Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 485927 times)

Wolf_Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #600 on: September 06, 2015, 06:00:33 PM »
As a lawyer, I can tell you that we fall onto the same goddamned hedonic treadmill as everyone else. I've got a book called 'The Pinstriped Prison' which describes how big firms deliberately use this effect to keep their new hires from leaving. Give a new graduate a $10,000 loan (referred to as the 'golden handcuffs' - repayable if the graduate leaves in the first year) for office clothes and gear, watch them piss away all of their new income on the flashy lifestyle the partners indulge in, then they realise that they can't leave because they can't save the $10,000  because of their new spending level.
I have seen this happen first hand with relocation packages. Dude wouldn't quit over a mere $3,000 that the company paid him to move to the area. Household income over $200k, and worried about $3k? smh

This is my situation right now. I held off on quitting because I wanted to hold out a year so I didn't have to pay them back the money. However, the situation just kept escalating. So put in my resignation last week (should have just done it back in June, but I thought if I could get HR involved things would improve. I was so so wrong).

I have the cash to pay it back, but it does make things tighter for me on looking for a new job, now I have to find something within 2 months instead of 6.

Faraday

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #601 on: September 06, 2015, 06:13:41 PM »
As a lawyer, I can tell you that we fall onto the same goddamned hedonic treadmill as everyone else. I've got a book called 'The Pinstriped Prison' which describes how big firms deliberately use this effect to keep their new hires from leaving. Give a new graduate a $10,000 loan (referred to as the 'golden handcuffs' - repayable if the graduate leaves in the first year) for office clothes and gear, watch them piss away all of their new income on the flashy lifestyle the partners indulge in, then they realise that they can't leave because they can't save the $10,000  because of their new spending level.
I have seen this happen first hand with relocation packages. Dude wouldn't quit over a mere $3,000 that the company paid him to move to the area. Household income over $200k, and worried about $3k? smh

This is my situation right now. I held off on quitting because I wanted to hold out a year so I didn't have to pay them back the money. However, the situation just kept escalating. So put in my resignation last week (should have just done it back in June, but I thought if I could get HR involved things would improve. I was so so wrong).

I have the cash to pay it back, but it does make things tighter for me on looking for a new job, now I have to find something within 2 months instead of 6.

Yeah. HR exists to protect MANAGEMENT from lawsuits, not humor the employees. I'm an IT professional who supported HR departments....so I'm not making that shit up. I have a co-worker at the current job who just now discovered that.

So....how are you fixing it. This is a thread of epic stories, not "oh man, I suck so bad...."
« Last Edit: September 06, 2015, 06:15:49 PM by mefla »
FIRE in 2020.

lhamo

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #602 on: September 06, 2015, 07:03:52 PM »
The world is full of incompetent crazy people who get hired into management positions. How the hell that happens, I just don't know.

Because most of the sane people either:

1)  Don't want the management jobs in the first place and refuse to be promoted into them; or
2)  Quickly learn how horrible they are and move back to being a primary contributor as soon as they can; or
3)  Go insane themselves; or
4)  Die from overwork.

Wherever you go, there you are

Wolf_Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #603 on: September 07, 2015, 03:52:49 PM »
This is my situation right now. I held off on quitting because I wanted to hold out a year so I didn't have to pay them back the money. However, the situation just kept escalating. So put in my resignation last week (should have just done it back in June, but I thought if I could get HR involved things would improve. I was so so wrong).

I have the cash to pay it back, but it does make things tighter for me on looking for a new job, now I have to find something within 2 months instead of 6.

Yeah. HR exists to protect MANAGEMENT from lawsuits, not humor the employees. I'm an IT professional who supported HR departments....so I'm not making that shit up. I have a co-worker at the current job who just now discovered that.

So....how are you fixing it. This is a thread of epic stories, not "oh man, I suck so bad...."

Ok, here is my semi-epic horrible story:

I started at this job at the tail end of February/beginning of March.

Right of the bat there were problems. The person who had previously done this job was still there and training me. His "training" went a bit like this:

Trainer: So I pull this number into this spreadsheet -
Me: Wait, where did you get that number and how do you know to put it there?
trainer: I just know.

Further prodding gets me nowhere. So I basically receive NO training, despite having a trainer. The trainer also gives me a workbook of things that are behind that need to be done ASAP. Some of them are tax returns that are two years past due. Others are things still not done that are related to a merger the company went through the year before I started. I get so sick the first two weeks I'm there that I collapse and am rushed to the emergency room.

Meanwhile, my boss keeps dropping more and more duties on me. My first week I took over all cash forecasting, all the fixed asset stuff, Construction licenses, and became their key user for the new EPR system that was supposed to be going live May 1st.

By April I was in charge of:
  • Cash Forecasting
  • Construction Licenses
  • All Fixed assets, including Construction in Progress, gathering backup documentation for all FA purchases, and disposals
  • Approval of all FA invoices before they are paid and reporting on all outstanding FA Purchase Orders
  • Depreciation Forecasting
  • Depreciation monthly entries
  • Monthly prepaid allocations
  • Reconciling all Inter-company accounts at the end of each month (this place has about a dozen different offshoots in Europe, Asia, America, Africa, etc)
  • Sales tax for all 50 states including registration, renewals, and filings

By the end of May, go live had been pushed back to October 1st. Meanwhile I was given new duties on TOP of all the duties listed above:
  • all the User acceptance testing assignments
  • all the system master data validations
  • writing all the procedures & documentation
  • the assignment to train everyone in finance on how to use the new system

By June I had the following duties ADDED To my plate, and remember I'm STILL in charge of everything above as well:
  • Credit Card management of all corporate credit cards
  • Registering fleet vehicles with the Dept of Motor Vehicles
  • Signing off on all outgoing ACH and WIRE payments
  • Filling out the monthly Financial Statement package
  • Management of all corporate insurance

In the middle of June one day I get so stressed out that I basically have a complete meltdown at work. I go to my boss, begging for help where I'm told I'm just 'not working hard enough.' I walked out of her office, went in the bathroom and cried for an hour. I was VERY VERY tempted to just walk away that day and never come back, but the aforementioned 'golden handcuffs' convinces me to stay and try to get things under control. At this point I've not even been there 4 months and had two breakdowns.

In July I have another meeting with my boss where I tell her I'm overloaded, and ask her to give me priorities. She refuses, tells me 'everything' is a priority and reiterates that the reason I'm behind is that I'm not working enough and not working hard enough. Also, she gives me a list of more duties that she's going to be transferring over to me in the near future.

I begin to cope by literally dropping every task that someone is not asking me for right at that moment, but I'm enough of a stickler that the undone tasks are stressing me out.

At the beginning of Aug I go to HR, and ask them to moderate a meeting between me and my boss. During that meeting, I'm VERY honest with the fact that I haven't been doing a lot of tasks on my list simply because of the lack of time. She FREAKS OUT about the merger related tasks that still aren't done, and insists I do them NOW. She does finally agree to take ONE tasks off my list of duties, but since it is one of the things I hadn't been doing it doesn't affect my workload in any way.

Later in the month she uses the excuse that she took that one task off my list to try and give me three more tasks.

I write a resignation later, and on August 26th go in with the letter in hand to try and have one more conversation with her about my workload.

Now, remember, it is a month before go live. Because of my crazy task list above I've had time to do zero training and written zero documentation and zero procedures. I'm the ONLY one in the department that even knows how to log into the new system.

She doesn't budge so I hand her the letter with my last day as Sept 11th. She FREAKS OUT, but finally calms down long enough to ask if I'll stay until after go live if she takes everything off my tasks list except the training, documentation, and procedure documentation.

So it all works out for me. I have a job for 2 more months, time to job hunt, and since the amount I have to pay back is prorated  it means that I'll only have to pay back about 1/4 of the starting bonus.

After the announcement went out that I was quitting, IT (whom I'd been working closely with on the new system implementation - BTW their jaws hit the floor when I repeated my bosses claim that I wasn't 'working hard enough') offered me a job with them for $25K more a year than I'd been making in accounting. I declined, because F*** this company.

lhamo

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #604 on: September 07, 2015, 04:12:24 PM »

After the announcement went out that I was quitting, IT (whom I'd been working closely with on the new system implementation - BTW their jaws hit the floor when I repeated my bosses claim that I wasn't 'working hard enough') offered me a job with them for $25K more a year than I'd been making in accounting. I declined, because F*** this company.

Good for you!  Ask the IT guys to help you network.  I bet you'll find something better/better paying in no time.  And if you do, I would leave ASAP.  This place doesn't deserve any more of your time.

Wherever you go, there you are

tyort1

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #605 on: September 08, 2015, 05:48:37 PM »
This is my situation right now. I held off on quitting because I wanted to hold out a year so I didn't have to pay them back the money. However, the situation just kept escalating. So put in my resignation last week (should have just done it back in June, but I thought if I could get HR involved things would improve. I was so so wrong).

I have the cash to pay it back, but it does make things tighter for me on looking for a new job, now I have to find something within 2 months instead of 6.

Yeah. HR exists to protect MANAGEMENT from lawsuits, not humor the employees. I'm an IT professional who supported HR departments....so I'm not making that shit up. I have a co-worker at the current job who just now discovered that.

So....how are you fixing it. This is a thread of epic stories, not "oh man, I suck so bad...."

Ok, here is my semi-epic horrible story:

I started at this job at the tail end of February/beginning of March.

Right of the bat there were problems. The person who had previously done this job was still there and training me. His "training" went a bit like this:

Trainer: So I pull this number into this spreadsheet -
Me: Wait, where did you get that number and how do you know to put it there?
trainer: I just know.

Further prodding gets me nowhere. So I basically receive NO training, despite having a trainer. The trainer also gives me a workbook of things that are behind that need to be done ASAP. Some of them are tax returns that are two years past due. Others are things still not done that are related to a merger the company went through the year before I started. I get so sick the first two weeks I'm there that I collapse and am rushed to the emergency room.

Meanwhile, my boss keeps dropping more and more duties on me. My first week I took over all cash forecasting, all the fixed asset stuff, Construction licenses, and became their key user for the new EPR system that was supposed to be going live May 1st.

By April I was in charge of:
  • Cash Forecasting
  • Construction Licenses
  • All Fixed assets, including Construction in Progress, gathering backup documentation for all FA purchases, and disposals
  • Approval of all FA invoices before they are paid and reporting on all outstanding FA Purchase Orders
  • Depreciation Forecasting
  • Depreciation monthly entries
  • Monthly prepaid allocations
  • Reconciling all Inter-company accounts at the end of each month (this place has about a dozen different offshoots in Europe, Asia, America, Africa, etc)
  • Sales tax for all 50 states including registration, renewals, and filings

By the end of May, go live had been pushed back to October 1st. Meanwhile I was given new duties on TOP of all the duties listed above:
  • all the User acceptance testing assignments
  • all the system master data validations
  • writing all the procedures & documentation
  • the assignment to train everyone in finance on how to use the new system

By June I had the following duties ADDED To my plate, and remember I'm STILL in charge of everything above as well:
  • Credit Card management of all corporate credit cards
  • Registering fleet vehicles with the Dept of Motor Vehicles
  • Signing off on all outgoing ACH and WIRE payments
  • Filling out the monthly Financial Statement package
  • Management of all corporate insurance

In the middle of June one day I get so stressed out that I basically have a complete meltdown at work. I go to my boss, begging for help where I'm told I'm just 'not working hard enough.' I walked out of her office, went in the bathroom and cried for an hour. I was VERY VERY tempted to just walk away that day and never come back, but the aforementioned 'golden handcuffs' convinces me to stay and try to get things under control. At this point I've not even been there 4 months and had two breakdowns.

In July I have another meeting with my boss where I tell her I'm overloaded, and ask her to give me priorities. She refuses, tells me 'everything' is a priority and reiterates that the reason I'm behind is that I'm not working enough and not working hard enough. Also, she gives me a list of more duties that she's going to be transferring over to me in the near future.

I begin to cope by literally dropping every task that someone is not asking me for right at that moment, but I'm enough of a stickler that the undone tasks are stressing me out.

At the beginning of Aug I go to HR, and ask them to moderate a meeting between me and my boss. During that meeting, I'm VERY honest with the fact that I haven't been doing a lot of tasks on my list simply because of the lack of time. She FREAKS OUT about the merger related tasks that still aren't done, and insists I do them NOW. She does finally agree to take ONE tasks off my list of duties, but since it is one of the things I hadn't been doing it doesn't affect my workload in any way.

Later in the month she uses the excuse that she took that one task off my list to try and give me three more tasks.

I write a resignation later, and on August 26th go in with the letter in hand to try and have one more conversation with her about my workload.

Now, remember, it is a month before go live. Because of my crazy task list above I've had time to do zero training and written zero documentation and zero procedures. I'm the ONLY one in the department that even knows how to log into the new system.

She doesn't budge so I hand her the letter with my last day as Sept 11th. She FREAKS OUT, but finally calms down long enough to ask if I'll stay until after go live if she takes everything off my tasks list except the training, documentation, and procedure documentation.

So it all works out for me. I have a job for 2 more months, time to job hunt, and since the amount I have to pay back is prorated  it means that I'll only have to pay back about 1/4 of the starting bonus.

After the announcement went out that I was quitting, IT (whom I'd been working closely with on the new system implementation - BTW their jaws hit the floor when I repeated my bosses claim that I wasn't 'working hard enough') offered me a job with them for $25K more a year than I'd been making in accounting. I declined, because F*** this company.

Soooo, the companies perspective it "Hey, we f'd you up for months and months.  Please stick around a bit longer, otherwise you put us in a difficult position".  Yeah, I know what I'd say to that....Hahaha.
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Cpa Cat

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #606 on: September 08, 2015, 08:04:50 PM »
As many of you are aware, I am FIRE'd, but I have a fake job as a self-employed CPA. I like doing taxes and being a CPA is kind of fun.

But I have this weird client. He was one of my first clients and he started as a tax/accounting client, but over time his requests got a little outside of the norm of what you would normally ask your CPA to do. Like shopping for his health insurance, dealing with his property insurance company, drafting letters to various organizations, paying his bills. He even gave my phone number to his mortgage company so that I could "handle" his mortgage refinance. Obviously, I'm not charging this guy enough, because he seems to view me as his personal assistant.

So today, as a courtesy, I sent an email letting know a few of my clients that I'm going on vacation.

About 30 seconds later, I get a call from him: "Before you go on vacation, I need you to submit an invoice for a government contract."

So I reply with, "Um... I don't know how to do that, so I don't think it's going to be possible."

Him: "This is something I'll need you to do monthly. It's really easy, I'll walk you through it. "

Me: "This really isn't what I do. I am a Certified Public Accountant... And my E&O insurance isn't going to cover me if I make an error on something like this. You're going to need to find someone else to do that."

Him: "Other accountants have done it for me in the past. Anyway, I would need more notice than 5 minutes before it's due if I were going to find someone else."

Me: "I think you've misunderstood our professional relationship. I'm not your employee. I said no. It's not open for negotiation."

Him: "I'm sensing some tension. Let's talk about this some more when you've calmed down."

I told him: "Good luck with that." And I hung up. [I must have been calm, because I didn't tell him to shove his phone up his A$$.]

The true beauty of being FIRE'd: I don't need that guy's check to pay my bills.

Taran Wanderer

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #607 on: September 08, 2015, 08:08:38 PM »
As many of you are aware, I am FIRE'd, but I have a fake job as a self-employed CPA. I like doing taxes and being a CPA is kind of fun.

But I have this weird client. He was one of my first clients and he started as a tax/accounting client, but over time his requests got a little outside of the norm of what you would normally ask your CPA to do. Like shopping for his health insurance, dealing with his property insurance company, drafting letters to various organizations, paying his bills. He even gave my phone number to his mortgage company so that I could "handle" his mortgage refinance. Obviously, I'm not charging this guy enough, because he seems to view me as his personal assistant.

So today, as a courtesy, I sent an email letting know a few of my clients that I'm going on vacation.

About 30 seconds later, I get a call from him: "Before you go on vacation, I need you to submit an invoice for a government contract."

So I reply with, "Um... I don't know how to do that, so I don't think it's going to be possible."

Him: "This is something I'll need you to do monthly. It's really easy, I'll walk you through it. "

Me: "This really isn't what I do. I am a Certified Public Accountant... And my E&O insurance isn't going to cover me if I make an error on something like this. You're going to need to find someone else to do that."

Him: "Other accountants have done it for me in the past. Anyway, I would need more notice than 5 minutes before it's due if I were going to find someone else."

Me: "I think you've misunderstood our professional relationship. I'm not your employee. I said no. It's not open for negotiation."

Him: "I'm sensing some tension. Let's talk about this some more when you've calmed down."

I told him: "Good luck with that." And I hung up. [I must have been calm, because I didn't tell him to shove his phone up his A$$.]

The true beauty of being FIRE'd: I don't need that guy's check to pay my bills.

The nerve of some people amazes me...

(Him, not you!)
« Last Edit: September 08, 2015, 08:10:10 PM by FlatWave »

dragoncar

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #608 on: September 08, 2015, 08:16:08 PM »

G-dog

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #609 on: September 08, 2015, 08:40:38 PM »
@cpa cat
"Him: "I'm sensing some tension. Let's talk about this some more when you've calmed down."

Hahahaha! Re: your retort and hang up - Way to go, this was long overdue! I like how it is your fault that he doesn't have time to find someone else to fulfill a deadline he just told you about (for an issue out of your scope).

big_slacker

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #610 on: September 08, 2015, 09:18:20 PM »
Yup, when I was self employed it was always about the 80/20 rule. Fire that 20% that take up 80% of your time and energy. :)

As many of you are aware, I am FIRE'd, but I have a fake job as a self-employed CPA. I like doing taxes and being a CPA is kind of fun.

But I have this weird client. He was one of my first clients and he started as a tax/accounting client, but over time his requests got a little outside of the norm of what you would normally ask your CPA to do. Like shopping for his health insurance, dealing with his property insurance company, drafting letters to various organizations, paying his bills. He even gave my phone number to his mortgage company so that I could "handle" his mortgage refinance. Obviously, I'm not charging this guy enough, because he seems to view me as his personal assistant.

So today, as a courtesy, I sent an email letting know a few of my clients that I'm going on vacation.

About 30 seconds later, I get a call from him: "Before you go on vacation, I need you to submit an invoice for a government contract."

So I reply with, "Um... I don't know how to do that, so I don't think it's going to be possible."

Him: "This is something I'll need you to do monthly. It's really easy, I'll walk you through it. "

Me: "This really isn't what I do. I am a Certified Public Accountant... And my E&O insurance isn't going to cover me if I make an error on something like this. You're going to need to find someone else to do that."

Him: "Other accountants have done it for me in the past. Anyway, I would need more notice than 5 minutes before it's due if I were going to find someone else."

Me: "I think you've misunderstood our professional relationship. I'm not your employee. I said no. It's not open for negotiation."

Him: "I'm sensing some tension. Let's talk about this some more when you've calmed down."

I told him: "Good luck with that." And I hung up. [I must have been calm, because I didn't tell him to shove his phone up his A$$.]

The true beauty of being FIRE'd: I don't need that guy's check to pay my bills.

happy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #611 on: September 09, 2015, 05:27:35 AM »
As many of you are aware, I am FIRE'd, but I have a fake job as a self-employed CPA. I like doing taxes and being a CPA is kind of fun.

But I have this weird client. He was one of my first clients and he started as a tax/accounting client, but over time his requests got a little outside of the norm of what you would normally ask your CPA to do. Like shopping for his health insurance, dealing with his property insurance company, drafting letters to various organizations, paying his bills. He even gave my phone number to his mortgage company so that I could "handle" his mortgage refinance. Obviously, I'm not charging this guy enough, because he seems to view me as his personal assistant.


This is obviously the problem!.sheesh,  senior accountants here charge like a wounded bull ( up to $500/hr).  No way you'd get them to shop for deals on health insurance etc.

The joy of FU money :) and  now you don't have to worry about telling him you've tripled your charge rate.
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

Faraday

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #612 on: September 09, 2015, 08:36:32 AM »
As many of you are aware, I am FIRE'd, but I have a fake job as a self-employed CPA. I like doing taxes and being a CPA is kind of fun.

But I have this weird client. ....

That's an awesome story! You gotta tell us if there ends up being any more to it. I have this feeling he'll be back....?
FIRE in 2020.

The_path_less_taken

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #613 on: September 09, 2015, 09:22:49 AM »
As many of you are aware, I am FIRE'd, but I have a fake job as a self-employed CPA. I like doing taxes and being a CPA is kind of fun.

But I have this weird client. He was one of my first clients and he started as a tax/accounting client, but over time his requests got a little outside of the norm of what you would normally ask your CPA to do. Like shopping for his health insurance, dealing with his property insurance company, drafting letters to various organizations, paying his bills. He even gave my phone number to his mortgage company so that I could "handle" his mortgage refinance. Obviously, I'm not charging this guy enough, because he seems to view me as his personal assistant.

So today, as a courtesy, I sent an email letting know a few of my clients that I'm going on vacation.

About 30 seconds later, I get a call from him: "Before you go on vacation, I need you to submit an invoice for a government contract."

So I reply with, "Um... I don't know how to do that, so I don't think it's going to be possible."

Him: "This is something I'll need you to do monthly. It's really easy, I'll walk you through it. "

Me: "This really isn't what I do. I am a Certified Public Accountant... And my E&O insurance isn't going to cover me if I make an error on something like this. You're going to need to find someone else to do that."

Him: "Other accountants have done it for me in the past. Anyway, I would need more notice than 5 minutes before it's due if I were going to find someone else."

Me: "I think you've misunderstood our professional relationship. I'm not your employee. I said no. It's not open for negotiation."

Him: "I'm sensing some tension. Let's talk about this some more when you've calmed down."

I told him: "Good luck with that." And I hung up. [I must have been calm, because I didn't tell him to shove his phone up his A$$.]

The true beauty of being FIRE'd: I don't need that guy's check to pay my bills.



;-0

You rock!

"Dear Sir,

In light of our last conversation, I thought this would be a good time to go over my billing policy.

I will continue to do your TAXES at the same rate as last year, although next year that fee will double.

I currently will accept phone calls for advice and other transactions at the hourly rate of $350 per, with a one hour minimum. To clarify, that means that if I pick up the phone = you owe me $350. Email reading/writing will continue to be $350 an hour. With a one hour minimum. One email = you owe me $350.

Since I have no idea how to submit the form you mentioned, I anticipate that there will be a studying/learning curve: this takes time away from the things I am supposed to be doing, so that will be $500  per hour for that portion.

And you are absolutely right that 'notice' should be given when terminating a financial relationship: please consider this to be 365 day notice. On this date next year, all the fees previously mentioned will double.

Thank you for your understanding. Before you call me, please re-read this document as calling/emailing will be costly, and these fees are non-negotiable, and effective immediately. CPA Cat"

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #614 on: September 09, 2015, 12:55:35 PM »
I just want to say, I love this thread.

LouisPritchard

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #615 on: September 09, 2015, 05:17:17 PM »
Well I just quit a $120K a year job after 6 years with the company. Claiming the local management treats the employees like shit would be an understatement. They've gone so far as to trespass on private hunting leases and threaten peoples jobs over it if they press charges. They started in on me for not coming in on my days off, pretending I didn't exist, canceling my vacations, some yelling and screaming and threatening my job, and petty crap like that. I told them a year ago I was going back to school to get the remaining classes I needed to sit the CPA exam, buying a house with cash, packing my stuff and moving across the country back home. All I heard was that I was full of shit and would never leave, cant give up that pension after all. I bought the house back in June and they just said it must be a rental property. So couple weeks ago I wrote a nice long resignation letter with all the crap they've been pulling along with dates and sent it to HR and walked out the door for good, a 2 week notice would have just amped up the harassment so I didn't bother. Had a nice exit interview, they wanted more details, sounds like HR will be paying them a visit to investigate. Starting my last couple of classes tomorrow, hope to get some work doing tax prep this season and take the CPA exam afterwards towards May/June. It's nice not having a mortgage or car notes.

surlygirl

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #616 on: September 09, 2015, 08:57:33 PM »
Lots of awesome stories.

I got my FU fund (or emergency fund) piled up a few years back, and sooo glad I had it.  I'd taken a new job that was 50 (yes, yes, I know...) miles away from home, but the pay was good and it got me out of a job that I'd had for far too long.  I had worked with my manager at a previous job, so I knew her style, she knew mine, and we worked well together.  She told me I could work from home, there would be some travel but not much, and that I'd be doing what I was good at - Business Analyst stuff. 

All of that went to plan until one day in a staff meeting, she announced that she had been promoted to Director of IT and that, among other management changes, I was the ERP Manager.  What the WHAT?  She hadn't asked me if that's what I wanted, just assumed that it would be OK, because who in their right mind would turn down a management position?  I didn't think I'd like it, but was willing to take a chance.  This shiny new title came with a (wait for it) 1% raise. Soon after, we all reported to a new person, the brother-in-law of the brand-new CEO (notice a trend?  High turnover in C/E/D/M levels?).  He was a micromanager to the highest degree and thought you were slacking if you only worked 8 hours. 

I suddenly couldn't work from home anymore. I was traveling almost 50% of the time. On top of having an hour+ commute each way, I was a single mom, the proud owner of an aging house, and was trying to keep a relationship with my boyfriend alive.  I'd put in my 8 hours in the office, then come home and try to juggle DS's homework, housework, laundry, and cooking, then off to work some more once kiddo was asleep.  Our new manager (we called him "Bill" behind his back, our nickname since he was the DBIL of the CEO) would yell if he sent you an email at 11pm and you hadn't responded by the time he woke up in the morning.  He would change deadlines at the last minute, would be ridiculously over-involved in little decisions, and drove everyone crazy.  On my family vacation, I ended up working over 40 hours in order to meet a deadline that had changed AFTER I left for the vacation.

I'd finally had enough.  My (now former) manager (who had quit shortly after "Bill" showed up on the scene) apologized to me for getting me into that situation and encouraged me to get a job I really wanted, not just one that came along.  I did, and she gave me a strong recommendation.  I had my FU fund, so I decided to take some time off between jobs and only gave one week's notice.  I handed in my resignation letter, and the panic began.  I received no less than 3 calls in 10 minutes from people frantic to find out why I was leaving.  I mentioned all of the indignities.  The HR rep that I spoke with got very quiet, and asked if I'd be willing to stay if "Bill" was no longer with the company.  It turns out they fired him 5 minutes BEFORE I handed in my resignation, but they weren't ready to make it public.  I wasn't the only one who had complained (or quit), and brother-in-law or not, they gave him the boot.  I told them no, but that I would be willing to stay the full two weeks instead of the one week I'd put in my resignation letter if they could include the week of missed vacation due to "Bill's" new deadlines in my final payout.  They did.

Even though I stayed on the full two weeks, I still had a two week break between jobs.  My new job only pays me monthly, and I started right at the end of the pay cycle, so I ended up going almost two months without any income to speak of.  I didn't have to touch my FU funds, even better, I was able to stretch that final payout to last me the full time, even with a mortgage and child support payments to make.  It was heaven.

RosieTR

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #617 on: September 09, 2015, 09:22:20 PM »
This isn't the greatest FU story, but here goes. My job had moved to Phoenix, AZ, a place that DH and I both wound up hating. Then at work a couple years in, my boss called an awful meeting in which he told the whole office we were all fired (not FIRE'd ha ha). I had to bite my lip to keep from grinning because all I was thinking after that was, "Woohoo!! Moving back to Colorado!!!!" Then about a week later, it was made clear we were supposed to each arrange to have individual meetings with boss for some sort of debriefing. He told me he hoped I would stay. I told him I wasn't spending another summer in Phoenix (this was like late summer/early fall, by the calendar, anyway). Being very motivated, it was super easy to save for the few months I took to find a job in CO. As it was, I did get a job in January and DH did a couple months after that. But we would have moved back in April even if no job had been forthcoming because we had at least a couple years of bare-bones expenses saved, outside of official tax-advantaged retirement plans.

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #618 on: September 10, 2015, 09:43:05 AM »
Lots of awesome stories.

I got my FU fund (or emergency fund) piled up a few years back, and sooo glad I had it.  I'd taken a new job that was 50 (yes, yes, I know...) miles away from home, but the pay was good and it got me out of a job that I'd had for far too long.  I had worked with my manager at a previous job, so I knew her style, she knew mine, and we worked well together.  She told me I could work from home, there would be some travel but not much, and that I'd be doing what I was good at - Business Analyst stuff. 

All of that went to plan until one day in a staff meeting, she announced that she had been promoted to Director of IT and that, among other management changes, I was the ERP Manager.  What the WHAT?  She hadn't asked me if that's what I wanted, just assumed that it would be OK, because who in their right mind would turn down a management position?  I didn't think I'd like it, but was willing to take a chance.  This shiny new title came with a (wait for it) 1% raise. Soon after, we all reported to a new person, the brother-in-law of the brand-new CEO (notice a trend?  High turnover in C/E/D/M levels?).  He was a micromanager to the highest degree and thought you were slacking if you only worked 8 hours. 

I suddenly couldn't work from home anymore. I was traveling almost 50% of the time. On top of having an hour+ commute each way, I was a single mom, the proud owner of an aging house, and was trying to keep a relationship with my boyfriend alive.  I'd put in my 8 hours in the office, then come home and try to juggle DS's homework, housework, laundry, and cooking, then off to work some more once kiddo was asleep.  Our new manager (we called him "Bill" behind his back, our nickname since he was the DBIL of the CEO) would yell if he sent you an email at 11pm and you hadn't responded by the time he woke up in the morning.  He would change deadlines at the last minute, would be ridiculously over-involved in little decisions, and drove everyone crazy.  On my family vacation, I ended up working over 40 hours in order to meet a deadline that had changed AFTER I left for the vacation.

I'd finally had enough.  My (now former) manager (who had quit shortly after "Bill" showed up on the scene) apologized to me for getting me into that situation and encouraged me to get a job I really wanted, not just one that came along.  I did, and she gave me a strong recommendation.  I had my FU fund, so I decided to take some time off between jobs and only gave one week's notice.  I handed in my resignation letter, and the panic began.  I received no less than 3 calls in 10 minutes from people frantic to find out why I was leaving.  I mentioned all of the indignities.  The HR rep that I spoke with got very quiet, and asked if I'd be willing to stay if "Bill" was no longer with the company.  It turns out they fired him 5 minutes BEFORE I handed in my resignation, but they weren't ready to make it public.  I wasn't the only one who had complained (or quit), and brother-in-law or not, they gave him the boot.  I told them no, but that I would be willing to stay the full two weeks instead of the one week I'd put in my resignation letter if they could include the week of missed vacation due to "Bill's" new deadlines in my final payout.  They did.

Even though I stayed on the full two weeks, I still had a two week break between jobs.  My new job only pays me monthly, and I started right at the end of the pay cycle, so I ended up going almost two months without any income to speak of.  I didn't have to touch my FU funds, even better, I was able to stretch that final payout to last me the full time, even with a mortgage and child support payments to make.  It was heaven.
This one is sweet!

Urchina

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #619 on: September 11, 2015, 01:25:23 AM »
While in grad school (financed through work and a scholarship), I was asked to come on as a full-time research project coordinator at the research hospital/medical school where I was employed, doing a job very close to what I thought was my dream job. I jumped at the chance, put my grad career on hold (it had a 7-year ticking clock, so not really on hold...) and moved a couple of hours away to work full-time.

Fast-forward 10 months later and I hate the job so much and am so stressed by two of my three supervisors (yes, I had three bosses -- one of many problems with this job) that I'm vomiting with anxiety every morning before work. I want to go back to grad school but don't see a clear path back financially. To ease the stress, I hit the gym every day after work, then ride the bus home and hop off a couple of stops early to browse the stacks at my favorite used/new/independent bookstore, which was huge enough to function as a library. While there, I happen to pick up a used copy of The Complete Tightwad Gazette by Amy Dacyczyn and figure what the hell. I pay $12 for it and take it home and read the whole thing that night. The frugality light that I've always had gets a high-beam setting from this book. I make a plan.

The next morning I get up, get ready for work, vomit from anxiety, and head out the door. That night I find a new, waaaay cheaper place to live, figure out the bus commute (I rarely drove in that city because public transit was so great) and give up the lease on my trendy little apartment. I move two weeks later and proceed to stash every single last damn dime. I have fun with friends while I'm doing it, but I focus on savings first. This drives my roommates (party girls) nuts, but it turns out they only have to put up with me for another six months because in that time I save about 75% of my salary and have $10,000 in the bank, which is enough to finance the last year of my graduate education. I contact my program and get back in, plus they give me a paying TA position a term early so I can quit my job... in two weeks!

The next day, after I have received and accepted the e-mail offer of employment from my university, I write my resignation letter, have my morning anxiety puke, go in to work, and make an appointment with the most difficult of my three bosses. He is demanding, critical, mercurial, and harsh. He's a terrible boss for me and did not bring out my best achievements. I go in, sit down, and when he waves at me to begin I thank him for the opportunity to work with his team, and it's taught me unbelievably valuable life lessons, etc., etc. Then I tell him I've been offered a TA position at my graduate program, have accepted, and am leaving in two weeks.

For the first time ever in 18 months I have his complete and undivided attention. He is not pleased, but what can he say? I'm going back to grad school. I hand him my resignation letter and two weeks later I am out that door.

Over the next year or so, three of the collaborative scientists on that research project summarily quit the project. Turns out, they didn't like the job, either. One of them later told me they realized that if the grad student (read: academic slave) could claim her freedom, the rest of them could, too.

I graduated two years later with no debt and an incredibly strong sense of what type of work environment does NOT work for me. The unbelievably valuable life lesson learned? Life is too short to stay in a job that makes you puke from anxiety every morning. That's wasn't FU money. That was Freedom Cash.

nancyjnelson

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #620 on: September 11, 2015, 01:39:13 PM »
One of them later told me they realized that if the grad student (read: academic slave) could claim her freedom, the rest of them could, too.

Beautiful.

AerynLee

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #621 on: September 11, 2015, 02:41:13 PM »
Mine's not as epic as it should have been but I'm putting it here to follow this thread.

A few years ago I had just finished my Masters in Accounting and was working on the CPA exam. I was only taking on temp jobs so I could focus on the studying. One was about to end so I told the temp agencies I was working with that I'd be ready for another one soon. One of them got me a job without an interview (red flag anyone?) for a locally well known company. The way it was described was well below my abilities but they could possibly utilize me to work on some new projects. Since it was a temp job I wasn't worried about being underemployed. They wanted me to start right away...even before my old one ended and would move on to the next candidate if I couldn't (second red flag). I manage to get two days (they called me Friday evening and I put off starting until Wednesday) and worked two 10+ hour days to finish up the old project.

So I come into the first day of work and talk with my supervisor at the company. She said she had expressed concern to her contact at the temp agency (a person I had never talked to) about me being way overqualified but was assured that I "wanted the job no matter what" (third red flag). Hindsight I wish I had told her that I most certainly did not say that but I needed at least some income since we were not in the best financial position at the time.

My job ends up being even less than data entry. I literally pulled up A/P info in their system, made sure it had all relevant fields entered and hit "okay" to send it through. I don't remember what I was supposed to do if it wasn't complete but it certainly wasn't fill it in since I didn't have copies of the invoices. I almost didn't even come back after lunch but since they treated me (and the entire team) to lunch at a restaurant across the street I figured I should give them a shot. I managed to finish out the day but on my way home called the temp agency and said I wasn't going back. After pleading with me to give it a week he starts yelling at me about how unprofessional it was to not give notice (remember they wanted me to quit my last temp position with no notice...) and neither he nor the agency will ever work with me again.

I drove to the big box tax prep company I was working very part time for at the time and told them I could work more hours that season and ended up averaging close to what that job would have paid me an hour (though less hours) and have ever since told everyone it was relevant to to NOT use that agency. If I'd had a way to contact the supervisor for the company I would have told her that they flat out lied to her about me (as well as the other way around).

Oh, and something I had forgotten at first was that the way I first got in contact with this company was the guy called on my work number (which I did not give out at that job) saying "someone" had recommended me to him but he couldn't tell me who, that should have been the very first red flag.

This probably happened in late January/ early February and I got my current awesome job in April and passed the final CPA exam in August.

Faraday

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #622 on: September 11, 2015, 05:24:05 PM »
I graduated two years later with no debt and an incredibly strong sense of what type of work environment does NOT work for me. The unbelievably valuable life lesson learned? Life is too short to stay in a job that makes you puke from anxiety every morning. That's wasn't FU money. That was Freedom Cash.

That's one hell of an awesome story.
FIRE in 2020.

FrugalWad

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #623 on: September 11, 2015, 08:33:56 PM »
I stopped in at a national motorcycle gear retailer, and the manager was impressed with my knowledge of manufacturer quality and general safety. He offered me a job on the spot. I was well into FU and FI status, but figured it'd be fun BSing all day with the close-knit community of riders. I didn't think much of it, until I got a call for the first round of interviews. They wanted it done immediately, but I was in the middle of something and asked for an hour. The job was close. The first round of interviews go great, until at the end I find out the job I applied for isn't the one I'll be getting. I debate saying well, when the job I want opens up, let me know, but on a whim I say screw it, I'll see what it's like as a salesman instead of a merchandiser.

Round two of the interviews, and I'm with the district manager. I explain to him I'll be happy to work there if I'm not micromanaged, if customer service is top priority over sales, and that the company treats their employees like people. I'm promised up and down that everything is awesome.

I start my first day. It's supposed to be a week of training behind closed doors, but after the second day I'm thrown into the fold. It's retail, so the learning curve isn't steep. I spend two glorious weeks chatting it up with every biker who comes in with an interesting story, make 140% of whatever my sales are supposed to be, and have a blast with the people I work with. Everything is still awesome.

Third week rolls around. Old manager is fired, a new manager-in-training (MIT)is brought up, along with a more seasoned manager (MSM) who's supposed to be showing him the ropes. MSM's idea of manager-employee relations is asking such skill-building questions as, what's your favorite color? Quality leadership right there, right?

Micromanaging from MIT begins immediately. I refuse to upsell the crap they're trying to unload on people that's always front and center on the checkout counters. The people who want them will see them and buy them. The people who don't won't, and I'm not going to try to sucker people into buying things when their wallets are out because corporate feels they're more susceptible to buying crap at that point. So in the middle of a transaction MIT steps between me and the register while reaching across from me to grab whatever trinket's on sale and tells me to try and sell it. Strike one.

One guy and his wife comes in, they had a flat or blow out or something, so they're stranded in the parking lot. I get them a tire and let them borrow tools to fix it. MIT says because of insurance reasons no one can do any maintenance in the parking lot. I ignore him. Bikers don't leave bikers stranded when they can help; the good ones don't, anyway. Another guy comes in at some point and wants to see how a bike stand works. Super fancy thing, top of the line on the market in terms of quality. My personal favorite; I've got a pair in my garage. I'm too happy to show him, because I believe in buying quality once so that you BIFL. I need an adjustable wrench to show him, so I go grab one. MIT doesn't ask what it's for, first thing out of his mouth is we don't lend tools.

My eval comes up, and either it's corporate policy or MSM tells him that no matter how good someone is, they should get the lowest score possible on one eval criteria. Mine was presentation, which means I was poor at explaining to a customer how a product worked. No one in that store knew how anything worked better than I did. I had to show them all the proper way of sizing helmets, for crying out loud. And MIT's surprised when he pulls up my sales and sees I'm still cruising at 140% over quota. At this point, we're reached strikes two through screw this 'tard.

In the meantime, I also have a job as a consultant making about one forty times an hour what I am there. It means meetings and such at times when needed, but not within the hours I'm at the store. I've told them this at the store; they have me from such-a-such time on these days, that's it. Okay, they say. Well, once a month at the store, it's time for everyone to come in late after hours and re-organize displays for new sales. Only MIT also wants everyone to also give a presentation about their favorite item in the store. I say first, that's stupid; that's eating away valuable time it takes to get the store set up. I say second, I probably can't make it anyway, I have a meeting at my other job, and it's outside the hours I said I'd be available. I let the assistant manager know. I let the MSM know. MIT isn't there the two days prior, but I'm not too worried about him not finding out because I just told two other managers.

But apparently communication isn't taught to managers here, because the next day rolls around and it turns out to be a beautiful day in the FUhood. Because of the stupid show and tell tap dance MIT wanted, the store didn't get done, so everyone's scrambling to get that fixed while people are wandering the store. MIT is finally there. I work the day, and at the end MIT asks to come to the back office for a chat.

He gives me a spiel about the importance of teamwork and if I don't show up again without any notice, he'll consider firing me. Then he slips out a written notice of reprimand. I told him I'm not signing it and list my grievances. Goes in one ear and straight out the other. I take my employee shirt off on the spot, toss it on the desk, and tell him I quit. I lasted at that job three weeks. I spent longer waiting for the job interview and corporate to process my resume and do a background check than I spent on the actual job.

Six months later the store was closed down.
Just a big nerd on a little budget over at http://www.frugalwad.com

Spiffsome

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #624 on: September 12, 2015, 02:06:11 AM »
I can't talk about the circumstances right now, but things at my workplace are bad enough that I'm thinking of my FU money and paid-off mortgage with a warm and happy glow.

Jack

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #625 on: September 12, 2015, 07:05:28 AM »
The world is full of incompetent crazy people who get hired into management positions. How the hell that happens, I just don't know.

Because most of the sane people either:

1)  Don't want the management jobs in the first place and refuse to be promoted into them; or
2)  Quickly learn how horrible they are and move back to being a primary contributor as soon as they can; or
3)  Go insane themselves; or
4)  Die from overwork.

It's the Peter Principle in action: competent people keep getting promoted until they stop being competent. Then, instead of being demoted again (like they should be), they stay in their incompetent role.

But what's really terrible are the implications: since the principle applies to all employees, eventually every position would be occupied by an incompetent!

I get so sick the first two weeks I'm there that I collapse and am rushed to the emergency room.

...

In the middle of June one day I get so stressed out that I basically have a complete meltdown at work. I go to my boss, begging for help where I'm told I'm just 'not working hard enough.' I walked out of her office, went in the bathroom and cried for an hour.

...

I begin to cope by literally dropping every task that someone is not asking me for right at that moment, but I'm enough of a stickler that the undone tasks are stressing me out.

I just don't understand this kind of thing. Admittedly, I've somehow been lucky enough never to have a job with that kind of unreasonable workload, but still, I see no reason to get stressed out about it. Be like Peter from Office Space, and just stop caring about the bullshit!

If somebody asks you to get something done, tell them you'll add it to your queue and it'll get done after you've finished the stuff you're already working on. If somebody wants you to work unpaid overtime or come in on your day off, simply tell them you're not doing that. If somebody complains that you're not working fast enough, tell them "too bad." Remember, they're already understaffed -- if they don't like it, what are they going to do? Fire you and thereby screw themselves over harder?! And even if they did, who cares since the alternative would be for you to quit anyway!

Standing up for yourself from the beginning by setting appropriate boundaries and expectations means you never reach an epic "FU, I quit" situation in the first place.

Pooperman

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #626 on: September 12, 2015, 09:56:42 AM »
Standing up for yourself from the beginning by setting appropriate boundaries and expectations means you never reach an epic "FU, I quit" situation in the first place.

 +1

This exactly. If you're not willing to set boundaries, expect to be pushed until you set them. Sometimes it will mean getting fired, but if you got fired because they have unrealistic expectations, fuck 'em.

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #627 on: September 12, 2015, 08:58:33 PM »
One of them later told me they realized that if the grad student (read: academic slave) could claim her freedom, the rest of them could, too.

Beautiful.

+1

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #628 on: September 12, 2015, 09:08:10 PM »
Standing up for yourself from the beginning by setting appropriate boundaries and expectations means you never reach an epic "FU, I quit" situation in the first place.

 +1

This exactly. If you're not willing to set boundaries, expect to be pushed until you set them. Sometimes it will mean getting fired, but if you got fired because they have unrealistic expectations, fuck 'em.
I don't know, personally, for me, they seem to sneak up on you.  Gradually they give you more work.  And you have "stretch goals".  Until one day, ALL your goals are "stretch goals" and they are impossible. It's like they get used to how much you can do, then push you little by little until you break.  I was pretty good at the push back when I was younger, and as I got older, I just would do what I wanted.

I had a position a couple of years ago where I was managing people, and some of them worked nights.  I was working 32 hours a week at the time.  Through a lot of thought, I agreed to go full time, and negotiated a schedule change with my spouse so that I could overlap with the night guys 2 days a week.  Not 10 days after I made the switch, they laid off my entire fucking group.

And not even just that, but as we were walking out of the after-meeting where they discussed the sad reasons for the layoff and how they needed everyone to give "120%!", the company President (whom I'd known for years and worked for at a prior company), said "well, now that you are full time, you can work and give us 120%!"

Fuck you.  I mean, my last layoff hadn't even happened yet, the guy was in the meeting!  (He was the night guy.)  I said "oh, silly, you were already getting 100% when I was at 32 hours, so by definition you'll be getting it!"  My spouse told me that it was probably a poor career move (and he was right), but fuck that.  Asshole. 

Anyway, that's how it happens.

jlajr

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #629 on: September 13, 2015, 03:01:48 AM »
Standing up for yourself from the beginning by setting appropriate boundaries and expectations means you never reach an epic "FU, I quit" situation in the first place.

Amen.

Earlier this year, three people from my technical writing team of 14 were laid off, including the manager, who was a member of the team for almost 25 years and remained a productive writer in her own right; and the two people responsible for a product line (including one who had worked on that product line for 29 years) - despite the company's "single-point-of-failure" initiative.

The new manager and his manager - who has no other functional responsibilities - are not technical writers and have little experience managing technical writing teams or projects. Therefore, they asked a bunch of us to be "coordinators", that is, assume responsibilities and perform tasks the manager and these other experienced writers had assumed and performed. (A brilliant cost-cutting move: The company is now paying a Senior Manager and Director to have less responsibility and do less work than the Manager they laid off.)

As my current position is three or four grades below that level, I informed my manager that I will happily accept these product line-wide and other responsibilities if they change my title and increase my salary significantly. Not surprisingly, he said the company would not do it. Fine, no problem. I was happy to accept my position, for which I'm overqualified, only about a year and a half ago, and I'm happy to continue in that capacity.

Two weeks later, though, they announced that I have been assigned to be a coordinator. They left it up to me to make it clear to my co-coordinator, a much higher-grade writer and a former manager with a couple of decades of experience on the team, that I won't be assuming these responsibilities, which leaves her with them. Also fine.

I also "damaged my image" again not too long ago by refusing to mentor or supervise an incompetent colleague that had been assigned to work with us. At the end of that discussion, my manager asked me if I wanted him to inform the others that I'm no longer a "coordinator". "Sure", I said. Please, demote me after you asked me assume Manager-level responsibilities but refused to promote me to the grade three levels below Manager...

Finally, they hired about a month and a half ago someone with less experience as a technical writer than myself at a grade higher than mine. At the same time they laid off the manager and those writers (who were based in the US, where they cost more), they also opened up three experienced positions on the team in my less-expensive office. Two of those positions are the grade above me. That is, even with open positions at the grade above, they refused to promote me when they asked me to assume those higher-level responsibilities.

So, with some FU money, I have strongly felt the urge to resign before finding another job.

I presume in a month or two we will be told that a colleague has been promoted to a grade higher than myself. She's now at the same grade as me but with a few years less experience as a technical writer. She was also assigned to be a coordinator, but she accepted the responsibilities. Hey, I don't blame her.

Maybe I'll tell them to fuck off at that point.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2015, 03:03:58 AM by jlajr »

jlajr

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #630 on: September 13, 2015, 04:07:11 AM »
Sold the nursery and property in SoCal and moved back to Washington to try semi retirement. After starting another nursery to feed my Farmers Market habit it was getting into fall so nothing to do out in the greenhouses.
 I was driving by a Fred Meyer (Kroger) distribution center and they had the normal sign out for help wanted so I decided I'd try it for the holiday season...

Awesome story, ghsebldr.

Reminds me a little of the black jelly bean theory of economics someone mentioned in a comment to a MMM post (http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/ask-a-mustachian/what-are-your-'black-jelly-beans'/).

You can make a decent amount of money doing things most others don't want to do.

Wilson Hall

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #631 on: September 13, 2015, 07:03:30 AM »
Standing up for yourself from the beginning by setting appropriate boundaries and expectations means you never reach an epic "FU, I quit" situation in the first place.

 +1

This exactly. If you're not willing to set boundaries, expect to be pushed until you set them. Sometimes it will mean getting fired, but if you got fired because they have unrealistic expectations, fuck 'em.
I don't know, personally, for me, they seem to sneak up on you.  Gradually they give you more work.  And you have "stretch goals".  Until one day, ALL your goals are "stretch goals" and they are impossible. It's like they get used to how much you can do, then push you little by little until you break.  I was pretty good at the push back when I was younger, and as I got older, I just would do what I wanted.

I had a position a couple of years ago where I was managing people, and some of them worked nights.  I was working 32 hours a week at the time.  Through a lot of thought, I agreed to go full time, and negotiated a schedule change with my spouse so that I could overlap with the night guys 2 days a week.  Not 10 days after I made the switch, they laid off my entire fucking group.

And not even just that, but as we were walking out of the after-meeting where they discussed the sad reasons for the layoff and how they needed everyone to give "120%!", the company President (whom I'd known for years and worked for at a prior company), said "well, now that you are full time, you can work and give us 120%!"

Fuck you.  I mean, my last layoff hadn't even happened yet, the guy was in the meeting!  (He was the night guy.)  I said "oh, silly, you were already getting 100% when I was at 32 hours, so by definition you'll be getting it!"  My spouse told me that it was probably a poor career move (and he was right), but fuck that.  Asshole. 

Anyway, that's how it happens.

This sounds like something that happened to a friend of mine years ago. The two supervisors above her had their positions eliminated and she was told she would be doing their jobs as well as hers. She said fine, and asked for a small (less than $5k) raise for taking on the additional responsibilities. They said no. Friend says ok, here's my two-week notice. The employer was flabbergasted, as was I. Friend was married with two young children and a fair amount of debt; at the time it seemed like a risky move. Within a few months, though, she had landed a job making almost $30k more than the previous one.

I did a mini-FU move about ten years ago. My employer had been doing to me what you described above, adding more and more work even though I could barely keep up. I wasn't complaining, which meant, in their minds, that everything was just fine and dandy. By the time I had been there a year, the place had been re-orged and the turnover was up to about one third of the staff. My original job description no longer matched what I was doing day to day. The final straw came when I asked for a couple weeks off for a vacation, and the next day I was called into a meeting in which I was told I needed to put in more hours to get all the ever-increasing duties of my job done. Went home, talked to the husband, who told me I should quit if I wanted. I did just that, and nine months later ended up in a job that was much better suited to my disposition. Almost ten years later I'm still there. In anticipation of some major management changes next year, I am rebuilding the FU fund just in case.

cavewoman

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #632 on: September 13, 2015, 11:50:14 AM »
Posting so these inspirational stories show up in my new replies

markbike528CBX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #633 on: September 13, 2015, 03:29:49 PM »
Pre-FU

The consensus in the office is that the office lifetime is short.
 FU money givs me the peace-of-mind that I can't be forced to go to hell (headquarters, 2000 miles away).

ender

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #634 on: September 13, 2015, 03:41:27 PM »
I don't know, personally, for me, they seem to sneak up on you.  Gradually they give you more work.  And you have "stretch goals".  Until one day, ALL your goals are "stretch goals" and they are impossible. It's like they get used to how much you can do, then push you little by little until you break.  I was pretty good at the push back when I was younger, and as I got older, I just would do what I wanted.

I was fortunate that when I first started doing these sorts of goals, my first manager who I really worked with basically forced me to set the goals lower than I wanted.

Hindsight being 20-20 it's one of the best career things that happened to me. Setting the "official bar" low means I am free to do all the things that actually add value to the company (and me) instead of playing dumb games.

nawhite

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #635 on: September 14, 2015, 10:02:18 PM »
Some of the Golden handcuff talk got me thinking about one time I left a job 2 weeks short of vesting 9k in 401k match. I had been working a job I really liked with a fantastic team but because our team was so far ahead of schedule compared to the rest of the project, I was asked to do some much less fun stuff for a manager I didn't like as much for 6 months. 6 months came and went and it looked like the new role was going to be extended for another year minimum and likely become permanent. So I started looking and found a new job paying 25k more than I was making doing stuff I'd enjoy with a commute I can do via 20 min on a train instead of 15 miles by car.

I told my immediate manager first who's comment was "you gotta be f-ing kidding me." I offered to stick it out for 6 weeks (very long lead times for hiring defense contractors due to the clearance process so I was trying to be nice) but they realized that if they said I had to leave in 2 weeks then I'd miss 3 years of vesting in my 401k which was worth over 9k and "no one would walk away from 9k, he'll have to stay with us for a while longer". That logic made no sense to me and I was so done with it all at that point I said "just watch me."

It worked out pretty darn well for me too, the new job gave me an additional $5k raise within 6 months and I realized that I could maximize the ESPP program at the new job for another $10k/year risk free on top of my salary (discussing the epic-ly awesome ESPP program with my co-workers definitely deserves a post in the overheard at work thread now that I think about it)
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Liberty Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #636 on: September 15, 2015, 07:26:03 AM »
... but they realized that if they said I had to leave in 2 weeks then I'd miss 3 years of vesting in my 401k which was worth over 9k and "no one would walk away from 9k, he'll have to stay with us for a while longer"...

nawhite, that's awesome that you were able to walk away without any issues. I'm with you though, I don't understand their logic. We're they expecting that the need to stay few extra weeks to vest would translate to you having to pass on the new job, thereby forcing you to stay at the company for another 6-12 months? That's pretty weak/convoluted at best.
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AZDude

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #637 on: September 15, 2015, 11:31:26 AM »
Loved reading these. Some really great stuff.

Way back in the day, I was having a tough time finding a job, and was working about 30 hours a week doing tech support for slightly more than minimum wage. I was desperate for something higher paying, but found little and so I end up taking another P/T job doing tech support. Well, it was supposed to be part time. After about three days into the two week training, they have a major emergency and suddenly I am on the phones doing support full time, 40+ hours a week, although I am still getting P/T pay.

This goes on for about a month, and I am working 70+ hours a week between the jobs. One job literally ends at 4, the other literally starts at 4, so to say I am doing a juggling act puts it mildly. At this time I go my PoS boss and ask him if I am going to be working full time going forward. He informs that they are understaffed as it is and that yes, there is no way I will be working part time hours. Great, I say, and then I ask if that means I will get bumped to the full time wage. He says yes, but that it might take a few weeks to a month to get the paperwork through. No problem, I tell him, and I gleefully inform my other P/T job that I am resigning.

At this point, even making low wages, at 70+ hours a week for almost two months, I have, for the first time in my life, a decent cash reserve, and I'm dancing in to work because I feel like my financial problems are over. I keep working there for about two months, no raise yet, and I start bugging the boss. He keeps saying the raise is coming and to just be cool. In the meantime I do everything asked of me. I come in early. I take a "lunch" at 2PM so I can handle the extra load when everyone else leaves for a more normal lunch. I stay late on calls even when my co-workers are hanging up on customers because its the end of their shift.

Then one day, I ask my boss again about when I am officially moved to F/T. He tells me "that is not going to happen" and that he is sorry. I ask why, and he blames upper management and some reorganization, but that my hours are not in jeopardy. I flip the fuck out, and call him a corporate lackey, among other things, but somehow I don't get fired. I start coming in late every day. One day the boss asks me to change my schedule to come in at 6AM. I say no. He tells me its not negotiable, I say tough and come in at 8 the next day. I still do not get fired.

My boss asks me one day to do a special project for the company, and I say no, that its not my job. If he wants it done, it will cost him $X.XX dollars per hour more. He is not amused, but unfortunately, I do not get fired since they are super busy and understaffed.

Months go by. My boss stops talking to me, ever, unless it is to criticize me for coming in late. Finally, the reorganization is complete, and a new "co-manager" is appointed to our group. He comes to introduce himself to everyone. He gets to me and we talk about the poor treatment I have received from his company. He apologizes and says he will get it fixed. A couple weeks later I am given a raise that is about 50% of what it should be. My boss and the new co-manager act like they are giving their puppy a dog treat. Two weeks later I land a development job, and start my career in that field.

When I tell my boss, he just nods and says "if you are not here the full two weeks, you will not be eligible for rehire" and turns back around. To say our relationship is toxic at this point is an understatement. A team building activity gets scheduled for my last day, and my co-workers use as it as going-away party. My boss does not show up.

Not sure if that story qualifies, and I would really like to say I learned my lesson at that time about the power of FU money, but sadly it would still be several years before I got my shit together.






mtn

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #638 on: September 15, 2015, 11:46:25 AM »
Some of the Golden handcuff talk got me thinking about one time I left a job 2 weeks short of vesting 9k in 401k match. I had been working a job I really liked with a fantastic team but because our team was so far ahead of schedule compared to the rest of the project, I was asked to do some much less fun stuff for a manager I didn't like as much for 6 months. 6 months came and went and it looked like the new role was going to be extended for another year minimum and likely become permanent. So I started looking and found a new job paying 25k more than I was making doing stuff I'd enjoy with a commute I can do via 20 min on a train instead of 15 miles by car.

I told my immediate manager first who's comment was "you gotta be f-ing kidding me." I offered to stick it out for 6 weeks (very long lead times for hiring defense contractors due to the clearance process so I was trying to be nice) but they realized that if they said I had to leave in 2 weeks then I'd miss 3 years of vesting in my 401k which was worth over 9k and "no one would walk away from 9k, he'll have to stay with us for a while longer". That logic made no sense to me and I was so done with it all at that point I said "just watch me."

It worked out pretty darn well for me too, the new job gave me an additional $5k raise within 6 months and I realized that I could maximize the ESPP program at the new job for another $10k/year risk free on top of my salary (discussing the epic-ly awesome ESPP program with my co-workers definitely deserves a post in the overheard at work thread now that I think about it)

Admirable that you're able to do that, but I can't comprehend turning down the $9k! Only two more weeks? Why not work it? They're logic made no sense either, obviously, since you gave 6 weeks--I'd either figure they'd say "Great, thanks for the 6 weeks notice" or "Pack your things and go now".  If it was 8 weeks away from the $9k, or if you needed to start the new job ASAP, sure, I understand... But both parties on this are confusing to me. Definitely wouldn't call that golden handcuffs, or even "One more year" syndrome.

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #639 on: September 15, 2015, 08:29:37 PM »
Then one day, I ask my boss again about when I am officially moved to F/T. He tells me "that is not going to happen" and that he is sorry. I ask why, and he blames upper management and some reorganization, but that my hours are not in jeopardy. I flip the fuck out, and call him a corporate lackey, among other things, but somehow I don't get fired. I start coming in late every day. One day the boss asks me to change my schedule to come in at 6AM. I say no. He tells me its not negotiable, I say tough and come in at 8 the next day. I still do not get fired.

My boss asks me one day to do a special project for the company, and I say no, that its not my job. If he wants it done, it will cost him $X.XX dollars per hour more. He is not amused, but unfortunately, I do not get fired since they are super busy and understaffed.

Oh, even though you didn't quit right away, your story still qualifies in my book. Love that you ignored his demands about the earlier starting time.

Having some money in the bank is very empowering, no doubt about it.

Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #640 on: September 16, 2015, 08:23:23 PM »
Anyone see the FU story told in front of an international audience? 33 year old US Open women's tennis winner Flavia Pennetta retires right after accepting the winning trophy and on international TV! Well, she didn't really say FU, but it was a grand retirement speech.

Audio on retiring starts around 1:30:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1Lol_lkdto

An article describing her thoughts on retiring:
http://news.yahoo.com/flavia-pennetta-wins-us-open-title-210147552--ten.html;_ylt=A0LEV7kHH_pV0wsAV4MnnIlQ;_ylu=X3oDMTEzcnMxdjY1BGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwM4BHZ0aWQDRkZSQTAxXzEEc2VjA3Ny

Excerpts:
"With this winning today, my life is perfect," Pennetta said.
"I don't know what I like to do, so I have to discover everything," she said. "It's a new life for me.
"Sometimes we are more scared to take the decision because we don't know what we like or what we're going to do after, how is going to be the life.
"But I think it's going to be a pretty good life. I did everything that I expected.
"And more. Much more."

BackNColo

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #641 on: September 17, 2015, 08:22:31 AM »
I have 2 sort of FU stories. The first happened when I was in high school. I was working at the local movie theater.  I was the assistant manager and the manager was an OK person. She knew that I had enlisted in the military, but wouldn't leave for 9 months. She scheduled me for Thanksgiving, my birthday, Christmas, and Christmas eve.  I asked her to reconsider. When she didn't I quit. I waited till after the holidays and then got a job at a big box lumber store.

While in the military, an instructed stopped class to tell how much he loved the Navy. He wanted to retire form it. He said," Not everyone will like the Navy as much as me. Save some money or you will be trapped here. It isn't good for you or the Navy." I don't know why he brought this up, but it struck a cord with me and I started saving. Fast forward 6 years. I sold ~60 days vacation back to the Navy, and was on a 30 day terminal leave ( you sign your paperwork and go away, you keep getting paid and have insurance... you get the hint).

I snagged a job right away, while on vacation. It was a strange family owned veterinary medical company. The equipment came in covered in pig/cow/horse feces. I had to troubleshoot the electronics while being conscious of the poo. The company seemed a bit doomed, low tech, but it was a job. The real problem for me was the chain smoking secretaries/wives of the owners). I would shut the door to their area to keep the smoke out of my area. They would immediately open it. Repeat.
 I had been there for 2 weeks when a previously submitted resume landed me a better job, for more money at a different company. I handed in my 5 minutes notice and walked. They wanted 2 weeks... The best [art was I don't even need to list it on a resume, since I was still employed by the Navy.
 

force majeure

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #642 on: September 18, 2015, 05:16:23 AM »
A guy I worked with, was in the firm for 10 years. He wore the same sweater everyday, always brought in his lunch and just did his job, never spoke to anyone voluntarily. He left the firm this summer aged 35 and someone heard he was living in Bali. That sounds like a plan, there's tons of beachs that nobody goes to, you can rent for $200 a month near Ubud. I would be nervous in a pace like that, like to keep my head on my shoulders, and dont like wearing an orange jumpsuit. Anyway, we heard he was now teaching English and living near the beach, and that he had about 1M in index funds stashed away. Yes, he worked in technology. Hey, its always the IT guys!
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Shane

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #643 on: September 18, 2015, 06:35:19 PM »
A guy I worked with, was in the firm for 10 years. He wore the same sweater everyday, always brought in his lunch and just did his job, never spoke to anyone voluntarily. He left the firm this summer aged 35 and someone heard he was living in Bali. That sounds like a plan, there's tons of beachs that nobody goes to, you can rent for $200 a month near Ubud. I would be nervous in a pace like that, like to keep my head on my shoulders, and dont like wearing an orange jumpsuit. Anyway, we heard he was now teaching English and living near the beach, and that he had about 1M in index funds stashed away. Yes, he worked in technology. Hey, its always the IT guys!

Maybe he's here on this forum...

Kriegsspiel

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #644 on: September 18, 2015, 07:10:57 PM »
Anyone see the FU story told in front of an international audience? 33 year old US Open women's tennis winner Flavia Pennetta retires right after accepting the winning trophy and on international TV! Well, she didn't really say FU, but it was a grand retirement speech.

Audio on retiring starts around 1:30:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1Lol_lkdto

An article describing her thoughts on retiring:
http://news.yahoo.com/flavia-pennetta-wins-us-open-title-210147552--ten.html;_ylt=A0LEV7kHH_pV0wsAV4MnnIlQ;_ylu=X3oDMTEzcnMxdjY1BGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwM4BHZ0aWQDRkZSQTAxXzEEc2VjA3Ny

Excerpts:
"With this winning today, my life is perfect," Pennetta said.
"I don't know what I like to do, so I have to discover everything," she said. "It's a new life for me.
"Sometimes we are more scared to take the decision because we don't know what we like or what we're going to do after, how is going to be the life.
"But I think it's going to be a pretty good life. I did everything that I expected.
"And more. Much more."

This is a good link for her interview, starts at 2:00. It sounds like she just got worn down, "Sometimes it's getting hard for me to compete. This is the important point: when you're on the court, and you have to play 24 weeks a year, you have to fight every week. And if you don't fight every week like I fought today, it's going to be bad.... and I don't feel like I have this power anymore."

golfreak12

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #645 on: September 18, 2015, 08:56:10 PM »
A guy I worked with, was in the firm for 10 years. He wore the same sweater everyday, always brought in his lunch and just did his job, never spoke to anyone voluntarily. He left the firm this summer aged 35 and someone heard he was living in Bali. That sounds like a plan, there's tons of beachs that nobody goes to, you can rent for $200 a month near Ubud. I would be nervous in a pace like that, like to keep my head on my shoulders, and dont like wearing an orange jumpsuit. Anyway, we heard he was now teaching English and living near the beach, and that he had about 1M in index funds stashed away. Yes, he worked in technology. Hey, its always the IT guys!

We went to Bali for our honeymoon.
People there were very friendly and I never felt at any time that I was unsafe.
Of course again, I was probably in a touristy area and doesn't know better.

Gyosho

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #646 on: September 19, 2015, 09:42:51 PM »
FU money is the greatest! As a previous post says, they can't MAKE you do anything at work, especially when you can leave at any time.

We had an "emergency" one weekend at work and my boss freaked out and started texting me at midnight on a Friday night! I was NOT ON CALL that weekend so I just turned off my phone. He later texted a mutual acquaintance and asked her to track me down! She started leaving me voice mail as well. (WTF?) I ignored both of them until the next afternoon, when I was READY to take the time to get back to him.

And I felt fine doing this because with my FU money I can leave at any time. They need me more than I need them (obviously!)

In the meantime, manager finally realized I was "not available" and got the scheduled on call person to deal with the emergency. By the time I answered him the emergency was mostly resolved and they didn't really need me.

Why was he calling me in the first place? I don't know. Narcissistic entitlement?

Someone once gave me a very useful mantra for these situations - "Don't make your problem my problem."

badger1988

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #647 on: September 20, 2015, 08:53:26 PM »
Watching football tonight, and got to thinking...Barry Sanders' retirement was an epic FU money story. Arguably the best running back ever to play in the NFL, and he retired in his prime because he couldn't stand to play another year for the Lions, and they refused to let him go to a different team:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barry_Sanders

"Averaging over 1,500 rushing yards per season, Sanders left the game just 1,457 yards short of being first place on the list for the NFL all-time rushing record at that time."

"He left football healthy, having gained 15,269 rushing yards, 2,921 receiving yards, and 109 touchdowns (99 rushing and 10 receiving). He retired within striking distance of Walter Payton's career rushing mark of 16,726 yards."

"Sanders' retirement came somewhat unexpectedly and was a matter of controversy. Two years earlier, Sanders had renewed his contract with the Lions for $35.4 million over six years with an $11 million signing bonus. The Lions demanded that he return $5.5 million of the bonus. Sanders refused, and the Lions sued. On February 15, 2000, an arbitrator ruled that Sanders had to immediately repay $1.833 million (a sixth of the bonus), with the remaining bonus to be repaid over each of the three years Sanders had left on the contract provided he stayed retired. Before the ruling, Sanders offered to pay back the entire $5.5 million in return for his release from the team."

"Several years after retirement, with repeated refusals to discuss the abruptness of it, Sanders finally admitted that the culture of losing in the Lions' organization was too much to deal with, even though he said that he could still play and that Detroit had made the playoffs in five of his ten seasons."

plainjane

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #648 on: September 21, 2015, 05:48:56 AM »
Standing up for yourself from the beginning by setting appropriate boundaries and expectations means you never reach an epic "FU, I quit" situation in the first place.
This exactly. If you're not willing to set boundaries, expect to be pushed until you set them. Sometimes it will mean getting fired, but if you got fired because they have unrealistic expectations, fuck 'em.

It's a lot easier to set those boundaries if you have FU money though - or at least a decent EF.  If you have responsibilities and no EF/buffer, it's a lot harder to put things at risk.  It doesn't make for an _epic_ FU story, but being fired due to setting boundaries because you have the buffer to cope with the consequences is actually an FU story too. :)
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MichikoMustache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #649 on: September 22, 2015, 01:33:44 AM »
I taught one year of school when I was fresh out of college. It was one of the worst periods of my life as I was young, inexperienced, our state school systems sucks and I had 4 different principals in 6 months. I lived at home that year and saved all my money. At the end of the year I quit to travel the world for 3 months. My teacher friends were incredulous--I only needed one more year for "tenure"!

I love teaching and I substitute quite a bit. I've been a sub for for 5 years now. Every year I get asked to teach full-time and because of my FU money, I don't even hesitate saying NO. I love being in the classroom, teaching the kids, and walking away every day from the drama of working for the Department of Education in the People's Republic of Hawaii. I also only sub for teachers I like and respect and who leave me great sub plans.

FU money allows me to continue to love to teach!
« Last Edit: September 22, 2015, 01:38:19 AM by MichikoMustache »