Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 1027738 times)

Bicycle_B

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2000 on: November 16, 2017, 04:12:42 PM »
Statistics? More men than women in Tech.

Statistically speaking, men supported Trump and women didn't, so I think it's more likely that the person who shut down Trump's twitter feed for 11 minutes was female.  And Hispanic.  And queer.  And an overweight immigrant veteran small business owner with a belief in democracy and civil liberties.

Well... That statement has been making me laugh over and over. Though have we ruled out Clinton's personal emails and the FBI?

Are we sure the Potus account was specifically targetted? Is it possible that someone threw a switch deactivating all accounts that start with a "P" because of an ex-romantic partner or something, and didn't even realize it would get the one account everyone watches?

I'm pretty sure we're not sure, since there's only one case and we're applying population-level statistical level generalizations plus Sol-level humor. 

Personally I'm intrigued by the statistical "reasoning" but suspect the reasoning given is incorrect.  I wish I knew Bayesian analysis better and could apply it somehow before the actual identity of the person emerges.  More primitively, my first take is to apply case rates (actual numbers out of the air, better research welcome):

80% male/female ratio in tech
60% males vote Trump, 60% women Clinton
Resultant tech voters: 48% male for Trump, 32% male for Clinton, 8% female for Trump, 12% female for Clinton.
Combined result:  Of 44% for Clinton, 32 male to 12 female, giving 8 to 3 odds that the Twitter quitter is male. 

Obviously a less gender rigid analysis would be better.  Nonetheless the heavy skew toward men in tech appears to predominate, making it more likely that the Twitter quitter is male.

Thoughts?

tipster350

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2001 on: November 16, 2017, 04:36:08 PM »
Statistics? More men than women in Tech.

Statistically speaking, men supported Trump and women didn't, so I think it's more likely that the person who shut down Trump's twitter feed for 11 minutes was female.  And Hispanic.  And queer.  And an overweight immigrant veteran small business owner with a belief in democracy and civil liberties.

Well... That statement has been making me laugh over and over. Though have we ruled out Clinton's personal emails and the FBI?

Are we sure the Potus account was specifically targetted? Is it possible that someone threw a switch deactivating all accounts that start with a "P" because of an ex-romantic partner or something, and didn't even realize it would get the one account everyone watches?

I'm pretty sure we're not sure, since there's only one case and we're applying population-level statistical level generalizations plus Sol-level humor. 

Personally I'm intrigued by the statistical "reasoning" but suspect the reasoning given is incorrect.  I wish I knew Bayesian analysis better and could apply it somehow before the actual identity of the person emerges.  More primitively, my first take is to apply case rates (actual numbers out of the air, better research welcome):

80% male/female ratio in tech
60% males vote Trump, 60% women Clinton
Resultant tech voters: 48% male for Trump, 32% male for Clinton, 8% female for Trump, 12% female for Clinton.
Combined result:  Of 44% for Clinton, 32 male to 12 female, giving 8 to 3 odds that the Twitter quitter is male. 

Obviously a less gender rigid analysis would be better.  Nonetheless the heavy skew toward men in tech appears to predominate, making it more likely that the Twitter quitter is male.

Thoughts?


Thoughts? Please take that crap elsewhere. This thread is about Epic FU money stories related to jobs. It has been awesome. You're ruining the vibe.

Taran Wanderer

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2002 on: November 16, 2017, 08:50:07 PM »
Thoughts? Please take that crap elsewhere. This thread is about Epic FU money stories related to jobs. It has been awesome. You're ruining the vibe.

Yes.  Yes, yes, yes, yes, YES.

Luckyvik

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2003 on: November 16, 2017, 11:40:38 PM »
Thoughts? Please take that crap elsewhere. This thread is about Epic FU money stories related to jobs. It has been awesome. You're ruining the vibe.

Yes.  Yes, yes, yes, yes, YES.
Yep back to FU Money Stories please.

I might have one coming up, I applied for an extra weeks leave for the week before Christmas and I was told that this was approved but may be subject to change due to us being a bit short staffed. If they try and cancel my leave I will say ‘sorry, I can’t cancel it, I have already made plans’  I’ll keep you posted if that happens.


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Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2004 on: November 17, 2017, 12:57:10 AM »
I might have one coming up, I applied for an extra weeks leave for the week before Christmas and I was told that this was approved but may be subject to change due to us being a bit short staffed. If they try and cancel my leave I will say ‘sorry, I can’t cancel it, I have already made plans’  I’ll keep you posted if that happens.

That sounds like an odd definition of "approved". Are they a chaotic place to work generally?

Luckyvik

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2005 on: November 17, 2017, 01:52:34 AM »
I might have one coming up, I applied for an extra weeks leave for the week before Christmas and I was told that this was approved but may be subject to change due to us being a bit short staffed. If they try and cancel my leave I will say ‘sorry, I can’t cancel it, I have already made plans’  I’ll keep you posted if that happens.

That sounds like an odd definition of "approved". Are they a chaotic place to work generally?
Not generally but there has been a fairly recent change of management and there is some pressure to get more done with less. We will see what happens, it’s hard to push back while trying to put out a ‘keen’ vibe (to get promoted and earn more $$$) and when everyone else seems to think it’s the norm to work an extra hour or two a day.


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Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2006 on: November 17, 2017, 02:04:18 AM »
Not generally but there has been a fairly recent change of management and there is some pressure to get more done with less. We will see what happens, it’s hard to push back while trying to put out a ‘keen’ vibe (to get promoted and earn more $$$) and when everyone else seems to think it’s the norm to work an extra hour or two a day.

Sounds like something is going to be tugging on your FU money whether it is this or the next "enhancement".

If everyone else thinks it, it probably is the norm for your workplace. Crap norm though.

Enigma

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2007 on: November 17, 2017, 03:50:03 AM »
I never wanted a job in Washington DC but I took a gov job there that I ended up hating.  Then I got complacent after 2 years.  No one stateside offered near as much as I made there.  At the end of Aug/Sep I was offered a job overseas that I used to do years ago.  One that I enjoyed doing.  If I didn't have my savings and wasn't already FI then I wouldn't have been able to move very quickly.

I ended up selling my new car with a $4k loss.  Had to pay the difference to the bank...  Also had to get rid of my apartment that had a few thousand dollars in fees to break the lease early.

Moving quickly cost me about $10-$15k but I should be able to make it up quickly with my new position where rent is paid.

radram

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2008 on: November 17, 2017, 07:39:48 AM »
I never wanted a job in Washington DC but I took a gov job there that I ended up hating.  Then I got complacent after 2 years.  No one stateside offered near as much as I made there.  At the end of Aug/Sep I was offered a job overseas that I used to do years ago.  One that I enjoyed doing.  If I didn't have my savings and wasn't already FI then I wouldn't have been able to move very quickly.

I ended up selling my new car with a $4k loss.  Had to pay the difference to the bank...  Also had to get rid of my apartment that had a few thousand dollars in fees to break the lease early.

Moving quickly cost me about $10-$15k but I should be able to make it up quickly with my new position where rent is paid.

Great and Epic. Spending money for a better life. Can't think of a better use for $15k. Congratulations and enjoy your new life!

Greenback Reproduction Specialist

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2009 on: November 17, 2017, 08:37:25 AM »
Enigma's story reminds me of a similar story of my own. I don't know if I consider mine epic, but having FU money rocks!

I was working a job, that I actually really enjoyed, but along came an opportunity to take a position that paid almost double per hour what I was making. The risk was that it was an open ended contract, with a possibility of termination on short notice if the project were to complete or get cancelled. It was a big opportunity to get to FIRE faster, and having enough FU money in place I was willing to take the risk. Now its been 2 years and I'm still in the open ended contract. At the moment it looks like the project I'm working on will continue for at least a few more years, paid off pretty well. Brought my projected FIRE date from 10yrs to 5yrs... Maybe even sooner, we shall see : )

Loren Ver

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2010 on: November 17, 2017, 08:44:55 AM »
Enigma's story reminds me of a similar story of my own. I don't know if I consider mine epic, but having FU money rocks!

I was working a job, that I actually really enjoyed, but along came an opportunity to take a position that paid almost double per hour what I was making. The risk was that it was an open ended contract, with a possibility of termination on short notice if the project were to complete or get cancelled. It was a big opportunity to get to FIRE faster, and having enough FU money in place I was willing to take the risk. Now its been 2 years and I'm still in the open ended contract. At the moment it looks like the project I'm working on will continue for at least a few more years, paid off pretty well. Brought my projected FIRE date from 10yrs to 5yrs... Maybe even sooner, we shall see : )


That would be awesome if you finished before the contract ended :D.

Sibley

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2011 on: November 17, 2017, 08:48:45 AM »
Developments!
I've officially accepted the new position, pending background check (it's a bank). Plan to give notice in December.

I've got a coworker, let's call him Alex. Alex and I are the only 2 on our team with a particular subset of experience, and a lot of it too. We're both working on a project that no one else on the team is capable of doing (that subset of experience is needed). Another team used to do this project (it's an annual thing), but they didn't have capacity so my team took it over. This project is not negotiable, and is high profile. If it goes bad, the big boss will take a lot of heat.

Alex is leaving at the end of the month. I'll be giving notice a week or two after he leaves. This project will have to go back to the original team, and they don't have capacity to handle it.

Pivoting... I'm in charge of day to day admin on the software we use. The person who is my backup - is also looking for a new job.

Is it wrong that I'm enjoying the prospect of the havoc my leaving is going to cause, particularly the timing? This is better than using my FU money!

Greenback Reproduction Specialist

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2012 on: November 17, 2017, 08:51:56 AM »
That would be awesome if you finished before the contract ended :D.

It sure would!

FIRE cant seem to happen fast enough ; )

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2013 on: November 17, 2017, 01:14:11 PM »
Is it wrong that I'm enjoying the prospect of the havoc my leaving is going to cause, particularly the timing? This is better than using my FU money!

If they have underpaid you, under-appreciated you, or treated you badly then no, I'm going to tell you it's not wrong.

Congratulations on the new job!

Livingthedream55

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2014 on: November 17, 2017, 02:08:39 PM »
Is it wrong that I'm enjoying the prospect of the havoc my leaving is going to cause, particularly the timing? This is better than using my FU money!

If they have underpaid you, under-appreciated you, or treated you badly then no, I'm going to tell you it's not wrong.

Congratulations on the new job!

+1  I once turned down a fabulous new job offer because I felt my leaving would be too disruptive to my (then) current job because of all of the transitions/people leaving. A year later, job I stayed with (out of loyalty) selected my department to be eliminated from the agency so I was laid off. Lesson learned!

scottish

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2015 on: November 17, 2017, 04:05:16 PM »
Is it wrong that I'm enjoying the prospect of the havoc my leaving is going to cause, particularly the timing? This is better than using my FU money!

If they have underpaid you, under-appreciated you, or treated you badly then no, I'm going to tell you it's not wrong.

Congratulations on the new job!

+1  I once turned down a fabulous new job offer because I felt my leaving would be too disruptive to my (then) current job because of all of the transitions/people leaving. A year later, job I stayed with (out of loyalty) selected my department to be eliminated from the agency so I was laid off. Lesson learned!

You shouldn't gloat over their misfortune.    That can lead to a negative attitude which will slow you down.  You won't be around to see it actually happen,   but if you were you would see that it's not happy time for anyone involved.

You should still leave of course.    Congrats on the new job!


Sibley

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2016 on: November 17, 2017, 06:30:28 PM »
Is it wrong that I'm enjoying the prospect of the havoc my leaving is going to cause, particularly the timing? This is better than using my FU money!

If they have underpaid you, under-appreciated you, or treated you badly then no, I'm going to tell you it's not wrong.

Congratulations on the new job!

+1  I once turned down a fabulous new job offer because I felt my leaving would be too disruptive to my (then) current job because of all of the transitions/people leaving. A year later, job I stayed with (out of loyalty) selected my department to be eliminated from the agency so I was laid off. Lesson learned!

You shouldn't gloat over their misfortune.    That can lead to a negative attitude which will slow you down.  You won't be around to see it actually happen,   but if you were you would see that it's not happy time for anyone involved.

You should still leave of course.    Congrats on the new job!

I don't think I'm gloating, but point taken. I will miss most of my coworkers, and I really hope that management has a wake up call about this one manager who's driving all the experienced people out (I'll make #4 that I know of). She's good with very inexperienced staff, but not anyone who knows what they're doing.

tyort1

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2017 on: November 17, 2017, 08:58:55 PM »
You shouldn't gloat over their misfortune.    That can lead to a negative attitude which will slow you down.  You won't be around to see it actually happen,   but if you were you would see that it's not happy time for anyone involved.

You should still leave of course.    Congrats on the new job!

Oh I think gloating is totally fine for a few days.  Then yeah, move forward - onwards and upwards!

Freedomin5

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2018 on: November 18, 2017, 12:13:13 AM »
You shouldn't gloat over their misfortune.    That can lead to a negative attitude which will slow you down.  You won't be around to see it actually happen,   but if you were you would see that it's not happy time for anyone involved.

You should still leave of course.    Congrats on the new job!

Oh I think gloating is totally fine for a few days.  Then yeah, move forward - onwards and upwards!

I agree. Whenever you celebrate something, there will always be someone telling you you're [fill in negative emotion/trait/characteristic/behavior] and then tell you you shouldn't do it. Go ahead and be happy, celebrate, and move forward! :)

Rowellen

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2019 on: November 18, 2017, 03:56:55 AM »
Developments!
I've officially accepted the new position, pending background check (it's a bank). Plan to give notice in December.

I've got a coworker, let's call him Alex. Alex and I are the only 2 on our team with a particular subset of experience, and a lot of it too. We're both working on a project that no one else on the team is capable of doing (that subset of experience is needed). Another team used to do this project (it's an annual thing), but they didn't have capacity so my team took it over. This project is not negotiable, and is high profile. If it goes bad, the big boss will take a lot of heat.

Alex is leaving at the end of the month. I'll be giving notice a week or two after he leaves. This project will have to go back to the original team, and they don't have capacity to handle it.

Pivoting... I'm in charge of day to day admin on the software we use. The person who is my backup - is also looking for a new job.

Is it wrong that I'm enjoying the prospect of the havoc my leaving is going to cause, particularly the timing? This is better than using my FU money!

That's awesome. I don't think it's wrong at all. If anything it should show the higher ups that something is seriously wrong in your division. Something that is not you.

Enigma

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2020 on: November 22, 2017, 03:42:27 AM »
Developments!
I've officially accepted the new position, pending background check (it's a bank). Plan to give notice in December.

I've got a coworker, let's call him Alex. Alex and I are the only 2 on our team with a particular subset of experience, and a lot of it too. We're both working on a project that no one else on the team is capable of doing (that subset of experience is needed). Another team used to do this project (it's an annual thing), but they didn't have capacity so my team took it over. This project is not negotiable, and is high profile. If it goes bad, the big boss will take a lot of heat.

Alex is leaving at the end of the month. I'll be giving notice a week or two after he leaves. This project will have to go back to the original team, and they don't have capacity to handle it.

Pivoting... I'm in charge of day to day admin on the software we use. The person who is my backup - is also looking for a new job.

Is it wrong that I'm enjoying the prospect of the havoc my leaving is going to cause, particularly the timing? This is better than using my FU money!

It sounds like the company you are with has been the ones taking the gamble.  Either they were not paying well enough -or- they kept cutting people and tasking remaining individuals more.

Maenad

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2021 on: November 22, 2017, 05:21:45 AM »
I have a sad lack-of-FU-money story. I ran into a coworker at a break area who's being denied a PTO request for the days between Xmas and NYE because she's "needed here". Her request was to fly home to Mexico to visit her elderly father and commemorate the anniversary of her mother's death. :-(

Happy ending of sorts to report - as it turns out, the co-worker had FU money, so she quit! Hopefully this will be a lesson to her managers that a little flexibility would have been better. (It was one day she was "needed"! She could have done that remotely!)

dandarc

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2022 on: November 22, 2017, 06:48:25 AM »
I have a sad lack-of-FU-money story. I ran into a coworker at a break area who's being denied a PTO request for the days between Xmas and NYE because she's "needed here". Her request was to fly home to Mexico to visit her elderly father and commemorate the anniversary of her mother's death. :-(

Happy ending of sorts to report - as it turns out, the co-worker had FU money, so she quit! Hopefully this will be a lesson to her managers that a little flexibility would have been better. (It was one day she was "needed"! She could have done that remotely!)
Nice!  From "Sad" to "EPIC" in one update!  Good on your coworker - even with FU money, it can be hard to pull the trigger on that type of move. 

shelivesthedream

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2023 on: November 22, 2017, 06:54:10 AM »
I have a sad lack-of-FU-money story. I ran into a coworker at a break area who's being denied a PTO request for the days between Xmas and NYE because she's "needed here". Her request was to fly home to Mexico to visit her elderly father and commemorate the anniversary of her mother's death. :-(

Happy ending of sorts to report - as it turns out, the co-worker had FU money, so she quit! Hopefully this will be a lesson to her managers that a little flexibility would have been better. (It was one day she was "needed"! She could have done that remotely!)

Brilliant news!

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2024 on: November 22, 2017, 10:29:54 AM »
I have a sad lack-of-FU-money story. I ran into a coworker at a break area who's being denied a PTO request for the days between Xmas and NYE because she's "needed here". Her request was to fly home to Mexico to visit her elderly father and commemorate the anniversary of her mother's death. :-(

Happy ending of sorts to report - as it turns out, the co-worker had FU money, so she quit! Hopefully this will be a lesson to her managers that a little flexibility would have been better. (It was one day she was "needed"! She could have done that remotely!)

Awesome!  I hope you had a chance to tell her bravo.

AMandM

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2025 on: November 23, 2017, 07:09:33 AM »
I don't think I'm gloating, but point taken. I will miss most of my coworkers, and I really hope that management has a wake up call about this one manager who's driving all the experienced people out (I'll make #4 that I know of). She's good with very inexperienced staff, but not anyone who knows what they're doing.

Can you (and Alex, and the other person you mentioned) point out this one manager to the higher-ups on your way out?  That might go some way toward helping the coworkers yo0u are leaving behind.
Congrats on the new job!

Sibley

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2026 on: November 23, 2017, 02:36:13 PM »
I don't think I'm gloating, but point taken. I will miss most of my coworkers, and I really hope that management has a wake up call about this one manager who's driving all the experienced people out (I'll make #4 that I know of). She's good with very inexperienced staff, but not anyone who knows what they're doing.

Can you (and Alex, and the other person you mentioned) point out this one manager to the higher-ups on your way out?  That might go some way toward helping the coworkers yo0u are leaving behind.
Congrats on the new job!

Alex chose not to say anything. However, I'm well known for being honest and saying things you don't necessarily like to hear. I do plan to (professionally) explain why I'm leaving. I'm expecting to get a counteroffer - they are NOT going to like losing me. But that means that I will get a nice, private interview with the #1 guy in the dept, and possibly with his boss (so #0?).

I passed background much faster than I expected, and we set a start date. I'll start 12/18, so am giving 2 weeks notice Monday. For those of you looking at a calendar, I'm taking a week between jobs.

rantk81

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2027 on: November 24, 2017, 06:55:52 AM »
A FU story might be brewing with me....  My employer of over 13 years is changing their medical plan network for 2018, to a very restrictive network with only a small hand-full of in-network providers in Chicago. So restrictive that there isn't even a single MRI provider in-network in the entire city of Chicago, and a very minimal number of in-network facilities (a couple of hospitals, only one urgent care center within the whole city of Chicago.) Pathetic for a large employer of a skilled/professional workforce.  Compounding the problem is, they removed ANY out-of-network coverage too. Not even some astoundingly-high-deductible plan. Simply no out of network coverage.

I compared the network of doctors on the employee plan with the network of doctors on the most inexpensive healthcare.gov exchange plan for 2018, and the plan on the exchange had about 3x of the network facilities in Chicago.

The kicker is, it is a global company with facilities all over the country and the world, but our office in Chicago is the only one that is subject to such a restrictive health care network. Employees in other offices of the country are retaining their same nation-wide and much larger network of providers in their medical plans.  Yet our payroll premiums are the same.

I barely use the medical insurance and I am generally pretty healthy. However, I like having a medical plan that assures me that I can get care if I need it. The plan offered by my employer (and exclusively to their Chicago employees) does not reassure me that I would be able to receive quality care if I need it.

It's probably not easy to change jobs around the holidays... but a lot of companies are working through their budgets for 2018, so probably will be looking to move on in the new year.

WhiteTrashCash

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2028 on: November 24, 2017, 07:17:12 AM »
A FU story might be brewing with me....  My employer of over 13 years is changing their medical plan network for 2018, to a very restrictive network with only a small hand-full of in-network providers in Chicago. So restrictive that there isn't even a single MRI provider in-network in the entire city of Chicago, and a very minimal number of in-network facilities (a couple of hospitals, only one urgent care center within the whole city of Chicago.) Pathetic for a large employer of a skilled/professional workforce.  Compounding the problem is, they removed ANY out-of-network coverage too. Not even some astoundingly-high-deductible plan. Simply no out of network coverage.

I compared the network of doctors on the employee plan with the network of doctors on the most inexpensive healthcare.gov exchange plan for 2018, and the plan on the exchange had about 3x of the network facilities in Chicago.

The kicker is, it is a global company with facilities all over the country and the world, but our office in Chicago is the only one that is subject to such a restrictive health care network. Employees in other offices of the country are retaining their same nation-wide and much larger network of providers in their medical plans.  Yet our payroll premiums are the same.

I barely use the medical insurance and I am generally pretty healthy. However, I like having a medical plan that assures me that I can get care if I need it. The plan offered by my employer (and exclusively to their Chicago employees) does not reassure me that I would be able to receive quality care if I need it.

It's probably not easy to change jobs around the holidays... but a lot of companies are working through their budgets for 2018, so probably will be looking to move on in the new year.

Yeah, it sounds like it's time to move on while in your position of strength. The economy is doing well enough right now that it's won't be hard to find another job, especially if you are highly skilled. When it comes down to it, everyone is a business and when employers don't offer an appropriate level of compensation, it's time to take your business elsewhere. Just my two cents, anyway.

AlanStache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2029 on: November 24, 2017, 09:20:20 AM »
A FU story might be brewing with me....  My employer of over 13 years is changing their medical plan network for 2018, to a very restrictive network with only a small hand-full of in-network providers in Chicago. So restrictive that there isn't even a single MRI provider in-network in the entire city of Chicago, and a very minimal number of in-network facilities (a couple of hospitals, only one urgent care center within the whole city of Chicago.) Pathetic for a large employer of a skilled/professional workforce.  Compounding the problem is, they removed ANY out-of-network coverage too. Not even some astoundingly-high-deductible plan. Simply no out of network coverage.

I compared the network of doctors on the employee plan with the network of doctors on the most inexpensive healthcare.gov exchange plan for 2018, and the plan on the exchange had about 3x of the network facilities in Chicago.

The kicker is, it is a global company with facilities all over the country and the world, but our office in Chicago is the only one that is subject to such a restrictive health care network. Employees in other offices of the country are retaining their same nation-wide and much larger network of providers in their medical plans.  Yet our payroll premiums are the same.

I barely use the medical insurance and I am generally pretty healthy. However, I like having a medical plan that assures me that I can get care if I need it. The plan offered by my employer (and exclusively to their Chicago employees) does not reassure me that I would be able to receive quality care if I need it.

It's probably not easy to change jobs around the holidays... but a lot of companies are working through their budgets for 2018, so probably will be looking to move on in the new year.

Are there local HR people who are aware of this and have some power over it?  Could this have just been some dumb mistake by people in Charlotte NC who did not see the effect in Chicago and will fix it once it is pointed out to them?  Or it could be part of a larger penny-pinching initiative that will have other dumb repercussions and you are right to be moving on.  You dont sound overly happy with your current employer otherwise. 


Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2030 on: November 24, 2017, 11:04:26 AM »
A FU story might be brewing with me....  My employer of over 13 years is changing their medical plan network for 2018, to a very restrictive network with only a small hand-full of in-network providers in Chicago. So restrictive that there isn't even a single MRI provider in-network in the entire city of Chicago, and a very minimal number of in-network facilities (a couple of hospitals, only one urgent care center within the whole city of Chicago.) Pathetic for a large employer of a skilled/professional workforce.  Compounding the problem is, they removed ANY out-of-network coverage too. Not even some astoundingly-high-deductible plan. Simply no out of network coverage.

I compared the network of doctors on the employee plan with the network of doctors on the most inexpensive healthcare.gov exchange plan for 2018, and the plan on the exchange had about 3x of the network facilities in Chicago.

The kicker is, it is a global company with facilities all over the country and the world, but our office in Chicago is the only one that is subject to such a restrictive health care network. Employees in other offices of the country are retaining their same nation-wide and much larger network of providers in their medical plans.  Yet our payroll premiums are the same.

I barely use the medical insurance and I am generally pretty healthy. However, I like having a medical plan that assures me that I can get care if I need it. The plan offered by my employer (and exclusively to their Chicago employees) does not reassure me that I would be able to receive quality care if I need it.

It's probably not easy to change jobs around the holidays... but a lot of companies are working through their budgets for 2018, so probably will be looking to move on in the new year.

I just FIREd and ended up going with Liberty Health Share. My coverage starts in December, so I am not sure how the operational stuff with it will go. One of the things I like is that there is no network, you go to whatever provider you want and they negotiate with them. Like I said, I'm not sure how this will work in practice. You also have to agree with their terms, which some people have an issue with. They are a Christian based health sharing group.

If you go this route, then you can stay with your current employer and get your health coverage outside ofyour employer.

Look into it. If you are interested, PM me. They also provide a referral bonus of $100 for any member that refers someone.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 05:55:00 PM by Daisy »

Finances_With_Purpose

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2031 on: November 24, 2017, 01:28:23 PM »
I wish I could share half the things I would like to here.  And some others' stories, too.  But alas, anonymity and all that.

However, I'll share some of my alternative uses of FU money (along the theme of this thread).  To me, FU money is helpful for self-respect - it empowers you to respect yourself, your family, and your other priorities, too.  On to the story part. 

At the time, I had a nice-sized emergency fund and realized I could live on very little.  I wasn't retired yet, and still am not (or even close), but I also realized that I didn't need to put up with the same level of nonsense I would back when I desperately needed a job (due to debt), either.  Life is short -- too short for some kinds of awfulness -- as I have learned through some hard lessons over the years.

So, my FU Money empowered me to start saying "no" to nonsense.  We need you to work through your holiday (on a project we have known was coming for months or weeks but didn't care enough to prepare for)?  No.  Move my wedding to work on a project that I asked not to be on because the deadlines were during my honeymoon?  No.  (With that one, I said I didn't care if I had a job or not when I came back - I would be gone, and they could figure it out.  They did.  And lo, I still had a job - with as much job security as ever, if not more, because they knew they needed me.)  Do something unethical, even though nobody would ever know it but me?  No.  Put my name on something that is absolutely awful and demonstrably wrong, just to look like we're doing something about a problem?  No.  Find someone else. 

The result: managers began internalizing the costs of their own failures - to plan, to allocate, and to care about people.  The workplace improved some.  I stopped hating my job every day, worrying about the next bomb that would drop.  I simply said no to bombs, and started making people respect some personal boundaries.  I don't check work email at 2PM on a Sunday or stay up all night for the job anymore, and that's just how it is.

After a while, the problem manager labeled me "Mr. No."  I just smiled.  This was ironic, as I worked hard, still put up with a good deal of the typical nonsense, and they knew this - which is why I kept getting the really tough last-minute things.  However, my own boss gained tremendous respect for me as a result, and began saying no more as well.   

Soon, the worst nonsense work began going elsewhere.  Management learned that I would not put up with it.  Eventually, I left the job anyway, even with nothing even lined up (no bridge-burning epic FU story about it; I kept it very professional, even though I told them why I left).  After I left, my former colleagues called me to ask if I could help them strategize about obtaining new positions or if I could hire them now.  Some simply burned out and quit.  Before long, all but a few were gone.  My old boss, the good one, called and offered to hire me pretty much anytime, anywhere.  Others realized that I wasn't bankrupt and didn't seem too concerned, so they asked for help with finances.  Sadly, I cannot imagine that it's better now for the few who remained.  As former colleagues left, they opened up more, and I learned that (as I suspected) it was even worse than I knew.  Most who stayed had no good options. 

I have witnessed, first-hand, what toxic jobs can do to a person's health, well-being, and relationships.  Life's too short. 

I spent my 20s learning that the courageous choice is the right one - to do the right thing even when it seems like a financial (emotional, relational, or general) disaster.  I never look back from those choices.  As one wise relative put it, "it's the things I didn't do that I regret."  FU money doesn't create character - it more so magnifies whatever character is present - but it empowers you to make good choices by making those choices cheaper and easier to make.  The hardest thing to do - that nags at you - is usually the one thing you need to do.  Over the years, those choices in my life have paid far more dividends than the rest, and continue doing so to this day.  (One of them led me into a relationship with my wife, but that's another story for another blog post . . .) 

And wouldn't you know: the day after I left the job, God sent me a check in the mail worth a couple of months' salary, totally unexpected.  I expected, someday, a check for maybe $100.  Nothing like that ever happened before in my life, and nothing like that has ever happened since.  I learned a lot about not worrying, faith, and trust.  Now I take each day's problems as they come, rather than worrying how the next year will turn out.

Meanwhile, that old employer never could figure out why other people wouldn't go work there, accept their offers, and so on.  I did not dish on them, as you may suspect: instead, I just never recommend them.  I'm sure someone else put the word out, and probably not as diplomatically as I would have. 

My history and FU money - and especially God - had put me in a position of strength: I was then offered jobs based upon reputation, which made finding new work easy.  In fact, it was too easy: I first had to turn down things that paid well or had some attractiveness, but probably had similar demands.  (Again, thanks to the FU funds for making it easier.)  I love where I went next - my life is so much better - and I have never looked back.  Better hours, better pay per hour, better benefits, better health care, far better work, and far less stress.  Life's too short.

Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2032 on: November 24, 2017, 02:08:47 PM »
Great story, Finances With Purpose!

 At Thanksgiving dinner, I told my visiting nieces about my "sabbatical" and they were very interested. I mentioned FU money and they both giggled. I asked if they had heard about it before and they said no, but they instantly understood what it was and what it was useful for.

One just graduated college and is not too happy with her first job and the other is a senior in college. They both like to be frugal, so I hope I can set them on a good course for their life with my advice and FU money stories.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2017, 04:16:56 PM by Daisy »

Secretly Saving

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2033 on: November 24, 2017, 02:51:44 PM »


I have witnessed, first-hand, what toxic jobs can do to a person's health, well-being, and relationships.  Life's too short.

I spent my 20s learning that the courageous choice is the right one - to do the right thing even when it seems like a financial (emotional, relational, or general) disaster.  I never look back from those choices.  As one wise relative put it, "it's the things I didn't do that I regret."  FU money doesn't create character - it more so magnifies whatever character is present - but it empowers you to make good choices by making those choices cheaper and easier to make.  The hardest thing to do - that nags at you - is usually the one thing you need to do. 

My history and FU money - and especially God - had put me in a position of strength: I was then offered jobs based upon reputation, which made finding new work easy.  In fact, it was too easy: I first had to turn down things that paid well or had some attractiveness, but probably had similar demands.  (Again, thanks to the FU funds for making it easier.)  I love where I went next - my life is so much better - and I have never looked back.  Better hours, better pay per hour, better benefits, better health care, far better work, and far less stress.  Life's too short.

These three ideas/paragraphs really resonated with me.  I used FU money to put in my resignation last week.  I'm not willing to put up with toxic people nor will I let my family suffer (based on the idea that life is too short). I'm willing to make the difficult, but courageous choice (including standing up for those that can't).  Interestingly I have already been offered the next (and better) job which came so easily based on reputation!

I'm looking forward to walking away from one particular toxic coworker with a huge smile on my face.  I'm also looking forward to making a difference at a new job, while having more balance for my family. Thank you FU money!

ramblez

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2034 on: November 24, 2017, 07:19:46 PM »
I wish I could share half the things I would like to here.  And some others' stories, too.  But alas, anonymity and all that.

However, I'll share some of my alternative uses of FU money (along the theme of this thread).  To me, FU money is helpful for self-respect - it empowers you to respect yourself, your family, and your other priorities, too.  On to the story part. 

At the time, I had a nice-sized emergency fund and realized I could live on very little.  I wasn't retired yet, and still am not (or even close), but I also realized that I didn't need to put up with the same level of nonsense I would back when I desperately needed a job (due to debt), either.  Life is short -- too short for some kinds of awfulness -- as I have learned through some hard lessons over the years.

So, my FU Money empowered me to start saying "no" to nonsense.  We need you to work through your holiday (on a project we have known was coming for months or weeks but didn't care enough to prepare for)?  No.  Move my wedding to work on a project that I asked not to be on because the deadlines were during my honeymoon?  No.  (With that one, I said I didn't care if I had a job or not when I came back - I would be gone, and they could figure it out.  They did.  And lo, I still had a job - with as much job security as ever, if not more, because they knew they needed me.)  Do something unethical, even though nobody would ever know it but me?  No.  Put my name on something that is absolutely awful and demonstrably wrong, just to look like we're doing something about a problem?  No.  Find someone else. 

The result: managers began internalizing the costs of their own failures - to plan, to allocate, and to care about people.  The workplace improved some.  I stopped hating my job every day, worrying about the next bomb that would drop.  I simply said no to bombs, and started making people respect some personal boundaries.  I don't check work email at 2PM on a Sunday or stay up all night for the job anymore, and that's just how it is.

After a while, the problem manager labeled me "Mr. No."  I just smiled.  This was ironic, as I worked hard, still put up with a good deal of the typical nonsense, and they knew this - which is why I kept getting the really tough last-minute things.  However, my own boss gained tremendous respect for me as a result, and began saying no more as well.   

Soon, the worst nonsense work began going elsewhere.  Management learned that I would not put up with it.  Eventually, I left the job anyway, even with nothing even lined up (no bridge-burning epic FU story about it; I kept it very professional, even though I told them why I left).  After I left, my former colleagues called me to ask if I could help them strategize about obtaining new positions or if I could hire them now.  Some simply burned out and quit.  Before long, all but a few were gone.  My old boss, the good one, called and offered to hire me pretty much anytime, anywhere.  Others realized that I wasn't bankrupt and didn't seem too concerned, so they asked for help with finances.  Sadly, I cannot imagine that it's better now for the few who remained.  As former colleagues left, they opened up more, and I learned that (as I suspected) it was even worse than I knew.  Most who stayed had no good options. 

I have witnessed, first-hand, what toxic jobs can do to a person's health, well-being, and relationships.  Life's too short. 

I spent my 20s learning that the courageous choice is the right one - to do the right thing even when it seems like a financial (emotional, relational, or general) disaster.  I never look back from those choices.  As one wise relative put it, "it's the things I didn't do that I regret."  FU money doesn't create character - it more so magnifies whatever character is present - but it empowers you to make good choices by making those choices cheaper and easier to make.  The hardest thing to do - that nags at you - is usually the one thing you need to do.  Over the years, those choices in my life have paid far more dividends than the rest, and continue doing so to this day.  (One of them led me into a relationship with my wife, but that's another story for another blog post . . .) 

And wouldn't you know: the day after I left the job, God sent me a check in the mail worth a couple of months' salary, totally unexpected.  I expected, someday, a check for maybe $100.  Nothing like that ever happened before in my life, and nothing like that has ever happened since.  I learned a lot about not worrying, faith, and trust.  Now I take each day's problems as they come, rather than worrying how the next year will turn out.

Meanwhile, that old employer never could figure out why other people wouldn't go work there, accept their offers, and so on.  I did not dish on them, as you may suspect: instead, I just never recommend them.  I'm sure someone else put the word out, and probably not as diplomatically as I would have. 

My history and FU money - and especially God - had put me in a position of strength: I was then offered jobs based upon reputation, which made finding new work easy.  In fact, it was too easy: I first had to turn down things that paid well or had some attractiveness, but probably had similar demands.  (Again, thanks to the FU funds for making it easier.)  I love where I went next - my life is so much better - and I have never looked back.  Better hours, better pay per hour, better benefits, better health care, far better work, and far less stress.  Life's too short.

“God” sent you a cheque?  Please elaborate on that.

lhamo

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2035 on: November 24, 2017, 07:22:33 PM »
A FU story might be brewing with me....  My employer of over 13 years is changing their medical plan network for 2018, to a very restrictive network with only a small hand-full of in-network providers in Chicago. So restrictive that there isn't even a single MRI provider in-network in the entire city of Chicago, and a very minimal number of in-network facilities (a couple of hospitals, only one urgent care center within the whole city of Chicago.) Pathetic for a large employer of a skilled/professional workforce.  Compounding the problem is, they removed ANY out-of-network coverage too. Not even some astoundingly-high-deductible plan. Simply no out of network coverage.

I compared the network of doctors on the employee plan with the network of doctors on the most inexpensive healthcare.gov exchange plan for 2018, and the plan on the exchange had about 3x of the network facilities in Chicago.

The kicker is, it is a global company with facilities all over the country and the world, but our office in Chicago is the only one that is subject to such a restrictive health care network. Employees in other offices of the country are retaining their same nation-wide and much larger network of providers in their medical plans.  Yet our payroll premiums are the same.

I barely use the medical insurance and I am generally pretty healthy. However, I like having a medical plan that assures me that I can get care if I need it. The plan offered by my employer (and exclusively to their Chicago employees) does not reassure me that I would be able to receive quality care if I need it.

It's probably not easy to change jobs around the holidays... but a lot of companies are working through their budgets for 2018, so probably will be looking to move on in the new year.

Could this be a way to force enough people out of the Chicago office so they can shut it down entirely?

I would complain to HR, at any rate.  Might be that some low level HR person made a mistake when choosing the local plan.  Or not.   Either way, it doesn't hurt to ask, especially if you might be leaving anyway.

G-dog

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2036 on: November 24, 2017, 07:53:50 PM »
A FU story might be brewing with me....  My employer of over 13 years is changing their medical plan network for 2018, to a very restrictive network with only a small hand-full of in-network providers in Chicago. So restrictive that there isn't even a single MRI provider in-network in the entire city of Chicago, and a very minimal number of in-network facilities (a couple of hospitals, only one urgent care center within the whole city of Chicago.) Pathetic for a large employer of a skilled/professional workforce.  Compounding the problem is, they removed ANY out-of-network coverage too. Not even some astoundingly-high-deductible plan. Simply no out of network coverage.

I compared the network of doctors on the employee plan with the network of doctors on the most inexpensive healthcare.gov exchange plan for 2018, and the plan on the exchange had about 3x of the network facilities in Chicago.

The kicker is, it is a global company with facilities all over the country and the world, but our office in Chicago is the only one that is subject to such a restrictive health care network. Employees in other offices of the country are retaining their same nation-wide and much larger network of providers in their medical plans.  Yet our payroll premiums are the same.

I barely use the medical insurance and I am generally pretty healthy. However, I like having a medical plan that assures me that I can get care if I need it. The plan offered by my employer (and exclusively to their Chicago employees) does not reassure me that I would be able to receive quality care if I need it.

It's probably not easy to change jobs around the holidays... but a lot of companies are working through their budgets for 2018, so probably will be looking to move on in the new year.

Could this be a way to force enough people out of the Chicago office so they can shut it down entirely?

I would complain to HR, at any rate.  Might be that some low level HR person made a mistake when choosing the local plan.  Or not.   Either way, it doesn't hurt to ask, especially if you might be leaving anyway.

Lhamo’s first question was my gut reaction. Let you all self-select out of the organization.  It is very weird that this is happening at only one site.

Finances_With_Purpose

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2037 on: November 24, 2017, 08:56:49 PM »

“God” sent you a cheque?  Please elaborate on that.

The day after I decided to go, I finally prayed, quit worrying, and then I received a call.  Instead of a $100 check, as we had expected, we received one for far, far more.  We knew we'd be getting a tiny amount (from a settlement) but figured it was trivial.  Turned out to be not as trivial.  Timing couldn't have been better.  Our needs were provided for - thankfully, without having dipping into our emergency fund at all.  (As it happened, we wouldn't have needed the check either - we just didn't know that for a while after.) 

WhiteTrashCash

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2038 on: November 25, 2017, 06:43:14 AM »

“God” sent you a cheque?  Please elaborate on that.

The day after I decided to go, I finally prayed, quit worrying, and then I received a call.  Instead of a $100 check, as we had expected, we received one for far, far more.  We knew we'd be getting a tiny amount (from a settlement) but figured it was trivial.  Turned out to be not as trivial.  Timing couldn't have been better.  Our needs were provided for - thankfully, without having dipping into our emergency fund at all.  (As it happened, we wouldn't have needed the check either - we just didn't know that for a while after.)

It's always a nice moment when you realize that God has stepped in for a second to help out. :-)

Finances_With_Purpose

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2039 on: November 26, 2017, 04:54:24 PM »


I have witnessed, first-hand, what toxic jobs can do to a person's health, well-being, and relationships.  Life's too short.

I spent my 20s learning that the courageous choice is the right one - to do the right thing even when it seems like a financial (emotional, relational, or general) disaster.  I never look back from those choices.  As one wise relative put it, "it's the things I didn't do that I regret."  FU money doesn't create character - it more so magnifies whatever character is present - but it empowers you to make good choices by making those choices cheaper and easier to make.  The hardest thing to do - that nags at you - is usually the one thing you need to do. 

My history and FU money - and especially God - had put me in a position of strength: I was then offered jobs based upon reputation, which made finding new work easy.  In fact, it was too easy: I first had to turn down things that paid well or had some attractiveness, but probably had similar demands.  (Again, thanks to the FU funds for making it easier.)  I love where I went next - my life is so much better - and I have never looked back.  Better hours, better pay per hour, better benefits, better health care, far better work, and far less stress.  Life's too short.

These three ideas/paragraphs really resonated with me.  I used FU money to put in my resignation last week.  I'm not willing to put up with toxic people nor will I let my family suffer (based on the idea that life is too short). I'm willing to make the difficult, but courageous choice (including standing up for those that can't).  Interestingly I have already been offered the next (and better) job which came so easily based on reputation!

I'm looking forward to walking away from one particular toxic coworker with a huge smile on my face.  I'm also looking forward to making a difference at a new job, while having more balance for my family. Thank you FU money!

I LOVE this.  Thanks so much for sharing that.  Stories like that are why I blog - to share encouragement with others in hopes they can see similar life improvement.  Life is way too short for toxic work environments.

I am incredibly thankful to have a father, mentors, and another relative who demonstrated a lot of character and showed me that - though it far too long for those lessons to sink in.  Now, though, I am incredibly happy about making those decisions - as I sit here at a patio, typing this while watching a beautiful sunset across a lake. 

paddedhat

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2040 on: November 26, 2017, 05:35:48 PM »
I've always maintained a position that life is too short to waste it surrounded by toxic people. I hoped that it was rubbing off on our children, but you never know until they are faced with difficulty. My oldest boy was still in his early-teens when he got a job at a local Subway shop. He was a few weeks in, when he started telling us that the owner was a bit crazy, and obsessed with control and making sure that here minimum wage peons were giving her 110% at all times. He has always been a real hard worker, but one day his shift manager pulled him into a corner of the store for a talk. He asked why she wanted to talk in such a strange spot, and she made a paranoid comment about being "watched". He was a bit surprised by that claim, since there were no cameras anywhere. Shortly after, he was alone in the dining area, and leaning on a table for a moment, after scrubbing everything in the room to operating room standards. He heard the phone ring, then got called into the office. The manager told him that he couldn't be leaning on a table. He asked how she would possibly know that? since she couldn't see him from the office, and he is the only other person in the building? She then confessed that the place was loaded with hidden cameras, and the owner spent her time away from the store staring at the monitor in her home, micromanaging and calling to scream about who had spent more than a few seconds not working, or was doing something that deviated from exactly how she wanted it done. He told the manager that he was done, and called for us to come pick him up. I was really happy to see that he learned well. My wife OTOH, was of a much different mindset and had put up with some real abusive A-holes in some of her first jobs. She thought that he had made a big mistake. We agreed to disagree, and I congratulated him for doing the right thing.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2041 on: November 26, 2017, 05:42:51 PM »
I've always maintained a position that life is too short to waste it surrounded by toxic people. I hoped that it was rubbing off on our children, but you never know until they are faced with difficulty. My oldest boy was still in his early-teens when he got a job at a local Subway shop. He was a few weeks in, when he started telling us that the owner was a bit crazy, and obsessed with control and making sure that here minimum wage peons were giving her 110% at all times. He has always been a real hard worker, but one day his shift manager pulled him into a corner of the store for a talk. He asked why she wanted to talk in such a strange spot, and she made a paranoid comment about being "watched". He was a bit surprised by that claim, since there were no cameras anywhere. Shortly after, he was alone in the dining area, and leaning on a table for a moment, after scrubbing everything in the room to operating room standards. He heard the phone ring, then got called into the office. The manager told him that he couldn't be leaning on a table. He asked how she would possibly know that? since she couldn't see him from the office, and he is the only other person in the building? She then confessed that the place was loaded with hidden cameras, and the owner spent her time away from the store staring at the monitor in her home, micromanaging and calling to scream about who had spent more than a few seconds not working, or was doing something that deviated from exactly how she wanted it done. He told the manager that he was done, and called for us to come pick him up. I was really happy to see that he learned well. My wife OTOH, was of a much different mindset and had put up with some real abusive A-holes in some of her first jobs. She thought that he had made a big mistake. We agreed to disagree, and I congratulated him for doing the right thing.
I feel like I've read this story before somewhere. Have you posted it elsewhere?

SwordGuy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2042 on: November 26, 2017, 05:44:19 PM »
Please report the business to your state labor relations board and to the police.
And to the local newspaper and TV stations. 

Might not accomplish something, might get the owner fined, jailed, or scared enough to quit doing it.   

It's worth a try.

« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 08:38:35 PM by SwordGuy »

sequoia

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2043 on: November 26, 2017, 08:11:32 PM »
I've always maintained a position that life is too short to waste it surrounded by toxic people.
....cut....
 He told the manager that he was done, and called for us to come pick him up. I was really happy to see that he learned well.

Congratulations, I believe you have raised him well!

paddedhat

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2044 on: November 26, 2017, 08:17:25 PM »
I've always maintained a position that life is too short to waste it surrounded by toxic people. I hoped that it was rubbing off on our children, but you never know until they are faced with difficulty. My oldest boy was still in his early-teens when he got a job at a local Subway shop. He was a few weeks in, when he started telling us that the owner was a bit crazy, and obsessed with control and making sure that here minimum wage peons were giving her 110% at all times. He has always been a real hard worker, but one day his shift manager pulled him into a corner of the store for a talk. He asked why she wanted to talk in such a strange spot, and she made a paranoid comment about being "watched". He was a bit surprised by that claim, since there were no cameras anywhere. Shortly after, he was alone in the dining area, and leaning on a table for a moment, after scrubbing everything in the room to operating room standards. He heard the phone ring, then got called into the office. The manager told him that he couldn't be leaning on a table. He asked how she would possibly know that? since she couldn't see him from the office, and he is the only other person in the building? She then confessed that the place was loaded with hidden cameras, and the owner spent her time away from the store staring at the monitor in her home, micromanaging and calling to scream about who had spent more than a few seconds not working, or was doing something that deviated from exactly how she wanted it done. He told the manager that he was done, and called for us to come pick him up. I was really happy to see that he learned well. My wife OTOH, was of a much different mindset and had put up with some real abusive A-holes in some of her first jobs. She thought that he had made a big mistake. We agreed to disagree, and I congratulated him for doing the right thing.
I feel like I've read this story before somewhere. Have you posted it elsewhere?
No but I seem to think it may be somewhere in my post history also.

antarestar

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2045 on: November 27, 2017, 07:49:01 AM »
I've always maintained a position that life is too short to waste it surrounded by toxic people. I hoped that it was rubbing off on our children, but you never know until they are faced with difficulty. My oldest boy was still in his early-teens when he got a job at a local Subway shop. He was a few weeks in, when he started telling us that the owner was a bit crazy, and obsessed with control and making sure that here minimum wage peons were giving her 110% at all times. He has always been a real hard worker, but one day his shift manager pulled him into a corner of the store for a talk. He asked why she wanted to talk in such a strange spot, and she made a paranoid comment about being "watched". He was a bit surprised by that claim, since there were no cameras anywhere. Shortly after, he was alone in the dining area, and leaning on a table for a moment, after scrubbing everything in the room to operating room standards. He heard the phone ring, then got called into the office. The manager told him that he couldn't be leaning on a table. He asked how she would possibly know that? since she couldn't see him from the office, and he is the only other person in the building? She then confessed that the place was loaded with hidden cameras, and the owner spent her time away from the store staring at the monitor in her home, micromanaging and calling to scream about who had spent more than a few seconds not working, or was doing something that deviated from exactly how she wanted it done. He told the manager that he was done, and called for us to come pick him up. I was really happy to see that he learned well. My wife OTOH, was of a much different mindset and had put up with some real abusive A-holes in some of her first jobs. She thought that he had made a big mistake. We agreed to disagree, and I congratulated him for doing the right thing.
I feel like I've read this story before somewhere. Have you posted it elsewhere?

I think hidden cameras happen a lot more than people realize.

rockstache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2046 on: November 27, 2017, 08:09:26 AM »
I've always maintained a position that life is too short to waste it surrounded by toxic people. I hoped that it was rubbing off on our children, but you never know until they are faced with difficulty. My oldest boy was still in his early-teens when he got a job at a local Subway shop. He was a few weeks in, when he started telling us that the owner was a bit crazy, and obsessed with control and making sure that here minimum wage peons were giving her 110% at all times. He has always been a real hard worker, but one day his shift manager pulled him into a corner of the store for a talk. He asked why she wanted to talk in such a strange spot, and she made a paranoid comment about being "watched". He was a bit surprised by that claim, since there were no cameras anywhere. Shortly after, he was alone in the dining area, and leaning on a table for a moment, after scrubbing everything in the room to operating room standards. He heard the phone ring, then got called into the office. The manager told him that he couldn't be leaning on a table. He asked how she would possibly know that? since she couldn't see him from the office, and he is the only other person in the building? She then confessed that the place was loaded with hidden cameras, and the owner spent her time away from the store staring at the monitor in her home, micromanaging and calling to scream about who had spent more than a few seconds not working, or was doing something that deviated from exactly how she wanted it done. He told the manager that he was done, and called for us to come pick him up. I was really happy to see that he learned well. My wife OTOH, was of a much different mindset and had put up with some real abusive A-holes in some of her first jobs. She thought that he had made a big mistake. We agreed to disagree, and I congratulated him for doing the right thing.
I feel like I've read this story before somewhere. Have you posted it elsewhere?

I think hidden cameras happen a lot more than people realize.

I don't think the hidden cameras are the issue. Everyone knows that cameras are everywhere, or at least they should. The problem is the spying, micromanaging owner. That's what FU money is for.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2047 on: November 27, 2017, 08:14:48 AM »
I think hidden cameras happen a lot more than people realize.
I think they're fine as long as the employees know they exist. Secret cameras are a whole 'mother story. And no cameras in bathrooms, please.

I know someone who owns multiple donut stores. They're full of cameras, so he can check on them from anywhere with  his phone. IDK if the line staff knows about them, but I'm sure his managers do.

Laura33

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2048 on: November 27, 2017, 08:41:23 AM »
I've always maintained a position that life is too short to waste it surrounded by toxic people. I hoped that it was rubbing off on our children, but you never know until they are faced with difficulty. My oldest boy was still in his early-teens when he got a job at a local Subway shop. He was a few weeks in, when he started telling us that the owner was a bit crazy, and obsessed with control and making sure that here minimum wage peons were giving her 110% at all times. He has always been a real hard worker, but one day his shift manager pulled him into a corner of the store for a talk. He asked why she wanted to talk in such a strange spot, and she made a paranoid comment about being "watched". He was a bit surprised by that claim, since there were no cameras anywhere. Shortly after, he was alone in the dining area, and leaning on a table for a moment, after scrubbing everything in the room to operating room standards. He heard the phone ring, then got called into the office. The manager told him that he couldn't be leaning on a table. He asked how she would possibly know that? since she couldn't see him from the office, and he is the only other person in the building? She then confessed that the place was loaded with hidden cameras, and the owner spent her time away from the store staring at the monitor in her home, micromanaging and calling to scream about who had spent more than a few seconds not working, or was doing something that deviated from exactly how she wanted it done. He told the manager that he was done, and called for us to come pick him up. I was really happy to see that he learned well. My wife OTOH, was of a much different mindset and had put up with some real abusive A-holes in some of her first jobs. She thought that he had made a big mistake. We agreed to disagree, and I congratulated him for doing the right thing.
I feel like I've read this story before somewhere. Have you posted it elsewhere?

I think hidden cameras happen a lot more than people realize.

FWIW, these can be illegal in some states.  Most states require at least one person being taped to have granted permission; others require permission from everyone.*  If it's in the employment context, obviously check any documents you've signed, but if you discover someone is actually spying on you with hidden cameras, might be worth at least checking your state's laws.

*Caveat that my experience has been with audiotapes; not sure it applies to video if it didn't include sound.  I learned this when the real asshat bad guy in a case thought he was being clever by secretly taping our client, trying to trick him into some sort of admission**.  But not only didn't our client say anything to hurt his case, the asshat didn't realize that he was violating the law by taping our client without the client's permission.  Now that was satisfying.

Sibley

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2049 on: November 27, 2017, 08:05:57 PM »
Well, I gave notice today at work. Wish I could say that it was epic, but honestly it was mostly exhausting and emotional. (The smoke detector deciding to start chirping at 1am about low battery didn't help with any of it.) I was honest about why I was leaving, and it seems some of the strain I've been under this year showed. It surprised me - I've apparently been employing some defensive mechanisms and didn't realize how much some of this has affected me.
 
Cliff notes of the issues: manager is alternately micromanage-ey and unavailable when you need her, then when you do something perfectly reasonable, tells you that you should have checked with her first. Her written communication style reads as hypercritical and disapproving, even though I know she doesn't intend it that way. Parts of my work require intense manager involvement/review, and she regularly doesn't do this timely. By the time she gets around to it, it's the last minute and becomes a frantic effort to make the changes. Then she tells you not to be so frantic (WTF? You made massive changes to the document half an hour before I have to present it to the VP! I gave the damn thing to you 2 days ago!). While this particular combination is annoying and frustrating for my coworkers, turns out that it's toxic to me. While I like her as a person, as a manager she's a disaster for me.

I've been assured by both my manager's boss and grandboss (various flavors of director) that they will be doing coaching and other things to address the problems. The grand boss told me that he'd been planning to move around the manager assignments so it wasn't so siloed, as well as moving some managerial tasks around to rebalance workloads. All of which is great and should really take the stress off the staff next year, but I don't think I can recover (and it is a recovery) without a massive change. Interestingly, he told me that he would wait to start anything until after my last day "to avoid causing me any more stress". Holy crap, what a day for my poker face to take a vacation! This guy is gruff, blunt, and doesn't pay attention to emotions. I think I made an impression, and I really didn't mean to.
 
They're not really pushing to try to get me to stay, which is not the MO for them. I was told very specifically that if I ever want to return, I just have to say the word. It's one thing for your employee to tell you that they're getting more money or a promotion going somewhere else, and quite different for them to say they're leaving because they feel un-trusted and incompetent due to the mgmt style on a near daily basis and are going to the exact same job but somewhere else. Especially when it's one of your high performers. I got promoted earlier this year, and another director who I work with (but not in my reporting line) hinted that I had been on the promotion list for 2018. (For context, it usually takes 2-3 years to go between these levels.) So clearly, they think I'm good. What a pity my manager had to convey the opposite impression.

I haven't heard from the great-grand boss yet, but I was also told he knows and is not happy. After all, he's got a team of 12 losing 2 experienced staff in the space of a couple weeks (my coworker's last day is Thursday, he's just as good as I am though we have different strengths). This puts a major project in jeopardy. I expect that I will be talking to him at some point. I plan to be more vague about why I'm leaving with him, and hopefully what little poker face I have will be back on by then. Whether or not he tries to get me to stay, we'll see. He generally takes his director's input on staff matters, though has been known to override. I guess it'll depend on why they're deviated from the MO in the first place, and if that gets shared.

I didn't talk to my manager today outside of a hello in passing. I will need to talk to her tomorrow, if nothing else to prioritize what I'm working on for my last 2 weeks. I am not going to tell her that she's the reason I'm leaving - I may be blunt, but I try not to be cruel.

I start at the new job 12/18. My last day at current job is 12/8. I'll be taking the week in between to decompress and probably do a bunch of painting at home. I honestly think knowing that I could quit if I needed to really helped me cope this year. Having FU money gave me the ability to change jobs when it was a good time for me, rather than having to scramble and potentially mess up everything else I've had going on this year.

Sorry for the book. This turned into therapy...