Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 1733025 times)

Trifele

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2600 on: March 01, 2019, 05:11:41 AM »
I would snip, but would mess up the formatting somehow.

Anyway, a family member's former employer was screwing up the wages/overtime/etc rules for years. Someone reported it to the state's DOL, and while I think it took a year or more, all the impacted employees eventually got back pay (up to $20k for some), then they all got recategorized so that they're getting salary + overtime pay. (Please don't ask details, I have no idea.) Messing up wages is a big deal. If it's deliberate, even more so.

+1.   In my experience (former employment law attorney) state DOLs always investigate these complaints and take them seriously.  They have specific departments for 'Wage and Hour' complaints, and this is why they exist.  Please do report it @saguaro.

Unique User

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2601 on: March 01, 2019, 06:59:39 AM »
I don't know if this is actually epic, but here goes.  My husband's job...sucks.  He does groundskeeping for a 180 unit apartment complex.  He likes the job, and it paid decently well.  His boss has hated him ever since he was offered (and turned down) the GM job at another complex.  She has done everything she can over the last two years to make him quit.  Changing his time card and cheating him of time?  Check.  Making him buy back vacation days in cash only days before the start of scheduled trip and still telling him that they couldn't guarantee that he'd have a job when he got back?  Check.  Suspending him for two days because he couldn't/wouldn't rake leaves in a thunderstorm?  Check. 

So, it turns out that she was trying to get him to quit because the company is trying to cut payroll.  It was announced Friday afternoon that everyone was being cut to minimum wage.  That's something like a 40% pay cut for everyone.  Effective today.  He'll be tendering his resignation this morning and we have every intention of fighting them on a constructive dismissal unemployment claim.  They're lucky I can't prove the wage theft. 

The FU part comes in because we don't actually need his job to pay the bills.  The lights aren't going to get cut off.  We're not going to eat ramen noodles for three meals a day.  We probably won't even adjust the amount going into my retirement accounts.  The only part that sucks is that for all their BS, they had a decent 401(k) plan with low-cost Vanguard funds and they matched 50 cents on the dollar up to 16.66%.

You don't have to prove the wage theft yourself. You report it and the state (or federal, depending) agency will investigate on your behalf. I would report it anyway.
@Sugaree , just want to up the odds that (a) you see this so you can take action and (b) to help you stick it to the man, because this particular employer deserves it.

I totally agree.  It has been one thing after another for months now.  This probably isn't even the half of it.  What sucks is that he really liked his job.  The hours were good.  He loves the tenants.  He liked most of his co-workers.  But local management was allowed to run roughshod over their little fiefdoms.

Quoting myself to say that they gave him the choice to take minimum wage with no benefits or be "laid off."  He chose laid off.  Unemployment payments are crap here, but he should still get one more paycheck before we have to worry about that.  In theory, he has a week of PTO that should be paid out too, but I'm betting we will have to fight for that and I don't know if it will be worth it.  He has some side gigs lined up already, so I think everything's going to be okay.

Not sure what state you are in, but there are specific rules in PTO payout also.  DH's former company (global 50k employee corp) tried to tell him that they did not owe him for PTO, but he had the original hire paperwork that showed otherwise.  In NC, vacation pay needs to be paid upon termination unless there is a written policy that states that vacation pay will be forfeited.  Each state is different, but that is another claim to your state DOL.  Check your state rules and if they don't pay it, I'd report them. 

ducky19

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2602 on: March 01, 2019, 10:19:50 AM »
Posting up my DW's story. My wife is a preschool teacher at a private center. She's been working for this place since last August, and has been miserable nearly the entire time. She has been labeled by her boss (the owner) as "confrontational". When asked why, she claimed it was because she questioned the practice of the boss sending out a group text each night with the next day's schedule, then requiring everyone in the group text to reply to the group text. They held it against her for not updating the Facebook site for months, even though she told them back in August that she didn't have admin rights and that they needed to grant those to her if they wanted her to update it (never happened). Since she is salaried, any time off had to be made up - fine. But she was only allowed to count certain hours, the majority of the extra time she put in was not considered eligible. The final straw came yesterday though when she was called into her boss' office and told she was being written up for "missing too much time". Her boss had documented all of the time she claimed my wife missed, but would not let her leave with the sheet without signing it. My wife wanted to cross reference it with her own records and refused to sign it, so they finally gave her a copy. She came home at lunch and found numerous errors/discrepancies that she produced documentation for and copied to the back of the sheet (so it couldn't be misplaced). She took it back into her boss and said, "here is the form, I've attached corrections on the back and signed it, and the sheet below it is my resignation". Her boss wouldn't even look at her and just said, "ok". My wife said, "I'll give you two weeks notice, but I will understand if you don't want it and will leave today if you prefer". Her boss, still not looking at her, said "ok". My wife said, "so.... which do you prefer?" and was finally told she'll take the two weeks. It sucks for my wife's coworkers, because the boss won't hire anyone else and will just expect them to fill in for her. She's already gotten a lot of supportive texts from her coworkers and parents, so she feels validated that not everyone thought she was doing a terrible job (even had some tears from some of her coworkers). I feel for them, but DW has to do what's right for her. She already had another job offer, but we could survive indefinitely without her pay. Just glad she finally put an end to putting up with this one's shit!

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2603 on: March 01, 2019, 10:27:03 PM »
Posting up my DW's story. My wife is a preschool teacher at a private center. She's been working for this place since last August, and has been miserable nearly the entire time. She has been labeled by her boss (the owner) as "confrontational". When asked why, she claimed it was because she questioned the practice of the boss sending out a group text each night with the next day's schedule, then requiring everyone in the group text to reply to the group text. They held it against her for not updating the Facebook site for months, even though she told them back in August that she didn't have admin rights and that they needed to grant those to her if they wanted her to update it (never happened). Since she is salaried, any time off had to be made up - fine. But she was only allowed to count certain hours, the majority of the extra time she put in was not considered eligible. The final straw came yesterday though when she was called into her boss' office and told she was being written up for "missing too much time". Her boss had documented all of the time she claimed my wife missed, but would not let her leave with the sheet without signing it. My wife wanted to cross reference it with her own records and refused to sign it, so they finally gave her a copy. She came home at lunch and found numerous errors/discrepancies that she produced documentation for and copied to the back of the sheet (so it couldn't be misplaced). She took it back into her boss and said, "here is the form, I've attached corrections on the back and signed it, and the sheet below it is my resignation". Her boss wouldn't even look at her and just said, "ok". My wife said, "I'll give you two weeks notice, but I will understand if you don't want it and will leave today if you prefer". Her boss, still not looking at her, said "ok". My wife said, "so.... which do you prefer?" and was finally told she'll take the two weeks. It sucks for my wife's coworkers, because the boss won't hire anyone else and will just expect them to fill in for her. She's already gotten a lot of supportive texts from her coworkers and parents, so she feels validated that not everyone thought she was doing a terrible job (even had some tears from some of her coworkers). I feel for them, but DW has to do what's right for her. She already had another job offer, but we could survive indefinitely without her pay. Just glad she finally put an end to putting up with this one's shit!
Hooray! I love this story. Erm, well, not quite. I'm sorry she was in such a miserable situation and glad she's found the exit door.

MissNancyPryor

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2604 on: March 02, 2019, 08:24:23 AM »
I think I remember reading this somewhere here but it is a great reminder to get the FU money going immediately in life. 


https://www.thebillfold.com/2016/01/a-story-of-a-fuck-off-fund/


WhiteTrashCash

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2605 on: March 02, 2019, 08:48:54 AM »
I think I remember reading this somewhere here but it is a great reminder to get the FU money going immediately in life. 


https://www.thebillfold.com/2016/01/a-story-of-a-fuck-off-fund/

As someone who lived a version of what happened to that poor girl in the story you shared, I endorse your post. Having FU Money is essential for a person's well-being and reaching that level requires eliminating all the voices that prevent you from saving and investing to make it happen -- which means getting rid of advertising, nexting spendypants friends, and learning to take as much pleasure from watching your money grow as you did from some shiny new gazingus pin.

Capt j-rod

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2606 on: March 02, 2019, 06:38:46 PM »
The lovelyDW works in medicine. She switched jobs and life has been much better than the previous workplace. We have made an amazing discovery... No one is in charge! There are lots of big job titles, TONS of meetings where nothing gets done, and no one has the authority to do anything. They complain constantly about everything... They try to get you to work over. They try to switch the schedules. Finally the DW pulled out her contract and asked where it was agreed upon that these things could be changed. No one could get an answer. She politely refused to do what was asked and they threatened to "write her up". She replied that unless she signs the papers that the procedure can't be billed. She suggested three days off without pay, which would happen with more write ups... The problem is that the office manager can't see patients, or perform surgery. No doc, no charges, no surgeries no income to the big machine. Finally administration got involved when the managers called them in. After a quick review of the emails, requests, and other stories... They are currently hiring a new manager LOL. FU money and borderline FIRE give you muscles you never knew you had. She pointed out that an employed physician is very different than a partner. As an employee, you show up, work your shift, do what needs done and go home. They want you to be a part of the practice, but they won't pay more and nothing can quench their thirst. After the meeting they have moved onto others who have no choice but to do what they're told. She is in year 2 of a 3 year contract. They are worried that she doesn't want to renew... They are right!

Freedomin5

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2607 on: March 04, 2019, 02:31:56 AM »
The lovelyDW works in medicine. She switched jobs and life has been much better than the previous workplace. We have made an amazing discovery... No one is in charge! There are lots of big job titles, TONS of meetings where nothing gets done, and no one has the authority to do anything. They complain constantly about everything... They try to get you to work over. They try to switch the schedules. Finally the DW pulled out her contract and asked where it was agreed upon that these things could be changed. No one could get an answer. She politely refused to do what was asked and they threatened to "write her up". She replied that unless she signs the papers that the procedure can't be billed. She suggested three days off without pay, which would happen with more write ups... The problem is that the office manager can't see patients, or perform surgery. No doc, no charges, no surgeries no income to the big machine. Finally administration got involved when the managers called them in. After a quick review of the emails, requests, and other stories... They are currently hiring a new manager LOL. FU money and borderline FIRE give you muscles you never knew you had. She pointed out that an employed physician is very different than a partner. As an employee, you show up, work your shift, do what needs done and go home. They want you to be a part of the practice, but they won't pay more and nothing can quench their thirst. After the meeting they have moved onto others who have no choice but to do what they're told. She is in year 2 of a 3 year contract. They are worried that she doesn't want to renew... They are right!

:D I like this story. I hate it when management tries to get me to do something that is not in my contract or that is unethical.

Sugaree

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2608 on: March 08, 2019, 10:54:15 AM »
I don't know if this is actually epic, but here goes.  My husband's job...sucks.  He does groundskeeping for a 180 unit apartment complex.  He likes the job, and it paid decently well.  His boss has hated him ever since he was offered (and turned down) the GM job at another complex.  She has done everything she can over the last two years to make him quit.  Changing his time card and cheating him of time?  Check.  Making him buy back vacation days in cash only days before the start of scheduled trip and still telling him that they couldn't guarantee that he'd have a job when he got back?  Check.  Suspending him for two days because he couldn't/wouldn't rake leaves in a thunderstorm?  Check. 

So, it turns out that she was trying to get him to quit because the company is trying to cut payroll.  It was announced Friday afternoon that everyone was being cut to minimum wage.  That's something like a 40% pay cut for everyone.  Effective today.  He'll be tendering his resignation this morning and we have every intention of fighting them on a constructive dismissal unemployment claim.  They're lucky I can't prove the wage theft. 

The FU part comes in because we don't actually need his job to pay the bills.  The lights aren't going to get cut off.  We're not going to eat ramen noodles for three meals a day.  We probably won't even adjust the amount going into my retirement accounts.  The only part that sucks is that for all their BS, they had a decent 401(k) plan with low-cost Vanguard funds and they matched 50 cents on the dollar up to 16.66%.

You don't have to prove the wage theft yourself. You report it and the state (or federal, depending) agency will investigate on your behalf. I would report it anyway.
@Sugaree , just want to up the odds that (a) you see this so you can take action and (b) to help you stick it to the man, because this particular employer deserves it.

I totally agree.  It has been one thing after another for months now.  This probably isn't even the half of it.  What sucks is that he really liked his job.  The hours were good.  He loves the tenants.  He liked most of his co-workers.  But local management was allowed to run roughshod over their little fiefdoms.

Quoting myself to say that they gave him the choice to take minimum wage with no benefits or be "laid off."  He chose laid off.  Unemployment payments are crap here, but he should still get one more paycheck before we have to worry about that.  In theory, he has a week of PTO that should be paid out too, but I'm betting we will have to fight for that and I don't know if it will be worth it.  He has some side gigs lined up already, so I think everything's going to be okay.

Not sure what state you are in, but there are specific rules in PTO payout also.  DH's former company (global 50k employee corp) tried to tell him that they did not owe him for PTO, but he had the original hire paperwork that showed otherwise.  In NC, vacation pay needs to be paid upon termination unless there is a written policy that states that vacation pay will be forfeited.  Each state is different, but that is another claim to your state DOL.  Check your state rules and if they don't pay it, I'd report them.

Wanna take a guess who didn't get his last paycheck today like he was supposed to? 

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2609 on: March 08, 2019, 01:26:36 PM »
@Sugaree that's terrible.  I echo all the others on reporting them.   

Also want to update all that DH's day of freedom from the clusterf**k is here.  He is leaving with vacation time, severance pay (a big deal since they are known not to give severance per other employees) and.....money refunded because they charged him for health insurance that he opted out of because they messed up the paperwork.

He has learned more about their umpteenth, gazillionth throw something at the wall and see what sticks er, restructuring and this person who is coming on board to take over his job in addition to a bunch of other things (a deal with the devil if you ask me) they will dream up on the spot.   Seems that an ex employee is coming back on board, someone who, incidentally, has come and gone multiple times.  Not sure why this person is giving it another go, even if they need $$.   According to DH, this person knows a lot of the business however, he's not sure about knowledge of the complex software he uses.  He's also been training some other coworkers in the past week and their heads are exploding.   Yep, they are letting someone go without totally knowing what that person does.

At any rate he's leaving on good terms, he has some contacts that might pan out when they all jump ship (he got a lead on another job already), some extra money, plus eligible for UI, plus then SS.   This is better than when he was planning to retire next year. 

Unique User

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2610 on: March 09, 2019, 06:17:36 AM »
@Sugaree  That just sucks.  They think they will get away with it, probably because no one has every called them on it. Internet stranger here, but I'd write up a letter with everything you are owed, including paid PTO time and send to the employer.  Look at your state and see what penalties they face for not paying on time and include in your notice.  Give them a time limit and let them know you will go to your state's DOL to collect after that time.  Formal written notice is crucial in this type of situation.  I've had it happen twice and each time I received everything I was owed within 24 hours. 

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2611 on: March 09, 2019, 08:58:21 AM »
@Sugaree  That just sucks.  They think they will get away with it, probably because no one has every called them on it. Internet stranger here, but I'd write up a letter with everything you are owed, including paid PTO time and send to the employer.  Look at your state and see what penalties they face for not paying on time and include in your notice.  Give them a time limit and let them know you will go to your state's DOL to collect after that time.  Formal written notice is crucial in this type of situation.  I've had it happen twice and each time I received everything I was owed within 24 hours.
While I agree with most if this,  I have another, more nefarious suggestion. Look up your state's regulations, make up your spreadsheet on what you are owed and then WAIT. It will get a lot more interesting if they violate state law. You don't need the money for this week's groceries, so why not fuck with them right back?

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2612 on: March 09, 2019, 01:38:05 PM »
@Sugaree  That just sucks.  They think they will get away with it, probably because no one has every called them on it. Internet stranger here, but I'd write up a letter with everything you are owed, including paid PTO time and send to the employer.  Look at your state and see what penalties they face for not paying on time and include in your notice.  Give them a time limit and let them know you will go to your state's DOL to collect after that time.  Formal written notice is crucial in this type of situation.  I've had it happen twice and each time I received everything I was owed within 24 hours.
While I agree with most if this,  I have another, more nefarious suggestion. Look up your state's regulations, make up your spreadsheet on what you are owed and then WAIT. It will get a lot more interesting if they violate state law. You don't need the money for this week's groceries, so why not fuck with them right back?

I like the way you think.  After fines and penalties, they'll be less likely to screw over the next person.   Always try to leave the world a better place as you pass thru it...

Sugaree

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2613 on: March 11, 2019, 05:23:40 AM »
@Sugaree  That just sucks.  They think they will get away with it, probably because no one has every called them on it. Internet stranger here, but I'd write up a letter with everything you are owed, including paid PTO time and send to the employer.  Look at your state and see what penalties they face for not paying on time and include in your notice.  Give them a time limit and let them know you will go to your state's DOL to collect after that time.  Formal written notice is crucial in this type of situation.  I've had it happen twice and each time I received everything I was owed within 24 hours.
While I agree with most if this,  I have another, more nefarious suggestion. Look up your state's regulations, make up your spreadsheet on what you are owed and then WAIT. It will get a lot more interesting if they violate state law. You don't need the money for this week's groceries, so why not fuck with them right back?

I like the way you think.  After fines and penalties, they'll be less likely to screw over the next person.   Always try to leave the world a better place as you pass thru it...


I'm kind of liking this idea.  It seems that this is all his local management.  She didn't turn in his final time sheet.  But I'm wondering if she really told them that he left because he had some PTO hours that need to be paid out (at least I think they have to be paid out, but it's Alabama and it's not exactly the most worker-friendly state)  It's really a shame (for them) that one of DH's good childhood friends is an employment attorney.  We've already got a call in to her.  I'm not sure she can still practice here (just passed the bar in her new state), but she should still have connections in the city where the corporate office is located. 

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2614 on: March 11, 2019, 07:52:48 AM »
@Sugaree  That just sucks.  They think they will get away with it, probably because no one has every called them on it. Internet stranger here, but I'd write up a letter with everything you are owed, including paid PTO time and send to the employer.  Look at your state and see what penalties they face for not paying on time and include in your notice.  Give them a time limit and let them know you will go to your state's DOL to collect after that time.  Formal written notice is crucial in this type of situation.  I've had it happen twice and each time I received everything I was owed within 24 hours.
While I agree with most if this,  I have another, more nefarious suggestion. Look up your state's regulations, make up your spreadsheet on what you are owed and then WAIT. It will get a lot more interesting if they violate state law. You don't need the money for this week's groceries, so why not fuck with them right back?
I like the way you think.  After fines and penalties, they'll be less likely to screw over the next person.   Always try to leave the world a better place as you pass thru it...
I'm kind of liking this idea.  It seems that this is all his local management.  She didn't turn in his final time sheet.  But I'm wondering if she really told them that he left because he had some PTO hours that need to be paid out (at least I think they have to be paid out, but it's Alabama and it's not exactly the most worker-friendly state)  It's really a shame (for them) that one of DH's good childhood friends is an employment attorney.  We've already got a call in to her.  I'm not sure she can still practice here (just passed the bar in her new state), but she should still have connections in the city where the corporate office is located.
I worked for a large manufacturing company based in another state. They believed they could enforce their state laws throughout the country. My state has a different opinion. When the company said vacation time was "use it or lose it", all it took was a couple of firmly worded emails to HR with a few key quotes from my state's employment code. This resulted in new policies that benefited everyone. In the course of this research, it was also discovered that the task of tracking vacation time is the burden of the employer, not the employee.

Fast forward a few years. A local colleague, a superstar salesperson for decades, was laid off for reasons that looked suspiciously like ageism. The company's severance package was pretty stingy. He decided to go after them for thirty years of unpaid vacation time. Whoopsie! The company did not have accurate records. He ended up with the severance package he was quite happy with. (This is a FU money story, because he didn't need it. He liked working and was great at his job. He was just pissed that they were kicking him to the curb, and making such a paltry severance offer.)

I'm posting this to show that not every case requires a lawyer. Start by reading up on your state's employment code.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 11:29:08 PM by Dicey »

BicycleB

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2615 on: March 11, 2019, 04:44:26 PM »
I came for the stories, and then you educated me!

Well done, @Dicey

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2616 on: March 11, 2019, 11:30:04 PM »
I came for the stories, and then you educated me!

Well done, @Dicey
Thanks. Musta been an accident.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2617 on: March 12, 2019, 08:02:14 AM »
@Sugaree  That just sucks.  They think they will get away with it, probably because no one has every called them on it. Internet stranger here, but I'd write up a letter with everything you are owed, including paid PTO time and send to the employer.  Look at your state and see what penalties they face for not paying on time and include in your notice.  Give them a time limit and let them know you will go to your state's DOL to collect after that time.  Formal written notice is crucial in this type of situation.  I've had it happen twice and each time I received everything I was owed within 24 hours.
While I agree with most if this,  I have another, more nefarious suggestion. Look up your state's regulations, make up your spreadsheet on what you are owed and then WAIT. It will get a lot more interesting if they violate state law. You don't need the money for this week's groceries, so why not fuck with them right back?
I like the way you think.  After fines and penalties, they'll be less likely to screw over the next person.   Always try to leave the world a better place as you pass thru it...
I'm kind of liking this idea.  It seems that this is all his local management.  She didn't turn in his final time sheet.  But I'm wondering if she really told them that he left because he had some PTO hours that need to be paid out (at least I think they have to be paid out, but it's Alabama and it's not exactly the most worker-friendly state)  It's really a shame (for them) that one of DH's good childhood friends is an employment attorney.  We've already got a call in to her.  I'm not sure she can still practice here (just passed the bar in her new state), but she should still have connections in the city where the corporate office is located.
I worked for a large manufacturing company based in another state. They believed they could enforce their state laws throughout the country. My state has a different opinion. When the company said vacation time was "use it or lose it", all it took was a couple of firmly worded emails to HR with a few key quotes from my state's employment code. This resulted in new policies that benefited everyone. In the course of this research, it was also discovered that the task of tracking vacation time is the burden of the employer, not the employee.

Fast forward a few years. A local colleague, a superstar salesperson for decades, was laid off for reasons that looked suspiciously like ageism. The company's severance package was pretty stingy. He decided to go after them for thirty years of unpaid vacation time. Whoopsie! The company did not have accurate records. He ended up with the severance package he was quite happy with. (This is a FU money story, because he didn't need it. He liked working and was great at his job. He was just pissed that they were kicking him to the curb, and making such a paltry severance offer.)

I'm posting this to show that not every case requires a lawyer. Start by reading up on your state's employment code.

Agree!!  @Dicey - I like your idea of dealing with the company better than mine.  :)

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2618 on: March 12, 2019, 11:14:14 AM »
@Sugaree  That just sucks.  They think they will get away with it, probably because no one has every called them on it. Internet stranger here, but I'd write up a letter with everything you are owed, including paid PTO time and send to the employer.  Look at your state and see what penalties they face for not paying on time and include in your notice.  Give them a time limit and let them know you will go to your state's DOL to collect after that time.  Formal written notice is crucial in this type of situation.  I've had it happen twice and each time I received everything I was owed within 24 hours.
While I agree with most if this,  I have another, more nefarious suggestion. Look up your state's regulations, make up your spreadsheet on what you are owed and then WAIT. It will get a lot more interesting if they violate state law. You don't need the money for this week's groceries, so why not fuck with them right back?
I like the way you think.  After fines and penalties, they'll be less likely to screw over the next person.   Always try to leave the world a better place as you pass thru it...
I'm kind of liking this idea.  It seems that this is all his local management.  She didn't turn in his final time sheet.  But I'm wondering if she really told them that he left because he had some PTO hours that need to be paid out (at least I think they have to be paid out, but it's Alabama and it's not exactly the most worker-friendly state)  It's really a shame (for them) that one of DH's good childhood friends is an employment attorney.  We've already got a call in to her.  I'm not sure she can still practice here (just passed the bar in her new state), but she should still have connections in the city where the corporate office is located.
I worked for a large manufacturing company based in another state. They believed they could enforce their state laws throughout the country. My state has a different opinion. When the company said vacation time was "use it or lose it", all it took was a couple of firmly worded emails to HR with a few key quotes from my state's employment code. This resulted in new policies that benefited everyone. In the course of this research, it was also discovered that the task of tracking vacation time is the burden of the employer, not the employee.

Fast forward a few years. A local colleague, a superstar salesperson for decades, was laid off for reasons that looked suspiciously like ageism. The company's severance package was pretty stingy. He decided to go after them for thirty years of unpaid vacation time. Whoopsie! The company did not have accurate records. He ended up with the severance package he was quite happy with. (This is a FU money story, because he didn't need it. He liked working and was great at his job. He was just pissed that they were kicking him to the curb, and making such a paltry severance offer.)

I'm posting this to show that not every case requires a lawyer. Start by reading up on your state's employment code.
Did we work for the same company?  My old company loved the "Use it or lose it", until they realized that it's not allowed in CA.  Then they adjusted the rule for us to say that you stop accruing after so much time, and adjusted it for their home state to allow them to carry over 40 hours.  Thing is, they often wouldn't allow people to take the time off.  In the end, after about 10 years, I think they adjusted it again to not be use or lose in any sense.

That story about unpaid vacation time was glorious.

albireo13

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2619 on: March 13, 2019, 05:25:39 AM »
Also, your state's Dept of Labor can be a great advocate if you don't want a lawyer.  It will take time to resolve, if your case is valid but, they can be like a pitbull .... grabbing and not letting go until you submit.
Nothing like getting the state attorney general knocking on their door to make them wet their pants.   
LOL

Laura33

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2620 on: March 13, 2019, 07:54:04 AM »
@Sugaree:  Please do notify the company, in writing.  The best thing you can do if you want to get your money, go to the state, hire a lawyer, or whatever, is to document document document; otherwise, it's he-said-she-said and bad memories, or looks like you're playing a game of "gotcha."

Yes, theoretically you don't have to, because they should pay your husband what he deserves.  But the reality is that the way to win (or force a settlement, or initiate a DOL investigation) is to create a record that shows very clearly that you have politely and reasonably repeatedly asked for what you are owed.

spotila

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2621 on: March 13, 2019, 05:01:46 PM »
A small FU money story I have - sorry I don't have more details, it was a few years back now

DW was working at a local cafe doing... cafe stuff, barista primarily.
The job started out really well and she made some good friends, money was average, not terrible.
But I believe the cafe sold to new management shortly after this.

As soon as this happened things went downhill due to one of the new ladies in charge.
Bad attitude, yelling at employees, unrealistic or non-contract requests, all the standard stuff.

During a pre-opening standup meeting one morning (discuss cafe operations before opening the doors I guess), the new manager was particularly crazy, spouting nonsense about how lazy they all were an so on.

At the time we had about 5 years' expenses in the stash, and we always agreed we'd just bail if this sort of thing started happening.

So she said (paraphrasing) - "I don't need this kinda BS, I have money...".
And walked straight out the door before the morning rush.

She was worried what I would think, but I couldn't have been more proud.
FU money is great
Also people don't leave their jobs, they leave their managers

Livingthedream55

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2622 on: March 14, 2019, 09:47:03 AM »
A small FU money story I have - sorry I don't have more details, it was a few years back now

DW was working at a local cafe doing... cafe stuff, barista primarily.
The job started out really well and she made some good friends, money was average, not terrible.
But I believe the cafe sold to new management shortly after this.

As soon as this happened things went downhill due to one of the new ladies in charge.
Bad attitude, yelling at employees, unrealistic or non-contract requests, all the standard stuff.

During a pre-opening standup meeting one morning (discuss cafe operations before opening the doors I guess), the new manager was particularly crazy, spouting nonsense about how lazy they all were an so on.

At the time we had about 5 years' expenses in the stash, and we always agreed we'd just bail if this sort of thing started happening.

So she said (paraphrasing) - "I don't need this kinda BS, I have money...".
And walked straight out the door before the morning rush.

She was worried what I would think, but I couldn't have been more proud.
FU money is great
Also people don't leave their jobs, they leave their managers

That story is badass!

And yes, I'm leaving my manager in just a few months myself. I am just stockpiling the savings at this stage.

bigair360x

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2623 on: March 14, 2019, 10:49:21 AM »
I started working out of college in a corporate IT role and enjoyed the position and thought the money was good. I worked there 6 years until I met my girlfriend who would later become my wife. She asked if I would go with her to New York to live a while while she worked a travel role. I knew that I would essentially have to quit my job to go on this epic trip with her. I knew that I had a little FU money and definitely had the FU skills, so I schemed to ask for a leave of absence thinking I might have my job back when I returned 6 months later. I was granted the 6 month leave with no guarantee that my job would be available when I got back. I was fine with that. "Live once or die trying"... So off we go to live in Manhattan - down town. I had no job or job prospects and my girlfriend wasn't making enough to support me and my bills as I still had a house at home. I busted tail doing odd jobs here and there and figuring out how to make it in the big city. "If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere!".  I ended up leaving to come home engaged to my girlfriend and with more money than I ever thought I would make. We probably would have stayed longer except I was being told that I still had my job waiting for me when I get home. Until 2 days before we were set to get on a plane to come home I got a voicemail telling me that my job was no longer available. I was bummed but was also armed with all my new knowledge and skills learned from NYC so I was excited to see what I could do at home. I started pounding the pavement when I got home doing odd jobs but it didn't translate as well as in NYC so I started looking for a job again. I learned that my previous company was sold to a new entity and that they were struggling to move all their systems over. I reached out and said that I could help make the transition go more smoothly since I had specific knowledge of the systems and people from the previous company. I said I want X$ to turn the operation around and they told me no. FU money allowed me to say "give me a call if you change your mind". 2 days later I got a call "when can you start?". I started right away and walked in to see my previous boss (who didn't tell me that my job was no longer available to me until last minute) packing up his office because they didn't hire him over. What a great feeling!

I ended up working for the new company for another 6 years. During that time they hired a basically abusive manager and a narcissistic psychopath steroidal VP over him.  The VP figured he was king and would do whatever he wanted. This guy showed up in a corporate environment on Halloween as a gladiator with a sword. Yes, a "cut your head off" sword. HR turned a blind eye. He would have poker tournaments where drugs were gambled (instead of money). HR turned a blind eye. On and on.. The expectations were unrealistic, the demands were unreal, and we were being reprimanded for not completing impossible tasks. I realized that the company was not big enough for the three of us so they needed to go, or I needed to go. I had the FU money to walk out clean but I liked my job and the people I worked with other than these two. These two made a lot of stupid mistakes so I started to look for opportunities to make a move and eventually one came. One of the guys that worked under me forwarded an email to me from the VP asking him to modify a tax record for the manager in photoshop so that he would qualify to purchase a new car. I smelled blood and quickly brought the evidence to HR knowing that they would have no choice but to walk the two of them out right then and there. I had a big grin on my face as they were called to HR and walked out of the building. I was promoted to the manager position and all was well for awhile. I later learned that the steroidal VP had a massive heart attack and died in his 40's. Was it karma? I don't know - you decide. I didn't like the guy, and he made my life hell, but I didn't wish death on him. The manager disappeared into the sunset.

I had the manager position for a number of years and all was well until they decided I was a better lead engineer than a manager so I was "promoted" down to lead engineer. I was upset about my "promotion demotion" and that was when things started to go south again. Leadership started taking the company in odd directions and people started to not work together any more and the environment started to become stale. I was upset with leadership again and decided it was time to go and considered taking my FU money and just leaving. I figured I would try to find a different job so as not to dig into my stache so much. I was lucky enough to find my dream job doing what I do best for people that value me and want me to be there. I was offered the position and accepted. I provisioned to give my old company 2 weeks notice but I never did. I transitioned knowledge to my coworkers who loosely knew what my plans were. I still thought the new job was too good to be true. After 1 week I started the new job and started calling in sick from the old job so that I could go back in the event that the new job was in fact too good to be true. After 2 weeks, the big boss of the old company happened to be in town to fire one of the guys on my team (not me). I drove in and pulled him aside and explained everything wrong with leadership and the company and IT in general. I put down my badge and walked out and never looked back.

I later found out that the boss that "promoted demoted" me was later "promoted demoted" herself. Funny how things work out in the long run.

FIPurpose

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2624 on: March 14, 2019, 11:15:06 AM »
@bigair360x That is a crazy ride. Great story!

BicycleB

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2625 on: March 14, 2019, 10:49:33 PM »
Epic first post, @bigair360x. Welcome to the forum.

CindyBS

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2626 on: March 16, 2019, 02:07:41 PM »
Not really "epic", but I did have a moment this week.

I started a new job 3 weeks ago that I quickly realized after starting that I had been misled.  Week one I thought I could last a year.  By week 2 I was sending out resumes.  This week went downhill very rapidly.  A probably arose, management became very difficult with me - especially when I didn't just become passive and take it.   By Wed. night I was very upset about the whole thing.  Thursday I worked through a very awkward day.  Thursday night I emailed the boss with a letter of resignation effective immediately and never went back.

It took a little time for me to "get over" my work ethic and the idea that what I was doing was wrong, but in the end I wasn't going to take it anymore if I didn't have to.

BicycleB

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2627 on: March 16, 2019, 02:13:20 PM »
That's epic enough for me. Well done, @CindyBS!

iluvzbeach

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2628 on: March 16, 2019, 02:23:30 PM »
That's epic enough for me. Well done, @CindyBS!

I totally agree. When you realize something isnít right, itís 100% better to cut bait and get out ASAP. Otherwise, after youíve been there a while it begins to feel normal and acceptable. Nice job on just GTFO.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2629 on: March 16, 2019, 04:25:15 PM »
  Week one I thought I could last a year.  By week 2 I was sending out resumes.  This week went downhill very rapidly. 

The pace of narrative sounds like:
ďThe first ten million years were the worst," said Marvin, "and the second ten million years, they were the worst too. The third ten million years I didn't enjoy at all. After that I went into a bit of a decline.Ē
― Douglas Adams, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe
found at: https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/316990-the-first-ten-million-years-were-the-worst-said-marvin

Good to hear that you listened to yourself and GTFO and didn't go into a bit of a decline.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2630 on: March 16, 2019, 04:34:07 PM »
Enjoy your time off, @CindyBS! You've earned it!

SwordGuy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2631 on: March 16, 2019, 08:14:00 PM »
Not really "epic", but I did have a moment this week.

I started a new job 3 weeks ago that I quickly realized after starting that I had been misled.  Week one I thought I could last a year.  By week 2 I was sending out resumes.  This week went downhill very rapidly.  A probably arose, management became very difficult with me - especially when I didn't just become passive and take it.   By Wed. night I was very upset about the whole thing.  Thursday I worked through a very awkward day.  Thursday night I emailed the boss with a letter of resignation effective immediately and never went back.

It took a little time for me to "get over" my work ethic and the idea that what I was doing was wrong, but in the end I wasn't going to take it anymore if I didn't have to.


And you were there such a short time that, unless you're applying for a job with a security clearance, you need never mention it on your resume at all.

Livingthedream55

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2632 on: March 18, 2019, 10:41:32 AM »
Not really "epic", but I did have a moment this week.

I started a new job 3 weeks ago that I quickly realized after starting that I had been misled.  Week one I thought I could last a year.  By week 2 I was sending out resumes.  This week went downhill very rapidly.  A probably arose, management became very difficult with me - especially when I didn't just become passive and take it.   By Wed. night I was very upset about the whole thing.  Thursday I worked through a very awkward day.  Thursday night I emailed the boss with a letter of resignation effective immediately and never went back.

It took a little time for me to "get over" my work ethic and the idea that what I was doing was wrong, but in the end I wasn't going to take it anymore if I didn't have to.


And you were there such a short time that, unless you're applying for a job with a security clearance, you need never mention it on your resume at all.
+1

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2633 on: March 18, 2019, 11:46:51 AM »
Not really "epic", but I did have a moment this week.

I started a new job 3 weeks ago that I quickly realized after starting that I had been misled.  Week one I thought I could last a year.  By week 2 I was sending out resumes.  This week went downhill very rapidly.  A probably arose, management became very difficult with me - especially when I didn't just become passive and take it.   By Wed. night I was very upset about the whole thing.  Thursday I worked through a very awkward day.  Thursday night I emailed the boss with a letter of resignation effective immediately and never went back.

It took a little time for me to "get over" my work ethic and the idea that what I was doing was wrong, but in the end I wasn't going to take it anymore if I didn't have to.
And you were there such a short time that, unless you're applying for a job with a security clearance, you need never mention it on your resume at all.
+1

Good job @CindyBS , when the job turns out that be so bad that 3 weeks later you are sending resumes, it's often better to cut loose than tough it out. 

I can relate to the feeling that I was doing something wrong in just up and leaving.  Years ago, I took a new job and by the 2nd week, it was apparent that I had been misled about the job.  Frankly my new boss was incompetent, she simply wanted someone to basically cover for her while she goofed off.  By the end of 2 weeks, I was informed that she hadn't gotten around to talking to me about my benefits because they were changing, next day I was looking at sending out resumes again.  Middle of week 3, did overtime into the evening because she waltzed in late and gave me a task just before quitting time when I had been sitting around all day.    Next day, she disappeared for most of the day so I took some initiative in learning about the job by asking my coworkers because she was often out of the office and when she was in, she didn't have time to "train" me.   Next and last day, I was chastised for "socializing" while she was out of the office, which was my attempt to learn about the job and told her so.   It was at that point, I clocked out for lunch, took a walk, made my decision, went back to collect some things from my desk without saying anything to anyone, walked out, got in the car and drove off.   I didn't even offer up a resignation letter, I was that pissed off and besides I figured the now ex-boss could figure it out.

Yep, it was not quite professional to just walk off, but they weren't exactly professional with me.  Never mentioned it on a resume.  Even when I applied to The Big Company nearly 3 years later.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2019, 11:56:58 AM by saguaro »

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2634 on: March 18, 2019, 12:19:13 PM »
Not really "epic", but I did have a moment this week.

I started a new job 3 weeks ago that I quickly realized after starting that I had been misled.  Week one I thought I could last a year.  By week 2 I was sending out resumes.  This week went downhill very rapidly.  A probably arose, management became very difficult with me - especially when I didn't just become passive and take it.   By Wed. night I was very upset about the whole thing.  Thursday I worked through a very awkward day.  Thursday night I emailed the boss with a letter of resignation effective immediately and never went back.

It took a little time for me to "get over" my work ethic and the idea that what I was doing was wrong, but in the end I wasn't going to take it anymore if I didn't have to.
This is def epic.

theSlowTurtle

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2635 on: March 18, 2019, 03:03:10 PM »
Not really "epic", but I did have a moment this week.

I started a new job 3 weeks ago that I quickly realized after starting that I had been misled.  Week one I thought I could last a year.  By week 2 I was sending out resumes.  This week went downhill very rapidly.  A probably arose, management became very difficult with me - especially when I didn't just become passive and take it.   By Wed. night I was very upset about the whole thing.  Thursday I worked through a very awkward day.  Thursday night I emailed the boss with a letter of resignation effective immediately and never went back.

It took a little time for me to "get over" my work ethic and the idea that what I was doing was wrong, but in the end I wasn't going to take it anymore if I didn't have to.
I feel like this is just begging for more juicy details...

talltexan

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2636 on: March 21, 2019, 01:11:25 PM »
Add me to the group of people who would like more textured detail w.r.t the word "misled".

CindyBS

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2637 on: March 24, 2019, 04:50:15 PM »
It was a job working with kids with disabilities.  They were much more physically aggressive than I was led to believe in the interview.   Pretty sad situation overall. 

I've gone from feeling a rush and the thrill of raising a middle finger at the world to being pretty discouraged about the whole thing.  I'm very fortunate to have to cushion to do this, but now I am back into a difficult job search.  Sigh. 

Fi(re) on the Farm

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2638 on: March 24, 2019, 05:30:36 PM »
I thought I'd share an FU money story that is my mom's.   She was reliving it again to me, when I finally saw it for what it is:  an FU story. 

Now, I'll start by saying that mom did not actually have FU money, but she did eventually learn her worth in the market -- and that became her FU currency

Background:  Mom is widowed with 5 children to feed.  Money is extremely tight in the household.   Certified as a teacher, a teachers' strike makes finding a job impossible, so mom begins baking cakes and selling them to local restaurants.  After 5-6 months, she has 4-5 fancy restaurants on her daily rotation.  She's making 15-20 cakes and pies per day out of our home kitchen. 

One of her restaurants is a mob-run place at a racetrack.  She despises working with them because they treat her badly and wait weeks to pay her what she's owed -- very difficult when trying to buy supplies. There is a miscommunication over an error and the big boss mobster fires mom -- but makes the bookkeeper do it.  Mom was secretly relieved.  The mobsters were not professional and always ran on emotions. 

4 days later, the bookkeeper comes sniveling back and says the big boss wants her to come back and bake the desserts again. Mom raises the price on some of her desserts and then says she never wants to have to ask to get paid again.  All money is due at delivery or she's taking her cakes with her and never stepping foot inside again. 

I was about 11-12 when this happened, and I still remember the worry she had over how to pay bills and how empowered she was when she came home that day after setting her foot down.

That's just beautiful!

nwa-non

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2639 on: April 02, 2019, 11:41:56 AM »
Not exactly an FU story, but...

I bailed in January right after the holidays.  There were aspects of the job that were very off-putting (travel), but the important parts of the job were interesting and generally worthwhile.  The problem was everything else.  Endless meetings and conference calls for absolutely no reason.  Reams of useless make-work that did nothing but help the officer class substantiate to their superiors that they had firm control over everything. 

My direct manager was easily the best I have ever worked for, but like me he was a prisoner of the system.  I took pains to give them 2 weeks' notice, make the transition as easy as I could, spent time schooling up someone who could fill in for me and left on cordial terms.  To this day I don't think they have any idea why I left.

This is what drives me insane! The enormous rates that my employer bills me out to HAS to be justified my inanities that are borderline insane. Being busy for the sake of looking/being busy.

I wish I had the courage to walk off. I've brought down the OMY syndrome to 5 more months. Almost every day I look at the number of days left

CindyBS

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2640 on: April 05, 2019, 06:31:46 AM »
Not really "epic", but I did have a moment this week.

I started a new job 3 weeks ago that I quickly realized after starting that I had been misled.  Week one I thought I could last a year.  By week 2 I was sending out resumes.  This week went downhill very rapidly.  A probably arose, management became very difficult with me - especially when I didn't just become passive and take it.   By Wed. night I was very upset about the whole thing.  Thursday I worked through a very awkward day.  Thursday night I emailed the boss with a letter of resignation effective immediately and never went back.

It took a little time for me to "get over" my work ethic and the idea that what I was doing was wrong, but in the end I wasn't going to take it anymore if I didn't have to.
This is def epic.


****UPDATE*****

I am so, so happy I had both the FU money and courage to walk out of that situation. 

I just got hired for a different job - same number of hours.  Salary is more than twice the salary of the bad job!!   :-) 

RWD

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2641 on: April 05, 2019, 07:13:54 AM »
Not really "epic", but I did have a moment this week.

I started a new job 3 weeks ago that I quickly realized after starting that I had been misled.  Week one I thought I could last a year.  By week 2 I was sending out resumes.  This week went downhill very rapidly.  A probably arose, management became very difficult with me - especially when I didn't just become passive and take it.   By Wed. night I was very upset about the whole thing.  Thursday I worked through a very awkward day.  Thursday night I emailed the boss with a letter of resignation effective immediately and never went back.

It took a little time for me to "get over" my work ethic and the idea that what I was doing was wrong, but in the end I wasn't going to take it anymore if I didn't have to.
This is def epic.

****UPDATE*****

I am so, so happy I had both the FU money and courage to walk out of that situation. 

I just got hired for a different job - same number of hours.  Salary is more than twice the salary of the bad job!!   :-)

Nice, congrats!

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2642 on: April 05, 2019, 07:24:01 AM »
Whoo congrats Cindy!

Step37

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2643 on: April 05, 2019, 08:10:59 AM »
YAY @CindyBS!! That is so great! 😁

partgypsy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2644 on: April 05, 2019, 10:11:22 AM »
My mother has some hilarious stories of a series of jobs she had after moving away from teaching community college, and trying to get a job with higher salary and benefits. Like one she thought was just kind of new age, but it was actually some kind of cult. The cafeteria was vegetarian and you cleaned your own bowl afterwards and they did some kind of ritual before eating. And one where she was hired to be an assistant to a broker, but they thought she was good enough and they had to take a test and she was on her way to becoming a broker herself when she thought, what the hell am I doing? She didn't have confidence in herself and dropped out of the program. And one where she was an employee, but she spent so much time explaining and teaching the software to the other middle aged ladies, they thought she was a computer whiz and- fired their only IT person (who not only installed the software but also dealt with hardware issues) and changed her title to IT person. As she was just an ordinary person with no IT background, that did not end well.
Another one she was a salesperson for educational software to companies. She actually ended up doing really well, because her background was as an English teacher and she could explain in regular language (versus tech or sales langauge) what the software did and how it could help their company. She became too successful, so the owner kept switching her region to give her region to less successful people after she made the original sales, invite himself to her sales pitches and when they got the sale say that he was the person who got the commission, not her.

The one I was reminded of was, she got hired to work as a teacher in a closed mental health facility, teens. They told her as part of her job, that she had to participate in "take downs". (i.e. if a teen gets agitated, violent, that she as the teacher would need to restrain or "take them down"). (she's an out of shape, middle aged lady, a grandmother at that point).  She said no, she doesn't agree to do this.  Within the first month one of her students became violent. Rather than participating in a "take down" she ended up talking him down and no force was needed. However, since she did not do a "take down", they administration put a note in her work record. At that point she said thanks but no thanks (and you people are nuts!). 
« Last Edit: April 05, 2019, 10:13:03 AM by partgypsy »

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2645 on: April 05, 2019, 01:06:36 PM »
Not really "epic", but I did have a moment this week.

I started a new job 3 weeks ago that I quickly realized after starting that I had been misled.  Week one I thought I could last a year.  By week 2 I was sending out resumes.  This week went downhill very rapidly.  A probably arose, management became very difficult with me - especially when I didn't just become passive and take it.   By Wed. night I was very upset about the whole thing.  Thursday I worked through a very awkward day.  Thursday night I emailed the boss with a letter of resignation effective immediately and never went back.

It took a little time for me to "get over" my work ethic and the idea that what I was doing was wrong, but in the end I wasn't going to take it anymore if I didn't have to.
This is def epic.


****UPDATE*****

I am so, so happy I had both the FU money and courage to walk out of that situation. 

I just got hired for a different job - same number of hours.  Salary is more than twice the salary of the bad job!!   :-)
so awesome

Alfred J Quack

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2646 on: April 05, 2019, 01:39:43 PM »
Posting to follow.

My current employer is reasonable (management goes every which way but my boss and his boss keep us on a more than reasonable track).

The only FU like thing that happened to me was after I got fired from a part-time job in a supermarket (at 17) because the manager claimed he saw me smoking pot in a cafe at night the day before. Which was impossible because I was working at the time he claimed. And since I had to work until 23:00 it was unreasonable to expect me to be back at 6:00. They did this a couple of times even though I said they shouldn't because I was prone to oversleeping, even a special 80dB alarm couldn't wake me.
So I go home, not quite bothered because at 17 I could find a job in 2 days, maybe 3.

I had indeed landed a job after a few interviews at several temp agencies. I was working in a freezer cell, packing premade lunches for 6f an hour (about 3$). When I was done on the first day I walked out and never went back because I got a call to work at McDonalds.
On the plus, I wasn't cold anymore, just hot. On the downside, they paid me 5,50 an hour.

Incidentally, my mom sent a vicious letter to the supermarket corporate after we received a questionnaire because of my resignation. She detailed all the things they did wrong like letti g a minor work past his maximum time, too many hours, ignoring mandatory break time between 2 consecutive shifts (at least 10 hours for a minor).
Everything was in their systems because they used time cards. I walk in a couple of months later and chat with a former coworker. Appearently the team leader, and his assistant (who fired me) had been relocated to locations far away for our standards. We never heard back about the letter to corporate but I suspect they did the transfer because of it.

Taran Wanderer

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2647 on: April 05, 2019, 09:19:05 PM »
Posting to follow.

My current employer is reasonable (management goes every which way but my boss and his boss keep us on a more than reasonable track).

The only FU like thing that happened to me was after I got fired from a part-time job in a supermarket (at 17) because the manager claimed he saw me smoking pot in a cafe at night the day before. Which was impossible because I was working at the time he claimed. And since I had to work until 23:00 it was unreasonable to expect me to be back at 6:00. They did this a couple of times even though I said they shouldn't because I was prone to oversleeping, even a special 80dB alarm couldn't wake me.
So I go home, not quite bothered because at 17 I could find a job in 2 days, maybe 3.

I had indeed landed a job after a few interviews at several temp agencies. I was working in a freezer cell, packing premade lunches for 6f an hour (about 3$). When I was done on the first day I walked out and never went back because I got a call to work at McDonalds.
On the plus, I wasn't cold anymore, just hot. On the downside, they paid me 5,50 an hour.

Incidentally, my mom sent a vicious letter to the supermarket corporate after we received a questionnaire because of my resignation. She detailed all the things they did wrong like letti g a minor work past his maximum time, too many hours, ignoring mandatory break time between 2 consecutive shifts (at least 10 hours for a minor).
Everything was in their systems because they used time cards. I walk in a couple of months later and chat with a former coworker. Appearently the team leader, and his assistant (who fired me) had been relocated to locations far away for our standards. We never heard back about the letter to corporate but I suspect they did the transfer because of it.

And justice is served!

Alfred J Quack

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2648 on: April 06, 2019, 03:02:34 PM »
@Taran Wanderer, presumably ;)

But writing the previous story made me realise that we actually do have a somewhat epic story.

DW was working for one of the larger healthcare organisations in the city who provide care for the elderly (at home or institutionalised). She started working with a 1 year contract which has a 1 month trial period and a 1 month notice-period (2 for the employer but only with signature by a judge, local law).

She was supposed to receive training for one week, and be surpless for the 2nd so that she could tag along with more experienced colleagues. But, healthcare being healthcare, she had to start fulltime on the workfloor from day one including responsibilities where lower qualified personel called her in case of questions, emergencies etc. 29 days after starting she gets called into the office, her work is sub-par (well duh!) and colleagues have been complaining (without specifying about what). They were going to extend her trial period by one month after which she was no longer welcome (i.e. she was let go during her trial period).

She came home, quite distressed and I told her I would handle it. Since DW is foreing the language is a barrier so the legal terms would have been difficult for her. I called her HR contact, said my piece in a reasonable way and basically told them "you can't do this, it's unlawful, and fix it". They denied in all vehemence that what they did was unlawful and that my wife being foreing was the source of the whole problem (her language skills were appearently the problem, her previous employers lauded her attempts and had no problem that her grammar was often a bit off as long as she could make the meaning clear).
I had a few back and forths with them, they wouldn't budge. So, I called a lawyer and asked them how much to handle this, 600,- for a few letters and at least another 600,- again if it goes to court. 600,- isn't a big deal for us but for someone in my wife's job (often parttime, unwilling to confront and dependent on the income and frequently single moms too) that's quite a sum without any guaranteed prospect of returns. I said go for it. The lawyer had a nice back and forth with HR.

Meanwhile my wife is in her last week. HR or the manager was putting on airs and she had to work 6 days, one until 23:00, starting the next at 7:00 and that for all consecutive workdays (she had 3 of those days the past month and their union agreement states that such a shift may only occur once every 14 days). I called her HR again and said that if they didn't change it, we would report them. I also implied that my wife wasn't feeling well and might call in sick (which had serious repercussions if she left the workforce sick, as in they had to keep on paying sickleave for up to 10 years if she was unable to work).
They changed the shifts to all late shifts, annoying but OK. Salarywise, my wife didn't need to work (my base salary was more than enough for living cost) so we didn't apply for unemployment. Unemployment has some very annoying rules and my wife didn't want to go through that again. Also, there was a risk that we had to return the unemployment money if the lawyer didn't do a good job and ended the contract in the wrong way.

1 month later, DW had the same job with a different employer at a close-by town/village ;P The lawyer had an offer from the previous employer entailing that they would pay one more month of salary, it should have been the 10 month still left in the contract BUT my wife would have to remain "available" in case te employer folded and let het finish the contract. So, I told the lawyer that we wanted 2 months as a final offer (matching the employer notice period) and otherwise we would go to court and I told the lawyer specifically to mention that as well. They accepted.

For me this was a case of principle and I would have taken them to court, regardless of the outcome or cost. They are a fairly big company and know how the rules work. They knowingly transgressed and played ignorant which appearently works and I figured it should stop. What also played a major part is that they advertise that they desperately needed people, women returning to the workplace after the kids left home (education included) were more than welcome. But when my wife was hired, all promisses went out the window (even the mandatory training and re-certification one) and they basically walked all over her.
Realistically, they won't change their ways but at least they got bitten by their own stupidity.

SwordGuy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2649 on: April 06, 2019, 03:22:37 PM »
For me this was a case of principle and I would have taken them to court, regardless of the outcome or cost. They are a fairly big company and know how the rules work. They knowingly transgressed and played ignorant which appearently works and I figured it should stop.

On behalf of helpless and downtrodden employees everywhere, thank you.   People need to stick together.