Author Topic: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation  (Read 19463 times)

oldtoyota

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3021
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #200 on: January 15, 2018, 09:07:58 PM »
With out relatively low projected FIRE budget ($40-45k/yr), even a $15/hr job at Trader Joes could make a huge impact to the success likelihood.

2 People working 3X a week = $37,440 a year.

If a bad sequence of returns hit, I would do something like that in a heartbeat. Not to mention you would then get employer subsidized health insurance and other perks (free food).

I would consider this, too. I see some older folks working at Trader Joe's. It would be physically demanding yet perhaps fun for a bit. Costco treats its employees well, I hear. Might be another option.

You can also work your network to find projects in your previous field. I started a consulting business and then changed its focus. What I made last year part-time (and working when/if I want) is way more than I would make at a Trader Joe's type of job.


Paul der Krake

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3778
  • Age: 10
  • Board Member
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #201 on: January 15, 2018, 10:10:10 PM »
I'm quite familiar with that attitude.  That's the one I had when I was younger.  And indeed that's how it was when I was in my 20's.  Then all of a sudden I'm older and being good and reliable isn't as important as being young.  Then I've watched my wife struggle even more than I did.  It's brutal out there if you're over 30 years old.  All they'll hire is kids out of school these days.  Forget finding a job if you've got any experience!
The funny thing with the labor market (at least the small corner that I know) is that everybody thinks they have it hard.

- Experienced people complaining that companies only hire fresh graduates
- Fresh graduates complaining about experience requirements
- Minorities complaining about racist/sexist hiring
- Majorities complaining about diversity hiring
- Americans complaining about H1Bs
- H1Bs who can't wait to become Americans

dresden

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 31
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #202 on: January 15, 2018, 10:27:17 PM »
This is what I have been thinking about, but not as much in a fire failure situation as a bridge to age 60 when I start getting my pension to make sure I don't fire failure.

Work has been a real struggle due to daily headaches and back tightness from an auto accident almost a year ago.  They are letting me cut back to part time but I am not sure how much they like the arrangement so I assume it won't last too long.

I am 51 with 9 years to go until I start getting my pension I can live off of, but until then I will work try to at least break even with wages to avoid pulling out too much.

Malkynn

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 326
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #203 on: January 16, 2018, 04:24:12 AM »
]hmmm...perhaps "introvert" was the wrong word. Disinterested in doing volunteer/work related stuff of the kind you mentioned and would rather play instead? Yeah that's better. Sad boring ball scratcher for short ;-).

But seriously, yes anyone regardless of their disposition can learn skills if they are interested in being pro active. However some of us FIREd people are interested in other pursuits that may not help them land a job if needed,, or feel theiy can easily get a job if ever needed, or that a job will never be needed.

To each their own, but I firmly believe that doing whatever you enjoy in whatever capacity is likely to help you find work if you end up wanting it. I believe that almost anything interesting can be monetized and all interesting activities lead to networking, whether you intend them to or not.

Sure, we all know people who worked themselves into the ground, retired in their senior years and coasted out their days literally sitting on the porch and watching the river flow by and drinking themselves to death. Theyíre burnt and spent. They worked soulless jobs for so long that theyíve got no energy or personal identity left. Those are the ball scratchers and they are truly sad.
I donít know you, but I canít fathom that you are like that if you are here posting.

Mustachians retire young, live life to the fullest, and have the energy to do cool shit they like to do. Most Mustachians will end up drastically more employable in more dynamic ways in retirement just due to doing more cool shit, even if itís just fucking around with chill hobbies.
Itís *how* to monetize and convert being interesting into paid work that trips a lot of people up, but mostly just because they donít realize how valuable their talents and skills are. A lot of people simply donít have any experience with being paid for cool shit they like to do anyway.

Granted, I donít know anything about you or what your ďplayĒ activities are in retirement, maybe they are somehow incredibly non-valuable and not monetizable in any way shape or form. Possibly, but I canít imagine a single interesting hobby that is entirely antisocial and of no interest to anyone.

Hell, even someone who sits at home alone all day long and literally only paints their nails will likely get so good at it that people will spontaneously start offering to pay them to paint their nails.

Lastly, itís great if you feel you will never have to look for work in retirement, I donít think Iíll have to either, but this entire thread is about what if you did have to.








desk_jockey

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 218
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #204 on: January 16, 2018, 06:55:03 AM »
Sure, we all know people who worked themselves into the ground, retired in their senior years and coasted out their days literally sitting on the porch and watching the river flow by and drinking themselves to death. Theyíre burnt and spent. They worked soulless jobs for so long that theyíve got no energy or personal identity left. Those are the ball scratchers and they are truly sad.
I donít know you, but I canít fathom that you are like that if you are here posting.

Malkynn, I think this ball scratching may be some self-depreciating humor.  From reading 1000+ posts over the past 4 years, Iíd say Spartana is anything but sad, old and boring. 

Spartana could find a job within a month just reaching out to people on this forum but quite determined to complete life without anything remotely resembling work ever again.   Participating in a thread about the possibility of returning to work is, as best I can tell, just a form of personal entertainment. 

spartana

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 555
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #205 on: January 16, 2018, 09:03:54 AM »
Sure, we all know people who worked themselves into the ground, retired in their senior years and coasted out their days literally sitting on the porch and watching the river flow by and drinking themselves to death. They’re burnt and spent. They worked soulless jobs for so long that they’ve got no energy or personal identity left. Those are the ball scratchers and they are truly sad.
I don’t know you, but I can’t fathom that you are like that if you are here posting.

Malkynn, I think this ball scratching may be some self-depreciating humor.  From reading 1000+ posts over the past 4 years, I’d say Spartana is anything but sad, old and boring. 

Spartana could find a job within a month just reaching out to people on this forum but quite determined to complete life without anything remotely resembling work ever again.   Participating in a thread about the possibility of returning to work is, as best I can tell, just a form of personal entertainment.
Thanks Desk Jockey. Yes it was self-depreciating humor but I also initially viewed Malkkynn's comment as an insult to those who choose a different type of RE then she would. She's clarified with the last post so I understand better what she meant.

My point to this was that I agreed that most people can find some kind of employment after years in ER. Be that based on your past skills, ER hobbies/activities, or learning new skills. My own ER activities and connections aren't likely to land me a job  - or not one that I would want or could do when I'm older - and that's OK as there are (or hopefully will be) other options. I just don't structure my life or current interests around those potential options.

However I do think its wise to look at all the "what its" when thinking of FIRE. I disagree with Sol that it's fear-based to do that when contemplating a future job if ever needed. I look at it as being the same as looking at market history or what direction health insurance, social security, pensions, etc have gone or may go in the future. A planning tool for FIRE and nothing more.

Retired at 42

Malkynn

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 326
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #206 on: January 16, 2018, 09:53:45 AM »
Sure, we all know people who worked themselves into the ground, retired in their senior years and coasted out their days literally sitting on the porch and watching the river flow by and drinking themselves to death. Theyíre burnt and spent. They worked soulless jobs for so long that theyíve got no energy or personal identity left. Those are the ball scratchers and they are truly sad.
I donít know you, but I canít fathom that you are like that if you are here posting.

Malkynn, I think this ball scratching may be some self-depreciating humor.  From reading 1000+ posts over the past 4 years, Iíd say Spartana is anything but sad, old and boring. 

Spartana could find a job within a month just reaching out to people on this forum but quite determined to complete life without anything remotely resembling work ever again.   Participating in a thread about the possibility of returning to work is, as best I can tell, just a form of personal entertainment.

I was the one who started the ďball scratchingĒ comment, so I was clarifying what I meant. And I donít think for a second that Spartana is sad or boring. I have yet to come across anyone on this forum who seems sad and boring as far as I define it.

Spartana and I have gradually clarified enough to show that weíre both really saying the same thing, which is that regardless of what any of us choose to do, that it wouldnít be hard to find work if we needed to.

Some of us will do things that more closely resemble work, some of us will do things that more closely resemble leisure, but either way, weíll be in a prime position to mobilize effectively if the need for income arises.

lexde

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 731
  • Age: 28
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #207 on: January 16, 2018, 05:03:48 PM »
Consulting in whatever field you’re in. If you happen to be an attorney, then hanging a shingle is a good fallback after leaving a firm.

spartana

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 555
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #208 on: January 16, 2018, 05:17:32 PM »
Sure, we all know people who worked themselves into the ground, retired in their senior years and coasted out their days literally sitting on the porch and watching the river flow by and drinking themselves to death. They’re burnt and spent. They worked soulless jobs for so long that they’ve got no energy or personal identity left. Those are the ball scratchers and they are truly sad.
I don’t know you, but I can’t fathom that you are like that if you are here posting.

Malkynn, I think this ball scratching may be some self-depreciating humor.  From reading 1000+ posts over the past 4 years, I’d say Spartana is anything but sad, old and boring. 

Spartana could find a job within a month just reaching out to people on this forum but quite determined to complete life without anything remotely resembling work ever again.   Participating in a thread about the possibility of returning to work is, as best I can tell, just a form of personal entertainment.

I was the one who started the “ball scratching” comment, so I was clarifying what I meant. And I don’t think for a second that Spartana is sad or boring. I have yet to come across anyone on this forum who seems sad and boring as far as I define it.

Spartana and I have gradually clarified enough to show that we’re both really saying the same thing, which is that regardless of what any of us choose to do, that it wouldn’t be hard to find work if we needed to.

Some of us will do things that more closely resemble work, some of us will do things that more closely resemble leisure, but either way, we’ll be in a prime position to mobilize effectively if the need for income arises.
Yeah I think we are basicly on.the same page and in agreement. My only issue was your comment above: "I can’t fathom the type of boring sad person who retires early just to do absolutely nothing of value and learn no useful skill and associates with no one of any interest or consequence for 10-20 years.". Many of us ERees have self-enrichment goals, challenges, interests, and activities that may have no real value or interest to anyone but ourselves and may be unlikely to lead to any future job opportunities.  That doesn't mean we aren't doing helpful things, or aren't  busy and involved, just that the personal goals and activies we do aren't always useful,,valued or even wanted by others.
Retired at 42

wordnerd

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 701
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #209 on: January 16, 2018, 05:45:56 PM »
I'm quite familiar with that attitude.  That's the one I had when I was younger.  And indeed that's how it was when I was in my 20's.  Then all of a sudden I'm older and being good and reliable isn't as important as being young.  Then I've watched my wife struggle even more than I did.  It's brutal out there if you're over 30 years old.  All they'll hire is kids out of school these days.  Forget finding a job if you've got any experience!

I think age discrimination is a very real phenomenon, especially if you're looking to jump back into the same level you left. But the levels of income needed to stave off a FIRE failure, if you have low living expenses, should be very attainable based on the types of careers suggested in this thread.

My personal experience: I heard my dad complain about age discrimination for over a decade. He was in his 50s when I was growing. When he was 55ish, he quit his high-paying gig and eventually lost a ton of money in a failed business. He didn't have a college degree, couldn't get back into the job market where he left, and blamed age discrimination (which I think was real). Eventually, however, he found a lot of ways to make money. He sold cars. He finished his degree and became a substitute teacher and eventually a full-time English teacher. When he got laid off from that, he started volunteering at an adult education center. Eventually, they hired him to run the program full time (he was almost 70 at that point). He left that job eventually, and now makes over $30K a year tutoring at age 75.

I realize this is all anecdotal, but the lessons I've drawn from the past 20 years of his life are: 1) age discrimination exists, but 2) there are a ton of ways to make money and reinvent yourself if you're creative. FIREes have the added benefit of tons of time to retool themselves through education, networking, and volunteering before they're out of money.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 05:48:47 PM by wordnerd »

Malkynn

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 326
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #210 on: January 16, 2018, 09:04:48 PM »
Yeah I think we are basicly on.the same page and in agreement. My only issue was your comment above: "I canít fathom the type of boring sad person who retires early just to do absolutely nothing of value and learn no useful skill and associates with no one of any interest or consequence for 10-20 years.". Many of us ERees have self-enrichment goals, challenges, interests, and activities that may have no real value or interest to anyone but ourselves and may be unlikely to lead to any future job opportunities.  That doesn't mean we aren't doing helpful things, or aren't  busy and involved, just that the personal goals and activies we do aren't always useful,,valued or even wanted by others.

Agree to disagree.
I think I see things as vastly more monetizable, which is where what Iím saying is getting coloured in a way that is...interesting to me.
Iím not saying that choosing self-enrichment doesnít have value, Iím saying I think it has *more* value than you think it does in terms of helping job prospects. Even if itís *just* in terms of meeting people. In fact, meeting people who could choose to pay you or know someone who could choose to pay you is the biggest factor in employability. And chances are that focusing solely on self-enriching activities will make you much cooler, and  also probably make you meet more cool people who will think you are awesome, which will drastically increase your chances of employment if needed.

I think just being an interesting member of a forum like this would be enough to get someone a job if they needed one.

I stick by what i said that you quoted. I truly cannot fathom anyone who manages to retire early  spending 10-20 years doing nothing of value and meeting no one of consequence. That would be an incredibly sad retirement. Iím am absolutely NOT referring to ERs who choose to focus on self-enrichment, that has huge value. Thatís the opposite of the sad and depressing and meaningless life  Iím referring to.

Whether or not simply living your best life makes you employable/monetizable...well, as I said, Iíll agree to disagree.

Livingthedream55

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 338
  • Location: Massachusetts, USA
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #211 on: January 17, 2018, 09:19:26 AM »
If it were truly a depression era like really, really bad time I would probably sell stuff at yard sales/eBay plus would  rent out my house and double up with a family member and pay them a reasonable rent

or

get a roommate (or two) -  I have a paid for 3 BR house in a suburb of a pretty HCOL area - people will still need a place to live

or

nanny/babysit for the people who have jobs

But (for me) I have built in so many redundancies, margins for error, plus I have good old fashioned common sense so could problem solve whatever crisis presented itself.

 



Villanelle

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2019
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #212 on: January 17, 2018, 05:36:42 PM »
If it were truly a depression era like really, really bad time I would probably sell stuff at yard sales/eBay plus would  rent out my house and double up with a family member and pay them a reasonable rent

or

get a roommate (or two) -  I have a paid for 3 BR house in a suburb of a pretty HCOL area - people will still need a place to live

or

nanny/babysit for the people who have jobs

But (for me) I have built in so many redundancies, margins for error, plus I have good old fashioned common sense so could problem solve whatever crisis presented itself.

I don't know why I've never really considered a roommate as an additional fail safe.  Thanks!!  As an extreme introvert (and one who likes to not wear pants around the house!), I would semi-hate the idea of living with a roommate, but sucking it up for a year wouldn't be too awful if the shit was really hitting the fan, especially because presumably I'd have the time and finances to be somewhat picky or maybe even find a friend or at least a friend of a friend..  Also, this brings to mind taking in exchange students (some programs pay, others don't) and/or hosting a foreign college student for a school year.  I don't ever see us living in a house with less than 2 baths (and probably three bed, but certainly 2), so it would be very doable. 

Roadrunner53

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 390
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #213 on: January 17, 2018, 09:36:06 PM »
I am an extreme introvert too and the idea of a stranger or relative or friend living in my house is just unacceptable to me. I would find some other way to make money like ebay or some part time job even if I hated it at least I could come home to peace and quiet. I personally couldn't share my house with anyone but my Hub and dogs. I was an only child so I guess that is why I do not relish being around gobs of people. Some people I know had lots of brother and sisters and sharing their house wouldn't be an issue.

Imma

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 677
  • Location: Europe
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #214 on: January 18, 2018, 03:23:57 AM »

Lastly ďIíll work for free for a yearĒ is a powerful phrase that can make magic happen.
Your FIRE life is/would be very different from mine (and probably an introverts version of hell lol) but I agree there are many things one can do in FIRE to improve your likelihood of getting a job someday if you ever need one asap.

[/quote]

As an introvert, I plan to retire to a homestead-type of situation. I come from a long line of small time farmers and my relatives never needed a lot of actual money, because they had few bills (they owned their farms outright). You can make and grow a lot yourself if you want to, at a cost of next to nothing, and you can scrimp and save and make do. I wouldn't mind at all if that meant I'd never have to step into an office again. If my retirement plan works out and I can own a small farm outright and have reached my target stash, I think I can easily go back to withdrawing 2% for a couple of years.

rosarugosa

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 66
  • Location: Eastern Massachusetts
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #215 on: January 18, 2018, 04:43:16 AM »
I actually just picked up a twice per month housekeeping job for pretty decent money, for someone I know who has a lovely home.  I figure this will pay for our occasional concert and theater tickets, stuff like that.  Interestingly, I'm hearing of additional opportunities to do housekeeping or landscape design, but working 2 days per month suits me just fine.

SwordGuy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3675
  • Location: Fayetteville, NC
    • Flipping Fayetteville
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #216 on: January 20, 2018, 02:35:28 PM »
I am an extreme introvert too and the idea of a stranger or relative or friend living in my house is just unacceptable to me. I would find some other way to make money like ebay or some part time job even if I hated it at least I could come home to peace and quiet. I personally couldn't share my house with anyone but my Hub and dogs. I was an only child so I guess that is why I do not relish being around gobs of people. Some people I know had lots of brother and sisters and sharing their house wouldn't be an issue.

You might be surprised how motivational it can be to find out you can't pay the rent or buy food if you don't get a roommate.

Roadrunner53

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 390
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #217 on: January 20, 2018, 10:01:02 PM »
Yes, might be true but for the foreseeable future, with our savings, that will never happen. Worst case, I would seek out senior housing and live in a studio. Living with a stranger would be the last thing on earth I would do. I do understand the there are people who like the company of others, but I don't!

Mika M

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 56
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Springfield, VA
  • FIRE stars in my eyes
    • The Lazy Frugal
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #218 on: February 12, 2018, 03:04:57 PM »
I always tell DH I can take an office admin job somewhere if needed (as part of my push to ER sooner than later)... which I would be willing to do although as I get older age-ism is something to take into consideration. (This is against his argument to keep pushing out in our cush jobs several more years in order to avoid needing more jobs at all.)

I find temp-ing appealing since you can enjoy some of the perks of office work but still change up your routine (where you work, the people you interact with, etc.)... and likely still have lots of downtime during the week lol.

I used to work as a temp; covering down for women on maternity leave for as long as six months was nice; good chunk of cash to cover down but without the worry of having to kick yourself all the time for being stuck to a desk (the same desk) for eternity.
Lazy Frugal

Mika M

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 56
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Springfield, VA
  • FIRE stars in my eyes
    • The Lazy Frugal
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #219 on: February 12, 2018, 03:08:46 PM »
I actually just picked up a twice per month housekeeping job for pretty decent money, for someone I know who has a lovely home.  I figure this will pay for our occasional concert and theater tickets, stuff like that.  Interestingly, I'm hearing of additional opportunities to do housekeeping or landscape design, but working 2 days per month suits me just fine.

Neat... I'll have to keep that in mind, too
Lazy Frugal

Roadrunner53

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 390
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #220 on: February 12, 2018, 03:22:28 PM »
I had this one temp job a bunch of years ago and it was at an okay company however, everyone was walking on eggs due to many layoffs. I was given this job to enter number from one data base to another. At first it seemed confusing but once I got it pretty darn easy. I got so good at it this one day I had done the full weeks work in 2 1/2 days! I went to my boss and asked if there was something else I could do and he said no! OMG! So, I had nothing to do for two and a half days but I needed a paycheck so I dilly dallied for the rest of the week and it was hell! Then the next week I had to stretch my 2 1/2 days of work to 5 days. OMG, it was like a slow death. I was falling asleep and was bored out of my gourd. BUT, I needed a paycheck! I did this gig for 5 1/2 months and called my agency and asked them to find me another job but they didn't. Finally, the big boss over everyone came to tell me I had two weeks left and that was around Thanksgiving. He thanked me profusely for my work and told me he would be a reference for future jobs and gave me his name and phone number. I was floored! What we do for a paycheck! It was a shame for the company because I could have done so much more for them and a shame for me because the work was way too easy and killed me! I think my last day I ran out the door with my hair on fire!


SwordGuy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3675
  • Location: Fayetteville, NC
    • Flipping Fayetteville
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #222 on: February 12, 2018, 05:40:03 PM »
I put Hardie board plank siding up on the walls of a house we were renovating to rent out.  I had several people stop, get out of their cars, walk up to the house and try to hire me out on the spot.

This is a job I had never done before!   How awesome is that?

Back when I was an IT consultant, I mentored those consultants reporting to me about what our job was.   Our job wasn't to bring technical knowledge and skills to the customer.  It wasn't to design and build software systems.   It was to (#1) make management's problems go away and (#2) make our customer contacts look like heroes to their organization.

I've volunteered for several civic functions over the years.   I've met a number of well heeled folks who either own their own businesses, or are high up in major businesses in the area, or who have strong social connections to those two groups.   If I demonstrate I have the ability to make problems go away and make the folks in the group look like heroes, I'll be able to find some work.   It might not have a darn thing to do with IT.

Plus, it makes the community I live in a better place to live.  It's a win-win.

MicroRN

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 994
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #223 on: February 12, 2018, 05:41:32 PM »
I had this one temp job a bunch of years ago and it was at an okay company however, everyone was walking on eggs due to many layoffs. I was given this job to enter number from one data base to another. At first it seemed confusing but once I got it pretty darn easy. I got so good at it this one day I had done the full weeks work in 2 1/2 days! I went to my boss and asked if there was something else I could do and he said no! OMG! So, I had nothing to do for two and a half days but I needed a paycheck so I dilly dallied for the rest of the week and it was hell! Then the next week I had to stretch my 2 1/2 days of work to 5 days. OMG, it was like a slow death. I was falling asleep and was bored out of my gourd. BUT, I needed a paycheck! I did this gig for 5 1/2 months and called my agency and asked them to find me another job but they didn't. Finally, the big boss over everyone came to tell me I had two weeks left and that was around Thanksgiving. He thanked me profusely for my work and told me he would be a reference for future jobs and gave me his name and phone number. I was floored! What we do for a paycheck! It was a shame for the company because I could have done so much more for them and a shame for me because the work was way too easy and killed me! I think my last day I ran out the door with my hair on fire!

Oh god, I'd completely forgotten about my short stint temping.  It was then that I learned that showing up to work on time, and doing what you were supposed to put you ahead of at least 50% of the the other employees.  Add efficiency and a good attitude, and you were ahead of 90%.     

I got hired into an office that needed 4 weeks of help catching up in their continuing education department.  I opened mail, filed papers, and added continuing ed credits to a database.  Easy work, but there were boxes full of mail to process.  I was efficient, found a ton of mis-filed folders, and worked myself out of a job in just over two weeks.  They raved to my temp agency though, which was nice.

Another job was for a company that scanned medical records.  After I spent 2 whole days scanning records, the boss told me that I'd picked things up so fast I was being bumped up to QC, where I spent a hellaciously boring 8 hours a day making sure that the records had been scanned properly.  The boss kept trying to hire me full time, and was even willing to pay the temp agency's headhunter fee.  I was so glad when the summer was over!

Nick_Miller

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 475
  • Age: 44
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #224 on: February 13, 2018, 08:39:21 AM »
I would worry about the combination of ageism and the blow to my ego if I were forced into a situation where I needed to work a retail or office drone type of job.

Ageism is a real thing. Technology moves so fast. After a few years out of the workforce, I can't imagine trying to get up to speed on office tech. And I highly value autonomy/calling the shots, as many here probably do. I can't help but think how hard it would be to swallow taking instructions from people 20 years younger, people with less education, etc. I would absolutely bristle at that.

I can't imagine all the engineers, nurses, IT folks, other lawyers, etc., on these boards would adapt well to that either.



Malkynn

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 326
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #225 on: February 13, 2018, 10:08:52 AM »
I would worry about the combination of ageism and the blow to my ego if I were forced into a situation where I needed to work a retail or office drone type of job.

Ageism is a real thing. Technology moves so fast. After a few years out of the workforce, I can't imagine trying to get up to speed on office tech. And I highly value autonomy/calling the shots, as many here probably do. I can't help but think how hard it would be to swallow taking instructions from people 20 years younger, people with less education, etc. I would absolutely bristle at that.

I can't imagine all the engineers, nurses, IT folks, other lawyers, etc., on these boards would adapt well to that either.

But thereís no rule that says that you would have to take on a job like that.

Planning for potential post-FIRE careers is like planning for any other career, you need to know what your strengths and limitations are and go from there.

If retail wonít work for someone, they should plan accordingly to make sure that they can do something other than retail.

People in high end/technical careers can usually do consulting, teaching, being a board member, working in non profits, high end sales, etc, etc. Plus there isnít much competition for those jobs since most professionals are busy making more money yíknow, doing their profession, lol. Perfect for side hustles and post-FIRE jobs though.


Roadrunner53

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 390
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #226 on: February 13, 2018, 10:11:49 AM »
Anyone work/volunteer for a local historical society? We have one in town and they are always looking for volunteers. I have developed a new interest in history. Always thought it was BORING but have read a lot of interesting books on historical characters and I am pretty wowed on life back then and how they coped and lived without modern conveniences.

I would be interested in hearing what you did at the historical society and if you enjoyed it.

Villanelle

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2019
Re: Jobs you can realistically get in a FIRE failure situation
« Reply #227 on: February 13, 2018, 11:55:53 PM »
I would worry about the combination of ageism and the blow to my ego if I were forced into a situation where I needed to work a retail or office drone type of job.

Ageism is a real thing. Technology moves so fast. After a few years out of the workforce, I can't imagine trying to get up to speed on office tech. And I highly value autonomy/calling the shots, as many here probably do. I can't help but think how hard it would be to swallow taking instructions from people 20 years younger, people with less education, etc. I would absolutely bristle at that.

I can't imagine all the engineers, nurses, IT folks, other lawyers, etc., on these boards would adapt well to that either.

I don't imagine I'd love it, but doing it, likely part time and certainly for a fairly short overall time, doesn't seem like it would be bad.  Knowing every day that unlike that 25year old ordering me around, I'm basically there for the a very short while and mostly because I choose to be so that I don't have to give up the year's travel plans or cut back to another night of meatless meals--I think psychologically that would be more than enough to get me through a short stint of working a fairly mindless job for 6-12 months.