Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 534075 times)

Taran Wanderer

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #450 on: January 24, 2015, 09:00:27 PM »
"please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Even if you were older or the manager, that might not get the response that you'd like to get.  It seems like the problem here is that nobody has gotten to the root cause of the "failure".  Could you try explaining that you need to get to root cause, and just installing a new version of the same unit won't do that?  Parts swapping is common in situations like this, but it can cost a lot of money without ever getting to root cause.

Malaysia41

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #451 on: January 24, 2015, 09:11:13 PM »
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Perhaps try the high road.  It's way less stressful. 

A) assume positive intent.  He felt hurt and responded poorly.  No need to get ruffled under the feathers.
B) focus on the solution.  "Before we replace the part again, I'd like to rule out other possibilities like mis-coordination issues."
C) reply directly to him with no one on cc.  Keep A) and B) in mind with your response.

I'm guessing this guy has a very good idea that you don't think much of him.  Perhaps keep on the lookout for some action he takes that's useful so you can feel less resentful toward him.
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MrsCoolCat

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #452 on: January 24, 2015, 10:29:55 PM »
As odput said my Horrible Bosses thread/story is an FU in the making... except I'm just starting with investing so way far from FI than I would like.

For those of you familiar with the thorn against my side, every day I probably imagine Mortal Kombat Fatalitying her ass because of the sheer stupidity of her actions. MIND F*CKED 24-7.

MY FU story involves personally going to her boss, the General Counsel of the company, and dropping off the folder of evidence proving that my boss is the most inefficient person I've ever worked with. I'd say that to him (and HR, too, for my imaginary FU story), too. Luckily I don't think anyone would seriously keep my boss if she had to change companies and she "means well" and is nice. SO I will save/spare her and my bridge by not having it burn down in flames. Life is too short to be that cynical. Even for me. :-)

And boy do I have example after example, which I've already outlined in detail in my Horrible Bosses thread. So for now this will all be imaginary and I will continue to build up my Burn Work Book (like from Mean Girls) with all my evidence as therapeutic justice and as an attempt to keep my sanity from the pure MIND F*CK of it all. Thank you. :-D

bzzzt

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #453 on: January 25, 2015, 07:25:13 AM »
The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Opinions are like assholes (eveyone has one) but egos are poison. Degrees and book smarts don't necessarily make you the expert. I don't have enough fingers and toes to count the times where engineers/architects have been not just wrong but TOTALLY wrong in my experience. I try not to do hang people out to dry, but if they play the "I am the expert/boss!" card, I'll let them choke on their piece of paper instead of politely informing them of their mistake before it snowballs.

However, I'm just a lowly tradesman without a piece of paper informing others how smart I am.

Congrats on building up the FU money, but make sure you're doing it for the right reasons.

luna

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #454 on: January 25, 2015, 07:57:10 AM »
The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Opinions are like assholes (eveyone has one) but egos are poison. Degrees and book smarts don't necessarily make you the expert. I don't have enough fingers and toes to count the times where engineers/architects have been not just wrong but TOTALLY wrong in my experience. I try not to do hang people out to dry, but if they play the "I am the expert/boss!" card, I'll let them choke on their piece of paper instead of politely informing them of their mistake before it snowballs.

However, I'm just a lowly tradesman without a piece of paper informing others how smart I am.

Congrats on building up the FU money, but make sure you're doing it for the right reasons.

This!

Anyone trying to throw their title around instead of the facts will lose my respect pretty much immediately (the typical example in my line of business being "I'm your boss so this is the correct design for this piece of software").

I couldn't care less if you had the opportunity to go to a good university or not. I'd say pretty much half of the people studying computer science with me would never in a lifetime make good programmers. And they still ended up with a comp sci degree. And the best programmer I've ever worked with had a liberal arts degree.

Degrees mean nothing. Facts do.

(Also, I hope you change the attitude of "I know best" before you become a manager. It will be very hard to retain any good people with that way of thinking. A good manager hires people that are expects at what they do, and thus believes that they are better situated to make decisions than the manager himself.)

Tabaxus

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #455 on: January 25, 2015, 09:00:49 AM »
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Although there has been an implication along these lines in previous posts:  I won't say people like you suck.  I will say that people who think this way suck, so hopefully you fix how you think.  Discounting "tons of experience from being out in the field" when you are some kid out of college is ridiculous.  You can point to the obvious Gates-type example, but even outside of that kind of obvious example, it is still ridiculous. 

You need to do your job, nothing wrong with that, nothing wrong with calling for something to be done differently from the guy with lots of experience, but appealing to authority (in this case, the authority of a piece of paper) is gross.

I know plenty of grizzled paralegals who know more about the law than freshly-minted lawyers.

Westoftown

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #456 on: January 25, 2015, 09:32:41 AM »
Just to play devil's advocate, I'll share an experience of when FU money can actually hurt you.  I had a great job of 8 years - pension, good bonus, etc and I liked it but got bored.  After a couple of key customers went out of business, I got a new boss that I didn't like and ended up travelling way too much.  This was the same time as we had 2 babies.   I was just freaked out by life with all the travel, new family, etc, etc.   I knew I wanted to do something new - and thought that quitting would be a great way to make this happen - it would force me to make a change, even though I didnt have a good idea of what that change looked like!  If I didnt quit, I'd end up staying there and find financial reasons not to leave.

Anyway, long story short I quit on a whim.  6 months later I was in a similar job with slightly lower pay.  I guess it worked out, but given that I'm in the same field - I would have been better off riding out that bad manager/travel storm.  The company was great and now I'd be in a better role.

The moral - if you use your FU powers - make sure you have a plan.   IF you don't take control of your career direction, life will do it for you.  I guess everything works out, we're close to FIRE now and I have a concrete exit plan, SMART goals to get there, etc.

mjs111

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #457 on: January 25, 2015, 12:49:25 PM »
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field

I have a degree and I also manage a team.  Many managers (most? almost all?) would tend to value tons of field experience over a degree. I certainly do when I need to hire.  It's also nice to have a mix: older experienced folks and younger (but talented and hungry) folks. The older guys tend to bring a lot of experience and maturity to the team, and the younger guys bring a lot of creativity to the team.  Years and years of experience leads to good judgement, but judgement also can tend to limit creativity, since you already have pretty defined notions about what works and what doesn't.


Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

I hope, for your sake, that if you become a manager that you lose this attitude or you likely won't be a manager for long.  You'll either be moved out of the position, an unhealthy amount of your team will quit, or some combination of the two will occur.  Another poster said it well: as manager you hire good guys to work for you and then get the heck out of their way, supporting them as best they need to get the job done. Instilling fear in them is never part of the equation.

Mike

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #458 on: January 25, 2015, 01:06:51 PM »

 long story short I quit on a whim.

Don't quit on a "whim". Even if something pisses you off at work don't quit rite away just say you don't feel well and leave work rite then and sleep on your decision for a few days to make sure it's what you really want. I don't see ANY downfalls from having FU $$$$$ if you least do that. 

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #459 on: January 25, 2015, 01:09:22 PM »
Not an epic FU story - more like frugal habits = financial choices.  I worked for the Dept of State as a Foreign Service officer and really liked my job.  Although I was frequently transferred, I knew that if I didn't like either my supervisor or colleagues, either they or I would be moving on within a couple of years.  Then the world changed and the number of dangerous, unaccompanied tours soared.  The Dept instituted a policy of "fair-share" so that all of us would share the burden of these tours (there aren't many of us - there are fewer FSOs worldwide than full-time musicians with the U.S. Army bands).  I agreed with the policy, but I was a single mother with no one with whom I could have left my daughter.  Boarding school would have been provided, but all kids are different - and mine wouldn't have done well in that environment.  So, having reached the age of 50 with 25 years in, I retired.

My colleagues were taken aback when I told them I didn't plan on getting a full-time job afterwards (pension at age 50 is drastically reduced so most early "retirees" have another full-time job lined up before they take the plunge).  How was I going to survive?  This is where my frugal habits saved me.  While my colleagues had purchased nice houses in the suburbs when they started their careers, I had bought an 850 sq ft fixer-upper within a 5 minute walk to the metro and only one stop to DC.  In addition to saving time (I spent about 35 minutes a day commuting on public transport - my colleagues spent on average 2 1/2 hours), it saved money - $1.40 per trip, vs over $4.00.  When the real estate situation improved, I didn't upgrade.  I also didn't upgrade my 2-dr Toyota despite some urging (a couple of different colleagues actually took me aside and told me that my dented, 17 year old car wasn't part of the image that the U.S. Embassy wanted to project).

When I retired, I sold my house for triple for what I paid for it, moved to the midwest closer to my relatives, and bought a house for cash.  A year later I am working on my own web-based business - it doesn't make any money yet, but I can afford to do what I want.  It's a great feeling.
This is great.  I have a friend who I'm pretty sure is a military version of an FSO (not sure if they have the same title?)  But he has had way too many unaccompanied tours of late, so he's getting out.  And very soon.

LadyStache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #460 on: January 25, 2015, 01:10:30 PM »
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field

I have a degree and I also manage a team.  Many managers (most? almost all?) would tend to value tons of field experience over a degree. I certainly do when I need to hire.  It's also nice to have a mix: older experienced folks and younger (but talented and hungry) folks. The older guys tend to bring a lot of experience and maturity to the team, and the younger guys bring a lot of creativity to the team.  Years and years of experience leads to good judgement, but judgement also can tend to limit creativity, since you already have pretty defined notions about what works and what doesn't.


Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

I hope, for your sake, that if you become a manager that you lose this attitude or you likely won't be a manager for long.  You'll either be moved out of the position, an unhealthy amount of your team will quit, or some combination of the two will occur.  Another poster said it well: as manager you hire good guys to work for you and then get the heck out of their way, supporting them as best they need to get the job done. Instilling fear in them is never part of the equation.

Mike

I agree with Mike 100%. I also want to add, the reason you're upset is because he emailed you for an explanation. Perhaps he genuinely wanted to know how to do his job better. Perhaps he had no way of knowing that the equipment had been replaced by brand new equipment recently (he is fairly new to your company after all). And if you were going to overrule him on a project he's been working on, it would have been courteous of you to call him to discuss the issue or to take the initiative to coach him on specific things that could be done in the future before requesting replacements. After all, that's what a real leader would do.

Kris

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #461 on: January 25, 2015, 01:20:14 PM »
Not an epic FU story - more like frugal habits = financial choices.  I worked for the Dept of State as a Foreign Service officer and really liked my job.  Although I was frequently transferred, I knew that if I didn't like either my supervisor or colleagues, either they or I would be moving on within a couple of years.  Then the world changed and the number of dangerous, unaccompanied tours soared.  The Dept instituted a policy of "fair-share" so that all of us would share the burden of these tours (there aren't many of us - there are fewer FSOs worldwide than full-time musicians with the U.S. Army bands).  I agreed with the policy, but I was a single mother with no one with whom I could have left my daughter.  Boarding school would have been provided, but all kids are different - and mine wouldn't have done well in that environment.  So, having reached the age of 50 with 25 years in, I retired.

My colleagues were taken aback when I told them I didn't plan on getting a full-time job afterwards (pension at age 50 is drastically reduced so most early "retirees" have another full-time job lined up before they take the plunge).  How was I going to survive?  This is where my frugal habits saved me.  While my colleagues had purchased nice houses in the suburbs when they started their careers, I had bought an 850 sq ft fixer-upper within a 5 minute walk to the metro and only one stop to DC.  In addition to saving time (I spent about 35 minutes a day commuting on public transport - my colleagues spent on average 2 1/2 hours), it saved money - $1.40 per trip, vs over $4.00.  When the real estate situation improved, I didn't upgrade.  I also didn't upgrade my 2-dr Toyota despite some urging (a couple of different colleagues actually took me aside and told me that my dented, 17 year old car wasn't part of the image that the U.S. Embassy wanted to project).

When I retired, I sold my house for triple for what I paid for it, moved to the midwest closer to my relatives, and bought a house for cash.  A year later I am working on my own web-based business - it doesn't make any money yet, but I can afford to do what I want.  It's a great feeling.
This is great.  I have a friend who I'm pretty sure is a military version of an FSO (not sure if they have the same title?)  But he has had way too many unaccompanied tours of late, so he's getting out.  And very soon.

This is a great story.  It is fairly amazing how a few well-traced "paths" seem to attract the majority of the traffic, so much so that it's difficult for most people to see that there are other ways to get from A to B. 
"Well I'm sure I'd feel much worse if I weren't under such heavy sedation."   - David St. Hubins, This is Spinal Tap

Cinder

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #462 on: January 25, 2015, 03:01:29 PM »

 long story short I quit on a whim.

Don't quit on a "whim". Even if something pisses you off at work don't quit rite away just say you don't feel well and leave work rite then and sleep on your decision for a few days to make sure it's what you really want. I don't see ANY downfalls from having FU $$$$$ if you least do that.

The old saying goes... don't run away from something, run to something.

tyler1215

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #463 on: January 26, 2015, 06:19:24 PM »
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

caliq

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #464 on: January 26, 2015, 06:25:51 PM »
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

I think you should follow Twain's advice :)

Edit:  I realized that you're probably feeling like everyone just shit on you, and that's kind of what happened.   So I can see why you came back with a hugely defensive reply.

I just want to offer this -- have you ever thought about the best way to achieve the "results and bottom line" you're looking for?  Has it occurred to you that seeing the employees you supervise as people, approaching them with compassion and sympathy, and to work together with them to solve problems might be the most effective way of achieving those results?  It's very hard to be motivated to fix a problem for a guy who's always treating you like shit; if you developed actual relationships with your underlings, their productivity would probably rise, which would make you look even better to your boss...
« Last Edit: January 26, 2015, 06:54:34 PM by caliq »

Cheddar Stacker

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #465 on: January 26, 2015, 06:38:43 PM »
I think you should follow Twain's advice :)

I thought the same thing. I know nothing abut you Tyler1215, but your aggressiveness here seems misplaced. And if you ever re-read the second paragraph you just wrote with an editor's eye you might learn to be a bit more humble. Or not, whatever.
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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #466 on: January 26, 2015, 06:58:41 PM »
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

Phew.  I'm happy I don't work with you. 

+1 on Cheddar Stacker's comments, and I'll add this:

In the future, you may want to reconsider posting in a public forum where 'face-punching' is both accepted and encouraged. 

In the investor forums, I got beaten up pretty badly.  I thought I had my shit together.  Ultimately, however, the searing face-punches made me take a second look at my thinking.  And damned it if some of those harsh responders weren't right!
   
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« Reply #467 on: January 26, 2015, 07:00:51 PM »
I work as an independent contractor and am regularly on call for emergency based response contracts that include traveling across the country as a prerequisite. Every job requires travel.

I am young, married but with no mortgage (very low rent), no children, no pets, very little debt. My wife works with me often as my assistant, thus saving/earning us more money.

Because we have very little debt to service we can afford to decide which jobs to take, and when to take time off.

Until recently I have specifically contracted to a single company for the entirety of my business. Our relationship has been very beneficial to each of us and there has been no reason to diversify. However, due to circumstances out of my control, I have recently had to subcontract through another company (an affiliate and acquaintance in the industry).

When the time came to make the switch, I began to negotiate the contract rates with the new company. Historically I have received 90% of the contract award while the company I originally contracted with kept 10% as a finders fee. 10% is very low, but I am 95% autonomous, thus they make money for simply giving me the contract. I manage all aspects of the job, freeing capacity for the company to pursue more business.

When making the switch I offered to let the new company keep 15% of the award rate. They were flabbergasted. NO WAY. They would offer a minimum of 30%, they have overhead, upkeep, etc!

I pointed out that what while they may have overhead and upkeep with their other contractors, I bring autonomy to the table, thus greatly reducing all of their overhead. I require no maintenance, am completely self sufficient, AND self funded. Thus they have no upfront cost for contract acquisition.

In lieu of the facts, they unhappily offered a 20/80 split, which I accepted, but only for the FIRST contract.

The next contract recently came up and I was contacted by the new company to take the job. They were eager to capitalize on my capacity as they previously had not had a contractor available, and thus could not to accept these lucrative contracts.  I agreed under the condition that the new contract award split would be 15/85. Having seen my previous performance, they agreed. They had no choice. Take it or leave it.

I'm not even part way close to FI, but have a 12mo emergency fund, thus had the option to take the "FU" position. I did, and it worked.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2015, 07:06:50 PM by bigalsmith101 »
I spent the first 6 years of "real" life in a self imposed semi retirement, to secure a lifetime of stories. Now it's time to secure the next lifetime through the badassity of FI.

"I achieved such a high level of badassity I just don't realize how normal people miss the whole process." --Le Barbu

Knapptyme

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #468 on: January 26, 2015, 09:56:13 PM »
I think FU Money is an attitude that can be had without the funds to back it up if you believe in your own skills/potential. My example:

In the summer of 2007, I ran a one-week summer soccer camp for high school kids in my area at my school. I had to set up a separate business entity to do it right, but all my proceeds went to benefit the team I coached at that school because there were no funds for the athletic program. I did this same thing the year before and everything went just fine. This year, however, they wanted me to "rent" the field from the school even though they knew all my proceeds went back to the school's soccer program. They told me it was to cover the cost of mowing the field for the week where they would've just let it keep growing until school started again. I thought this was fairly reasonable, but not the brightest move by any means. (Let it be known that the principal was an absolute tool. She had no clue what she was doing, and this was one more piece of evidence.) Anyway, I arrive on Monday for my soccer camp, and the fields have not been mowed. My first day with the kids is in knee-high grass and weeds. Needless to say, I was pissed, especially if that's what I was paying rent for. I stormed into the office to give her a piece of my mind and left to mow half the field that night myself with my push mower so I wouldn't look like such an idiot the next day. The rest of the week went okay; a parent came and mowed the rest of the field for free. The principal came to collect the rent money from me late in the week; I had a bag of coins for her to count out if she cared.

I realize that's a lot of lead-in if you've read this far, but my tale is about one-third in. After the weekend, I get notified on Monday that the school board would like to talk to me about my behavior and interaction with our principal during that week of soccer camp. Apparently, my reaction to the indignity of the fields not being mowed was a sign of insubordination to them. (This is weird because I was a separate entity that was renting the field from the school as instructed. The fact that I happened to be employed there should not have been a factor.) They set up a meeting where I had an opportunity to apologize and come to terms with being the bad guy in this situation. In this special hearing, I stood firm to my beliefs as a soccer coach, a teacher, and a human being that I was in the right. I gave them a list of reasons why it would be foolish to terminate my contract for the upcoming school year and the difficulty they would face in doing so. It felt really good to let them know what a terrible decision they were about to make. After a brief deliberation, I was welcomed back into the room to hear my fate of termination. Here's the best part, and they didn't know this was coming. My wife also worked there as a teacher and resigned immediately. We were young, had recently bought a house, and had no secure income outside of our teaching gigs. Their only response were mouths agape. The principal had the gall to speak, and in her stupidity uttered towards my wife, "Can I get that in writing?" The middle of July is not an ideal time to find replacements for the English and Math Department Chairs as well as new soccer coaches.

The following year was what we call our "lean" year. Mustachian principles had to be used to survive, not thrive with a large savings rate. I began selling some of my video games, old CD's, and books online as a side gig. I did construction work for my brother. I did some substitute teaching (pretty rough sometimes because I took any and all gigs available). In my new temporary job--as in-school suspension room monitor--I was allowed access to the internet all day, every day in what amounted as my search for a new full-time job. I got hooked up with a teacher head-hunting firm and they found a great opportunity for me in the private sector making twice what I made at my other school. The best part was that my wife got hired on at that new school, too. We doubled our income, moved out of wintery Michigan for Florida, and live biking/walking distance from our employment. As for our bumbling principal, she was demoted back to being a fifth-grade teacher the year we moved and is no longer with the school (I'm not sure why).

Having an FU attitude allowed us to pursue even better opportunities elsewhere. I can tell you that school was so conservative, they never thought anyone would be so "reckless" about their future, and that made all the difference. Now, we're just about 9 years from FI and an option to RE which I will likely take. My wife may continue to teach; she finds it fulfilling.

expatartist

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #469 on: January 26, 2015, 10:43:36 PM »
"If you don't take control of your career direction, life will do it for you."

+1 to the poster above who wrote this.

DoubleDown

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #470 on: January 27, 2015, 09:48:32 AM »
I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead.

Where did you get this idea? Did someone teach this to you, or did you conclude it on your own?
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ender

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #471 on: January 27, 2015, 12:56:52 PM »
I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead.

Where did you get this idea? Did someone teach this to you, or did you conclude it on your own?

To be fair, you don't really need it to manage. It generally makes you a poor leader but you can still manage without either compassion or sympathy.

But managing and leading are very, very different things.

Luck12

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #472 on: January 27, 2015, 01:09:34 PM »
As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

Anybody can comment on anything they wish to comment on!  Jack Welch was a big time asshole.   Your management style is one reason a lot of people want FU money so they don't have to put with arrogant and condescending jerk store managers. 

dd564

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #473 on: January 27, 2015, 03:38:57 PM »
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Although there has been an implication along these lines in previous posts:  I won't say people like you suck.  I will say that people who think this way suck, so hopefully you fix how you think.  Discounting "tons of experience from being out in the field" when you are some kid out of college is ridiculous.  You can point to the obvious Gates-type example, but even outside of that kind of obvious example, it is still ridiculous. 

You need to do your job, nothing wrong with that, nothing wrong with calling for something to be done differently from the guy with lots of experience, but appealing to authority (in this case, the authority of a piece of paper) is gross.

I know plenty of grizzled paralegals who know more about the law than freshly-minted lawyers.

I'm not sure why the poster feels the need to show up a seasoned veteran with real life experience.  It's a total pr!ck move to try and create conflict when there is no need for some.  I can only assume that due to his age he has an inferiority complex or something which is unusual for engineers.

At best this appears to be someone being a d!ck just for the sake of being a d!ck.  The older dude is probably planning his own FU story for when this kid becomes the "boss".

dd564

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #474 on: January 27, 2015, 03:45:08 PM »
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

Oh. I responded to your previous post before reading this.

Now, from your post above, I see that you have a bigger dick than any of us here so you win.

dandarc

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Re: Realizing my net-value
« Reply #475 on: January 27, 2015, 04:16:25 PM »
I work as an independent contractor and am regularly on call for emergency based response contracts that include traveling across the country as a prerequisite. Every job requires travel.

I am young, married but with no mortgage (very low rent), no children, no pets, very little debt. My wife works with me often as my assistant, thus saving/earning us more money.

Because we have very little debt to service we can afford to decide which jobs to take, and when to take time off.

Until recently I have specifically contracted to a single company for the entirety of my business. Our relationship has been very beneficial to each of us and there has been no reason to diversify. However, due to circumstances out of my control, I have recently had to subcontract through another company (an affiliate and acquaintance in the industry).

When the time came to make the switch, I began to negotiate the contract rates with the new company. Historically I have received 90% of the contract award while the company I originally contracted with kept 10% as a finders fee. 10% is very low, but I am 95% autonomous, thus they make money for simply giving me the contract. I manage all aspects of the job, freeing capacity for the company to pursue more business.

When making the switch I offered to let the new company keep 15% of the award rate. They were flabbergasted. NO WAY. They would offer a minimum of 30%, they have overhead, upkeep, etc!

I pointed out that what while they may have overhead and upkeep with their other contractors, I bring autonomy to the table, thus greatly reducing all of their overhead. I require no maintenance, am completely self sufficient, AND self funded. Thus they have no upfront cost for contract acquisition.

In lieu of the facts, they unhappily offered a 20/80 split, which I accepted, but only for the FIRST contract.

The next contract recently came up and I was contacted by the new company to take the job. They were eager to capitalize on my capacity as they previously had not had a contractor available, and thus could not to accept these lucrative contracts.  I agreed under the condition that the new contract award split would be 15/85. Having seen my previous performance, they agreed. They had no choice. Take it or leave it.

I'm not even part way close to FI, but have a 12mo emergency fund, thus had the option to take the "FU" position. I did, and it worked.
Next year ask for 90-10.
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Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #476 on: January 27, 2015, 08:14:05 PM »
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Although there has been an implication along these lines in previous posts:  I won't say people like you suck.  I will say that people who think this way suck, so hopefully you fix how you think.  Discounting "tons of experience from being out in the field" when you are some kid out of college is ridiculous.  You can point to the obvious Gates-type example, but even outside of that kind of obvious example, it is still ridiculous. 

You need to do your job, nothing wrong with that, nothing wrong with calling for something to be done differently from the guy with lots of experience, but appealing to authority (in this case, the authority of a piece of paper) is gross.

I know plenty of grizzled paralegals who know more about the law than freshly-minted lawyers.

I'm not sure why the poster feels the need to show up a seasoned veteran with real life experience.  It's a total pr!ck move to try and create conflict when there is no need for some.  I can only assume that due to his age he has an inferiority complex or something which is unusual for engineers.

At best this appears to be someone being a d!ck just for the sake of being a d!ck.  The older dude is probably planning his own FU story for when this kid becomes the "boss".

Perhaps this is an FU story after all, but told from the perspective of the older engineer.

Ha ha...reminds me of the demotivational poster:

oldtoyota

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #477 on: January 28, 2015, 08:20:44 AM »

 long story short I quit on a whim.

Don't quit on a "whim". Even if something pisses you off at work don't quit rite away just say you don't feel well and leave work rite then and sleep on your decision for a few days to make sure it's what you really want. I don't see ANY downfalls from having FU $$$$$ if you least do that.

That is what I did. I wanted to resign last fall and waited several months to do it.


rockstache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #478 on: January 28, 2015, 08:41:23 AM »
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

I didn't respond to the first one, but man....this guy is exactly why I am saving to be FI, so DH and I don't have to put up with someone like that ever becoming our boss.

gimp

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #479 on: January 28, 2015, 08:09:52 PM »
The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Well ain't you a dick and a half. I mean, maybe I shouldn't argue with you, since I don't have the "PE" initials following my name, since I'm just an electrical engineer who doesn't need the government to tell me that I can design things.

Winning an argument by appeal to authority - even if that authority is you (though it's really not, it's the certifying agency granting you license to say you're a PE) - is a maneuver that only works on small children. "I'm your parent and you will do what I say, because I know best." Even that doesn't work very well.

Maybe next time you should have a discussion with this person who is your peer, though arguably knows a hell of a lot more than you do, on the proper steps to take. When my boss doesn't know about something I'm doing, he doesn't come running in to tell me my decision is wrong, he asks me to tell him my decision and why I made it. We will come to an agreement on whether something is the right way to go, because we're on the same page; he knows more than I do in general, but I know more about the specific task on which I'm currently working.

Try to remember that, lest you become the sort of piece of shit boss people leave the company from. "I don't need compassion to lead." No, you don't. You can crack the whip all you like. Just remember that if you're cracking the whip, you damn well better be paying out the nose to make it worthwhile for anyone to stay. I can quit tomorrow and have a job as soon as I come back from a nice vacation. I wouldn't give two thoughts before leaving your employ.

Kris

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #480 on: January 28, 2015, 08:25:19 PM »
The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Well ain't you a dick and a half. I mean, maybe I shouldn't argue with you, since I don't have the "PE" initials following my name, since I'm just an electrical engineer who doesn't need the government to tell me that I can design things.

Winning an argument by appeal to authority - even if that authority is you (though it's really not, it's the certifying agency granting you license to say you're a PE) - is a maneuver that only works on small children. "I'm your parent and you will do what I say, because I know best." Even that doesn't work very well.

Maybe next time you should have a discussion with this person who is your peer, though arguably knows a hell of a lot more than you do, on the proper steps to take. When my boss doesn't know about something I'm doing, he doesn't come running in to tell me my decision is wrong, he asks me to tell him my decision and why I made it. We will come to an agreement on whether something is the right way to go, because we're on the same page; he knows more than I do in general, but I know more about the specific task on which I'm currently working.

Try to remember that, lest you become the sort of piece of shit boss people leave the company from. "I don't need compassion to lead." No, you don't. You can crack the whip all you like. Just remember that if you're cracking the whip, you damn well better be paying out the nose to make it worthwhile for anyone to stay. I can quit tomorrow and have a job as soon as I come back from a nice vacation. I wouldn't give two thoughts before leaving your employ.

Teachable moment.

Hope he takes note. + 1.
"Well I'm sure I'd feel much worse if I weren't under such heavy sedation."   - David St. Hubins, This is Spinal Tap

TonyPlush

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #481 on: January 28, 2015, 08:35:34 PM »
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."
I found it funny that when I googled Jack Welch, this image came up:


eyePod

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #482 on: January 29, 2015, 07:18:21 AM »
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

I think you should follow Twain's advice :)

Edit:  I realized that you're probably feeling like everyone just shit on you, and that's kind of what happened.   So I can see why you came back with a hugely defensive reply.

I just want to offer this -- have you ever thought about the best way to achieve the "results and bottom line" you're looking for?  Has it occurred to you that seeing the employees you supervise as people, approaching them with compassion and sympathy, and to work together with them to solve problems might be the most effective way of achieving those results?  It's very hard to be motivated to fix a problem for a guy who's always treating you like shit; if you developed actual relationships with your underlings, their productivity would probably rise, which would make you look even better to your boss...

I think someone's in line for a good reading of 7 habits of highly effective people.

Now, on the one hand, the non-engineer may be a moron. I've seen plenty of people with tons of "industry experience" who were lazy idiots.

On other hand though, I'm glad that I've never had a manager like you. You sound like an a-hole. And honestly, I'm surprised you're hanging out in an ER forum when you seem like you love the cutthroat idea of business and working for the man.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2015, 07:24:46 AM by eyePod »
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OldDogNewTrick

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #483 on: January 29, 2015, 07:42:00 AM »
Dependency is too weak a word, slavery too strong a word, but it's somewhere in the middle there.
Servitude?

Peonage -

Prairie Stash

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #484 on: January 29, 2015, 08:06:23 AM »
At this point it's getting funny and sad. Tyler made a mistake, multiple people pile on him and call him various adjectives. The other guy (his coworker) also made a mistake.

From what I read both people in the story took the low approach. Tyler for not consulting (informing, talking to etc.) with the other guy, the other guy for making a public display of it. Tyler screwed up and the other guy cc'd his entire group calling for Tyler to defend himself! Since when do experienced guys publicly ridicule new staff? I'd be hostile too if an experienced guy flaunted how I screwed up to my entire working group. However that doesn't excuse Tyler's actions, it just means both parties are behaving badly. I personally hope Tyler views this as a learning opportunity, it's great this happened. Think how much better his group will be if he learns from this, managers aren't born they learn from all their experiences; both good and bad.

Where I'm from Engineers sign an obligation, it was written by Rudyard Kipling (English author long deceased). In that oath we pledge not to belittle our colleagues. We ask for forgiveness for our mistakes. At the time of the obligation we're reminded that engineers can cause great harm when personal jealousies and pettiness corrupt our work.

fantabulous

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #485 on: January 31, 2015, 05:10:24 AM »
Thought I'd add my own, despite not having any serious FU money or having to say FU to work. Last week I came out as transgender at work to little excitement. Having enough money to cover my debts and enough job skills to find some remote work if need be helped me to get over the whole lack of employment protection concern I had. You might say I said FU to being closeted instead.

Also, to be both foamy and on topic, my bosses were all kinds of supportive in helping me get enough things sorted out before making the big announcement. This let me relatively focus on work without them simply cracking the whip.

Malaysia41

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #486 on: January 31, 2015, 05:36:40 AM »
Thought I'd add my own, despite not having any serious FU money or having to say FU to work. Last week I came out as transgender at work to little excitement. Having enough money to cover my debts and enough job skills to find some remote work if need be helped me to get over the whole lack of employment protection concern I had. You might say I said FU to being closeted instead.

Also, to be both foamy and on topic, my bosses were all kinds of supportive in helping me get enough things sorted out before making the big announcement. This let me relatively focus on work without them simply cracking the whip.

Congratulations fantabulous!
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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #487 on: January 31, 2015, 06:15:06 AM »
Thought I'd add my own, despite not having any serious FU money or having to say FU to work. Last week I came out as transgender at work to little excitement. Having enough money to cover my debts and enough job skills to find some remote work if need be helped me to get over the whole lack of employment protection concern I had. You might say I said FU to being closeted instead.

Also, to be both foamy and on topic, my bosses were all kinds of supportive in helping me get enough things sorted out before making the big announcement. This let me relatively focus on work without them simply cracking the whip.

I am glad your bosses were supportive. Still a very big step for you A congratulations. I am part of my company's LGBTA group and we are working on some training and education to support this exact scenario.  PM me if you have any thoughts, resources, or advice.
Also, I'd like to find a book or other resource regarding personal finance/FI - is any book you would recommend that maybe covers some issues LGBTA face or deal with more frequently than the general population?

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #488 on: January 31, 2015, 06:47:15 AM »
Thought I'd add my own, despite not having any serious FU money or having to say FU to work. Last week I came out as transgender at work to little excitement. Having enough money to cover my debts and enough job skills to find some remote work if need be helped me to get over the whole lack of employment protection concern I had. You might say I said FU to being closeted instead.

Also, to be both foamy and on topic, my bosses were all kinds of supportive in helping me get enough things sorted out before making the big announcement. This let me relatively focus on work without them simply cracking the whip.

Congratulations fantabulous!

+1

aschmidt2930

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #489 on: January 31, 2015, 07:12:49 AM »
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Is your coworker wrong? Probably, but a response like that is childish whether you have FU money or not.  I

marketnonsenses

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #490 on: February 02, 2015, 09:03:29 AM »
Not Epic but amusing.
I had a job I didnt like and did not like some of my coworkers. It was weird for me because I am really friendly and get along with almost everyone. I got a new job offer and accepted. I gave a full month notice, in part because I could not start the new job for that long. People immediately started treating me ever worse and being extremely rude. They doubled my work because "You will be gone and dont have to do this anymore. You can do more for the last few weeks to give us a break." It was some odd logic. One person stopping working for days because "if you are going to quit why should I have to work."  I explained to one coworker that I could walk out any time I want and do not need to take this abuse. I was only trying to help them transition. After a few days harassment and hostility I emailed everyone saying  I was not coming back the next day. They freaked out. They claimed they didnt know how to do any of my work or the status of anything (I tried telling them multiple times and showed them where I saved my stuff). They tried demanding that I come back and fulfill my time. I told management that I didnt ow them anything. I told them they just fired 5 people without warning and didnt give them a month.  They said I was a bad employee and tried to discredit me. I laughed about all of it. No clue what happened to them. Not living paycheck to paycheck allowed me to leave weeks early.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #491 on: February 02, 2015, 09:14:39 AM »
Thought I'd add my own, despite not having any serious FU money or having to say FU to work. Last week I came out as transgender at work to little excitement. Having enough money to cover my debts and enough job skills to find some remote work if need be helped me to get over the whole lack of employment protection concern I had. You might say I said FU to being closeted instead.

Also, to be both foamy and on topic, my bosses were all kinds of supportive in helping me get enough things sorted out before making the big announcement. This let me relatively focus on work without them simply cracking the whip.

:D Love stories like this.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #492 on: February 02, 2015, 09:15:19 AM »
People immediately started treating me ever worse and being extremely rude. They doubled my work because "You will be gone and dont have to do this anymore. You can do more for the last few weeks to give us a break." It was some odd logic. One person stopping working for days because "if you are going to quit why should I have to work."  I explained to one coworker that I could walk out any time I want and do not need to take this abuse. I was only trying to help them transition.

Wow, you worked with some crazy people.  Or perhaps small children.  I am glad you got out.

marketnonsenses

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #493 on: February 02, 2015, 09:33:38 AM »
People immediately started treating me ever worse and being extremely rude. They doubled my work because "You will be gone and dont have to do this anymore. You can do more for the last few weeks to give us a break." It was some odd logic. One person stopping working for days because "if you are going to quit why should I have to work."  I explained to one coworker that I could walk out any time I want and do not need to take this abuse. I was only trying to help them transition.

Wow, you worked with some crazy people.  Or perhaps small children.  I am glad you got out.

They are 40-50 year olds who act like children and have high paying jobs. Never been somewhere where so many people slipped though the cracks and ended up with jobs they are wildly unqualified for. There were a couple good ones but on average it was horrible.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #494 on: April 30, 2015, 01:46:39 AM »
Replying to bump this thread up for newer forum members who haven't seen it.  Very valuable source of encouragement, inspiration, and support.  Thank you everyone who shared their stories.
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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #495 on: April 30, 2015, 02:28:20 AM »

- is any book you would recommend that maybe covers some issues LGBTA face or deal with more frequently than the general population?

Sorry, can't help it - have you seen the price of a good Broadway show?  (took neice & nephew to Lion King for a major treat - tickets for 4 of us were crazy expensive)

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #496 on: April 30, 2015, 11:36:14 AM »
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."
I missed this the first time around.  I agree, you are kind of a d!ck.  Actually compassion is a very good skill to have when leading.

I cannot speak for your particular engineer, but some of the best engineers I've worked with have no degree.

When it comes to the equipment being replaced 3 times, with an engineer who has been there 6 months - my first question would have been, "who was responsible for the first two replacements?"  In my industry, 3 replacements might happen in 3 years, which means this 3rd one would have happened to this guy for the first time - and he had no history of it.

And if it was the same guy - for the people who work for me - I would have asked very leading questions on "have we figured out why it failed last two times? What information did we record the last two times?"  I'm all about root cause and documentation so that we don't make the same mistake twice, and so we don't rely on (faulty) memories.

Oh, and I'm an engineer.  With experience.  And degrees.  But not a jerk.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #497 on: April 30, 2015, 12:58:13 PM »
When it comes to experience vs degrees, one does not necessarily indicate a higher skill level than the other. There are plenty of people with years of experience in doing something in less than optimal ways. There are plenty of people with degrees that aren't very good at translating their academic achievements into solving real world problems. Sometimes the person with more years experience will be better. Sometimes the person with the degree will be better. Try to evaluate someone by their actual skill level rather than degrees or years of experience.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #498 on: May 31, 2015, 06:04:50 PM »
I sometimes find myself checking out this thread on Sunday nights.

Wonder why??

Seems to have been a shortage of epic stories recently.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #499 on: May 31, 2015, 08:25:43 PM »
I sometimes find myself checking out this thread on Sunday nights.

Wonder why??

Seems to have been a shortage of epic stories recently.
"Sunday Night Syndrome".

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One way to avoid this issue would be clicking on the "Notify" button by a post, but that would just spread the Sunday night review out across the rest of the week...
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