Author Topic: good paying job you don't like or not as good paying that you like doing?  (Read 789 times)

bakania

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Hello question here, should you force yourself to do things that are good for you like follow a high-paying career for early retiremen, but that you don't necessarily like or even make you miserable OR should you do a job that you enjoy and come naturally but doesn't have that much of a high earning potential or isn't the most optimal.

2nd question: Is there anyone here that did learned something they didn't like to do at all and felt miserable learning it, but eventually started liking it ? ( asking because alot of people who have high-paying jobs they don't like, end up quitting after a sometime, so that negates the theory that you become passionate at something if you practice it or do it alot.)

mm1970

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I think that you have more control over what you enjoy than you think. 

Some amount of enjoyment in work is going to be related to whether or not you are good at it.  Often, if you suck at something - the job sucks.
Also, the work environment - hours, coworkers, heat, cold, etc. will have a huge impact on your enjoyment.

I was put into a new position a little over six months ago that I did not want.  I was pretty miserable for 3-4 months because I did not know what I was doing.  I've got a better handle on it now.  I still don't love it - yes, I have skills in this area but it's not really that FUN.  And I'm overworked.  But for the most part - I have decent coworkers, and a flexible schedule.  I've decided to make the best of it because right now, it's easier than looking for a new job that would expect many more hours.

As far as quitting high paying jobs after sometimes - negating being passionate about something if you get good at it - people quit for many many reasons.  I'd assume people who get good at something and quit are likely quitting because they don't like office politics, they are promoted to a "less fun" job, they aren't a fan of the work hours - and honestly, if you are paid well and a good saver, then you have options.

big_slacker

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I think in the real world it's not going to be an on/off question, there are always more pros and cons. For instance in my own life:

Job #1: Travelling consulting. Engaging and lots of new projects all the time. Travel on someone else's dime, see cool stuff when not working. Lots of air/hotel/car points making personal travel nearly free. Live well on the road, save money on food/expenses at home. When not travelling work from home. Good company, good co-workers. OTOH hard to have a real life when on the road all the time.  Health can suffer because road food and drinking culture. Tough to schedule exercise and fun time. Stress on being able to deliver on high expectations and tight timelines all the time. Decent pay but possible to make more elsewhere. No way to advance without moving home base to some crappy midwest city.

Job #2: Pure desk job for big tech. Very stable. Work on big stuff. Family friendly flex schedule. Top of the field pay scale. Lots of opportunity for advancement. Nice people to work with. OTOH sloooooooow progress on projects. Not as much variety as other jobs. Some office politics. Some ridiculous corporate policy stuff. Office based culture, they love butts in seats and some WFH tolerated but not encouraged.

So which one is 'better'? Much more of a nuanced decision than: more money but it sucks vs less money but it's awesome. :D

FWIW when I make these calls I put down the pros and cons on a spreadsheet and weight them. Then I talk it over with my wife, and I use intuition/cut feel balanced by those more intellectual methods. Most times that works, a few times it hasn't.

Erica

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My Dad did what he enjoyed. Benefits and so so pay. Then got into Real Estate to make up for the lower wages.

wageslave23

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Three things:

1. I think you end up enjoying something more the more competence you gain in that field. 

2. If you are passionate about something and get in with a good company, you will end up rising to the top if that's a goal (and the money will follow).

3. All jobs/industries start to look the same the higher up you advance.

So in general, I think cream rises to the top if that's your goal, so whatever you choose - gain experience, work hard, and focus on advancing if money is important.


afox

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1st choice: Find something you like doing that also pays a lot of money.

2nd choice: If you cant find that find something that pays a lot of money with as little as possible time.  Lots of jobs pay a lot of money but expect a lot of your time, dont go after those!

I regret not pursuing a job/field with higher pay.  I chose a career field that I sort of like.  Keep in mind that over ones career your likes and dislikes will change.  In hindsight I should have gone to school for 10 years to get a job that pays $200k and worked for 10 years.  Instead I went to school for 6 years and got a job that pays less than 100k that I thought Id like.  I sorta like it but work is work and would have been better to do anything for 10 years or less.  The best job in the world is the one where you dont work, choose the career that has you spending as little time working as possible.



Cranky

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What Iíve learned from this group is that I am absolutely thrilled that I didnít become either an engineer or anything to do with computers, because those are evidently miserable professions.

Iíd rather do stuff I enjoy all along.

Disclaimer: YMMV
« Last Edit: August 29, 2018, 05:33:10 AM by Cranky »

Malkynn

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Hello question here, should you force yourself to do things that are good for you like follow a high-paying career for early retiremen, but that you don't necessarily like or even make you miserable OR should you do a job that you enjoy and come naturally but doesn't have that much of a high earning potential or isn't the most optimal.

2nd question: Is there anyone here that did learned something they didn't like to do at all and felt miserable learning it, but eventually started liking it ? ( asking because alot of people who have high-paying jobs they don't like, end up quitting after a sometime, so that negates the theory that you become passionate at something if you practice it or do it alot.)

Question 1:

There are countless ways to do what you are good at, it doesnít have to mean chasing an industry that is primarily about what you are good at. For example, if you really enjoy acting, you may excel in sales or in positions that require presentations to large groups. So donít get hung up on finding the right industry for your talents, you will be able to use those talents to find your right niche in whatever industry you end up in.

Also, itís rarely the work itself that makes anyone miserable, itís almost always the work culture. Itís not hard to find satisfaction in almost any job if you are working with a great and supportive team and under amazing leadership. DH and I are in WILDLY different fields, both of which are known for having terrible bosses, but weíre both very happy with our work because we both have enormous flexibility and can easily move on to a new team if we donít like our environment.

I donít think anyone should voluntarily do a job that makes them miserable. There are so many jobs out there, that seems like a very mentally unhealthy thing to do.

FWIW: I left a very high paying job because I hated it, took a massive pay cut to work fewer hours with a team I love and I would never ever go back. Life is too short to be voluntarily miserable. There are too many other options.

Question 2:

I have never heard of this theory, and no one quits because they hate what they learned to do. People quit because they hate the world in which that job is done. There are so many moves that someone can make if they dislike or tire of their main responsibilities. If they like their industry, theyíll pivot, they wonít just leave.

What are these skills that limit people to a single job??? Most professional skills are transferable to a large degree. I should know, Iím a medical professional trained to do a single thing that I donít enjoy doing full time. Technically, itís all Iím qualified to do, and yet, I get paid to write about my experience as a medical professional, I get paid to advise people, Iím starting to teach, and I found myself a nice little niche tackling procedures that few people do and that donít involve the parts of the job that I dislike. I only do what I trained to do 2 days a week.

If I hated the culture I would just leave and do something completely different. I like the culture, I just canít love the work itself for more than 20hrs a week, so I do other things.

My sister works as a policy analyst for the government. She got bored and got her employer to pay for her to be trained as a career coach and now part of her job is coaching people in her department part time and she has the option to move to it full time as she gets more experience.

Smart and savvy people find opportunities wherever they are working. They network and learn and adapt to their professional realities and both generate and recognize opportunities along the way. You donít just pick a career, close all other doors, and then diligently climb the one ladder youíve chosen to climb.

I mean...sure, many people do. Thatís largely because most people donít have the financial flexibility to take risks and make moves that could temporarily disrupt their cash flow. That doesnít mean it has to be that way.

If you keep yourself flexible, you can pretty much do anything.


jlcnuke

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Hello question here, should you force yourself to do things that are good for you like follow a high-paying career for early retiremen, but that you don't necessarily like or even make you miserable OR should you do a job that you enjoy and come naturally but doesn't have that much of a high earning potential or isn't the most optimal.

2nd question: Is there anyone here that did learned something they didn't like to do at all and felt miserable learning it, but eventually started liking it ? ( asking because alot of people who have high-paying jobs they don't like, end up quitting after a sometime, so that negates the theory that you become passionate at something if you practice it or do it alot.)

IMO, way too many shades of gray in there to answer this question.

1. Most people don't "like" their jobs imo. They "like it enough" maybe, or "tolerate it", and maybe even "like their workplace", but you're getting paid because it's not an enjoyable thing for most people to do.

2. There's a huge gap from "don't like" your job and "being miserable at work".  For most people, it takes a terrible manager to make work miserable. I have a terrible manager but work is still only in the "don't like" stage 99% of the time, with 1% of "it'll be great when I can FIRE". But the pay is really good and in the area I want to be in, so the balance of "pay and other benefits" to "happiness" is still in favor of sticking it out here for the money.

That's largely due to not wanting to leave the area, and so alternative jobs I'm qualified for would likely result in up to a 50% drop in my income. If it was a 10% drop, I'd probably have moved positions already. So "how much" different the pay was for a job I might enjoy more is an important factor.