today.  It's a small one but fine for us.  They did have b/s chicken breast for 99Ę/#, which again is the lowest I've seen in more than a year, but I didn't buy any because I don't think I have room -- I have about 30# out in the freezer.  But I'll reconsider once I have the roasts frozen, because we can eat chicken just as easily as we can eat beef.

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #531 on: November 18, 2020, 01:06:02 PM »
Carrots and cabbage seem a wise investment. I just found a cabbage steak recipe that you roast in the oven and brush it with olive oil salt, pepper, garlic. Roast in 400F oven for 20 minutes then turn and cook for another 20 minutes. I also made a nice chopped cabbage, onion, tomato casserole type thing cooked in a skillet and served with parmesan cheese. Another recipe with maple carrots roasted in the oven. Toss the cut carrot sticks in olive oil, salt, maple syrup, cayenne pepper. Roast in oven 400F around 20 minutes. Carrots and cabbage last a long time in the fridge as MudPuppy said. Good idea on eating fragile veggies first then eat the hardier veggies 2nd week.

The cabbage steak sounds yummy!

I also find that cabbage and carrots last a long time, and even broccoli does, especially if I prep it first and store it with paper towels to absorb any lingering moisture.  If we find really fresh romaine hearts they can last two weeks as well.  Overall most of my produce lasts longer if I prep it and store it well.  I also buy some produce purposely underripe, like pears and avocados, so they are good the second week.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #532 on: November 18, 2020, 01:22:02 PM »
K_in_the_kitchen, what part of the country are you in? I am on the east coast. I just looked at the store flyer for one store that is effective tomorrow and I see Rib Roasts at $7.99 a lb. There are a few more stores in my area and sales start tomorrow. I will have to see what their prices are.  You really got yourself some bargains and are very well stocked up! Good for you!

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #533 on: November 18, 2020, 02:27:13 PM »
K_in_the_kitchen, what part of the country are you in? I am on the east coast. I just looked at the store flyer for one store that is effective tomorrow and I see Rib Roasts at $7.99 a lb. There are a few more stores in my area and sales start tomorrow. I will have to see what their prices are.  You really got yourself some bargains and are very well stocked up! Good for you!

I'm on the west coast.  I was surprised by the good meat prices all around at this store, since usually they only have one really great sale item.  But they had the standing ribeye roasts, the pork butt, the b/s chicken breasts, Butterball turkeys at 99Ę/# and Jennie-O turkeys at 49Ę/# -- all were advertised as lowest prices of the year.  Another lowest price of the year was wild caught lobster tails at $6.99 each (5 oz.), which is good for our side of the country.  Flap meat at $3.99/#, unseasoned or marinated, is also listed at lowest price of the year, but it has been that price several times this year.  Not false advertising, but not as uncommon as the other prices.  Even the breakfast sausage links my kid likes were at their lowest in a very long time, at 99Ę for the 8 oz. package.  I didn't buy those, since he's old enough to have to buy his own treat foods and the rest of us don't eat them.

I have room to freeze more meat, so I have decide a) if I want to, and b) what to get.  The b/s chicken breast @ 99Ę/# is probably a no-brainer.

SunnyDays

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #534 on: November 18, 2020, 03:45:48 PM »
@K_in_the_kitchen, you make me want to weep with your egg prices.  Here in Canada, I pay 3.29 for a dozen/8.50 for 30, and they are never on sale.  I'm curious what your Costco vanilla costs.  The last time I looked here, a few months ago, it was 30 some dollars for whatever the size was, maybe 1/2 litre.

For the 10 dozen eggs at Costco I paid $1.68 USD per dozen.  I haven't seen 49Ę per dozen eggs since 2018, I think, although last year Aldi had eggs at 59Ę per dozen a couple of times.

The vanilla extract was $21.99 USD for 16 ounces.  A year ago it was $34.99, then we saw it drop to $29.99, and then $24.99 this summer.  I was telling my son that it was $6.99 and $8.99 5- 6 years ago.  In 2012 I paid $22.42 for half a pound of Madagascar bourbon vanilla beans.  Current price on those is $167, but a year ago it was over $200 for 1/4 pound.

I remember the 8.99 vanilla.  It lasted for years, then when I next needed it and saw the $30 price, my eyes almost popped out of my head.  Now I just use Mexican blend; itís good enough.

Tris Prior

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #535 on: November 18, 2020, 03:55:24 PM »
I'm soooo over this pandemic shopping "experience".

I ordered TP a couple days ago... now I get a notification that it is "back ordered" with a mid December estimated delivery date.  Paper towels are out of stock. 

I'm in Chicago too and was able to order a 24-pack of TP and a 6-pack of paper towels from Target. I was pretty surprised that they had it!

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #536 on: November 18, 2020, 04:53:42 PM »
Vanilla seems to be something that depends on the crops. Years ago, when I worked in R&D, we used a certain vanilla flavor in a food product and the source was from Madagascar. There were some devastating storm damage to the crops so what was left was primo and the price skyrocketed. Food manufacturers try to use the best ingredients but the cheapest to keep product prices low. We scrambled for about a month or so to try to find a replacement that was similar to the flavor we were using.

geekette

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #537 on: November 18, 2020, 05:17:25 PM »
@K_in_the_kitchen, you make me want to weep with your egg prices.  Here in Canada, I pay 3.29 for a dozen/8.50 for 30, and they are never on sale. 
For the 10 dozen eggs at Costco I paid $1.68 USD per dozen.  I haven't seen 49Ę per dozen eggs since 2018, I think, although last year Aldi had eggs at 59Ę per dozen a couple of times.
I just checked our local Wally World - eggs are .77 for 18.  That's kinda nuts. 

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #538 on: November 18, 2020, 06:19:44 PM »
Vanilla seems to be something that depends on the crops. Years ago, when I worked in R&D, we used a certain vanilla flavor in a food product and the source was from Madagascar. There were some devastating storm damage to the crops so what was left was primo and the price skyrocketed. Food manufacturers try to use the best ingredients but the cheapest to keep product prices low. We scrambled for about a month or so to try to find a replacement that was similar to the flavor we were using.

I read awhile ago that it was a combination of crops destroyed by storms and manufacturers switching from artificial vanilla to real vanilla because of consumer demand.  Plus the high demand had growers picking beans unripe to avoid theft, and I guess those beans then didn't reach high quality.  I think the crop damage was the most important factor, but I also don't see prices going back to where they were before because of consumer demand.

For decades, we would drive to apple country and buy heirloom varieties dirt cheap.  Our favorite was Arkansas Blacks, and each year we'd head up around Halloween and buy them for $15-$20 a bushel.  But heirlooms got popular, some of the apple sheds were profiled in the newspaper and on TV news, and next thing we knew they were selling Arkansas Blacks for $4 per pound minimum.

K_in_the_kitchen

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #539 on: November 18, 2020, 08:59:26 PM »
I went to Aldi tonight, which should be my final foray into groceries stores until I'm vaccinated.  It was busy, but since I almost never go in the evening, I would assume it was pretty normal for 5:30 p.m.  It wasn't packed.  I didn't see any obvious shortages, although toilet paper and paper towels were limited to one per person. Any turkeys I could see were huge.  Certain canned items are still limited to 4 per person, but they've been that way since March.

My main reason for going was to pick out stocking candy.  I wanted to do it in person so I could see ingredients (I have a wheat and dairy allergic child and one with celiac disease).  I kind of went all out because it feels right for this year.  I also bought peanut butter applesauce, salsa, canned peaches, canned pineapple, milk, cookies for the Feast of Saint Nicholas, BBQ sauce, white wine vinegar, plain sparkling water, decorations for Christmas cookies, facial tissue, zipper bags for freezing meats, a few other things I can't recall, and I'll admit it -- a puffer coat and two holiday sweaters for one of my dogs.

I decided not to go back to the other grocery store to buy more meat.  We're fine with what we have, and I didn't have time.  I wanted to finish all my shopping today so I can get a Covid test in 14 days and feel clear about it.  Actually, I may get tested tomorrow when I get my flu shot, but it won't tell me anything definitive about my exposure in the past two weeks.  My county just really wants everyone to get tested regularly.

Covid tests in two weeks, isolate until we get results, and then we plan to visit MIL outside, socially distant, with masks on.  It won't be Thanksgiving, and it won't be Christmas, but we really want to see her and this seems the safest way.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #540 on: November 22, 2020, 05:08:33 AM »
Okay, one little glitch in my supplies. I have the shelf stable 8 ounce boxes of milk. I think I bought 3 cases of it at different times and now the first batch has only one week left. So, I am in the process of freezing them. I experimented with two of the boxes and  made the box top a 'tent' shape on top to give it some room for expansion. Then put the two boxes into a ziplock and froze them. They froze perfectly and did not explode out of the boxes. So, now I will freeze the others that have a short shelf life. When I plan to use them I will take them out of the freezer and refrigerate the night before and next day shake them to make sure they have not separated.

So, my friends, check some of your expiration dates on your food! Waste not, want not!

I am also not finding any decent prices on rib roasts! Prices are higher this year. I hope they go down soon!

kite

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #541 on: November 22, 2020, 07:55:17 AM »
I canít bring myself to stock up.  The ďuse it up, wear it out, make it do, do withoutĒ refrain along with Christianity was drilled into me.  Knowing that so many in my community are reliant on food banks just to make it through the week, Iíd be deeply ashamed of myself if I had food on hand that we couldnít possibly be eating for several weeks or even months when others need it now. As a Christian, I feel like this is precisely what Jesus was talking about when he lambasted those of us going around with more than one coat while we see people who have none.  Even for those who are
I donít mean for this to come across as judging anyone else, itís only my interpretation of what Iíve been taught.  My very dear friend is a Latter Day Saint and it was instilled into her the importance of maintaining a well stocked pantry.  And I respect what she was taught despite not agreeing or adhering to it myself.  Depending on where you live and your family & transportation situation, it might be entirely reasonable to buy a few months worth of beans or tuna or whatever.
As a mustachian, I again come down on the side of not keeping excesses on hand.  For one, physical inventory costs money to store and maintain and it doesnít increase in value except on very rare occasions.  Consumables deteriorate. In my view, the money is better left in the market.  My personal experience living through hurricanes & other weather related extended power outages confirms this.
As a typical citizen of the world, dabbling in amateur epidemiology like everyone else, Iím also weighing the risk of exposure to others in the stores & such; mulling over whether the risk is worse right this minute versus how it will be two weeks or two months from now.  Itís really bad right this moment in my county, so I donít want to set foot into any store unless it is essential. Is it essential to buy food today that we donít yet need?  Again, it turns out, the answer is ďnoĒ.
 

RetiredAt63

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #542 on: November 22, 2020, 10:00:54 AM »
I'm doing large infrequent shops.  My main grocery store is in a high density area so I use the priority hour (yes I'm eligible).  I went this morning at 7:15 and am good for 2 weeks plus.  I am fine with eating the most perishable vegetables and fruits first,  it's better to have a slightly boring menu than shop more often.  We are in the lull between Thanksgiving and Christmas, everything was in stock.   Yes, toilet paper, paper towel, and yeast were plentiful.

We are supposed to get 15 cm or so of snow today and tomorrow, I was surprised when the store wasn't busy at 8:30
when I finished my shopping.

ixtap

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #543 on: November 22, 2020, 10:04:26 AM »
I canít bring myself to stock up.  The ďuse it up, wear it out, make it do, do withoutĒ refrain along with Christianity was drilled into me.  Knowing that so many in my community are reliant on food banks just to make it through the week, Iíd be deeply ashamed of myself if I had food on hand that we couldnít possibly be eating for several weeks or even months when others need it now. As a Christian, I feel like this is precisely what Jesus was talking about when he lambasted those of us going around with more than one coat while we see people who have none.  Even for those who are
I donít mean for this to come across as judging anyone else, itís only my interpretation of what Iíve been taught.  My very dear friend is a Latter Day Saint and it was instilled into her the importance of maintaining a well stocked pantry.  And I respect what she was taught despite not agreeing or adhering to it myself.  Depending on where you live and your family & transportation situation, it might be entirely reasonable to buy a few months worth of beans or tuna or whatever.
As a mustachian, I again come down on the side of not keeping excesses on hand.  For one, physical inventory costs money to store and maintain and it doesnít increase in value except on very rare occasions.  Consumables deteriorate. In my view, the money is better left in the market.  My personal experience living through hurricanes & other weather related extended power outages confirms this.
As a typical citizen of the world, dabbling in amateur epidemiology like everyone else, Iím also weighing the risk of exposure to others in the stores & such; mulling over whether the risk is worse right this minute versus how it will be two weeks or two months from now.  Itís really bad right this moment in my county, so I donít want to set foot into any store unless it is essential. Is it essential to buy food today that we donít yet need?  Again, it turns out, the answer is ďnoĒ.
 

I have given several months' worth of grocery bills to the local food bank.

On the other hand, my extra stores just mean if something happens at the end of two week restock and I can't get to the store, we can still eat *something*.

Imma

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #544 on: November 22, 2020, 10:05:05 AM »
@kite obviously this is something you have thought about quite a bit so a random forum member isn't going to change your mind. But I don't think stocking up is not the Christian thing to do. There are several texts in the Bible that could be interpreted as supportive or non-supportive of stocking up. But there are a few things to keep in mind:

- unlike in the Biblical age, there is no actual shortage of food. There is still more food in the world than people can eat. Just not everyone can afford to buy it. The food in your pantry is not stolen from anyone's mouth. Of course it would be extremely unchristian to keep food in your pantry just for you when there's a food shortage. To make sure other people can have food, too, you can donate food or money to charities like foodbanks and churches that give out food parcels. I do and I'm sure many on this thread do.

- In my country, there's one grocery store for every 3500 people. Say half of them regularly shop. That means every store theoretically has 1750 customers. If they all turn up twice a week like many people did pre-pandemic, that means the traffic in the store is 3500/week. If everyone reduced that to one weekly shop, there'd be only 1750 people per week per store. If people only buy food once every two weeks, there'd be only 875 customers a week! When the store is filled to normal capacity, there's a fair chance of transmission of viruses. When the shops are filled to 25% of capacity, people have way more space to implement social distancing, staff (generally minimum wage workers from underpriviliged groups) can do their work while not coming too close to customers, and staff have more time to properly clean the shop and carts. So every time you don't set foot in the shop you're actually making a massive difference in reducing traffic to the store.

- Of course it makes no financial sense to keep a warehouse full of food. But I don't think most people on this thread keep such insane amounts of food. Personally, I live in an old small house (800 square ft) and it comes with a built-in pantry and that's filled, like it always is. I come from a rural background and was taught to always keep food on hand by my grandparents who lived through WWII. They didn't starve but lived through hard times and one grandparent was completely dependant on produce from a tiny garden and charity. They always kept a small stockpile of non-perishables like coffee, tea, salt and sugar. Part of my pantry is canned food that I grew myself. A reasonable stockpile of food doesn't actually take up that much space. I think my pantry is 20 square ft and at any point in time there's maybe Ä50-100 worth of food in there. And these days empty shelves aren't exactly unusual, a while back the whole produce, dairy and meat aisles were empty for days. During the first lockdown I was very happy with the flour and yeast in my pantry because they were unavailable for months.

I feel that exactly because I'm in the privileged position of working from home and having enough money, I shouldn't be a burden on society by venturing out more than I need to be. Every time I don't go to a shop, other people there are safer simply because there are fewer people there. Some people will have to go to the store frequently simply because they can't afford to do one big shop in one go, they may rely on that day's tips to get some reduced food at the end of the day. I have most of my groceries delivered and I have started to tip a higher amount than I used to do too. I'm in the vulnerable group as well, but I'd rather avoid the special opening hours. I'm 30 and I don't look disabled. I'm quite private about my health and I don't want to get into an argument in front of the grocery store at 7am.

Michael in ABQ

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #545 on: November 22, 2020, 10:28:07 AM »
Due to current public health orders all stores are now limited to a max of 75 people, even a huge store like Costco. Multiple grocery store have been shut down if they have more than 4 employees test positive, which isn't that much if you're talking about a Walmart Supercenter with a few hundred employees. I got in line at Costco yesterday at 9:45 (they normally open at 10:00). I didn't get inside until  about 11:00 as there was probably 300-350 people in line. They also limited entry to one person per household so a couple shopping together wouldn't take up one of those 75 spots. I bought pretty much our normal every two weeks worth of stuff. We've got six kids so we buy the box of 15 dozen eggs, usually 6-8 gallons of milk, TP, diapers, baby wipes, produce, etc. It was actually quite nice having the store mostly empty. I normally go about twice as fast as everyone else in the grocery store and am usually slowed down by the crowds.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #546 on: November 22, 2020, 10:39:09 AM »
Due to current public health orders all stores are now limited to a max of 75 people, even a huge store like Costco. Multiple grocery store have been shut down if they have more than 4 employees test positive, which isn't that much if you're talking about a Walmart Supercenter with a few hundred employees. I got in line at Costco yesterday at 9:45 (they normally open at 10:00). I didn't get inside until  about 11:00 as there was probably 300-350 people in line. They also limited entry to one person per household so a couple shopping together wouldn't take up one of those 75 spots. I bought pretty much our normal every two weeks worth of stuff. We've got six kids so we buy the box of 15 dozen eggs, usually 6-8 gallons of milk, TP, diapers, baby wipes, produce, etc. It was actually quite nice having the store mostly empty. I normally go about twice as fast as everyone else in the grocery store and am usually slowed down by the crowds.

Michael ABQ what state are you in! Don't like what I hear but thank you for sharing the information! That is unbelievable to have this happen in our lifetimes!

Cranky

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #547 on: November 22, 2020, 11:05:58 AM »
I believe that New Mexico is requiring stores to shut if they have a certain number of employees who test positive.

I feel like when we stay out of the store because we are stocked up we are leaving spots open for other people and we are lowering to risk of taking up hospital space. We donate to several food programs... itís kind of our thing!

RetiredAt63

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #548 on: November 22, 2020, 02:35:28 PM »
Due to current public health orders all stores are now limited to a max of 75 people, even a huge store like Costco. Multiple grocery store have been shut down if they have more than 4 employees test positive, which isn't that much if you're talking about a Walmart Supercenter with a few hundred employees. I got in line at Costco yesterday at 9:45 (they normally open at 10:00). I didn't get inside until  about 11:00 as there was probably 300-350 people in line. They also limited entry to one person per household so a couple shopping together wouldn't take up one of those 75 spots. I bought pretty much our normal every two weeks worth of stuff. We've got six kids so we buy the box of 15 dozen eggs, usually 6-8 gallons of milk, TP, diapers, baby wipes, produce, etc. It was actually quite nice having the store mostly empty. I normally go about twice as fast as everyone else in the grocery store and am usually slowed down by the crowds.

Michael ABQ what state are you in! Don't like what I hear but thank you for sharing the information! That is unbelievable to have this happen in our lifetimes!

Grocery stores here have maximums.  And lines if you go at a busy time.  Makes perfect sense to lower store density in response to an air-borne virus.  We are all masking.  Ottawa's case numbers are slowly coming down.  And winter is here (it's snowing right now, 15 cm expected).

No limits on anything when I shopped this morning, but right now nothing is sold out.  My one Costco shop this fall had a TP limit, but of course one Costco package is a huge amount of TP!

Roadrunner53

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Re: Pandemic hoarding
« Reply #549 on: November 22, 2020, 03:13:59 PM »
Well, I am glad I am stocked up with nearly everything and don't have to go out for a while!

I have a Misfits vegetable order coming on Tuesday.

When I do a curbside pick up I get enough for several weeks. I have been very pleased with the service.