Author Topic: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)  (Read 7277 times)

BradminOxt19

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #100 on: January 13, 2020, 03:21:01 PM »
Thing that puzzles me is- why is it so awful to live in a place where it's too COLD* to venture outdoors 3 or 4 months of the year, and yet desirable to live in a place where it's too HOT to venture outdoors 3 or 4 months of the year?

*   especially since, thanks to the revolutionary invention of something called "clothing", one can actually safely venture outdoors during those months!
Because you haven't really tried to live somewhere warm to see how it really is.

I have relatives in really cold places and in really hot places.  In the really cold places it is pretty miserable, shoveling snow gets to be old, salt on roads everywhere gets everything dirty, rust on cars, external work on houses come to a stop except for emergency repair, roads break down due to the salt / freezing / moisture. 

For my relatives who live in sunny places like AZ, the heat can be annoying but it's easy to work around.  You don't have to shovel sunshine, nor scrape sunshine off the windows.   The weather is still pleasant in the morning.  You can easily jump into a pool to cool off in the afternoon / evening.  Joints don't ache as much in the heat.  Carry an insulated thermos full of ice with your favorite beverage of choice and stay hydrated to avoid any illness from the heat.  Plus there is a monsoon season with seasonal rains that cool things off fairly well.  The streets are in much better condition due to lack of salt / snow.  It's really easy to deal with the heat compared to all the misery that is snow and ice.

You really need to live in both to understand how heat is much easier for older folks.

BradminOxt19

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #101 on: January 13, 2020, 03:24:47 PM »

I think the whole thing about it being too hot to go outside is overblown.  Besides a few places in Florida and Arizona I don't think it's that hot or humid for long stretches.  The afternoon heat index here runs in the 90s most of the summer.  I bike or walk even on days when it gets over 100.  It's not exactly fun when it gets that bad, but it's doable if you pace yourself.  I'd much rather go out in the heat than in the cold because I don't like feeling like I'm wearing a space suit.

I think some people tolerate heat better, and some tolerate cold better. 

Then I think there are a lot of snowbirds who just take the best of both worlds.
100% spot on.  I recall last summer when it was 100+ degrees in Chicago, Minneapolis, DC, etc., along with high humidity to boot.  That was a lot more miserable than Phoenix at 115 degrees with no humidity.  People seem to over-state the heat based on the temperature number, but don't realize how easy it is due to the lack of humidity and the numerous ways to cool down (some delicious ways including refreshing smoothies / ice drinks).

Having lived in both climates, I'll never understand how people can compare extreme cold with extreme heat.  One is definitely harder than the other to deal with.

TVRodriguez

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #102 on: January 13, 2020, 03:27:35 PM »
Thing that puzzles me is- why is it so awful to live in a place where it's too COLD* to venture outdoors 3 or 4 months of the year, and yet desirable to live in a place where it's too HOT to venture outdoors 3 or 4 months of the year?

*   especially since, thanks to the revolutionary invention of something called "clothing", one can actually safely venture outdoors during those months!
Because you haven't really tried to live somewhere warm to see how it really is.

I have relatives in really cold places and in really hot places.  In the really cold places it is pretty miserable, shoveling snow gets to be old, salt on roads everywhere gets everything dirty, rust on cars, external work on houses come to a stop except for emergency repair, roads break down due to the salt / freezing / moisture. 

For my relatives who live in sunny places like AZ, the heat can be annoying but it's easy to work around.  You don't have to shovel sunshine, nor scrape sunshine off the windows.   The weather is still pleasant in the morning.  You can easily jump into a pool to cool off in the afternoon / evening.  Joints don't ache as much in the heat.  Carry an insulated thermos full of ice with your favorite beverage of choice and stay hydrated to avoid any illness from the heat.  Plus there is a monsoon season with seasonal rains that cool things off fairly well.  The streets are in much better condition due to lack of salt / snow.  It's really easy to deal with the heat compared to all the misery that is snow and ice.

You really need to live in both to understand how heat is much easier for older folks.

I love the way you put this.

BradminOxt19

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #103 on: January 13, 2020, 03:29:36 PM »

Personal preference, but my thoughts are one can always dress for the cold (and I’ve lived and happily spent hours outside in temps down to -30ºF/-35ºC) - but there’s far less one can do in extreme heat (arbitrarily defined here as “well above body temp (98.6ºF/37ºC).  I’ve also lived in areas where temps > 104ºF/40ºC occur, and about all you can do it take it slow and avoid exertion (or hide inside or in the water).

Both ends of the spectrum there is a risk of dying - but I can be active in the cold, not so much in the heat.
People are far more active in the hot summers than in freezing winters than you think.  Many people go hiking, fishing, swimming, tubing in rivers, camping, etc.  You seem to think the hot places are like the sahara, where nothing lives but snakes and lizards and lots of sand dunes.  You really need to travel more and see how it really is.

dougules

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #104 on: January 13, 2020, 03:36:03 PM »

I think the whole thing about it being too hot to go outside is overblown.  Besides a few places in Florida and Arizona I don't think it's that hot or humid for long stretches.  The afternoon heat index here runs in the 90s most of the summer.  I bike or walk even on days when it gets over 100.  It's not exactly fun when it gets that bad, but it's doable if you pace yourself.  I'd much rather go out in the heat than in the cold because I don't like feeling like I'm wearing a space suit.

I think some people tolerate heat better, and some tolerate cold better. 

Then I think there are a lot of snowbirds who just take the best of both worlds.
100% spot on.  I recall last summer when it was 100+ degrees in Chicago, Minneapolis, DC, etc., along with high humidity to boot.  That was a lot more miserable than Phoenix at 115 degrees with no humidity.  People seem to over-state the heat based on the temperature number, but don't realize how easy it is due to the lack of humidity and the numerous ways to cool down (some delicious ways including refreshing smoothies / ice drinks).

Having lived in both climates, I'll never understand how people can compare extreme cold with extreme heat.  One is definitely harder than the other to deal with.

Even with humidity the heat's not as bad as it can be made out to be. 

And also humidity makes things worse on both ends.  It can be humid here sometimes in the winter, and that damp cold is tough to deal with because it just seems like it penetrates as many layers as you can put on. 

nereo

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #105 on: January 13, 2020, 03:46:58 PM »

Personal preference, but my thoughts are one can always dress for the cold (and I’ve lived and happily spent hours outside in temps down to -30ºF/-35ºC) - but there’s far less one can do in extreme heat (arbitrarily defined here as “well above body temp (98.6ºF/37ºC).  I’ve also lived in areas where temps > 104ºF/40ºC occur, and about all you can do it take it slow and avoid exertion (or hide inside or in the water).

Both ends of the spectrum there is a risk of dying - but I can be active in the cold, not so much in the heat.
People are far more active in the hot summers than in freezing winters than you think.  Many people go hiking, fishing, swimming, tubing in rivers, camping, etc.  You seem to think the hot places are like the sahara, where nothing lives but snakes and lizards and lots of sand dunes.  You really need to travel more and see how it really is.

I don't think you've spent much time reading my posts.  I have lived in hot climates, including Mexico and the US South.  I've also lived in Québec and worked north of the Arctic circle. I've clearly stated that it's my own personal preference, yet you tell me that people's activity levels are "more than think" and then insist I "need to travel more to see how it really is". 

Some people prefer one over the other. That's fine.  No need to shit on other people and their opinions, and imply that they don't know what they are talking about when it comes to their preferences. FWIW I've burned my feet on asphalt baking in the sun and had my dashboard delaminate.  Just there are 'numerous ways to cool down" - there are numerous ways of staying warm and warming up.

BradminOxt19

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #106 on: January 13, 2020, 03:58:15 PM »

Personal preference, but my thoughts are one can always dress for the cold (and I’ve lived and happily spent hours outside in temps down to -30ºF/-35ºC) - but there’s far less one can do in extreme heat (arbitrarily defined here as “well above body temp (98.6ºF/37ºC).  I’ve also lived in areas where temps > 104ºF/40ºC occur, and about all you can do it take it slow and avoid exertion (or hide inside or in the water).

Both ends of the spectrum there is a risk of dying - but I can be active in the cold, not so much in the heat.
People are far more active in the hot summers than in freezing winters than you think.  Many people go hiking, fishing, swimming, tubing in rivers, camping, etc.  You seem to think the hot places are like the sahara, where nothing lives but snakes and lizards and lots of sand dunes.  You really need to travel more and see how it really is.

I don't think you've spent much time reading my posts.  I have lived in hot climates, including Mexico and the US South.  I've also lived in Québec and worked north of the Arctic circle. I've clearly stated that it's my own personal preference, yet you tell me that people's activity levels are "more than think" and then insist I "need to travel more to see how it really is". 

Some people prefer one over the other. That's fine.  No need to shit on other people and their opinions, and imply that they don't know what they are talking about when it comes to their preferences. FWIW I've burned my feet on asphalt baking in the sun and had my dashboard delaminate.  Just there are 'numerous ways to cool down" - there are numerous ways of staying warm and warming up.
I'm sorry if my post came across that way, but I took issue with your statement "but there’s far less one can do in extreme heat" which is definitely not true.  There are plenty of snow days where schools and businesses are closed due to the extreme cold and weather.  There are virtually no "sunny days" where schools or businesses are closed due to the heat.  Life generally doesn't come to a halt in the hotter places, people still can get business and personal things done and even enjoy the perks of the heat with pools, etc.

Not seeing the sun for weeks with only gloomy weather can wear on people.  Seeing blue skys and sunny weather generally is not an issue for most people. There are multitude of reasons why most people would be happier with the heat than the cold.  Many of them can't move due to family ties, but those that have the option to move to a sunny place generally love it.

TVRodriguez

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #107 on: January 13, 2020, 05:17:19 PM »
I forgot about the time that our gps (Garmin on the dashboard) melted in the car. No garage here.

We don't have snow days, but here in South Florida we do have hurricane days.

BradminOxt19

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #108 on: January 13, 2020, 06:43:16 PM »
I forgot about the time that our gps (Garmin on the dashboard) melted in the car. No garage here.

We don't have snow days, but here in South Florida we do have hurricane days.
Ouch! The one thing I always have in my car is a sun shade, regardless of where I am.  The sun shade reduces UV and heat, making it much more enjoyable to get in the car after it's been in the sun for a while.

fattest_foot

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #109 on: January 13, 2020, 07:17:42 PM »
Personal preference, but my thoughts are one can always dress for the cold (and I’ve lived and happily spent hours outside in temps down to -30ºF/-35ºC) - but there’s far less one can do in extreme heat (arbitrarily defined here as “well above body temp (98.6ºF/37ºC).  I’ve also lived in areas where temps > 104ºF/40ºC occur, and about all you can do it take it slow and avoid exertion (or hide inside or in the water).

Both ends of the spectrum there is a risk of dying - but I can be active in the cold, not so much in the heat.

I had a drill sergeant who took the opposite view.

As long as you drink enough water, the heat won't kill you (at least anywhere on Earth). But the cold? The cold will absolutely kill you if it gets low enough.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2020, 07:19:43 PM by fattest_foot »

TVRodriguez

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #110 on: January 13, 2020, 08:32:40 PM »
I forgot about the time that our gps (Garmin on the dashboard) melted in the car. No garage here.

We don't have snow days, but here in South Florida we do have hurricane days.
Ouch! The one thing I always have in my car is a sun shade, regardless of where I am.  The sun shade reduces UV and heat, making it much more enjoyable to get in the car after it's been in the sun for a while.

That's a good idea. 

DadJokes

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #111 on: January 14, 2020, 08:00:32 AM »
Today's high in Edmonton is -23F (-31C). It apparently feels like -47F, per the Weather Channel.

No amount of clothing is going to make that bearable, whereas I can just keep a steady supply of fluids when in 100 degree, hot & humid summers in the south and get by just fine.

nereo

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #112 on: January 14, 2020, 08:40:33 AM »
Today's high in Edmonton is -23F (-31C). It apparently feels like -47F, per the Weather Channel.

No amount of clothing is going to make that bearable, whereas I can just keep a steady supply of fluids when in 100 degree, hot & humid summers in the south and get by just fine.

I frequently ski at those temperatures, as well as drill ice cores.  The trick is layering.  Base layer, mid layer, loft layer and wind-stopping outer layer.   Technology has also made some nice cheats, like heated insoles and mid layers.

Is it for everyone?  No.  But given the millions who live and work in such condtions it’s a bit of hyperbole to say nothing can make that ‘bearable’ - eh?

DadJokes

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #113 on: January 14, 2020, 08:46:08 AM »
Today's high in Edmonton is -23F (-31C). It apparently feels like -47F, per the Weather Channel.

No amount of clothing is going to make that bearable, whereas I can just keep a steady supply of fluids when in 100 degree, hot & humid summers in the south and get by just fine.

I frequently ski at those temperatures, as well as drill ice cores.  The trick is layering.  Base layer, mid layer, loft layer and wind-stopping outer layer.   Technology has also made some nice cheats, like heated insoles and mid layers.

Is it for everyone?  No.  But given the millions who live and work in such condtions it’s a bit of hyperbole to say nothing can make that ‘bearable’ - eh?

Correction: bearable for me

nereo

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #114 on: January 14, 2020, 08:51:51 AM »
Thank you :-)

I fully realize I’m in the minority opinion here, but expressing it so forcefully here simply because I want others to realize that, yes, you can enjoy being outdoors in sub-zero temperatures, and for some of us that’s preferable than being outdoors in 100ºF+ (particularly with high humidity). 

Getting back to the OP - just as many retire to Florida or Phoenix for the warmer temperatures, there are many that retire to Maine or Vermont or Alaska because they like cold over heat.

Just Joe

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #115 on: January 14, 2020, 10:30:06 AM »
Don't forget all the inbetween places. Places where the winter gets really cold (teens) overnight but most of the winter is above freezing spiced up with 50F-60F bonus days.

And summer isn't 100F+, it's 80s and 90s with cool mornings and comfortable evenings if you have a screened porch to keep the mosquitoes away. And a/c makes it even better come bedtime.

BradminOxt19

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #116 on: January 14, 2020, 10:35:51 AM »
Thank you :-)

I fully realize I’m in the minority opinion here, but expressing it so forcefully here simply because I want others to realize that, yes, you can enjoy being outdoors in sub-zero temperatures, and for some of us that’s preferable than being outdoors in 100ºF+ (particularly with high humidity). 

Getting back to the OP - just as many retire to Florida or Phoenix for the warmer temperatures, there are many that retire to Maine or Vermont or Alaska because they like cold over heat.
Agree you are in the minority.  I just got back from a really cold place, and am sick of the chapped lips, cold / dried hands, grime over everything - shoes, clothing, hair, etc.  That salt residue gets everywhere.  Being outside scraping ice off the car just to go grocery shopping, gets real old, real fast.  Even more fun when it's freezing rain. Constantly having a running nose due to my sinuses trying to deal with the cold, weary of other sick people with colds or flus due to the cold weather.  Not my idea of fun for retirement, especially when my body gets more vulnerable to illness and arthritis in the future.

There were several huge deadly pile-ups due to the cold weather in the news recently, with dozens of people dying who did nothing wrong other than trying to get to work or school or shopping and ended up being crushed by tractor trailers and other vehicles.  Driving is deadly enough without the element of black ice, no thanks...I'll happily drive in my air conditioned car in the extreme heat with zero risk of deadly car slides and freezing weather accidents even after the roads have been plowed and salted.

The majority of people do prefer warmer, safer climates.  That and being in shorts, chilling with ice cold drinks, with misters outside, or in the pool as time allows.  Even just taking a plain cold shower sometimes feels invigorating and fun.  It's a lot more enjoyable and fun to be in warm places.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2020, 10:45:20 AM by BradminOxt19 »

dougules

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #117 on: January 14, 2020, 10:38:44 AM »
Not seeing the sun for weeks with only gloomy weather can wear on people.  Seeing blue skys and sunny weather generally is not an issue for most people. There are multitude of reasons why most people would be happier with the heat than the cold.  Many of them can't move due to family ties, but those that have the option to move to a sunny place generally love it.

Gloominess isn't really related to cold or hot weather.  Maybe in your area gray weather is associated with winter, but here we occasionally get spells of hot humid gloomy weather in the summer, too. 


Thank you :-)

I fully realize I’m in the minority opinion here, but expressing it so forcefully here simply because I want others to realize that, yes, you can enjoy being outdoors in sub-zero temperatures, and for some of us that’s preferable than being outdoors in 100ºF+ (particularly with high humidity). 

Getting back to the OP - just as many retire to Florida or Phoenix for the warmer temperatures, there are many that retire to Maine or Vermont or Alaska because they like cold over heat.

Yes, the big takeaway is that people really are different.  Some people will don't mind bundling up and dealing with the cold if it means not having to deal with sweating non-stop for months on end.  Other people don't mind sweating all summer if it means not having to shovel snow or dress like Randy in "A Christmas Story".  Then some people don't mind paying a stiff premium to live in that small strip of California that's always nice.  That's why these lists are so ridiculous because they're going to look completely different for different people. 

spartana

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #118 on: January 14, 2020, 11:19:53 AM »
Thank you :-)

I fully realize I’m in the minority opinion here, but expressing it so forcefully here simply because I want others to realize that, yes, you can enjoy being outdoors in sub-zero temperatures, and for some of us that’s preferable than being outdoors in 100ºF+ (particularly with high humidity). 

Getting back to the OP - just as many retire to Florida or Phoenix for the warmer temperatures, there are many that retire to Maine or Vermont or Alaska because they like cold over heat.
I'm with you. I have lived (lived and worked outdoors in extreme conditions and not just visited) in many very cold and many very hot areas (northern Ontario Canada, Alaska, Maine, New Orleans, Key West, Honolulu, SoCal, ...and many more) and FOR ME colder is better. As a very active outdoors person I have found that cold - and especially snow - is extremely invigorating and revs me up to want to go out and do things. Heat - especially dry sunny desert heat - just sucks the life out of me. If I can't have cool green/snowy  mountain give me the cool foggy (but no rain!) West Coast.

So I agree, this is an individual preference and no one can say what is best for anyone else. Aalso as a light skinned blonde of nordic descent my tolerance for excessive sun (and I'm outdoors about 10 hours a day everyday) is limited.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2020, 11:33:22 AM by spartana »

Just Joe

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #119 on: January 15, 2020, 11:05:12 PM »
And whatever your environment, a person can acclimate - somewhat. Back when I worked outside all the time I coped better than now when I work inside more often.

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #120 on: January 16, 2020, 02:15:15 AM »
Talking about preferred weather - I must surely be the only such person in the world, but I absolutely hate places that are always sunny. I don't mind a little sun every now and then but definitely not on a daily basis. This is probably the result of spending my childhood in a very hot and sunny climate :-)

I generally love overcast conditions. I lived in upstate New York for many years and loved the weather there!

spartana

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #121 on: January 16, 2020, 10:42:05 AM »
Talking about preferred weather - I must surely be the only such person in the world, but I absolutely hate places that are always sunny. I don't mind a little sun every now and then but definitely not on a daily basis. This is probably the result of spending my childhood in a very hot and sunny climate :-)

I generally love overcast conditions. I lived in upstate New York for many years and loved the weather there!
Not the only one! I like cool foggy weather or at least overcast and cloudy when it's hot. Hate that hard bright sun we get in the west and enjoy the "marine layer" (heavy overcast) we get most of the year on the coast. The sun! We hates it preciousss. It burnssss ussss.

Schaefer Light

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #122 on: January 16, 2020, 04:56:33 PM »
Today's high in Edmonton is -23F (-31C). It apparently feels like -47F, per the Weather Channel.

No amount of clothing is going to make that bearable, whereas I can just keep a steady supply of fluids when in 100 degree, hot & humid summers in the south and get by just fine.

I frequently ski at those temperatures, as well as drill ice cores.  The trick is layering.  Base layer, mid layer, loft layer and wind-stopping outer layer.   Technology has also made some nice cheats, like heated insoles and mid layers.

Is it for everyone?  No.  But given the millions who live and work in such condtions it’s a bit of hyperbole to say nothing can make that ‘bearable’ - eh?
How am I gonna' swing a golf club dressed like that? ;)

spartana

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Re: Miami Herald article with list of best states to retire (US)
« Reply #123 on: January 16, 2020, 05:05:01 PM »
Today's high in Edmonton is -23F (-31C). It apparently feels like -47F, per the Weather Channel.

No amount of clothing is going to make that bearable, whereas I can just keep a steady supply of fluids when in 100 degree, hot & humid summers in the south and get by just fine.

I frequently ski at those temperatures, as well as drill ice cores.  The trick is layering.  Base layer, mid layer, loft layer and wind-stopping outer layer.   Technology has also made some nice cheats, like heated insoles and mid layers.

Is it for everyone?  No.  But given the millions who live and work in such condtions it’s a bit of hyperbole to say nothing can make that ‘bearable’ - eh?
How am I gonna' swing a golf club dressed like that? ;)
No problem. Just come to the Bering Sea Invitational in Nome ;-)