Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 562612 times)

brewer12345

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #50 on: May 23, 2014, 06:59:35 PM »
After crying at work for the 6th time in 6 months

Thanks for the reminder.  I used to end up in tears about twice a week before I quit.  Must have been silly seeing a grown man hop out of a truck at the train station lot with tears running down his face.  Not at all since I quit.
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B L I S S

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #51 on: May 23, 2014, 07:09:59 PM »
Such an amazing thread.

iwasjustwondering

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #52 on: May 23, 2014, 09:09:35 PM »
I didn't have FU money, but I did have another job lined up.  I had an abusive sociopath of a boss.  She would call me up after conference calls, to discuss exactly what I did wrong each time (I either talked too much/interrupted, or didn't talk enough).  She criticized everything I did, and everything my coworkers did.  When I joined the company, two people pulled me aside to tell me how abusive Susan was, and to get out, get out, as quickly as I could.  Then I got severe pertussis, almost died (I coughed till I vomited every night, and cracked two ribs from coughing) and was out on disability for a month.  She posted my job on the company website during this time.

But because I did not have FU money, I had to stick with it.  Eventually I found another job and gave notice.  She started to berate me at the beginning of a conference call during my notice period, and I said, "Susan, you will speak to me in a respectful tone of voice, or you won't speak to me at all."  It was awesome.  When the client came on the line, she was so flustered she couldn't speak.

The sad thing is that the one person who managed to stay with her for more than five years became really warped.  He told me we all had to learn how to deal with her, and I said, no, actually, we don't.  Most of us wise up and leave.  He was so sad.  We called him No Affect because he spoke in this weird, scared monotone.  All the people who worked for her for more than two years started to develop this monotone, because it's what she wanted.  We weren't allowed to use the pronoun "I" with the client.  It was "we."  We weren't supposed to be actual human beings, just faceless agency reps.  No Affect ended up getting fired by her a year or so later.  There was no winning with her, and for some reason he couldn't understand that.

vern

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #53 on: May 23, 2014, 11:26:57 PM »
I learned many years ago that you have two choices in this life...you can be management or you can be happy.  Pick one.

A while back my two immediate supervisors called me into their office and said...

"If you don't accept this management position you're never getting promoted again."

My response...

"Cool."

You should have seen their faces!  They couldn't believe that someone would pass up a pay raise just to avoid a bunch of added headaches and stress.  (They ended up promoting a younger person, who of course complained about all of the extra work he had to put in.)

It never ceases to amaze me the amount of hoops people will jump through or the contortions they will go into in order to make a few extra grand a year. 

Having enough money banked made that call a no-brainer!
"Of my fifty-seven years I have applied at least thirty to forgetting most of what I had learned or read, and since I succeeded in this I have acquired a certain ease and cheer which I should never again like to be without."  World Chess Champion Emanuel Lasker

mmmellen

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #54 on: May 24, 2014, 05:57:00 AM »
Working for someone who is toxic is extremely detrimental, not only to your psych, but also to your health. 

I was an ESL teacher and speak Spanish, also, which meant I did a lot of interpreting in meetings, even when it was not my student being discussed.  I had been moved around to different schools in the system as they moved our minority population around to "balance" the schools racially (not a good move in this system as the schools in the poorer areas were often better performing than the mostly "white" schools. 

Despite the fact that I have decades of experience teaching English to immigrant students successfully, this principal decided I did not know how to teach the children and was forbidden to teach them reading and instead to teach them vocabulary.  The problem is that children learn most of their vocabulary through reading at a certain point as everyday language with children is pretty limited (this is why we read to our children from the time they are babies, to expand their vocabulary and comprehension).

Now, I have a brain injury and could only work three days a week, which really was a huge push for me since I could not function at home, but could not leave financially (did not have FU money as I had used my savings during time off for cancer treatment).

To make a long story short, my principal wrote me up on an observation that was full of lies, which I proved to her during a meeting with others present (including my union rep).  I was told I was not allowed to send my own books home with the students, nor was I to help them learn to read or write (this is what ELL teachers do).  Eventually the stress became so great that I began having seizures on my way home from work one Friday and am now unable to work as this has further injured my brain.

My FU in this is that, since then, the school has gone through many other ESL teachers who have left because the stress was "way too high" and now, I'm sure she is recognizing (although not admitting) that I did know what I was doing.

I have no doubt that if my doctors had not told me I could no longer work, my children would not have a mother now.  The sad part is that I loved teaching.

johnintaiwan

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #55 on: May 24, 2014, 06:01:07 AM »
I've got two. The first happened a few months ago and isnt all that exciting, but the second happened in high school and was pretty great.

A few months ago the other foreign teacher at my school moved away and they hired a new one. I was not very happy about the new hire because he was from Iran and not a native English speaker, but this didn't stop them from telling the parents that even though his English was worse than the local teachers. I got over that since they didnt really have any other choice. But then they wanted me to start giving up some of my hours to him since he had to travel from far away and didnt want to make the trip for just two classes. I told my boss i wasnt happy about this, but there was nothing I could do. So I walked across the street to a rival school during my break, did a demo and got a job offer with a rasie. After the break told them I wouldnt be back after the 2 week Chinese New Year vacation that started the next day. They still call me offering more money if I come back and numerous students have left to find me for private classes or to come to my new school.

Sophomore year in HS I got a job at a gas station (cant pump your own in Oregon) just for spending money and investing. I didnt need the job but wanted to get some money and stay out of trouble. I was only a sophomore but had already completed more school than any of the "adults" there. For about 2 months I would get calls at 6 am on Saturday and Sunday asking if I could come in because someone got arrested or was too drunk/high to work and I was the only one who could do it. I would have to pump the gas and run the car wash by myself until 12 while the owner worked the till. He would always yell at me to wash the windows of every car that came in no matter how busy we were.

One Saturday I got the call and showed up at 6:05 (I lived pretty close). at around 6:30 There were two cars getting filled up and buying a car wash. another was being filled and i was washing the windshield. Boss came out and told me to wash the windshield of every car. I told him, with squigee in hand that I was. He asked about the other two cars and I told him they were getting a car wash. He told me I needed an attitude adjustment. I told him to go fuck himself and that he needed to wash the windows, I quit and just left. He was dumbfounded. He had to shut down the station until the next worker showed up at 12.

Three months latter he lost the station and was working the pumps just like one of us lowly workers and for the same pay (he had taken out a loan from the previous owner and was unable to pay it back. The previous owner took control again). I came in to get some gas and he made a sarcastic comment about my shirt. I told all the other workers in spanish (most of them were from Guatemala) that at least I didnt run my company into the ground. They all started laughing their asses off and he had no idea why.

DoubleDown

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #56 on: May 24, 2014, 10:04:35 AM »
Not a "fuck you" story, but I was able to stick up for myself and some of my coworkers in situation where most are too cautious to.

A co-worker [We'll call him SHITHEAD] that I (and many) have to work with a lot is not mentally stable. He lied very very frequently to try to make himself look good. He treated people like shit often. He'd blow up on people in big meetings with visitors from headquarters - he'd pick one person to try to focus on and blame and try to make them look bad. They'd defend themselves and their team in a reasonable way and he'd just keep going, red, furious, and yelling. He did this to me and my team a few times. I'd always stand up for us and he would blow up in ways unacceptable at our workplace.

Him and I both reported to our plant manager, who was fairly new. I didn't really like the new plant manager, but he wasn't so bad. Three on the management team - basically the three worst on the team - the HR manager, SHITHEAD, and one other guy kissed his ass a ton. They became golfing buddies. They'd golf together every weekend, talk about it at work, etc.. So I was in a situation where I knew that when I stuck up for myself and the others, I'd be in a room with SHITHEAD, his golfing buddy (our boss the plant manager), and his other golfing buddy (the HR manager, who was a miserable HR manager). I'd talked to my boss a number of times about it and I was very clear that it was absolutely not acceptable for this to continue, it but it wasn't getting any better. There were plenty of other people who saw what happened. There was one person, [JOHN] who  SHITHEAD did much worse to than me (harrassment really), but JOHN was scared to stick up for himself because he had a lower hierarchal position and was worried he'd get blamed, had a family to support, etc.  I'd beed documenting what SHITHEAD did, so I emailed it to the HR manager and my boss. My boss was new as a plant manager and he needed to look like he could handle issues with his staff. The next day he looked like shit and told me he didn't sleep the night before. I'm a good employee (which is known across the division), so firing or blaming me was not really an option. My boss knew I'd continue sticking up for myself and that I would escalate if the situation didn't improve quickly. After me, JOHN sent his documentation also. We had a formal meeting together which was pretty much your standard mediation and "be nice to eachother" stuff. A month later I got a promotion with a 15 or 20% raise and relocation (the relocation money ends up being a $10k bonus for me). I'm all but certain the timing was related to me sticking up for myself.

When I left, JOHN got promoted to my position. A few months later, SHITHEAD got a final written warning and has been behaving better now.

Having and using Fuck You money can end up making things work out better for (nearly) all involved.

I enjoyed your story, especially referring to SHITHEAD in all caps throughout!
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DoubleDown

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #57 on: May 24, 2014, 10:16:43 AM »
I learned many years ago that you have two choices in this life...you can be management or you can be happy.  Pick one.

Amen. I eventually also started turning down all the "career advancing" star management jobs that were offered to me, and it was a great call. "You mean I can work an extra 10-20 hours a week, with tons of added stress and responsibility and politics and ass-kissing for an extra $10-20k/year? Woohoo, sign me up!!"

And on an unrelated note, so many assholes in this thread! Brings back many fond memories of the innumerable assholes in my career. But lots of great coworkers and managers too to balance them out.
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zataks

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #58 on: May 24, 2014, 10:29:53 AM »
I don't have a good story for this nor do I yet have FU money as I'm destroying debt and increasing EF and the stache.  But I've worked hard and taken work seriously in my career and had good and bad bosses.  Only had 3 employers in my career and both of those two times submitting my resignation with notice was very sweet.  The latest resignation, I was still expected to work for my final week but my access to all buildings via keycard, my keys, and my login credentials were taken away and disabled.  I used sick time to get paid for that week and just showed up to submit to a tool inventory before leaving.

mmmellen that's a rough story to hear.  I'm beginning to understand the effects of stress on the body.  While my issues are not as severe as yours were, I am currently under excessive stress and very difficult working conditions that provide little time off and very little sleep and I am beginning to see my health suffer.  The hours are stepping down towards 40 over the next couple weeks and I have two different vacations coming up between now and the middle of July.  Although I don't have the FU money, I would like to tell my boss that I can't do these hours much longer--and hopefully explain that it's not the work that's bothersome but that my health is suffering for it.

Wile E. Coyote

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #59 on: May 24, 2014, 10:37:25 AM »
Not really an FU story, but back in 2003 I was working at a firm making very good money, but wasn't happy.  I got a call from my friend, and she made me realize how much my job was adversely affecting the rest of my life.  I hung up the phone and called the partner that I work for (she wasn't in the office that day).  She wasn't the problem, it was the firm leadership.  I told her that I was giving my notice and wanted to let her know.  Her response was "I know I'm supposed to try to convince you to stay, but I'm not the right person to do that because I am leaving as well."  We just laughed.  I didn't have another job lined up and it was terrifying walking away from the security of the job, but it was one of the best decisions that I ever made.  I am so much happier today as a result.  I ended up working for her again a few years later at another firm and it was great.  We're still friends to this day because she actually cared more about her team than herself (not common in my field).
« Last Edit: May 24, 2014, 01:19:12 PM by Wile E. Coyote »

imustachemystash

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #60 on: May 24, 2014, 12:12:46 PM »
I learned many years ago that you have two choices in this life...you can be management or you can be happy.  Pick one.

A while back my two immediate supervisors called me into their office and said...

"If you don't accept this management position you're never getting promoted again."

My response...

"Cool."

You should have seen their faces!  They couldn't believe that someone would pass up a pay raise just to avoid a bunch of added headaches and stress.  (They ended up promoting a younger person, who of course complained about all of the extra work he had to put in.)

It never ceases to amaze me the amount of hoops people will jump through or the contortions they will go into in order to make a few extra grand a year. 

Having enough money banked made that call a no-brainer!

Very well put.  My husband is a software developer and he is so much happier just coding instead of having to manage a team of people.  Living the mustachian lifestyle lets him be satisfied what he earns and takes away the pressure of having to earn more more more!

Albert

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #61 on: May 24, 2014, 01:07:26 PM »
I don't have any horrible stories as I'm still on my first (possibly only) job after finishing grad school. I think I've been blessed with good bosses and rather relaxed work atmosphere. The second one has been better than the first one, but the first one wasn't particularly bad either. Just not really talented at dealing with people...

I have had, however, once incident from the perspective of a manager (I'm leading a small 2-3 people team). One day a member of my team, a women in her mid 20-ties, comes into my office crying and tells me that she can't work with that other guy in the lab (in his 50-ties, not reporting to me). Apparently he calls her and another female lab mate names, belittles and criticises them constantly. It was a mess, I had to involve my boss and HR to sort it all out. It was a learning experience for me, because I should have noticed something is not right but I didn'tů Eventually the guy was given a formal notice and my co-worker was moved elsewhere. I later found out that the perpetrator had a long history of being unable to get along with women, particularly young women.

Also I don't agree with all managerial work being unpleasant. I enjoy very much directing my team, and as far as I know I'm popular with my employees. I manage to make them do a lot of work without being mean or intruding into their private lives. :)

By the way if I handed in my resignation here, I would have to work another 3 months (or they would have to pay me for it). It's very difficult to fire people here unless there is a major reorganisation directed from the very top.

Jon_Snow

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #62 on: May 24, 2014, 01:12:59 PM »
This really is the best thread I've read in a long time.

DoubleDown

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #63 on: May 24, 2014, 02:09:21 PM »
Also I don't agree with all managerial work being unpleasant. I enjoy very much directing my team, and as far as I know I'm popular with my employees. I manage to make them do a lot of work without being mean or intruding into their private lives. :)

Agreed, but I think in many (most?) large organizations the "Peter Principle" is in effect. That is, talented employees and managers keep getting promoted until they eventually reach their level of incompetence. Then you're left with some crappy managers. So watch out, if you are good at leading your small team, you just may gain notice and be tapped by your managers to lead an even larger team, or to be the boss of the small team leaders!

I know where I worked (a very, very large organization), we were constantly encouraged to keep striving for more and more responsibility, to keep taking on bigger challenges and larger roles in the organization. It was the #1 promotion criteria. If you were good at your job, you were expected to use that talent on bigger efforts and to lead others. It makes sense, but it also leads people into some positions they just do not want. And of course it feeds the lifestyle inflation treadmill, because the bigger jobs come with bigger pay. It was very difficult for people who were good at their jobs, and just wanted to remain that way, to stay put. And we had plenty of terrible managers who had been promoted until they were in over their heads.
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5inatrailer

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #64 on: May 24, 2014, 02:41:37 PM »
LOVE this thread. Put your money where your mouth is:)

I started my career as a paramedic in a big metro city.  I remember being 23 at 3 am in some hospital eating my supper 8 hrs into a shift thinking "what choices have I made that got me to this shitty point?"

In my chosen field as a firefighter promotions are all done via seniority.  I have moved twice after 7 years.  I now have total bliss at my new job (3 years in I still say I love my job every single day)  I know I'm rambling but coming off night shift brain here.

When I left my first job at 25 I was having trouble with this over controlling ahole of a boss.  His dad had started the ambulance company before the city took it over.  Somehow, he had managed to become a supervisor.  My last day there I ended up our conversation with "My wife doesn't talk to me like that and I love her.  I don't even like you".

My second job as a FF-Paramedic was great for 2 years then started to unravel.  Unrealistic quotas, intolerable work loads, lack of support for PTSD made it really tough.  My platoon of 24 were very tight because of this- like going into battle every single day. It took me 6 months to decide to quit and when I did I cried for 3 hours at my front door (mostly because the boys took me out to get smashed one last time:) 

I left at a time when the company was hiring 25% more workforce.  I loved walking into the Chief's office and handing him my goodbye letter.  I told him it was easy to have successful beginnings somewhere, it was difficult having successful endings.  I told him that my time was up, and for me, this was a successful ending working for them.  I was the first one to leave there and it left them flustered.  They were trying to hire 40 guys and I was leaving after 7 years? Nobody does this.  Well, 5 years later, 15 year vets are quitting every month due to the terrible workload and emotional support.  I like to think I was the ground breaker!

Now at my new job, people can't fathom why I have 15 years into the pension, and left my seniority so I will never make officer.  I tell them that there are other ways to lead people other than by rank.  Setting a good example, and having authority without domination are traits you don't get promoted into. They are traits you develop personally. 
what is shibumi? It is an understated excellence, it being without the anxiousness of becoming, it is understanding rather than knowledge, and in the definition of a man, authority without domination.

Latwell

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #65 on: May 24, 2014, 04:00:58 PM »
One of my first jobs, I was a hostess. I was terrible at it b/c it wasn't until my next job that I would learn to not be socially awkward. I also hated all my coworkers and my bosses and waking up at the crack of dawn. I remember working on thanksgiving and crying in the bathroom because everyone else that was suppose to come in had called out and my manager told me I couldn't leave and I had to call my boyfriend at the time to tell him and his family not to wait on me any longer, for them to go ahead and eat. This was one of those times where I realized people only care about themselves.

So after only a couple months and shortly after thanksgiving, I was at my job thinking about how much I didn't want to be there so I randomly walked up to the manager that day told them I didn't want to work anymore. They were confused and thought I just wanted to leave early that day. I clarified that I didn't want to work at all or ever and that I'm leaving now and don't expect me to be coming back.

It was that job that made me realize I had to try my best to apply get a job that I WANT and not just a job that was willing to hire me.

sobezen

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #66 on: May 24, 2014, 06:17:28 PM »
These are some really eye opening stories!  Thank you one and all for taking the time to share in such vivid details some of your most challenging life adventures. 
The best thing money can buy is financial freedom.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #67 on: May 24, 2014, 08:42:02 PM »
This is not about me having FU money, but an FU job offer, and the timing was nearly perfect.  I was working for this place, lets call it a financial sweatshop, for a few years.  Each year when it was time to talk annual raise, they always had some excuse for giving me a crappy raise: the economy was bad, head office cut the budget, new employee scorecard etc.  So in this particular year, I finally got my annual raise notification letter, and it was brutal, just over 1%, I was offended to even be offered such a figure.  I was super steamed.  I wanted to walk out on the spot.  I had been looking for another job for over a year at that point, I was so ready to go.  Then just a few days after getting this letter I received a job offer, which would be about a 30% raise if I took it.  It also worked out that my manager was meeting with each of us that very same day I received the offer.  So I met with my manager, and let him know right off the bat I've received a job offer from another company.  We talk about it for a bit and he asks about money.  Is there an offer he could take to his boss to see what could be done?  Really??  NOW you want to talk money?  Suddenly now I might be able to get a real raise?   I told him not to bother, because I was 100% taking this job offer no matter what they could suddenly offer me.  It was amazing. 

Reepekg

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #68 on: May 24, 2014, 11:36:17 PM »
A couple of years ago, I had about 4 years of living expenses saved. I was the only US-based employee of a small European start-up company, and the client I was a resident engineer at was going through a nasty downturn because of very poor decision-making by upper management. The problems were actually something my technology could have fixed. Nevertheless, I wasn't surprised when they decided they couldn't afford the project I was on and had to let me go. To give you an idea of the kind of decisions this client made and how they treated their employees, they let me go by blocking my login credentials one Monday morning without a word.

A few weeks later, I get an invitation to lunch with a manager I had reported to at this company in the past. He was a nice enough guy, but he was moving departments in the reorganization and clearly thought he might be able to capitalize on the fact that I must have been hard up for work. He asked me to join the client company in his new group.

Me - "With the state the company is in, the offer would have to be pretty big to convince me to come on board."
Him - "Well, I'm sure we can work something out. What were you thinking?"
Me - A number that was about a 150% raise

His face was priceless. It was more than the VP of Engineering made. He said something along the lines of "I guess there is nothing to discuss then." He got a new job about 2 months later.
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Can't Wait

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #69 on: May 25, 2014, 10:05:37 PM »
I have an FU story that did NOT work out too well for me.

I had this job in my early 20's as a sales territory rep which basically required me to drive around to a set of stores within a specific geographical area and provide training and motivation to the stores. Of course my performance was based on the performance of the stores I represented. I had to be on call 24/7 to answer any questions these store might have had. On top of that, I had this dick-hole of a boss that would call me all day almost every hour to see where I had been, who I had talked to, and how I was going to get my stores to perform better. This dick-hole also liked to critique everything about me including what kind of tie I wore on any particular day to the scuff marks on my shoes. He would threaten to "put me on the street" (fire me) almost every day if didn't get my stores to perform better. I don't know what came over me one day, but on one of his calls I just blurted out "fuck off man" and hung up on him. He fired me.

I had no money in my savings, no other job lined up, and I had a car payment and rent to make. It took me over 6 months to find a new job and I ended up using credit cards to get by. I accumulated quite a bit of debt doing this and my new job didn't pay nearly what my old job did so I had trouble keeping up with the credit card payments and my credit took a dive. I was finally able to secure a federal govt job that would have made life great but I ended up getting my offer rescinded because I couldn't get the security clearance needed.. because of my poor credit..

It took some time, but I eventually made it to the federal govt and I recovered but man, I sure did pay for those two seconds of bliss when I told the dick-hole to fuck off.

5inatrailer

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #70 on: May 26, 2014, 08:47:55 AM »
It's clear that everybody leaves sooner or later.  They won't make a statue of you when you leave so best start working on your exit strategy right away.
Either through retirement or other opportunities.
what is shibumi? It is an understated excellence, it being without the anxiousness of becoming, it is understanding rather than knowledge, and in the definition of a man, authority without domination.

Gracie

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #71 on: May 27, 2014, 07:14:42 AM »
One of the things I'm now fond of saying is that people usually don't leave their jobs.  They leave their managers.

So true. My husband is thinking of taking the FU option soon, though I think he plans to make them fire him. He actually is the manager. He was brought in to fix all the problems caused by the previous manager. Turns out HR also screwed up some pay scales and are fighting him about giving the proper increases to affected employees. They are actually trying to change everyone's job description so they don't have to give the correct pay.

It comes out to less than $5000. It is chump change to the company, but would make a huge difference to the employees. Worse, the employees all know the pay is wrong.

This is just one in a string of similar problems recently. I swear, they found all the managers from "Office Space" and hired them.

Zaga

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #72 on: May 27, 2014, 08:13:32 AM »
These stories are just great, love reading them!

Rydenio

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #73 on: May 27, 2014, 08:47:56 AM »
For me, "FU money" being just enough savings to get by for about a year, it's been more about having that security in the back of my mind when negotiating pay. He can see in my eyes that I won't take any offer just to stay on the job.

workathomedad

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #74 on: May 27, 2014, 08:52:05 AM »
One of the things I'm now fond of saying is that people usually don't leave their jobs.  They leave their managers.

So true. My husband is thinking of taking the FU option soon, though I think he plans to make them fire him. He actually is the manager. He was brought in to fix all the problems caused by the previous manager. Turns out HR also screwed up some pay scales and are fighting him about giving the proper increases to affected employees. They are actually trying to change everyone's job description so they don't have to give the correct pay.

It comes out to less than $5000. It is chump change to the company, but would make a huge difference to the employees. Worse, the employees all know the pay is wrong.

This is just one in a string of similar problems recently. I swear, they found all the managers from "Office Space" and hired them.

If the employees *know* they're purposefully being screwed by an incompetent/uncaring management, it will cost the company a lot more than $5,000/employee in the long-run. Think pretend-working, theft, low-quality, etc. The company will be destroying themselves from the inside out.

DoubleDown

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #75 on: May 27, 2014, 10:18:36 AM »
It's amazing how easily a crappy manager (or even coworker) suddenly added into the mix can ruin what was otherwise a pretty blissful job for others. As a (former) manager myself, I was amazed how often managers would appear that apparently didn't even bother to show up for Day 1 of "Management 101" since they'd go about violating all kinds of tried and true management theory right off the bat. Hell, some of them obviously never even  showed up for "Human Decency 101."

Like, did no one ever tell them to wait at least 90 days after you show up on the job before you start introducing a bunch of changes into the workplace? Or that publicly embarrassing workers in front of their colleagues as the first go-to method is probably not the best way to get results? Or that understanding the subject matter of what you are managing can be useful and even bring some credibility?
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Vitai Slade

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #76 on: May 27, 2014, 12:02:39 PM »
This is a great thread! I have a story of my own to add as well. Not quite as badass as the others, but I felt like a champ when I did it.

Back when I was a teenager, I was working as a pizza delivery driver for Papa Johns. I always worked night shift and weekends so I never really got to hang out with friends. One particular Saturday, I worked out a way to get the opening mid-day shift so I could get that night off. I worked my shift, and when it was about time for me to go home, my manager kept telling me to just go on one more delivery, one more, one more. Finally I got fed up with it. I wanted to go hang out with friends, something I NEVER got to do. I told him, 'Look, either you are going to cash out my bank and I am going to leave, or I'm going to leave.' He cashed me out and the next day when I came in for my next shift he told me I was fired. A few days later, I got a call from HR stating that my manager did not have the authority to make me work longer than my scheduled hours and they hired me back at a different location.

KS

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #77 on: May 27, 2014, 12:17:38 PM »
It's amazing how easily a crappy manager (or even coworker) suddenly added into the mix can ruin what was otherwise a pretty blissful job for others.

+1! Several jobs ago, I was very happy, happy enough that when my husband got a job 300ish miles away we chose to live long distance for almost a year until he found something else up here, so I could keep my job I loved. Couple years later, enter new manager, who didn't understand at least 2 out of 3 of your described management theory mistakes (at least he didn't go in for public humiliation thankfully). Within 6-8 months over 30% of our (fairly small) branch of the company had quit, most of whom had been there a while, were awesome at what they did, and had no plans to leave otherwise. That branch has since been shut down and all activities transferred elsewhere. We still sometimes wonder if it was all part of a master shutdown plan and Bad Manager was brought in to intentionally drive out some of the old-timers and reduce the severance payments... Hard to believe anyone could so effectively fake being that bad at their job though, and he legitimately seemed bewildered every time someone else quit.

This thread has turned out to be awesome, some of you have some genuinely epic tales!

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #78 on: May 27, 2014, 12:27:16 PM »
About 8-9 years ago I was working a pretty miserable job with a crappy boss.  I was in debt (car loan, 2 maxed CCs, 2 student loans) and living paycheck to paycheck.  I wasn't making a lot of money, but more than I felt I could make somewhere else, so I was trapped.  Then a couple things clicked (meeting my frugal girlfriend was the main catalyst).  Over the course of a year I paid off all debts except one of the student loans and started saving 50% of my net.  I only had a couple months savings, but realizing I could get a job making half what I was currently suddenly put me into FU territory.  I made a list of demands for my boss, none of which were met, which is what I expected (he was the kind of guy that viewed everyone as an easily replaceable cog).  So I told him I was starting to job search, knowing what would happen.  Next day I'm handed a layoff notice (due to 'internal restructuring').  I knew 1) he would never let someone stay that was looking around, and 2) that he would have to lay me off (I'd been a flawless employee for 5 years, it would take too much time to build up a fireable case).  This made me qualify for unemployment, which at the time paid 50% of your previous 12 months wages.  Since that's what I'd been living on for a year, it had zero effect on my budget.  5 highly enjoyable and stress-free months later I landed one of the best jobs I've ever had, making 30% more than I was previously.

Not epic 'take this job and shove it', but if I hadn't had the financial stability and confidence, I might still be there.  FU money doesn't always have to be about your bank balance, either.  If you're living on half your paycheck, that opens a lot of doors that people don't usually have.  Most people can't afford to take a pay cut, which keeps them as trapped as debt or lack of savings does.

BFGirl

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #79 on: May 27, 2014, 12:59:09 PM »
Not an epic story, but one that demonstrates the freedom that comes with not having to worry about your job.  My mother's boss retired and she got a new boss who was horrible.  She would work through lunch (had to because of timings in lab experiments she was running) and then her boss would refuse to let her take comp time.  He basically terrorized her over her time for a while.  In the meantime, from savings that she and my dad had, she was able to buy credit towards retirement from another state she had worked in when she was younger.  Once she bought that time, she was eligible to retire.  She got a great deal of satisfaction from telling her boss she was retiring when he thought he had her over a barrel.

totoro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #80 on: May 27, 2014, 01:02:37 PM »
I have one.

I was working in a mid-size law firm owned by one lawyer (no partners) as a fairly new grad. 

The firm was a microcosm of life and some new lawyers were favourites and others were not.  It was something the junior lawyers spent a lot of time complaining about.  Particularly because of the lack of job security and the idea that if you were not a favourite you could be out at the end of the next big case.

Some lawyers were marked as superstars and rain makers by the owner, and others as workers.  The rain makers got a lot of facilitated client contact, perks, and approval, and recognition for bringing in business.  It was much easier for them to meet billable hours because they travelled to clients, met with them, travelled back and billed for all the hours.  The workers, well, they got to do the legal work for the rain makers, and lots of it.

I was marked as a worker bee.  I didn't mind the work, but I did not want to be put in an office for life doing what I was doing and there seemed to be no easy way to change it due to favortism. 

I decided I had to come up with a solution. I figured out a plan that I believed would increase revenues significantly and save our clients money at the same time.  I thought if I went to the owner it would be a sure-fire win:win:win.  I would be able to implement the plan and get out of the office more to see what our client needs were on the ground, the client would save money, and the firm revenues would increase.

So, I worked on my proposal and scheduled time with the owner, which was a bit intimidating as he and I did not have a lot of prior contact, and then made my pitch.  I thought I had done well, but he flat-out said no, things were fine as they were.  No real reason given.  I left his office thinking that maybe there was something wrong with my proposal.  A reason it would not work.  I couldn't find it.  And then I started to get mad.

I went home, I slept on it, I went back in the morning and gave my notice.  I was offered a significant raise to stay.  I turned it down.  I was still pretty mad.   

It was a bit nerve-wracking to quit, but during the notice period I set up my own practice.  We had some savings and my business plan seemed to indicate that it would work out better than being an employee. I also had young children I want to spend time with.  It was a gamble, but, well, I just did not feel I could keep working for someone who was not interested in positive change.

The day I left two major clients also chose to come with me, and are still with me today.  I immediately made more money working pt than my former ft salary because I had no staff or other overhead to pay for.

And that plan I presented, turned out there was absolutely nothing wrong with it.  It continues to work for me today.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2014, 04:21:25 PM by totoro »

Wolf_Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #81 on: May 27, 2014, 01:59:12 PM »
Totally forgot about this story until something today reminded me of it:

At the time I was working as a Temp through Robert Half. For the last 6 months I'd been working at an unnamed financial services office helping them convert their AP system program. I reported directly to the CFO, and due to what happened during the 6 months I was there, I'm 99% certain the CFO was suffering from early onset dementia.

For example, she would give me assignments, then act confused when I gave her the completed report claiming 'I never asked for this.' Another time she sketched out on her white board how she wanted a particular part of the system to work. Luckily that was still up the board later that week, because when I demonstrated it to her she freaked out and screamed at me about how stupid I was. Until I pointed up to the board, pointed to how it was working, and asked her what I did wrong. She stared at the board for about 10 min, then quietly muttered to herself and dismissed me from her office.

I quickly found out I had to get EVERYTHING in writing from her after that.

Anyway, the CFO called me one Monday morning, before the contract was supposed to end, to tell me they didn't need me any longer. I cheerfully said, ok bye! I had three months savings, plus the way my contract was worded I got unemployement.

I jumped on the net, had two interviews lined up for the next day. By Thursday I had a permanent full time offer with a 25% raise over Robert Half. That Friday, Robert Half called me and said the CFO had begged them to have me come back. When I told them, sorry, already have another position starting at $xx,xxx, the silence on the other end of the phone was deafening.

Robert Half still calls me trying to get me to come back. Got a call from them this morning -  which is what reminded me of this story.

bagap

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #82 on: May 27, 2014, 04:12:13 PM »
Best.Thread.Topic.Ever.

I joined the community after being a lurker for some time just to respond. On FOUR different occasions the hubby and I have had the opportunity to say FU to our employers...I'll keep it sorta brief ;)

Years ago, with two toddlers and both of us working full time, hubby's insurance job was relocating him across the country for 6 months from October to March and there was no negotiating the move...every big event in our family happens during that time, all our bdays, anniversary, and of course the holidays.  Yeah, that was a fun FU moment!  He quit and was a stay at home dad for some time and finished up some classes.  He now makes a ton more money as an engineer than he ever made in insurance.

For me, 3 separate FU stories.  First one, I had worked for a large government organization for over 14 years.  Then they hired some horrendous upper management and made completely insane hiring and reorganization decisions.  I put up with it for a year and then said FU!  They tried to keep me as I had excellent evals and was well respected...sorry, no can do! FU!

Second time for me, I worked a job where the commute was 2.5 hours (stupid, I know).  The manager and the work was okay, but the co-workers were certifiable.  A HUGE amount of backstabbing, gossip, inappropriate jokes...put up with it for a year when I decided FU!

Last one happened two months ago.  After almost three years in a mid-size nonprofit which was incompetently run, reeking of favoritism, had PROFOUNDLY inept bosses, and intense micromanagement (yes, folks were actually written up for being 5 minutes late in the mornings or after a break and were regularly fired with no notice or progressive discipline measures being taken)...I delivered the 3rd FU of my career by quitting!

The reason why my husband and I have been able to pretty much walk away from good paying jobs when they become unbearable??? No credit card debt, a paid off home, living within our means, driving economical cars, and saving at least 1/3 to 1/2 of our earnings consistently.

Freedom to CHOOSE to work, is priceless.  The ability to say FU to a shitty workplace/boss/co-workers is ...well, whatever is more priceless than priceless ;)

trailrated

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #83 on: May 27, 2014, 04:39:18 PM »
Best.Thread.Topic.Ever.

I am trying to be humble after this... but I agree. I finally started a thread that arebelspy responded to!

That being said, awesome story thank you for sharing!
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William

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #84 on: May 27, 2014, 05:22:30 PM »
Thanks guys for sharing these stories!  Here I thought this thread would be boring..
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Gracie

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #85 on: May 27, 2014, 06:15:51 PM »
One of the things I'm now fond of saying is that people usually don't leave their jobs.  They leave their managers.

So true. My husband is thinking of taking the FU option soon, though I think he plans to make them fire him. He actually is the manager. He was brought in to fix all the problems caused by the previous manager. Turns out HR also screwed up some pay scales and are fighting him about giving the proper increases to affected employees. They are actually trying to change everyone's job description so they don't have to give the correct pay.

It comes out to less than $5000. It is chump change to the company, but would make a huge difference to the employees. Worse, the employees all know the pay is wrong.

This is just one in a string of similar problems recently. I swear, they found all the managers from "Office Space" and hired them.

If the employees *know* they're purposefully being screwed by an incompetent/uncaring management, it will cost the company a lot more than $5,000/employee in the long-run. Think pretend-working, theft, low-quality, etc. The company will be destroying themselves from the inside out.

And the employees in question are Out-standing employees. My Husband is terribly angry about it. Luckily, he is good at hiding the anger. He is persist. He will insist on the raises until they are received or he is fired.

The amazing thing is you don't need a ton of money to FU. We can live on about 1/4th of what we make now. Or half of my income. :D

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #86 on: May 27, 2014, 06:36:57 PM »
Never thought about it as a FU story, more of an "always be prepared" story. 
Years ago, the company I worked for was acquired by another and I was asked to move to another city to train employees there about our products.  I took a big bump in pay and got a one year contract.  I knew it was a knowledge transfer situation and that after one year I'd be shown the door, so I was careful to save up and prepare for it. 
Well, at the one year mark, the company was not doing well and everyone was in danger of losing our jobs, but I was the only one prepared for it.  The company hired a "hatchet man" to travel around the country and lay people off.  It was awful.  He was absolutely not qualified to judge who should go and who should stay, but for some reason, the company wanted to give the illusion that this guy was making decisions - and maybe he was but it was very sad to watch what was happening. 
For some reason, when it was time for my branch to get the axe, there were delays after delays.  I had made plans to visit my new boyfriend on his super-awesome ranch, and I was starting to panic that they may not shit-can me in time for my trip.  I finally called the hatchet-man and told him I knew what was happening and wanted to know if we could discuss it over the phone that day?  He fumbled his words and sounded completely surprised but finally hemmed and hawed and said "I wanted to do this in person...."  I cut him off and said "Just mail the package".   (My severance).  It felt so good to get it over with.  I had enough saved up to last a few months, and to move me back to my previous location.   I ended up with few months severance in a lump sum, which meant I qualified for unemployment immediately, so I was able to enjoy a couple months of down-time before I hit the pavement again.  Best vacation ever. 
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

Spartana

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #87 on: May 27, 2014, 07:07:57 PM »
No epic FU money story here. Just had enough to quit work when I was 42 to support myself for what I thought would be a 5 year work break to do other stuff (play sports, travel...). I quit assumed I'd go back to work and would retire at a more traditional age. But knowing I had a government pension at 50, a paid off house I could sell and downsize, and no debt, kids or hubby either meant I could make the work break turn into early retirement.  Didn't walk off mad or anything, was just ....done....and wanted to do other things before I was too old.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2014, 07:13:17 PM by Spartana »

frugally

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #88 on: May 27, 2014, 07:19:15 PM »
The day I left two major clients also chose to come with me, and are still with me today.  I immediately made more money working pt than my former ft salary because I had no staff or other overhead to pay for.

And that plan I presented, turned out there was absolutely nothing wrong with it.  It continues to work for me today.

The beautiful part of this one, totoro, is that you not only FU'd it, but then took a risk on investing in yourself.  Very cool.

Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #89 on: May 27, 2014, 07:49:41 PM »
No epic FU money story here. Just had enough to quit work when I was 42 to support myself for what I thought would be a 5 year work break to do other stuff (play sports, travel...). I quit assumed I'd go back to work and would retire at a more traditional age. But knowing I had a government pension at 50, a paid off house I could sell and downsize, and no debt, kids or hubby either meant I could make the work break turn into early retirement.  Didn't walk off mad or anything, was just ....done....and wanted to do other things before I was too old.

Interesting...at what point did you decide the sabbatical turned into early retirement? Have you worked part time or anything in the meantime to plug any leaks in your plan? I wonder if I get downsized a year earlier than I expected, if I could parlay it into early or at least semi-retirement. It would be nice to hear your experience with this.

I am once-again dreading that my downsizing may happen this year instead of next as I had planned. I am still waiting to sell a house - or else I wouldn't be as worried. But my philosophy in life is that things happen when they should happen. So if I am downsized now I am sure I will figure out a way to get along. I am pretty sure I am FI for my basic needs, so it would just be a matter of figuring out the "luxuries" (how much health insurance I get, how much for travel).

Jon_Snow

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #90 on: May 27, 2014, 08:28:31 PM »
No epic FU money story here. Just had enough to quit work when I was 42 to support myself for what I thought would be a 5 year work break to do other stuff (play sports, travel...). I quit assumed I'd go back to work and would retire at a more traditional age. But knowing I had a government pension at 50, a paid off house I could sell and downsize, and no debt, kids or hubby either meant I could make the work break turn into early retirement.  Didn't walk off mad or anything, was just ....done....and wanted to do other things before I was too old.

As a fellow 42 year old who is a bit nervous about quitting my job (for good?), this post is much appreciated.

dweebyhawkeyes

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #91 on: May 27, 2014, 11:02:29 PM »
So happy to read these- it's downright inspiring to see how much freedom your 'staches have allowed you! It's also made me realize for the first time the power my little 'stache gives me. Although I'm currently blessed with a super easy-going and productive work environment (albeit low-paying), there's enough saved to last a few months and I'm so down with never feeling forced to work somewhere.

I've turned down.. babysitting jobs? Not much for me to contribute. Yet!

LouisPritchard

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #92 on: May 28, 2014, 02:23:06 AM »
Awesome thread. I'm in the midst of planning a FU moment. After working for the largest oil company in the world, getting transferred 1500 miles from home and dealing with some of the worst management I've ever had to deal with, me and the wife have decided to quit and move back home. Now instead of trying to just find a job (I'm in my 30s and still want to work for a while) I've got the wonderful dilemma of shopping for existing businesses or maybe buying a franchise and doing a start up that way. Having the fu stache is really opening up options that wouldn't otherwise exist. Now to just get over the mental issues/blocks that seem to creep in when planning possible self employment. I also kind of want to leave in a way that causes a hr investigation. My supervisors need it badly and I honestly feel it'd be good for this office and co-workers.

Spartana

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #93 on: May 28, 2014, 04:29:37 PM »
No epic FU money story here. Just had enough to quit work when I was 42 to support myself for what I thought would be a 5 year work break to do other stuff (play sports, travel...). I quit assumed I'd go back to work and would retire at a more traditional age. But knowing I had a government pension at 50, a paid off house I could sell and downsize, and no debt, kids or hubby either meant I could make the work break turn into early retirement.  Didn't walk off mad or anything, was just ....done....and wanted to do other things before I was too old.

Interesting...at what point did you decide the sabbatical turned into early retirement? Have you worked part time or anything in the meantime to plug any leaks in your plan? I wonder if I get downsized a year earlier than I expected, if I could parlay it into early or at least semi-retirement. It would be nice to hear your experience with this.

I am once-again dreading that my downsizing may happen this year instead of next as I had planned. I am still waiting to sell a house - or else I wouldn't be as worried. But my philosophy in life is that things happen when they should happen. So if I am downsized now I am sure I will figure out a way to get along. I am pretty sure I am FI for my basic needs, so it would just be a matter of figuring out the "luxuries" (how much health insurance I get, how much for travel).
I think about a year after I left work I realized I could actually retire permanently without having to ever work again - even p/t - if I just sold my paid off house and downsized. I did that and became instantly FI.  I was also frugal, debt free, child free, divorced, and had mostly free or very low cost activities and knew I would have a government pension of $1400/month starting at age 50 and had free or low cost medical thru the VA medical system (although I have always bought a low cost private policy). I also have no heirs so have no problem spending down any principal I have in savings or investments over the coming years to supplement my pension as needed. Currently, with a paid off house and low taxes, insurance and utilities, I can live on about half my pension ($700) per month for basic expenses. The extra goes to travel and fun stuff - or needed things like getting the car fixed.  I've been FIREed over a decade now and love it. And no, I haven't had to go to work to plug any financial holes. Just reduce spending in other areas as needed or do without some things that don't have that much importance to me.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2014, 04:35:05 PM by Spartana »

cdttmm

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #94 on: May 28, 2014, 06:07:32 PM »
I'll add my FU story to the list. I worked for a well-known educational services company for 15 years. The first 12 years, I was part of an independently owned franchise of the company. The franchise was a family-owned business and I quickly made myself a key player in the business as I liked my job and the office dynamic. Over time, I made myself valuable company-wide by developing some a niche skill-set. When the parent company bought out all the independently owned franchises, I was prepared to move on. I didn't have an FU-worthy stash, but I had several standing job offers so I wasn't concerned. But the parent company was desperate to keep me, so I negotiated a 100% salary bump, with guaranteed raises every year to follow, and a year's worth of severance pay should they ever decide to give me the boot. As an added bonus, the company paid rent so I could stay in my existing office space, which I just happened to own. I knew I wasn't destined for a long stay in what was now corporate land so I started stashing cash and lots of it. Two and a half years later and I saw the writing on the wall. I knew the company would ultimately have to close the division I worked for so I applied to grad school and prepared to leave. I took a weeklong vacation about 6 months later and my boss called me while I was away. I knew it must be important so I returned his call and he broke the news to me that we were getting shut down. I asked for 7 weeks to wrap up existing business, which he agreed to. The next day I got a call from the Ivy League school I had applied to and was told I had been accepted into the next class. Best timing ever. I finished out my seven weeks of work (in week six, the VP of another division called me and asked me to stay with the company in a job that was a demotion -- I declined, in what was not the most polite fashion!), then spent eight weeks relaxing, and went off to grad school for the next year, during which time I collected the year's worth of severance the company owed me. That was in 2010. I've not managed to go back to having a "real" job since. I plan to keep it that way for some time to come.

Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #95 on: May 28, 2014, 08:22:45 PM »
I think about a year after I left work I realized I could actually retire permanently without having to ever work again - even p/t - if I just sold my paid off house and downsized. I did that and became instantly FI.  I was also frugal, debt free, child free, divorced, and had mostly free or very low cost activities and knew I would have a government pension of $1400/month starting at age 50 and had free or low cost medical thru the VA medical system (although I have always bought a low cost private policy). I also have no heirs so have no problem spending down any principal I have in savings or investments over the coming years to supplement my pension as needed. Currently, with a paid off house and low taxes, insurance and utilities, I can live on about half my pension ($700) per month for basic expenses. The extra goes to travel and fun stuff - or needed things like getting the car fixed.  I've been FIREed over a decade now and love it. And no, I haven't had to go to work to plug any financial holes. Just reduce spending in other areas as needed or do without some things that don't have that much importance to me.

Thanks, that was very helpful. I like how you played with your options and finances (selling a home) to get you where you needed to be. And I love your beach volleyball and travel stories. Those are two of some of the things I want to spend more time on. I am also child-free and debt-free and don't plan on leaving much around when I get to the inevitable.

I just "downsized" late last year to a "smaller" place that helped me get mortgage free. I'm still waiting for the old house to sell (hence the nerves). But the new place is still quite luxurious and bigger than I need. I love the area. But I do have that as my ace in the hole if I need it (can sell and downsize even more in the future).

I'm just getting used to my new expense structure with this move. I think I have shaved off $20k in yearly expenses with this move - no mortgage, no yard maintenance, no alarm, no home phone, much less insurance costs, finally cut the cable, etc. It is quite freeing to see the change! And I only moved a mile away!

I am actually understating my stash. I have more than enough to cover my basic expenses at a 4% SWR. But I'd still like to beef up the travel amount and make sure I still have enough to cover my charitable donations. I'm also a little skittish with the current market highs. I'm sure it's doable if I am forced into the situation. We shall see...

tanhanivar

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #96 on: May 28, 2014, 08:37:54 PM »
Thanks to the guys who posted about crying at work. I'm sorry it happened, but it's also good to know it isn't a 'girly' thing to do or a problem with the employee. It's a human thing, and frequently means there's a problem with the job. Too easy to get shamed out of forgetting that.

Insanity

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #97 on: May 28, 2014, 09:48:32 PM »
I guess I should say that I had a reverse FU story which is currently going on as well.

On July 1, it will be 1 year since I was laid off from my full time job.  I have since gone on my own consulting and while the medical costs is severely hindering the take home pay, I am finding myself enjoying my job even more and doing the work that I was hoping to do with the consulting company but never was given the opportunity.  I was always pushed to be on the more technical side (which I can do) rather than the process side which is my stronger suit.

In the ironic portion of this FU, there are two factors.  One, I don't hold the layoff against the company.  I had a lot (still do) of personal things going on that probably distracted me more than I would like to admit it and more than I led on.  Had I asked for help dealing with them, I probably would have gotten it.  They are a good group of people and generally did care.  The second, the one contract I love right now - I beat out two of their consultants for the contract :)




quilter

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #98 on: May 28, 2014, 10:39:12 PM »
We reached if at age 52 and decided to pad the stache and wait till 55 because then hubby would get health insurance and we would be able to travel and be very comfortable.
Well, the house next door to us sells and I go over to meet the neighbors. The guy was bought in to "clean house" at the company I worked at.
So business as usual at work for me but after about six months we are told we have all been evaluated and there would be a "right sizing". The next day, HR shows up and people begin getting called into the office and escorted out. There seemed I be an awful lot of 50+ in the mix who stood to lose the most.  In our area jobs were tough to come by and being an unemployed older person was not very promising.  Some people had worked there for 30+ years with good evaluations until my clean house  neighbor comes along.
So we carry on and one day I was in a meeting with my boss/neighbor and he suggests something that I think is unethical. I mention my concerns but I am dismissed with a hand wave.
I make an appointment with the boss and tell him in my heart I feel like there are a lot of wrong things going on and I cannot be a party to it. I resign.

Well, here is the best part, about three months later a for sale sign goes up in their front yard. After he downsized the office they let him go too. It was devastating to them. He had a stay at home wife, two high schoolers and a junior high kid, all who had to switch schools to his new location.

He did apologize to me and conceded some of the things that went on were really morally wrong.

I have never been so glad that I skipped all those going out to eat lunch opportunities, did not buy clothes  and drove an old standard fuel efficient car. Because although I did not say it, FU was in my head if not on my tongue.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2014, 10:42:16 PM by quilter »

Tempe

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #99 on: May 29, 2014, 12:38:20 AM »
While I was working my first full time job doing housekeeping while saving for college, I didn't realize how much I hated my job until the end. It was very gossipy talk behind your back place (Some of the older workers were as bad as some of the teenagers working there.) Some of my coworkers were wonderful, some made me cry at different times. The expectations of management to clean rooms in a certain amount of time and the pressure on cleaning fast but not missing things was stressful (Oh god the memories of smashed cereal in every surface from little kids). I hated having the fast team help me more because then I spent time cleaning what they missed outside of my routine.  The pressure to go clean a room instantly because they routinely ignored the 5 pm check in time for guests that showed up earlier. Working for 8-11 hours but never reaching overtime, and crashing asleep once I got home, eating dinner, and then going back to sleep and repeating the next day with my knees hurting.
The owner of the place was one of the worst things at times. He was an elderly man and when he was around he would catch you alone and lecture you about something, sometimes random things, or about something you did wrong, and waste your time. Thank god I lied my ass off around Easter time about going to go to church like things with family so I wouldn't get lectured on values (I could sense it coming when he asked my easter plans and it was a busy saturday, so after one or two minutes he left me alone) One time a van-full of us were hoping to get away from him and ran to catch the ride but we got a full on lecture and he held us up for 30 minutes. (Our entire department used a verb created with his name for when we got caught, it was a valid excuse for lateness with our manager) Some of his complaints were us talking to each in the hallways, that we should only talk in the rooms we were cleaning even though policy and safety was to leave the doors open. I felt bad for him because I think he was getting some form of dementia. No one said anything back to him any time because we were afraid of being fired.

Two months before I was going away to college my mom asked me to quit so I could go home and spend time with my family. At the time there was a heat wave and I was going from AC-ed rooms to heated hallways to the pool areas humidity and was on and off sick for an entire month. When she asked me to quit and I thought about giving notice, the sense of relief I felt was overwhelming and so uplifting. I gave my two weeks the next day and I was so happy. My boss was sad to see me go, and I think tried to convince me not to leave verbally, but I was done. I had a nice chunk of money saved from it all, payed off most of the debt to my mom, and then got to vacation a bit before going to college. Not quite fu money, but having some extra helped the choice to leave. I do have good memories of some of the coworkers, but the bad outweighed the good.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2014, 12:41:25 AM by Tempe »