Author Topic: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?  (Read 13093 times)

damize

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GuitarStv

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #51 on: May 12, 2015, 09:06:00 AM »
Cryogenics has never made much sense to me.  Even assuming we develop some kind of supertechnology that can be used to cure your terminal disease, and then we develop some kind of way to rebuild all of the zillions of cells that explode as they freeze, and they develop some kind of technology to resurrect you from the decades long period of being dead . . . why do you think that future people would want to spend the effort to do so for you?

J Boogie

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #52 on: May 12, 2015, 11:35:45 AM »
Yes! Left on a cliff, so the eagles and vultures can pick my body clean. That would be cool.

Sky Burial - practiced by Tibetans to dispose of their dead bodies as generously and efficiently as possible.  The land they live on is often too rocky to dig a grave in, and the fuel used to cremate could be used to do something more practical.  I think you've identified the burial practice most inline with Mustachianism.

However, if you were to attempt this in say, San Francisco during the 1970s, a permanently raincoated cigar smoking detective might get called in to investigate.

GuitarStv

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #53 on: May 12, 2015, 12:09:44 PM »
I think that technically it would be most mustachian to ask your family to carve you up, cook, and devour you.  No waste, reduced grocery bills for a while and it's a paleo approved diet.

Prepube

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #54 on: May 12, 2015, 04:21:59 PM »
It really doesn't matter.  You are dead.  Your investments are irrelevant.  What happens to your body is irrelevant.  You are in a perfect mustachian state.  You are not costing more than your investments are are bringing in.  Fuck the 4% rule.  You are a perfect mustachian zero.  Who gives a shit about who eats you or where you aches are spread?  You are dead, dead, dead.

Roland of Gilead

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #55 on: May 12, 2015, 04:49:50 PM »
If you rob a bank right before you die, does the state have to pay your funeral expenses while awaiting trial (if you reject bail)?

expatartist

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #56 on: May 12, 2015, 06:32:51 PM »
This young funeral director turns a critical eye to his industry in blog posts and an informative TEDx talk http://www.calebwilde.com/

G-dog

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #57 on: May 12, 2015, 06:41:29 PM »
Yes! Left on a cliff, so the eagles and vultures can pick my body clean. That would be cool.

Sky Burial - practiced by Tibetans to dispose of their dead bodies as generously and efficiently as possible.  The land they live on is often too rocky to dig a grave in, and the fuel used to cremate could be used to do something more practical.  I think you've identified the burial practice most inline with Mustachianism.

However, if you were to attempt this in say, San Francisco during the 1970s, a permanently raincoated cigar smoking detective might get called in to investigate.

I thought he was in LA. In SF the permanently neurotic ocd-ridden consultant would be called in...

GuitarStv

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #58 on: May 13, 2015, 08:53:19 AM »
I think that technically it would be most mustachian to ask your family to carve you up, cook, and devour you.  No waste, reduced grocery bills for a while and it's a paleo approved diet.
Tastes like chicken!

I find it more like pork . . .

2ndTimer

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #59 on: May 13, 2015, 09:15:17 AM »
We had my MIL cremated and took her in a cardboard box and went as a family and sprinkled her in the Pacific Ocean near where we live.  Everybody seemed ok with that.

LiveLean

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #60 on: May 13, 2015, 02:34:20 PM »
I've been reading a lot about Ted Williams recently and having your body frozen for $150K might be the most anti-Mustachian thing ever, even when you won't be using the money anymore.

Our second home/weekly beach vacation rental is a block from the ocean and backs up to a canal leading to a freshwater bay. My instructions, hopefully for 2060 or beyond, is cremation and to have my sons and perhaps grandchildren and great-grandkids divide my ashes into two containers, ride a flotilla of paddleboards out into each body of water and dump me at sea. Then come back to the house, a key part of the FIRE plan, and have a party.

TheOldestYoungMan

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #61 on: May 13, 2015, 03:27:15 PM »
The "afterlife care" topic made me think this was going to be about buying insurance policies for heaven or something.

A whole new business model!

"Heaven insurance, starting at $999 -- 100% Guaranteed placement into heaven."

See Roman Catholic Church
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Luther

I want to be baked into cookies and mailed to organizations I dislike.  Literally "eat me."

cacaoheart

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Re: Inexpensive means of afterlife care?
« Reply #62 on: May 14, 2015, 08:17:50 AM »
When my dad passed away a few years ago we donated what we could for transplants and had the rest cremated. When my mom found that the funeral home offered a credit plan she suddenly wanted to do more and I had to emphasize that I would only help financially if we stuck with his wishes to be cremated and dealt with as cheaply as possible. I ended up covering the full cost of ~$1000. For a service we had several friends gather at my dad's favorite park and spread some of his ashes there.

When my father-in-law passed a few months later (tough year) he was also cremated, and we had a service for family/friends in a large room our apartment complex rented out for $50. His hospice nurse was very helpful when the  24 hour hotline of the cremation place we'd made contact with suddenly wasn't working and his body needed to be picked up from home. I'm very grateful for hospice nurses being around to help navigate end of life moments.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2015, 08:23:13 AM by cacaoheart »