Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 686089 times)

fantabulous

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #350 on: September 09, 2014, 08:39:02 PM »
I honestly don't know whether I get kudos or a face punch for this.

Kudos to you, face punch to your employer.

viper155

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #351 on: September 10, 2014, 06:10:19 AM »
I was bartending at a place that I actually loved working in but I was getting bored. I was waiting to be called to my dream job with the FDNY. Biding time. One day I received my notice that I would be getting sworn in 8 weeks later. I went to work the next day and when the boss came in, out of nowhere, I told him I quit. I worked one more day and the day after that I left on a 6 week bicycle journey. I had done this sort of thing before, but this time I did it the right way.
That was 1990. Today I'm retired from my job with the FDNY but it sure did feel good to just pack up and go!

Pat

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #352 on: September 10, 2014, 08:10:50 AM »
I agree with what tooqk4u22 said on the first page about FU money affording one the opportunity to stay as well as leave. I enjoy the work I do, most of the people I work with, have a relatively short commute, never travel for work, save >50% of my take-home, and still have room to grow in my career with our organization, so I have turned down other potentially higher paying opportunities because I didn't want to risk ending up somewhere I'm not as happy as I am now.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #353 on: September 10, 2014, 01:58:33 PM »
Two Stories that are not me but I witnessed.

1. This guy worked with us for a few months. We had a meeting almost monthly were we got yelled at for not doing enough work. All in really vague and unmeasurable terms. I thought they were funny and almost seemed like satire from a office show. This one guy did not. He called off the next day. Then the day after that called in and said I am not coming in today or ever again. Not sure how you want to notify HR or the rest of management but I will mail my ID badge in.  (Click)"   (The manager told us this conversation in a tone like this guy was a loser) Turns out he was working on a side project and needed to work for a few more months before he could go on his own. That meeting made him say it was time.

2. Get an email from a .net devloper that says.  "It was nice working with  you all. Good bye"  Management flipped out because he didnt give any warning. He sent that email and walked out with no explanation.  Still have no idea what happened

missbee

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #354 on: September 11, 2014, 01:14:27 AM »
I’m not sure if this belongs in the “find a new job” gauntlet challenge or here:
I had a horrible job – I took it because I thought it would be a good move but I never did get anything I was promised in the interviews…
Anyway, after a bit over a year in the job, the workload had tripled (as was expected) and they finally got me the long promised assistant. And decided to pay them more than me, even though I would be training and supervising them. This was the straw that broke the camel’s back (see other work related rant from a few months back).
So I did some sums and realised that I did have a couple of months FU money up my sleeve and I could afford to stand up for myself for once. So I did, and got sacked.
But, being in the wrong they had to give me my accrued leave and pay in lieu of notice so I got a few unexpected grand for acting in my own best interests for a change :)
The day after, I bumped into some team mates from a previous government job and got a foot back in the door there. I did get a glorious three weeks of leisure before stepping into a cushy role that pays more per hour for a fraction of the responsibility and has awesome flexibility in a super convenient location. Yes, FU money is a nice thing to have.

trailrated

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #355 on: September 22, 2014, 08:44:39 AM »
"What matters most is how well you walk through the fire. "

pachnik

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #356 on: September 22, 2014, 09:14:17 AM »
OP here, I think this lady takes the cake

http://www.mediabistro.com/tvnewser/alaska-tv-reporter-quits-on-air-fk-it-i-quit_b239657

Wow, I can't believe that one.  Talk about burning bridges.  I don't think I'd ever have the courage to do it quite so dramatically.  Thanks for posting it. 

partgypsy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #357 on: September 23, 2014, 01:19:46 PM »
I guess in retrospect I have a couple fu stories. I got a job right out of college that was actually quite good, in the late 80's making 21K a year in the field I wanted to be in (research). In addition to the job I was being paid to do (study coordinator for a study funded by a particular company) I did a lot of other things for them, being a recent college grad and eager beaver, including editing their newsletter, working on other studies, and formatting letters for the secretary (she was there for her looks and that's about it). Anyways the study is expanding to other sites, and I'm flown out to meet the expanded team. I'm also recognized because we were the first site and also helped them redo the data collection forms. The VP of the company lets us know that each site is getting 35K to pay for our job, and to let him know if we are not getting it. My mouth drops open. I figure I don't even care if I get the full 35K, but can use the news to at least get 28K a year. I schedule a meeting with the office manager (it's fall). He says he can only talk salary at the annual meeting in spring. Being naive, I wait until spring. When I go to meet with him, he basically pats me on the head, says that money is short but for me they will stretch and give me a 3% raise. I bring up what the VP said. He basically calls me a liar and "take it or leave it." Mind you, this is an office where 95% of the employees are cowed married middle aged females who work for peanuts, and only the primary doctor and upper management are men who drive cars that cost more than any employee's annual salary. Other sexist things like the women staff had to wear a skirt or dress on days the (male) doctor worked. So I let my immediate supervisor know, and think about it for a day. Basically I was so disgusted by them thinking I was this stupid I didn't think I could work for them anymore. I go back the next day saying "thank you for the opportunity, you said take it or leave it so I leave it; this is my 2 weeks notice". Now it was his turn for his mouth to drop open.
The VP ends up personally calling me, asking me to stay and I will get the money, as long as I agreed to stay until the trial was over (3 years). As I was planning to apply to grad school for the following year I end up having to decline, plus the situation would be, uncomfortable. (I had heard from the grapevine the manager had some "esplaining" to do). During the year and a half I did work there I had saved 7K, and all these long time employees who knew my grad school plans were shaking my hand, and congratulations kind of a Norma Rae moment. Because I lived frugally, was able to take 6 months off, and then just worked a part time job for the few months before beginning grad school.

As I now have dependents and house and such it would take me a lot more to something like that, but strangely it was the right decision at the time.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2014, 01:25:28 PM by partgypsy »

Joggernot

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #358 on: September 23, 2014, 02:22:50 PM »
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins

SisterX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #359 on: September 23, 2014, 03:06:38 PM »
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins

What the f*%# did I just read?  I sincerely hope that was satire, because otherwise it's partisan politics beyond inanity and into the realm of crazy.

Joggernot

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #360 on: September 23, 2014, 03:20:07 PM »
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins

What the f*%# did I just read?  I sincerely hope that was satire, because otherwise it's partisan politics beyond inanity and into the realm of crazy.
Not satire.  Real.  You can cuss out the boss and expect to keep your job.

jordanread

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #361 on: September 23, 2014, 04:02:39 PM »
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins

I don't think FU money means what you think it means... :D
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zataks

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #362 on: September 26, 2014, 10:40:10 AM »
Kind of have one; it's more about being badass by living below my means than actually having FU money but I think the principles are the same in this case.

Have been extremely over worked and understaffed for a long time and I reached a breaking point and applied for a different position that would be a voluntary demotion for me.  Not really much less money (maybe 5%) but a significant status and responsibility demotion.  I saw my manager yesterday (who I do not directly report to; there's a supervisor as a buffer) and told her how exhausted I am and concerned for my health and that is why I'm applying for the lower position. 
She came back to me later in the day and emailed today saying that they are going to get us temporary assistants for relief until a long-term position can be created as well as attempting to get me a status and wage promotion (10%)! 

tl;dr: because I don't need higher wages I encouraged management to give me help and more money by applying for a lower level job.

SisterX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #363 on: September 26, 2014, 11:54:52 AM »
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins

What the f*%# did I just read?  I sincerely hope that was satire, because otherwise it's partisan politics beyond inanity and into the realm of crazy.
Not satire.  Real.  You can cuss out the boss and expect to keep your job.

I was referring to the article itself.  It's crap.  And I'm not saying this from a partisan perspective, but as someone who understands journalism.  That article is not it.  Find better sources.

Joggernot

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #364 on: September 26, 2014, 01:59:39 PM »
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins

What the f*%# did I just read?  I sincerely hope that was satire, because otherwise it's partisan politics beyond inanity and into the realm of crazy.
Not satire.  Real.  You can cuss out the boss and expect to keep your job.

I was referring to the article itself.  It's crap.  And I'm not saying this from a partisan perspective, but as someone who understands journalism.  That article is not it.  Find better sources.
Please provide me with your list of unbiased sources that I may use them.

nyxst

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #365 on: September 26, 2014, 02:37:20 PM »
Back when I was married my ex had gotten promoted to a new job making decent money and his relative passed away leaving some inheritance.  I thought it was a good opportunity to shift gears and started taking real estate classes.  I worked as a receptionist at a lawyers office for shit money and didn't want to stay there forever.  Anyway, about a year later I was all squared away with my license. They hadn't given me a raise yet and it was about review time. They had increase my workload substantially from just receptionist to now doing all of the filing and estate planning for one of the partners.  I made a long list detailing everything I did for the firm and went in for my review.  I asked for a $8000 raise (which was a huge percentage of my salary...) and they basically laughed me out of the conference room.  So I handed them my two weeks notice (pre-typed) and kept my cool.  Each partner took turns over the next week grilling me on how I was going to manage and trying to scare me into staying.  Finally the 2 weeks passed and on my last Friday I was saying goodbye to my friends. Of course the top dawg partner calls me into his office and offers me a $10,000 to stay and said that he though I was just calling their bluff and they never interviewed anyone for the job and had no one to replace me.  I politely declined and explained that I didn't play games like that, but my moral code said human beings should treat each other with respect.  I was 23 at that time.... he was 67.. and he thought he was way more important that me since he was a big shot lawyer.  I don't think anyone had ever stood up for themselves like that with him.   It felt great! They ended up begging me to come in part time 2 days per week for over 3x my hourly rate to finish the estate work for 3 months.  I took that and ended up using them as my divorce lawyers (free of charge!!) so I'm glad I didn't burn the bridge to the ground.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2014, 02:42:56 PM by nyxst »

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #366 on: September 26, 2014, 02:41:16 PM »
@nyxst, cool story. Thanks for sharing.
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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #367 on: September 26, 2014, 09:12:33 PM »
That is a great story, nyxst.

SisterX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #368 on: September 29, 2014, 11:09:17 AM »
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins

What the f*%# did I just read?  I sincerely hope that was satire, because otherwise it's partisan politics beyond inanity and into the realm of crazy.
Not satire.  Real.  You can cuss out the boss and expect to keep your job.

I was referring to the article itself.  It's crap.  And I'm not saying this from a partisan perspective, but as someone who understands journalism.  That article is not it.  Find better sources.
Please provide me with your list of unbiased sources that I may use them.

I would never say "unbiased".  Everyone is biased.  I said "better".  The article you linked to?  That's the equivalent of using Buzzfeed as a source.

nyxst, fantastic story!!

MooseOutFront

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #369 on: September 30, 2014, 09:49:46 AM »
@nyxst, perfect FU money story.  FU and your money, guy.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #370 on: September 30, 2014, 11:14:43 AM »
Worked at a company for over 13 years.  Had a major customer audit coming up.  Was working 12-14hrs/day for months preparing for it.  Boss (CEO) didn't understand the urgency and was consistently pushing against any changes I proposed until customer berated him due to lack of implementation.  It became my fault for not explaining the issue, not his fault for failing to listen for multiple months. 

One month prior to audit, boss tells me that they hired my replacement but are moving me to a new role.  Basically wanted me to sit in audit, state their implementation delay was my fault, and then let me go after audit was complete (my take on the last part).  Even if they didn't let me go, my workload wouldn't be reduced because the new hire would dump all the grunt work on me while she sat in meetings, looking very "director-ish". 

First conversation with boss on this change started with the phrase "you know, it is very hard to go from two incomes to one income".  I was in such shock, I didn't know what to say.  But what he didn't know was that the house was paid off, had plenty of FU money, and I had already planned on exiting the company a month or so after the audit, mostly due to him.  So I submit the 2-week notice, and the HR director (nice guy BTW), comes in and starts with the same "you know, it is very hard to go from two incomes to one income" line.  By this time, I had a night of sleep and a clear head.  I stopped him and said "we can skip the rest of the conversation.  This is where all of you erred in judgment.  I don't NEED to work.  I CHOOSE to work.  Everything we have is paid.  Forget the two week notice, I am quitting right now."  Didn't make a scene, just walked out.  I huge weight was lifted when I walked through those doors.  Met co-workers for lunch and they were happy for me to get the heck out of there.  Still friends with many of them. 

Like someone else said, you don't leave companies, you leave bosses. 

SwordGuy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #371 on: September 30, 2014, 07:36:13 PM »
Like someone else said, you don't leave companies, you leave bosses.

I did that very thing today!   

Same client, new client department, new employer, better pay, more interesting technology to work with. :)

Got a nice send off from the client management today, which I'm sure rubbed my old boss the wrong way.  He was lurking around all day today, barely spoke, but looked like he wanted to say something snarky and couldn't.   It was pretty creepy.

Ladies, know that guy who watches you all the time and stands - just so - in a way that makes the hair on the back of your neck stand up?   That's how it was today.   People who came into our work area noticed it right away and commented on it to me.

Only reason I didn't leave over a year ago was because I really believe in what our client does and want to do my best for them.

I don't have an epic FU story to go with it, other than to say that having a goodly stache meant I didn't have to worry while I looked for a better position.  I could negotiate with the client, my (now) past employer, and any potential new employer from a position of strength.   


jprince7827

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #372 on: October 02, 2014, 07:26:51 AM »
So over a period of days I have read every. single. post. on this thread. This is the greatest thread of all time.

I too have a kind-of FU story, though at no point did I burn bridges or say FU.

About 1.2 years ago I was 1.5 years into my first job and hating it. We were working 10-12 hour days and once a quarter we'd spend a weekend in the office. It's software so spending that long coding does something to your mind. This is not to say my boss was an asshole, or even his boss's boss, I love and still love all the people that worked at this company, and consider my former boss one of my best friends and mentors. It was just that the upper management demanded unreasonable things from us in unreasonable time so we all had to put in the effort.

Well, 1.2 years ago, I was standing in the shower after having worked the last 12 days in a row, 10-12 hours each, and suddenly I had a nervous break down. It felt terrible and such a release at the same time. I resolved then and there that I'd begin looking for work elsewhere. I'd done my time.

Right after that, as if the company sensed I was pissed(I had been doing some interviews), the hours lessened, the deadlines became more reasonable, and we graduated to 9-10 hour days and weekends were a virtual guarantee. There was one 34 hour stint in the office overnight to get a product launched but I wore that as a badge of honor. I decided to stay, but also I started posting for jobs on Elance.

I took a job making <5$/hr for 20 hrs to beat out the Indians and built a Ruby gem wrapper for some company's API. It was crappy work. The next job I got a month later paid 20$/hr, and eventually I got that client up to 60$/hr. By the end of last year(about 8 months after said break down), I was charging 80$/hr for 10-15hrs/week on the side of my real job running a private consulting firm.

By January of this year I was making 1$ for every 1$ I made at work, working only 10-15hrs a week, making 100$/hr. I had hired on my co-workers to do part-time work for me and was making 50% margins on their hours as well. In one two week period, I brought in 5,000$, outside of my normal paycheck.

Life was good. I was stashing hard. Then my main client offered me the CTO position at his company, for 2x my current salary, with similar equity. I thought about it hard for three weeks, and then informed my boss. My boss didn't even try to counter me, though if he had matched the price, or even come close, I would have certainly stayed - by this point the hours had gotten much more palatable.

I gave them 6 weeks notice, and during those 6 weeks the company offered me to keep working out of my office there since my new job was completely remote. They wanted to keep an eye on me and basically would let me have my job back whenever I want. In return, whenever they have a question about the software I wrote I'm right there to ask, and I still get to hang out with my co-workers every day(though they're in a different part of the building now.) They're good friends, so it works out.

The new company I work for is a startup and while they DO have money it is a risk. My previous company is worth 500mm. The stashing I did during the last year made sure I had at least 4 months expenses saved up before I dropped the bomb, and this is not even counting the years of coverage I have stashed in my retirement accounts if the worse came to worst.

FU money is a powerful thing. And now I'm freer than I've ever been.

trailrated

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #373 on: October 02, 2014, 09:25:37 AM »
Congrats, truly inspiring! It is pretty amazing to see real world examples paying off...it really reinforces why we all do what we do here.
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dragoncar

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #374 on: October 02, 2014, 09:32:51 AM »
So over a period of days I have read every. single. post. on this thread. This is the greatest thread of all time.

I too have a kind-of FU story, though at no point did I burn bridges or say FU.

About 1.2 years ago I was 1.5 years into my first job and hating it. We were working 10-12 hour days and once a quarter we'd spend a weekend in the office. It's software so spending that long coding does something to your mind. This is not to say my boss was an asshole, or even his boss's boss, I love and still love all the people that worked at this company, and consider my former boss one of my best friends and mentors. It was just that the upper management demanded unreasonable things from us in unreasonable time so we all had to put in the effort.

Well, 1.2 years ago, I was standing in the shower after having worked the last 12 days in a row, 10-12 hours each, and suddenly I had a nervous break down. It felt terrible and such a release at the same time. I resolved then and there that I'd begin looking for work elsewhere. I'd done my time.

Right after that, as if the company sensed I was pissed(I had been doing some interviews), the hours lessened, the deadlines became more reasonable, and we graduated to 9-10 hour days and weekends were a virtual guarantee. There was one 34 hour stint in the office overnight to get a product launched but I wore that as a badge of honor. I decided to stay, but also I started posting for jobs on Elance.

I took a job making <5$/hr for 20 hrs to beat out the Indians and built a Ruby gem wrapper for some company's API. It was crappy work. The next job I got a month later paid 20$/hr, and eventually I got that client up to 60$/hr. By the end of last year(about 8 months after said break down), I was charging 80$/hr for 10-15hrs/week on the side of my real job running a private consulting firm.

By January of this year I was making 1$ for every 1$ I made at work, working only 10-15hrs a week, making 100$/hr. I had hired on my co-workers to do part-time work for me and was making 50% margins on their hours as well. In one two week period, I brought in 5,000$, outside of my normal paycheck.

Life was good. I was stashing hard. Then my main client offered me the CTO position at his company, for 2x my current salary, with similar equity. I thought about it hard for three weeks, and then informed my boss. My boss didn't even try to counter me, though if he had matched the price, or even come close, I would have certainly stayed - by this point the hours had gotten much more palatable.

I gave them 6 weeks notice, and during those 6 weeks the company offered me to keep working out of my office there since my new job was completely remote. They wanted to keep an eye on me and basically would let me have my job back whenever I want. In return, whenever they have a question about the software I wrote I'm right there to ask, and I still get to hang out with my co-workers every day(though they're in a different part of the building now.) They're good friends, so it works out.

The new company I work for is a startup and while they DO have money it is a risk. My previous company is worth 500mm. The stashing I did during the last year made sure I had at least 4 months expenses saved up before I dropped the bomb, and this is not even counting the years of coverage I have stashed in my retirement accounts if the worse came to worst.

FU money is a powerful thing. And now I'm freer than I've ever been.

Ah yes, nothing like an incestuous client relationship to keep the money train rolling :-)

jprince7827

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #375 on: October 02, 2014, 01:27:57 PM »
Quote

Ah yes, nothing like an incestuous client relationship to keep the money train rolling :-)

Not to mention one of my subcontractors was my brother, so hello nepotism :D He also then did two years of internship at the 500mm company on my recommendation. It's all who you know in this world.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #376 on: October 06, 2014, 02:35:05 PM »
Mine isn't a real FU story but I did manage to quit.

I basically had the boss who could write the book on how NOT to be a manager.  How one could manage to be a micro-manager yet totally unavailable is beyond me, but that was him.  He literally walked around the office at 4:55 each day to make sure everyone was still there.  His way of "motivating" people (literally his words) was to threaten to fire them.

He was absurdly paranoid to the degree that we could not send an email to another department unless we cc'ed him. He forbade us from going to the staff Christmas party or the staff retreat. 

Then he hired a crazy woman to be the assistant manager so he wouldn't have to deal with us lowly worker bees. She basically took her cues from him and one upped them.  She would lie to make us look bad in front of clients.  She took over the 4:55pm rounds, but worse, she was a workaholic and did the rounds at 8am as well to make sure we were there for the start of the day as well. 

One day she informed me, in front of coworkers, that my top was innappropriate because I was "jiggling" in it.  It wasn't even low-cut or tight! I know because I checked with at least 3 other employees (other the ones who were right there and appropriattely mortified for me).

I eventually found another job accross town making 10% more in a better company.  My last day I wore that top just to spite her.  The best part is, we have monthly meetings in town with all the people who work in that industry and so I see both her and my old boss occasionally.  I try to wear that top (which my current boss has no problem with) when I can.  I'm also sure it's a thorn in his paranoid side to know that I discuss him and his awful management style with my current coworkers.  Which I do.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #377 on: December 05, 2014, 08:04:32 PM »
I didn't end up quitting, but it felt really good

I had just gone through a company sponsored training program that was significant in time and money, but poorly run. I didn't get a lot out of it. Throughout the program I gave a lot of feedback to make it more useful, but this fell on deaf ears. Upon being released and required to perform my new monkey skills I still needed to ask for help. I went to a good friend and coworker just down the way to ask how to do a particular task. While talking to my cw and a few others about the task, his boss (a bitter old man who helped fund the training program) approached. He listened for a moment then looked directly at me and said:

You can't even do that? Well you aren't worth much.

I looked him in the eye and stated: You're a Dick.

TBH I didn't actually mean to say it, It was word vomit. BUT IT FELT WONDERFUL!

The company i work for is super prim and proper. It is a large organization, but this man certainly could have had me fired or at least had me written up among other punishments. He and the other cw's stood in disbelief and I walked away.

Though no consequences (that i am aware of) came to be, my small FU 'stache which would cover my expenses for 6 months or so gave me the freedom from anxiety of whatever consequence my word vomit would produce. It was the best, most accidental moment of my working career.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #378 on: December 05, 2014, 08:17:31 PM »
^That's beautiful.

jprince7827

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #379 on: December 05, 2014, 08:18:04 PM »

I looked him in the eye and stated: You're a Dick.


DAYUMN.

smalllife

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #380 on: December 06, 2014, 10:20:56 AM »
I finally have a story!

I don't have what I consider to be a FU stache, but I just had a major win at work.  My company has been resisting work from home opportunities for people in my department because of some responsibilities that do require physical presence.  I had a conversation with my direct boss and good friend that basically said that if the work environment didn't change I was one foot out the door.  The work is fine, we're just understaffed, overburdened, and have a physically stressful work environment (constant noise, distractions, and interruptions).  That led to a nice long chat with the head of the company, who will be meeting with my department to air some laundry and create a workable list of solutions.  AND I get to test working from home one day a week :-)

I credit a semblance of FU stache, a growing confidence in my skills and employability, and a wonderfully supportive SO.

WIN!
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DoubleDown

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #381 on: December 06, 2014, 10:39:48 AM »

One day she informed me, in front of coworkers, that my top was innappropriate because I was "jiggling" in it.  It wasn't even low-cut or tight! I know because I checked with at least 3 other employees (other the ones who were right there and appropriattely mortified for me).


I am not an employment law expert, but I'd say (based on a fair amount of training as a manager) this is about as much of a glaring, textbook, poster child example of sexual harassment that you could find (okay, one slightly step higher would be "have sex with me or I'll fire you"). I'd venture that if you pursued a claim against the company, you would almost certainly win (or force a settlement). I'm not advocating that course of action, because you may very well deem it's best to let it go and give it no further attention or power in your life. But if you were inclined to do so, I'd say you have a rock solid case. Perhaps a lawyer with experience in this area could chime in, if needed.
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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #382 on: December 06, 2014, 12:00:22 PM »
Vengeful fashion statements are my favorite fashion statements.
Astoundingly, my ability to do basic math is not impeded by the presence of a dollar sign in front of the numbers.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #383 on: December 07, 2014, 06:42:24 AM »
My story is not at all dramatic, but it does illustrate the power of FU.

I was close to retirement in my teaching job (1 year to go) when I heard about a really interesting term contract.  I applied, was offered the job, but - the job was at a higher level, in a Province that pays better, and they offered me less than the salary I was already making.  I had checked with the faculty union and knew starting salaries were negotiable, unlike the school I was at where salaries were totally set by the collective agreement (so I was not at all used to negotiating).  I had to sadly but confidently explain that although I really wanted the job, I did not need the job (which they knew) and I could not afford to take the job since they were offering me considerably less than my salary. Counteroffer - if the person talking salary with me could get it, would I take the job if I had a salary match plus some research money? Yes, I say, and a phone call a few days later said I had the new salary.  Of course after that it was a whirlwind move, but no bridges burned.  I am still on excellent terms with colleagues and superiors at my previous school and visit at least once a year.  But I did all the "responsible" things, got everything prepared for my successor, all in about two weeks.    So everyone was happy, although my colleagues were in shock at how fast it all happened - academic moves like I did are usually long slow processes.
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retired?

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #384 on: December 07, 2014, 11:07:38 AM »
In my view, the real value of FU$ is that it allows one to not say FU and hang on in fairly poor, but not horrific situations.  It changes your mindset and allows one to ignore stuff that would otherwise make you quit.  Two cases where this is very valuable are 1) you're in a high paying job but want more savings and 2) you are near your preferred full retirement age......allows you to hold on rather than enter a job search.

Unfortunately for me, I didn't realize that I had FU$.  Wasn't until after I quit (first time I'd quit without having a new job lined up) and started reading MMM, etc. that I started to realize I could cut way back on my earnings and be fine.  With my new and better understanding of my situation, I probably would not have quit.  Just knowing you can is a powerful thing.  Makes me think of the quote "The best offense is a good defense".


RE leaving managers rather than companies, attached is what I provided to sr. mgt. who perhaps had no idea how poor the mgr above me really was.  The company has an agenda to have more women in higher roles (a good idea), but there are not many women, at this firm, in roles that would lead to sr mgt roles.  Thus, whether or not a lady has sound mgt skills does not really matter in whether to "fast track" them.  I got a poor one.

Nords

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #385 on: December 07, 2014, 11:17:01 AM »
In my view, the real value of FU$ is that it allows one to not say FU and hang on in fairly poor, but not horrific situations.  It changes your mindset and allows one to ignore stuff that would otherwise make you quit.  Two cases where this is very valuable are 1) you're in a high paying job but want more savings and 2) you are near your preferred full retirement age......allows you to hold on rather than enter a job search.

Unfortunately for me, I didn't realize that I had FU$.  Wasn't until after I quit (first time I'd quit without having a new job lined up) and started reading MMM, etc. that I started to realize I could cut way back on my earnings and be fine.  With my new and better understanding of my situation, I probably would not have quit.  Just knowing you can is a powerful thing.  Makes me think of the quote "The best offense is a good defense".
If it's any consolation, anecdotal experience over the last decade (both here and Early-Retirement.org) indicates that once you're FI you have even less patience for the BS. 

I'm skeptical that anyone can ignore quitting-level provocations when they can just-- quit.  Six months before you reach FI, sure.  Six months after-- not so much.

My brother-in-law the tax CPA is coming up on his last tax season.  He just reached FI this summer but he Stockholm Syndrome feels obligated to go through one more marathon with the team before hanging it up in May.  Either that or he wants to make sure that he understands exactly why he's going to ER and never go back...
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retired?

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #386 on: December 07, 2014, 11:57:11 AM »
Nords - I'd call my situation "at FU$ with do-able effort in the spending area", but working another 5 years and I'd be "FU$ with no effort".  That's the trade-off for me.

There's FI and there's FI.  But, I agree, FI doesn't require much change would make it hard to put up with the bs.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #387 on: December 07, 2014, 12:44:22 PM »

One day she informed me, in front of coworkers, that my top was innappropriate because I was "jiggling" in it.  It wasn't even low-cut or tight! I know because I checked with at least 3 other employees (other the ones who were right there and appropriattely mortified for me).


I am not an employment law expert, but I'd say (based on a fair amount of training as a manager) this is about as much of a glaring, textbook, poster child example of sexual harassment that you could find (okay, one slightly step higher would be "have sex with me or I'll fire you"). I'd venture that if you pursued a claim against the company, you would almost certainly win (or force a settlement). I'm not advocating that course of action, because you may very well deem it's best to let it go and give it no further attention or power in your life. But if you were inclined to do so, I'd say you have a rock solid case. Perhaps a lawyer with experience in this area could chime in, if needed.

Nonlawyers are often under the impression that comments like this lead to automatic liability and big payouts from employers. It just isn't so. Sexual harassment is actionable only when it is so severe or pervasive that it effectively changes a term or condition of the plaintiff's employment. The "jiggling" comment almost certainly wouldn't meet that standard. You would be completely shocked at the behavior that courts have said is not severe enough to create liability.

That said, lawsuits are still expensive for employers, even if the employer is almost certainly likely to win. They want employees to stay far away from any behavior that could lead to a lawsuit so as to avoid the expense. That's why they train their managers to nip this kind of thing in the bud.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #388 on: December 08, 2014, 01:57:32 PM »
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.

P.S. It may come as a shock to you, but managers are people, too, not some bloodthirsty alien exploiters. They may be even genuinely worried about you from time to time, and they are most certainly concerned about making things run smoothly (if only in self-interest).

hdizz

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #389 on: December 08, 2014, 02:09:49 PM »
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.

P.S. It may come as a shock to you, but managers are people, too, not some bloodthirsty alien exploiters. They may be even genuinely worried about you from time to time, and they are most certainly concerned about making things run smoothly (if only in self-interest).

When you say "employment contract" are you speaking figuratively?  Because while you make some good points, for many the only conditions set out as requirements are the minimum requirements of US labor law, and frankly, even then I've rarely seen all of them met at the same time, and this is at white collar and blue collar jobs alike.

NumberCruncher

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #390 on: December 08, 2014, 02:16:13 PM »
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.

P.S. It may come as a shock to you, but managers are people, too, not some bloodthirsty alien exploiters. They may be even genuinely worried about you from time to time, and they are most certainly concerned about making things run smoothly (if only in self-interest).

You do have a point to a certain extent - sabotaging work is not the healthiest response to a bad work environment, but those stories seem like the minority.

I think the problem is that too often it can feel like you're trapped into a job and don't have the flexibility to choose or just get another job (or maybe the energy to look after particularly stressful days). That's why FU money (and mustachianism in general) can be so powerful, as illustrated in what seems to me as the majority of stories on this thread - you start feeling like you have the agency to up and move, as opposed to living in fear. Many people without as much financial security would see declining work as a luxury they could not afford.

Eric

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #391 on: December 08, 2014, 02:16:44 PM »
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Congrats!  You figured out the point of this thread!  Quitting feels good when your job sucks, but you can't quit if you're in debt or living paycheck to paycheck.  Hence, F U Money.
"Compound interest is the most powerful force in the universe."  -- Einstein

Raay

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #392 on: December 08, 2014, 02:17:56 PM »
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.

P.S. It may come as a shock to you, but managers are people, too, not some bloodthirsty alien exploiters. They may be even genuinely worried about you from time to time, and they are most certainly concerned about making things run smoothly (if only in self-interest).

When you say "employment contract" are you speaking figuratively?  Because while you make some good points, for many the only conditions set out as requirements are the minimum requirements of US labor law, and frankly, even then I've rarely seen all of them met at the same time, and this is at white collar and blue collar jobs alike.

Well, the places I worked (white collar in Germany) all had written contracts that always included a job description, at least outlining the tasks and responsibilities involved, and also included the clause that I will essentially "do my best" to fulfill my assigned duties. So saying "FU" to my employer or attempting any other "epic" escape would certainly feel to me like breaching the contract that I myself signed.

Here in Germany we also get an "Arbeitszeugnis" at the end of a job - which is a recommendation (or a veiled warning) from the employer that can be presented to (and is often asked by) the next employer. I long felt that it was stupid and patronizing and sucking out employees' liberty, but considering some stories told here, maybe it's not such a bad idea...

Raay

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #393 on: December 08, 2014, 02:22:31 PM »
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Congrats!  You figured out the point of this thread!  Quitting feels good when your job sucks, but you can't quit if you're in debt or living paycheck to paycheck.  Hence, F U Money.

Ok, I suppose I'm just arguing semantics. "FU money" certainly has an aggressive/negative/malevolent connotation to me... unlike "FI money". I just note that many stories revolve against long-term unhealthy work relationships and vengeful quitting, not just departure (maybe simply because the latter - not involving any sort of scandalous behavior or vigilance - tend to be rather boring and go unnoticed).

GardenFun

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #394 on: December 08, 2014, 05:02:50 PM »
One common problem in the U.S. are "non-compete agreements".  So if you are good at your job in a particular field, but the working conditions at your company have deteriorated from when you first hired on (and signed the non-compete), you typically cannot work in the industry for 1-2 years, depending on the length of non-compete paperwork.  For most of us who got a job right out of college and have worked at the same place for 10+ years, trying to break a non-compete agreement is a unknown (and somewhat scary) issue.  Hence, the desire/freedom of having FU money available to ride out the unemployed/underemployed timeframe.

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #395 on: December 08, 2014, 05:22:36 PM »
^^Congratulations because it certainly sounds like your working conditions in white collar Germany were better than people is the USA often experience.

Until very recently I have not had a job description that had any substance to it.  In some jobs there was not any description at all, or at least not one that anyone showed to me.  Other descriptions were so vague as to be completely meaningless.  I certainly agree with you:  it is refreshing to have an explicit document that one can examine before taking a job, and then again later whenever there are questions about exactly what one is supposed to be doing. 

But you have to remember that people often take job A (which might or might not have no written job description but is fairly amenable to the person's skills and interests) and then, either gradually over time or suddenly, that lovely job gets morphed into completely different job B without anyone ever asking them about it.  Sometimes it is simply a change of manager that leads to this; some managers just like to ignore formal company policies like working hours and some managers think it is somehow fun or motivational to insult or belittle other people. Sometimes it is a formal restructuring that takes a person out of a role they like and puts them into work conditions they don't enjoy at all. Sometimes someone ends up being harassed daily for years or otherwise harshly mistreated, and this is certainly difficult to predict from a few minutes at an interview before taking a job.  Sometimes a worker (often a women or minority) finds out that he or she is being drastically underpaid compared to everyone else who has the same job.  Sometimes when they point this out to the kind and reasonable manager that we must all surely work for, they are told "tough shit" either quite directly or in not so many words.  Indeed, there are all kinds of reasons someone might have an FU attitude upon leaving a job, and if you have never experienced that, then be thankful that you have had such a charmed working life.

GardenFun, from what I understand non-compete agreements are rarely worth the paper they are written on, but they do effectively scare many people into thinking that can't get another similar job.  Originally they were designed to keep salesmen from stealing customer lists, which made sense. I worked for a company that instituted these mid-stream to all employees after I'd been there a few years (everyone had to sign one when they earned their next promotion.)  The result was that most people just wouldn't tell anyone at work where they were going to work next when they left the company.  It was odd.

electriceagle

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #396 on: December 08, 2014, 05:39:30 PM »
One common problem in the U.S. are "non-compete agreements".  So if you are good at your job in a particular field, but the working conditions at your company have deteriorated from when you first hired on (and signed the non-compete), you typically cannot work in the industry for 1-2 years, depending on the length of non-compete paperwork.  For most of us who got a job right out of college and have worked at the same place for 10+ years, trying to break a non-compete agreement is a unknown (and somewhat scary) issue.  Hence, the desire/freedom of having FU money available to ride out the unemployed/underemployed timeframe.

Fortunately, these are enforceable in California only when your former employer pays you for your time.

gimp

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #397 on: December 08, 2014, 08:34:13 PM »
Quote
from what I understand non-compete agreements are rarely worth the paper they are written on

This is true. California is especially explicit, but it holds true pretty much everywhere: if you want an employee to honor a non-compete, you're paying them.

Investment banks and financial firms actually often do this, if you're laid off or whatever they will pay you 3 months' salary in exchange for a 3-month noncompete agreement. (3 months is normal but it may be more or less.) This is so that by the time you go back to work, any confidential information you had is most likely irrelevant / out in the open.

Tech companies try to make employees sign non-compete agreements but you can just laugh at those. Some try to make the noncompete a condition of employment but they'll never enforce it. In some cases, they will actually pay out to get a noncompete to really hold weight. This is entirely different from signing upon leaving that you won't discuss internal xxyyz and secret blah blah; that's not only good form, it's also probably already implicitly agreed upon when you signed NDAs to start working - now it's just explicit what you're NDAing on. Interviewers always understand an answer like "Well, I worked in this area with these sort of tools, but unfortunately I can't give you explicit details" - because your new employer wants you to be good at keeping secrets.

Basically non-competes are bullshit scare tactics. I've actually heard of non-competes... for people working in fast food... so they "can't" work for any other competition (any other restaurant in the area.) You can imagine exactly how much this is enforced. But you can also imagine scumbag managers ("managers" earning $10/hr instead of $8/hr) threatening high school kids with legal action if they take that taco bell job. Shit's weird, yo.

farmstache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #398 on: December 09, 2014, 06:21:03 AM »
Well, the places I worked (white collar in Germany) all had written contracts that always included a job description, at least outlining the tasks and responsibilities involved, and also included the clause that I will essentially "do my best" to fulfill my assigned duties. So saying "FU" to my employer or attempting any other "epic" escape would certainly feel to me like breaching the contract that I myself signed.

I think you either might not have experienced workplaces that are just bad enough, or maybe you are in a line of work where people don't suck the life out of their employees. Maybe Germany is nicer about their employers. I had contracts with job descriptions once. About a month in, the whole job description had changed, because me and another employee could work best at different stuff and our manager redivided the responsibilities to cater to our strengths. This was for the best and certainly was not added to the contract. Then there are whole industries where you are hired for 40h weeks, but expected to "give your blood and sweat" to the company, and work 60h weeks. This isn't in the contract and if you want out, you have to basically change your whole field of work, because every company is very similar in this field.

Still, most of us DO AGREE with these crazy conditions beforehand and it isn't them that makes us want to quit in a whim. It's the attitude of a boss after you ask to change some of it, it's a problem with a coworker, it's a particularly long stretch of strenuous work without recognition and taken for granted, it's the fact that you reach FI and don't need it anymore. If you have a boss that sucks, sometimes you won't be able (or want) to quit "politely" as you say. Also, there are bosses that feel extremely insulted by someone's leaving, especially if the reason isn't a higher pay somewhere else.

Dr.Vibrissae

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #399 on: December 09, 2014, 06:25:38 AM »
Quote
from what I understand non-compete agreements are rarely worth the paper they are written on
...
Basically non-competes are bullshit scare tactics....
In my field non-competes of a year are pretty typical, however, they are usually geographically limited. They can be challenged on the grounds that the geographic radius (5 miles or whatever) is wider than the area from which clients are drawn.  However, if they are appropriate, they are enforceable.  This is to stop associates from leaving a practice, setting up they're own shop (or moving to a neighboring practice) and poaching their previous employer's clients. Or, less commonly, to prevent a Dr. from selling their practice and then reopening a new practice shortly thereafter.

I worked with one Dr. who was originally hired on a part-time contract (no non-compete clause) though she was now working full-time hours.  She used that fact and the fact that she was the highest grossing Dr. as leverage to improve the terms of our emergency duty and to resist interference from the terrible manager that was hired on just before I left.
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