Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 1147625 times)

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2550 on: December 17, 2018, 08:23:45 AM »
I'm not Christian, but I didn't realize that men who wear their Christian religions on their sleeves looked down on women.  I thought that would be somehow... not Christ-like?  Fascinating

It is un-Christ-like. 

In addition to the guy mentioned in my earlier post on the subject of Christian men looking down on women, especially women in the workplace, I quit a job because I found myself with a manager who believed that women should be at home with children and, as a childless married woman, I realized there would be no promotions or raises from this guy because he was waiting for me to come to my senses, have a baby and quit.  He was shocked when I found a new job instead and with one of the premier employers in the area.   

« Last Edit: December 17, 2018, 08:38:09 AM by saguaro »

jeninco

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2551 on: December 17, 2018, 08:57:33 AM »
I'm not Christian, but I didn't realize that men who wear their Christian religions on their sleeves looked down on women.  I thought that would be somehow... not Christ-like?  Fascinating

It is un-Christ-like. 

In addition to the guy mentioned in my earlier post on the subject of Christian men looking down on women, especially women in the workplace, I quit a job because I found myself with a manager who believed that women should be at home with children and, as a childless married woman, I realized there would be no promotions or raises from this guy because he was waiting for me to come to my senses, have a baby and quit.  He was shocked when I found a new job instead and with one of the premier employers in the area.

Yeah, I "quit" a job with a manager who was quite clear that I didn't need to earn as much as the guy in the next office who had somewhat less experience than I did and no masters degree.

"Quit" is in quotes, because he was lining me up to be fired because I had realized this and was figuring out how to complain. Also, he claimed I missed a meeting (for which I had called into another coworker to explain my absence, because I was ... at the Obstetrician's office, having a miscarriage).  This was in the early 2000's, so not exactly the olden days. (And I still bump into that manager around town sometimes, ick.)

Slow&Steady

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2552 on: December 17, 2018, 09:04:05 AM »
I'm not Christian, but I didn't realize that men who wear their Christian religions on their sleeves looked down on women.  I thought that would be somehow... not Christ-like?  Fascinating

It is un-Christ-like. 

In addition to the guy mentioned in my earlier post on the subject of Christian men looking down on women, especially women in the workplace, I quit a job because I found myself with a manager who believed that women should be at home with children and, as a childless married woman, I realized there would be no promotions or raises from this guy because he was waiting for me to come to my senses, have a baby and quit.  He was shocked when I found a new job instead and with one of the premier employers in the area.

Yeah, I "quit" a job with a manager who was quite clear that I didn't need to earn as much as the guy in the next office who had somewhat less experience than I did and no masters degree.

"Quit" is in quotes, because he was lining me up to be fired because I had realized this and was figuring out how to complain. Also, he claimed I missed a meeting (for which I had called into another coworker to explain my absence, because I was ... at the Obstetrician's office, having a miscarriage).  This was in the early 2000's, so not exactly the olden days. (And I still bump into that manager around town sometimes, ick.)

A major motivator for me leaving my last job is because when I met my new boss (old company was purchased) I was standing there at like 7 months pregnant and he explained to me that he believes that the woman's job is to stay home and raise kids.  Also my role was environmental and he felt the need to explain to me that he was happy to drive his giant truck (with modifications to remove all emission controls) to counter-balance my EV.

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2553 on: December 17, 2018, 09:13:49 AM »
I didn't even realize I had an EPIC FUM moment until I described an altercation that I had with a manager to a coworker and his response was "wow, you must be financially secure".  After a second, I smiled very broadly and said, "yeah, I guess I am".  All of a sudden, I was no longer worried about the disagreement we had had.  Best feeling ever. 

Details are not even important.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2554 on: December 17, 2018, 09:51:01 AM »
I didn't even realize I had an EPIC FUM moment until I described an altercation that I had with a manager to a coworker and his response was "wow, you must be financially secure".  After a second, I smiled very broadly and said, "yeah, I guess I am".  All of a sudden, I was no longer worried about the disagreement we had had.  Best feeling ever. 

Details are not even important.

Argument details, no,  but level of escalation, maybe.

Padonak

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2555 on: December 17, 2018, 10:27:54 AM »
I'm not Christian, but I didn't realize that men who wear their Christian religions on their sleeves looked down on women.  I thought that would be somehow... not Christ-like?  Fascinating

It is un-Christ-like. 

In addition to the guy mentioned in my earlier post on the subject of Christian men looking down on women, especially women in the workplace, I quit a job because I found myself with a manager who believed that women should be at home with children and, as a childless married woman, I realized there would be no promotions or raises from this guy because he was waiting for me to come to my senses, have a baby and quit.  He was shocked when I found a new job instead and with one of the premier employers in the area.

Yeah, I "quit" a job with a manager who was quite clear that I didn't need to earn as much as the guy in the next office who had somewhat less experience than I did and no masters degree.

"Quit" is in quotes, because he was lining me up to be fired because I had realized this and was figuring out how to complain. Also, he claimed I missed a meeting (for which I had called into another coworker to explain my absence, because I was ... at the Obstetrician's office, having a miscarriage).  This was in the early 2000's, so not exactly the olden days. (And I still bump into that manager around town sometimes, ick.)
Did you get any compensation for that treatment? Did you sue then or go through arbitration?

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2556 on: December 17, 2018, 10:32:22 AM »
I'm not Christian, but I didn't realize that men who wear their Christian religions on their sleeves looked down on women.  I thought that would be somehow... not Christ-like?  Fascinating

It is un-Christ-like. 

In addition to the guy mentioned in my earlier post on the subject of Christian men looking down on women, especially women in the workplace, I quit a job because I found myself with a manager who believed that women should be at home with children and, as a childless married woman, I realized there would be no promotions or raises from this guy because he was waiting for me to come to my senses, have a baby and quit.  He was shocked when I found a new job instead and with one of the premier employers in the area.

Yeah, I "quit" a job with a manager who was quite clear that I didn't need to earn as much as the guy in the next office who had somewhat less experience than I did and no masters degree.

"Quit" is in quotes, because he was lining me up to be fired because I had realized this and was figuring out how to complain. Also, he claimed I missed a meeting (for which I had called into another coworker to explain my absence, because I was ... at the Obstetrician's office, having a miscarriage).  This was in the early 2000's, so not exactly the olden days. (And I still bump into that manager around town sometimes, ick.)

A major motivator for me leaving my last job is because when I met my new boss (old company was purchased) I was standing there at like 7 months pregnant and he explained to me that he believes that the woman's job is to stay home and raise kids.  Also my role was environmental and he felt the need to explain to me that he was happy to drive his giant truck (with modifications to remove all emission controls) to counter-balance my EV.

When I quit to go to the premier employer, henceforth known as The Big Company, I did as much homework as I could to make sure I didn't end up with someone like the old boss.  Luckily the Big Company's HR policies made it difficult for someone to be as overt about women in the workplace as this guy.   One issue is that we were in a small field office, so it was much easier for old boss to run the place like his own personal fiefdom.

force majeure

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2557 on: December 17, 2018, 12:36:50 PM »
I have been underperforming at work. Coming up this week is my PMP, the annual review and rating discussion with my manager.
I saw my rating over his shoulder, and it is "underperform".

I did the numbers, and even with recent market falls, I am near to 25 times salary in nett worth.
Emailed manager early today, told him no need for the one-to-one meeting... I am resigning.
He is in shock, wants to talk first thing tomorrow.

Its a strategy known as... get the retaliation in first.

Cannot Wait!

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2558 on: December 17, 2018, 12:41:48 PM »
Love it!   Tell us how it goes tomorrow!

jeninco

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2559 on: December 17, 2018, 02:26:48 PM »
I'm not Christian, but I didn't realize that men who wear their Christian religions on their sleeves looked down on women.  I thought that would be somehow... not Christ-like?  Fascinating

It is un-Christ-like. 

In addition to the guy mentioned in my earlier post on the subject of Christian men looking down on women, especially women in the workplace, I quit a job because I found myself with a manager who believed that women should be at home with children and, as a childless married woman, I realized there would be no promotions or raises from this guy because he was waiting for me to come to my senses, have a baby and quit.  He was shocked when I found a new job instead and with one of the premier employers in the area.

Yeah, I "quit" a job with a manager who was quite clear that I didn't need to earn as much as the guy in the next office who had somewhat less experience than I did and no masters degree.

"Quit" is in quotes, because he was lining me up to be fired because I had realized this and was figuring out how to complain. Also, he claimed I missed a meeting (for which I had called into another coworker to explain my absence, because I was ... at the Obstetrician's office, having a miscarriage).  This was in the early 2000's, so not exactly the olden days. (And I still bump into that manager around town sometimes, ick.)
Did you get any compensation for that treatment? Did you sue then or go through arbitration?

No, which I now have mixed feeling about.  At the time, I just wanted to be done with the whole stinky, steamy pile of a situation. Also, that small company had some other problems (several of which came back to bite them in the 5 years or so after I left).

On the one hand, shortly after I left I became pregnant, and shortly after that I wound up being a subcontractor to the greatest manager I'd had to that point (we'd worked together before). I've now subbed to that guy on and off for 18 years, and I honestly love my work-life balance 95% of the time (I typically work slightly less then half time, on average, at a technical niche job for which I am paid very, very well).

On the other hand, I kinda wish I'd stuck it out and tried to fix the situation somewhat for the next woman who came through.

Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2560 on: December 17, 2018, 10:48:44 PM »
Its been wonderful watching. Absolutely glorious management disconnect, currently I prefer watching this to netflix.

Real life is better than Netflix! Love it!

Laura33

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2561 on: December 18, 2018, 07:52:41 AM »
Details are not even important.

No, but they're fun. Spill!  ;-)

dcheesi

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2562 on: December 18, 2018, 08:59:32 AM »
I'm not Christian, but I didn't realize that men who wear their Christian religions on their sleeves looked down on women.  I thought that would be somehow... not Christ-like?  Fascinating
Like most faiths, a lot of what goes on in the name of "religion" is really just old tribal values propagating themselves into new generations. The actual tenets of the religion are largely forgotten in favor of the cultural norms that people grew up with, which get conflated with "good Christian1 values" from an early age . This is a prime example of how children learn by what those around them do, more than what they say.

(1 insert name of religion here)

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2563 on: December 18, 2018, 09:30:00 AM »
I think it's important to separate the misogyny, the Christianity, and the outspokenness, and not assume that there's always a causal relationship between them.  You can't always assume that a person's actions are consistent with their beliefs.  In fact, a basic tenet of Christianity is that a person can't be completely faithful. A religious person's views on women may be in accordance to, orthogonal to, or contrary to their professed belief.

Not every outspoken Christian is misogynist, and making a blanket statement to that effect is, in my opinion, divisive and counterproductive, just like saying Republicans don't care about the poor or that illegal immigrants are all criminal gangsters.  In fact, I'm wracking my brain trying to think of anyone I've met who's an outspoken Christian misogynist, and I'm coming up blank.  But we certainly *remember* those instances, because they're a confluence of three memorable and objectionable traits--the outspokenness, the misogyny, and the Christianity*.

* I call Christianity objectionable here only in the sense that the misogynist's religion is objectionable to the victim in this case

shelivesthedream

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2564 on: December 18, 2018, 12:45:04 PM »
I think it's important to separate the misogyny, the Christianity, and the outspokenness, and not assume that there's always a causal relationship between them.  You can't always assume that a person's actions are consistent with their beliefs.  In fact, a basic tenet of Christianity is that a person can't be completely faithful. A religious person's views on women may be in accordance to, orthogonal to, or contrary to their professed belief.

Not every outspoken Christian is misogynist, and making a blanket statement to that effect is, in my opinion, divisive and counterproductive, just like saying Republicans don't care about the poor or that illegal immigrants are all criminal gangsters.  In fact, I'm wracking my brain trying to think of anyone I've met who's an outspoken Christian misogynist, and I'm coming up blank.  But we certainly *remember* those instances, because they're a confluence of three memorable and objectionable traits--the outspokenness, the misogyny, and the Christianity*.

* I call Christianity objectionable here only in the sense that the misogynist's religion is objectionable to the victim in this case

Thank you. This is the thing I wanted to say but was worried I would phrase it badly and make things worse. Particularly the bolded - Christians believe that EVERYONE sins. All the time. FWIW, Standard American Christianity is totally alien (and very often unchristian) to me, even though we would be considered conservative/traditional Christians in the UK.

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2565 on: December 18, 2018, 01:58:20 PM »
I'm not Christian, but I didn't realize that men who wear their Christian religions on their sleeves looked down on women.  I thought that would be somehow... not Christ-like?  Fascinating

It is un-Christ-like. 

In addition to the guy mentioned in my earlier post on the subject of Christian men looking down on women, especially women in the workplace, I quit a job because I found myself with a manager who believed that women should be at home with children and, as a childless married woman, I realized there would be no promotions or raises from this guy because he was waiting for me to come to my senses, have a baby and quit.  He was shocked when I found a new job instead and with one of the premier employers in the area.

Yeah, I "quit" a job with a manager who was quite clear that I didn't need to earn as much as the guy in the next office who had somewhat less experience than I did and no masters degree.

"Quit" is in quotes, because he was lining me up to be fired because I had realized this and was figuring out how to complain. Also, he claimed I missed a meeting (for which I had called into another coworker to explain my absence, because I was ... at the Obstetrician's office, having a miscarriage).  This was in the early 2000's, so not exactly the olden days. (And I still bump into that manager around town sometimes, ick.)
Did you get any compensation for that treatment? Did you sue then or go through arbitration?

No, which I now have mixed feeling about.  At the time, I just wanted to be done with the whole stinky, steamy pile of a situation. Also, that small company had some other problems (several of which came back to bite them in the 5 years or so after I left).

On the one hand, shortly after I left I became pregnant, and shortly after that I wound up being a subcontractor to the greatest manager I'd had to that point (we'd worked together before). I've now subbed to that guy on and off for 18 years, and I honestly love my work-life balance 95% of the time (I typically work slightly less then half time, on average, at a technical niche job for which I am paid very, very well).

On the other hand, I kinda wish I'd stuck it out and tried to fix the situation somewhat for the next woman who came through.


Yeah, I know.  This is tough.

I had an experience where I was working part time (30 hrs / week), got a new boss and they told me they don't believe in PT.  I argued.  I lost.  I quit.

The happy note is that they let the next woman who asked for part time go part time.  But after a couple of years, they pressured her to go full time.  She quit.

During this time, there was another woman working part time - that was okay because she "wasn't in a technical position" (she had a PhD in materials science, so they corrected that to "not in the critical path").  After getting more work thrown at her so that she was working 40+ hours...she quit.

Finally, probably 5 years later?  Another new mom who went part time...and they let her stay part time for as long as she liked.  Until they shut down.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2566 on: December 18, 2018, 07:08:51 PM »
I'm not Christian, but I didn't realize that men who wear their Christian religions on their sleeves looked down on women.  I thought that would be somehow... not Christ-like?  Fascinating

It is un-Christ-like. 

In addition to the guy mentioned in my earlier post on the subject of Christian men looking down on women, especially women in the workplace, I quit a job because I found myself with a manager who believed that women should be at home with children and, as a childless married woman, I realized there would be no promotions or raises from this guy because he was waiting for me to come to my senses, have a baby and quit.  He was shocked when I found a new job instead and with one of the premier employers in the area.

Yeah, I "quit" a job with a manager who was quite clear that I didn't need to earn as much as the guy in the next office who had somewhat less experience than I did and no masters degree.

"Quit" is in quotes, because he was lining me up to be fired because I had realized this and was figuring out how to complain. Also, he claimed I missed a meeting (for which I had called into another coworker to explain my absence, because I was ... at the Obstetrician's office, having a miscarriage).  This was in the early 2000's, so not exactly the olden days. (And I still bump into that manager around town sometimes, ick.)
Did you get any compensation for that treatment? Did you sue then or go through arbitration?

No, which I now have mixed feeling about.  At the time, I just wanted to be done with the whole stinky, steamy pile of a situation. Also, that small company had some other problems (several of which came back to bite them in the 5 years or so after I left).

On the one hand, shortly after I left I became pregnant, and shortly after that I wound up being a subcontractor to the greatest manager I'd had to that point (we'd worked together before). I've now subbed to that guy on and off for 18 years, and I honestly love my work-life balance 95% of the time (I typically work slightly less then half time, on average, at a technical niche job for which I am paid very, very well).

On the other hand, I kinda wish I'd stuck it out and tried to fix the situation somewhat for the next woman who came through.


Yeah, I know.  This is tough.

I had an experience where I was working part time (30 hrs / week), got a new boss and they told me they don't believe in PT.  I argued.  I lost.  I quit.

The happy note is that they let the next woman who asked for part time go part time.  But after a couple of years, they pressured her to go full time.  She quit.

During this time, there was another woman working part time - that was okay because she "wasn't in a technical position" (she had a PhD in materials science, so they corrected that to "not in the critical path").  After getting more work thrown at her so that she was working 40+ hours...she quit.

Finally, probably 5 years later?  Another new mom who went part time...and they let her stay part time for as long as she liked.  Until they shut down.
Did Karma kill them?

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2567 on: December 19, 2018, 12:01:15 PM »
I'm not Christian, but I didn't realize that men who wear their Christian religions on their sleeves looked down on women.  I thought that would be somehow... not Christ-like?  Fascinating

It is un-Christ-like. 

In addition to the guy mentioned in my earlier post on the subject of Christian men looking down on women, especially women in the workplace, I quit a job because I found myself with a manager who believed that women should be at home with children and, as a childless married woman, I realized there would be no promotions or raises from this guy because he was waiting for me to come to my senses, have a baby and quit.  He was shocked when I found a new job instead and with one of the premier employers in the area.

Yeah, I "quit" a job with a manager who was quite clear that I didn't need to earn as much as the guy in the next office who had somewhat less experience than I did and no masters degree.

"Quit" is in quotes, because he was lining me up to be fired because I had realized this and was figuring out how to complain. Also, he claimed I missed a meeting (for which I had called into another coworker to explain my absence, because I was ... at the Obstetrician's office, having a miscarriage).  This was in the early 2000's, so not exactly the olden days. (And I still bump into that manager around town sometimes, ick.)
Did you get any compensation for that treatment? Did you sue then or go through arbitration?

No, which I now have mixed feeling about.  At the time, I just wanted to be done with the whole stinky, steamy pile of a situation. Also, that small company had some other problems (several of which came back to bite them in the 5 years or so after I left).

On the one hand, shortly after I left I became pregnant, and shortly after that I wound up being a subcontractor to the greatest manager I'd had to that point (we'd worked together before). I've now subbed to that guy on and off for 18 years, and I honestly love my work-life balance 95% of the time (I typically work slightly less then half time, on average, at a technical niche job for which I am paid very, very well).

On the other hand, I kinda wish I'd stuck it out and tried to fix the situation somewhat for the next woman who came through.


Yeah, I know.  This is tough.

I had an experience where I was working part time (30 hrs / week), got a new boss and they told me they don't believe in PT.  I argued.  I lost.  I quit.

The happy note is that they let the next woman who asked for part time go part time.  But after a couple of years, they pressured her to go full time.  She quit.

During this time, there was another woman working part time - that was okay because she "wasn't in a technical position" (she had a PhD in materials science, so they corrected that to "not in the critical path").  After getting more work thrown at her so that she was working 40+ hours...she quit.

Finally, probably 5 years later?  Another new mom who went part time...and they let her stay part time for as long as she liked.  Until they shut down.
Did Karma kill them?

Ah ha ha, maybe?  I think the company in general went in a different direction.  This office was a small satellite, and HQ decided to shut them down.  In general, HQ was not known to be employee friendly - not the greatest work conditions, and located in a state that is Company-friendly.  The rules in my own state (CA), directly contradicted some company policies, so they had to ease up (like the use-or-lose vacation policy).  Apparently, HQ folks referred to our location as a vacation spot.  Or a spa.  Or something like that.  We all worked hard and more than 40 hours for the FT employees - but apparently HQ prefers 60 hour weeks, but at below median pay.

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2568 on: December 19, 2018, 12:34:01 PM »
On the other hand, I kinda wish I'd stuck it out and tried to fix the situation somewhat for the next woman who came through.

Speaking of trying to fix a work situation for the next person, this reminds me of a long term temp assignment I had years ago.  It probably wasn't so much fixing the situation but paving the way for the next person not being blamed for the boss' crazy. 

Setup: sales and marketing office of telecom company recently acquired by an ever growing telecom company, which became infamous years later when their CEO went to jail, but I digress.  I was brought on to replace the previous temp to man the phones and support the sales team, my "self-named" boss was the office manager, henceforth known as Lovely Rita, who only supported the regional sales manager, the top guy in the office.   At first things were fine, I actually enjoyed the assignment and got on well with everyone including Lovely Rita.  Then about six months in, something seemed to change with her.   Lovely Rita became unlovely, critical, and micromanaging, giving me obnoxious tasks like setting up files in one part of the office but insisting that I answer all calls that came in which required I rush to my desk on the other side of the office, while she's yelling for me to answer the phone.  She would listen to my calls from her desk and inform me how I was "mishandling" them, telling me exactly what I should say.   She made subtle threats to replace me however never followed up on this.  Probably because 1) I did my job well and got good feedback from everyone else and 2) she couldn't handle the tasks I did which is why I was there.   When I went on vacation, there was another temp in my place for that last reason, Lovely Rita couldn't cover what I did, even though her workload seemed very light, for one week.  When I got back, I got all kinds of stories of how Lovely Rita micromanaged that temp.

I tolerated it as the pay was decent and, other than Lovely Rita, I liked the work and the people.   I made a good life long friend while there.  Finally it came to pass that, as part of the company acquisition, the office was moving to a location that was really going to be too far for me and my then not-so-reliable car.  I requested a change of assignment as I had a long-standing good relationship with my agency.  Worked out out a change so they could find a new person who could make the commute, bring that person on before I left so I could do some training and make an easier transition for Lovely Rita, who incidentally was not happy that I was leaving despite her previous threats.  However, before I left I warned the agency about my recent experiences with Lovely Rita, perhaps a risky thing to do saying negative things about a client but I felt it my duty to say so for the sake of the next person and hoped that, with my long-standing reputation of being reliable, they would take note of what I told them in case things hit the fan for this person.  Because somehow I had this feeling that Lovely Rita was not going to revert to being, well, Lovely Rita.

So I leave but not before Lovely Rita abruptly decides that the person will not be starting before I depart so I get no training done.  I go to the next assignment.  About a month later, the agency rep comes to check on how things are going.   In talking with her I learn the fate of my successor: he was tossed out after 3 weeks.  It seems that Lovely Rita totally flipped out on him.  It was over him talking with one of the sales reps a mere 10 feet from his desk.  She promptly booted him out of the office for the sin of leaving his desk.  The guy was furious because when he started, he was told this would be a temp to hire position (first time I heard this) and he had passed on a similar assignment to take this job because Lovely Rita put on a nice face when interviewing him.   Fortunately, because of what I had told the agency, they knew it was not the guy's fault.  They got him assigned to the other temp to hire job (the one he passed up on, he had been in the position of having to take one or the other) which luckily was still open.  I was glad for that as I heard good things about him.  But the agency also refused to fill any more assignments for Lovely Rita saying "we can't seem to meet her needs" which is code for when a client becomes too impossible to work with. 
« Last Edit: December 19, 2018, 02:23:32 PM by saguaro »

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2569 on: December 20, 2018, 02:19:09 PM »
Quote
But the agency also refused to fill any more assignments for Lovely Rita saying "we can't seem to meet her needs" which is code for when a client becomes too impossible to work with. 

This is glorious.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2570 on: December 20, 2018, 03:39:30 PM »
Quote
But the agency also refused to fill any more assignments for Lovely Rita saying "we can't seem to meet her needs" which is code for when a client becomes too impossible to work with. 

This is glorious.

The power of FU money also extends to agencies too!   
My former SemiMegaCorp got screwed over by clients.  The client would ask for a major job and then cancel at the last minute.  SemiMajorCorp now writes hefty penalty cancellation clauses for that client.   By contrast, SemiMegaCorp also has taken some sketchy contracts during lean times and gotten screwed as a result.

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2571 on: December 20, 2018, 08:27:54 PM »
Quote
But the agency also refused to fill any more assignments for Lovely Rita saying "we can't seem to meet her needs" which is code for when a client becomes too impossible to work with. 

This is glorious.

A couple more interesting things I learned after my departure.

As mentioned, my successor was to start during my last week so I could train.  I get there Monday morning and there's nobody.   Lovely Rita doesn't say anything.   An hour goes by and still nobody.  Because I am busy, I am not exactly counting the minutes.   After another hour, I finally ask Lovely Rita if my successor was coming and got a short abrupt answer that no, he wasn't, he would start next week now.  I was surprised because she really made a big deal about my training this person before I left.  So something changed but didn't know what, I didn't give it much thought.

Later, after I left, I learned from my one friend there that in fact, my successor did show up that morning to start the assignment.  Lovely Rita came down and informed him right there in the lobby that she didn't need him until next week.   So Lovely Rita changed the deal on the spot and sent him on his way.  Weird.  The guy was reportedly taken aback, but being new and his first assignment, he didn't make a fuss, and agreed to report the next week. But I am fairly certain that after 3 weeks, he reassessed the weirdness he encountered that day.

Another interesting tidbit: Lovely Rita was convinced that I sabotaged my computer in some sort of retaliation.   Any computer issues that arose had to be funneled through her, I was not allowed to contact the Help Desk. Any documents coming from the shared drive (she guarded it like a hawk) had to be downloaded by her and given to me on a disk.  OK, that's fine given my employment status there, company policy, etc.   However, during my last week, I was getting an error on startup.  It didn't prevent me from working but I reported the issue to her.  Lovely Rita blew it off.   Since it was my last week, I figured I wasn't going to worry about it, if it wasn't important to her, then it wasn't important to me.

My successor gets there and reports getting the error when he starts working.  Now, Lovely Rita pays attention and makes a big deal about it and drags my friend, who is the support engineer, into the whole thing.  She becomes convinced that somehow I created the problem, forgetting that I reported that issue to her before I left.    There was no convincing her that there were all kinds of reasons for a win.ini error.  Upon hearing this, I wasn't sure whether to be insulted that she would think I would stoop to sabotage, or feel flattered that she thought I had the technical capability to do it, which I didn't, but hey, I decided to feel flattered. 

Truthfully, in this situation, I didn't have FU money.  However, in addition to recently reading Your Money Or Your Life, it was a factor in my deciding that FU money was a very good idea.   The tale of how I quit The Big Company because of FU money is forthcoming.

 
« Last Edit: December 20, 2018, 08:41:51 PM by saguaro »

AMandM

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2572 on: December 21, 2018, 10:28:41 AM »
The tale of how I quit The Big Company because of FU money is forthcoming.

Can't wait!

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2573 on: February 07, 2019, 02:48:35 PM »
As promised, here is the saga of leaving The Big Company thanks to FU money.  Because The Big Company was well known I have avoided using buzzwords and phrases that are associated with it.  There’s a ton of stories I can tell about my experience there, but I tried to boil it down to the issues that finally pushed me out the door.

By way of background, The Big Company was considered one of the premier employers in our area, the hometown company done good.   If you got into The Big Company, people considered you as having really made it.  It was to the point you lost friends out of sheer jealousy.   

I started at The Big Company (henceforth referred to TBC for brevity) as a contractor.  Because everyone was beating down the doors to get inside TBC, it wasn’t easy to get hired, as you were playing the numbers game.  But being a contractor could get you in the door quite easily and you could show firsthand you could do the work thereby getting hired that way, with no competition.  It was the path to “TBC employee-hood” for many.   
 
TBC had many divisions/business units and the division I was working for (call it Division A) was a bit obscure in that TBC was not known for Division A’s products but it was a solid performing one.  The culture at TBC was a mixed bag.  While it had a reputation for a “family culture” that valued employees thanks to its founders, those guys had retired by the time I joined.   What remained of that culture really depended on the division / group you were in.  Fortunately, Division A was one of the better ones to work in but TBC was really like a lot of companies, despite their claims that they were different, with their own set of dysfunctions.

So, I do the contract job for six months, then move into a permanent position in another department.    I work this job for over 2 years.  Goes pretty well, liked my boss and coworkers.  Then, in missing the boat in moving to new technology, TBC has a bad enough quarter that they finally announce the Great Unthinkable Thing: layoffs.  Much to the shock of the company true believers who, like those who believed the Titanic was unsinkable, thought that TBC was “layoff proof”.  The Restructuring to Fix Everything is announced but what we all don’t know at the time that it’s the first of many reorgs / sell offs / outsourcing /  new company visions / reinventions of the wheel to come.  As a result, my department is eliminated, and I have 4 months to find another position in the company or leave.   
 
Luckily, I land another position elsewhere in Division A.  However, I learn firsthand about all the HR red tape and how department VPs can fight over internal transfers, even from departments that are on the brink of extinction.   Finally, I get into the new job and things go OK for a while.   Then another bad quarter hits and the decision is made to let all contractors in the facility go.  Unfortunately this means people are having to cover the responsibilities of those contractors without additional pay, in order to “right the ship”. OK, fine, I understand that and furthermore we are all pitching in, it’s not just me, TBC used a lot of contractors. However, I find, along with others, that once you are stuck with these responsibilities, they don’t go away.

CEO leaves and a new CEO, The One to Fix Everything, comes on board.  There’s actually a period of stability and increased profits under him due to a very successful product launch but it’s short lived.  Now things start really going downhill.  Somehow through the next couple of years, I avoid getting axed and a smaller Division A remains, but it is becoming a game of corporate musical chairs.  Anxieties are running high as morale sinks to new lows while business units get sold or spun off, first the little pieces and then the bigger pieces.  More reorgs and nearly quarterly layoffs occur, the latter aided and abetted by the company review / ranking system that TBC somehow thought was a good idea.

I decide to try to hold on as long as possible though I know the end will come sooner or later.  The pay has enabled me to pay off debt and build savings including the FU money, so the more I can have saved when the inevitable happens, the better. I consider moving to one of the bigger divisions which was closer to home and would pay more but with the company in a constant state of shrinkage there’s really no place to transfer to.   

Finally, about a year before my departure, comes yet another Reorg to Fix Everything.   This time it moves me and my boss involuntarily into a newly created group in the corporate structure and out of Division A.  We remain in the same building, working alongside our Division A coworkers but are part of the new corporate entity.  We learn why.  Division A’s time has come and will be sold, so this is how TBC is splitting off the personnel deemed important to TBC before buyout negotiations commence.
 
For the next year I get a front row seat to the unbelievable amounts of sheer idiocy that goes on at the Corporate, aka Ivory Tower level.  Coupled with unreasonable expectations and a ridiculous workload (courtesy of the new boss that I got when I was moved to Corporate, a story in itself), and tired of working with a sword over my head, I decide to just pull the plug with DH agreeing.  Not wait for the bitter end or wait for another job.  Just get out. We had pared down expenses, so we could live on DH’s salary while I searched for a new position.  We had the emergency fund aka FU money.  For the first time in my life I realized I could walk away and be OK! 

We went on vacation (priorities!) and I gave notice when I came back.  My resignation was met with shock that someone would dare to leave TBC, despite it clearly being a sinking ship, especially with nothing lined up.   I was flat out asked “How can you do it?  Did you win the lottery or something?”
 
Post TBC: I enjoyed my summer for a few weeks when I got a call from a recruiter on a Friday afternoon.  Two months to the day that I walked out of TBC, I started my new job….at my old Division A, now acquired by a different company.  With higher pay.

My former coworkers and bosses remaining at TBC were laid off two years later.  Fast forward to today, TBC as it was once known, is a shadow of its former self. 

And that, my dear mustachians, is my personal saga of the power of FU money.



Pooperman

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2574 on: February 07, 2019, 05:35:13 PM »
Sounds a lot like GE to me.

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2575 on: February 07, 2019, 06:25:52 PM »
Sounds a lot like GE to me.
ah ha that was my thought too.

But then I realized: there are quite a large # of companies that fit this category.

Still glorious!

solon

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2576 on: February 07, 2019, 09:13:02 PM »
Sounds a lot like GE to me.
ah ha that was my thought too.

But then I realized: there are quite a large # of companies that fit this category.

Still glorious!

I thought GE, and then Sears.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2577 on: February 07, 2019, 09:41:01 PM »
..... gigantic snip.....
Two months to the day that I walked out of TBC, I started my new job….at my old Division A, now acquired by a different company.  With higher pay.

......... TBC as it was once known, is a shadow of its former self. 

And that, my dear mustachians, is my personal saga of the power of FU money.

The whole post is awesome.

But walking into your new/old job with higher pay is something that the "burn the bridges" crowd could only dream of.  AND you didn't have to burn bridges, TBC did that for you.

Pooperman, mm1970: 
Ivory tower idioticy is far too common to pin this down to a specific "TBC". 

My SemiBigCorp had a, I kid you not, "Five Year Plan"*.   
 SemiBigCorp bankrupt at year 2.  ex-CEO's employment contract to about 2022 was terminated  2017.

*For those of you who slept through 20th Century History class......https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_five-year_plan 

EricL

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2578 on: February 07, 2019, 10:22:02 PM »
It is an awesome story. 

Sad how many corporations go down with new CEOs desperately pushing people into the water and re-arranging deck chairs with whomever remains while demanding the band play faster.  That's such an easy band aid and it looks good to investors.  For once I'd like to see a company say "Fuck that.  We're going to hold on to the employees we have, cut other stuff that genuinely won't hurt (like executive bonuses), and shit a product that works and sells.  If we die trying it's better to go falling off a cliff than by a thousand cuts."  Not going to hold my breath though.

Congrats to saguaro for breaking free.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2579 on: February 08, 2019, 05:58:15 AM »
From what I've seen, it seems like TBCs often fail because they're too ossified in legacy costs (like pensions or lots of large B&M stores) or legacy structure/bureaucracy/culture that they can't adapt to changing market forces (Sears, GM) or simply seem to grind to a halt (certain defense contractors, and I think of large govt projects like NASA's SLS project).

AMandM

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2580 on: February 08, 2019, 09:47:47 AM »
I often wonder how much idiocy is just the natural response to a doomed situation because the world has changed and there isn't a market to support TBC's business any more.  If nothing will save the company, then no matter what corporate does on the final downhill, it'll look like idiocy in the long run.

DeepEllumStache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2581 on: February 08, 2019, 10:12:11 AM »
I often wonder how much idiocy is just the natural response to a doomed situation because the world has changed and there isn't a market to support TBC's business any more.  If nothing will save the company, then no matter what corporate does on the final downhill, it'll look like idiocy in the long run.

This.

When it’s really going downhill, there aren’t many good choices since everyone brought in is supposed to fix something that needed to have been fixed ten years ago. This creates a fabulous opportunity for idiocy. And because we want to blame someone, we look for the idiocy as the cause when it’s more of a symptom of the decline.

Even if management lets it die gracefully, there comes a point where it’s still going to die. I worked in a portion of the business that was going downhill gracefully (surprising since we’re not know for that). Nothing would save it and everyone knew this was the Titanic. There was the element of fatalism among the employees since no one was trying for the magical Hail Mary. It was probably more efficient since everyone was willing to do what was necessary to prolong the sink versus attempting the latest cool management process, but people still lost their jobs in the end.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2582 on: February 08, 2019, 10:34:17 AM »
I agree with @DeepEllumStache. Here is a very recent example:

"The chief executive of California’s largest electric utility has quit as the company faces bankruptcy and possible criminal charges in the wake of last year’s deadly Camp Fire. Geisha Williams—the first Latina chief executive of a Fortune 500 company—has been in charge of Pacific Gas & Electric since March 2017. "

OMG, these fires were believed to be caused by years of mismanagement and neglect by PG&E and she gets the blame after a comparitive nanosecond in the job.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/head-of-california-electric-utility-quits-after-camp-fire-fallout


lhamo

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2583 on: February 08, 2019, 01:08:09 PM »
I agree with @DeepEllumStache. Here is a very recent example:

"The chief executive of California’s largest electric utility has quit as the company faces bankruptcy and possible criminal charges in the wake of last year’s deadly Camp Fire. Geisha Williams—the first Latina chief executive of a Fortune 500 company—has been in charge of Pacific Gas & Electric since March 2017. "

OMG, these fires were believed to be caused by years of mismanagement and neglect by PG&E and she gets the blame after a comparitive nanosecond in the job.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/head-of-california-electric-utility-quits-after-camp-fire-fallout

This is known as "the glass cliff" -- Freakonomics had a great episode about it:

http://freakonomics.com/podcast/glass-cliff/

Curmudgeon

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2584 on: February 08, 2019, 02:03:53 PM »
DW and I are FIRE'd, but neither of us is opposed to working, assuming it's something we enjoy.  DW enjoys working with special needs students, and so took a position that allowed her to do that, paid a small salary, and provided healthcare benefits.  But after about a year, some structural changes were made, which resulted in many more kids in the same space, with a higher kid-to-instructor ratio.  Some of these kids have behavioral issues (they throw things, grab people, etc.), and being crowded into a small space seemed certain to exacerbate these issues. That, combined with having fewer instructors, made the situation feel unsafe to her, and so she gave notice and quit. 

A few weeks later she found a new position, that also let her work with special needs children, but in a much better environment.  However, the pay is lower, with no benefits. The physical location of the new office was adjacent to the space used by her former employer, so all her former co-workers and old boss can see her working this new job.  They're all scratching their heads, wondering why she would take such a big pay cut to do this. 

Fast-forward a few weeks:  One of her former co-workers is in the hospital, and another on medical leave, recovering from injuries suffered at the hands of the students.  A third employee has quit, not wanting to be the next one.

Working is not so bad, when you don't HAVE to work.

 

happyuk

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2585 on: February 08, 2019, 02:09:44 PM »
An opposite take on the purpose of the FU fund.  I understand the satisfaction in being in a position to say "stuff you" to any deeply unsatisfactory situation you may find yourself in.

Years ago, circa 1990 I was a young low-paid apprentice.  Even so I was quite a little saver even then, still unaware of index funds, and it was to be another 6 years before I began using the power of the internet to alleviate my incredible ignorance on finance and how the world works in general.

The building firm I worked had for some time been taking a hammering during an ongoing recession and I knew redundancies were on the cards.  I also knew that my employer, a forceful bear of man, who was sometimes prone to loud outbursts and other regrettable behavior was also struggling with creditors and wages etc.

One week he was delayed in obtaining the cash to pay us, and came to me apologizing for the late payment in a state of utter humiliation and misery.  I had by then saved quite a substantial amount of cash, enough to keep me going for at least a year and a half.  I told him not to worry, and offered to work at a reduced rate given that I was still learning a lot of skills.  He was utterly disarmed, muttering something to the effect "no, no it's no sweat". I swear I detected a tear in his eye.

About two years after I had been let go, and at which point I was fine for  work, he rang me offering my old job back, now that he had managed to build his company back up again.  I still think having a good stash of cash enabled me to let go of any underlying resentments I might have had  and do an opposite display of kindness instead.

Frugality works.



« Last Edit: February 08, 2019, 02:12:32 PM by happyuk »

Gone_Hiking

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2586 on: February 09, 2019, 03:12:07 PM »
@happyuk that's an awesome story how you not only saved your sanity but left a relationship with a person who was in over his head intact.  Kudos.

Siebrie

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2587 on: February 11, 2019, 03:38:34 AM »
I was hired as Admin (Legal) 11 years ago, by a boss who the interim agency described as 'difficult', so I upped my requested salary by $700/month, and she agreed :) (I should have asked for more). The job was fulltime and permanent from day one. I was trained for a week by the guy that was leaving (his 6-month temp job wasn't prolonged), then I worked on my own for a week, then I had to train my new colleague Admin. We work for the Department (proofreading, layout, filing, corporate housekeeping, Board of Directors support, odd jobs for boss directly).

I worked for that boss for 6 years, and I had 5 Admin colleagues in that time; they all left more or less quickly due to my difficult boss. I could not leave, because my boyfriend/fiance/husband was still studying or in lowpaying jobs, we had two children (2x16wks paid maternity leave), and bought a house, and we needed my income. Then, my boss was fired! Joy!

No boss for 6 months, the whole Department (4 lawyers at different levels of seniority) lightened up. New boss for 2 years, until she got promoted back to her old company (European-American MSA affair). Wonderful boss, great fun to work for, but she thought I was her PA .....

In the meantime, husband has work experience and changes jobs twice, and now earns a normal income (nothing crazy, but decent). Also, in the meantime, company is acquired by Chinese, and company culture changes from family business vibe to strictly commercial/no mercy.

New boss comes in, thinks I'm her PA only, gives my Admin colleague a well-deserved promotion, and then doesn't replace her! I'm now on my own, trying to handle a workload even the two of us couldn't handle, working with a boss who refuses to hear that I'm not happy booking her private family vacation flights and visas to China when there is a proper work backlog. I hate booking flights, I'm a much better proofreader and librarian then I am a travel agent. Boss works from home two days a week, travels a lot, and when in the office, is in meetings all the time.

I run the numbers with husband; we will be able to cope on his salary alone, and he's behind me if I want to leave. I decide to stop pandering to boss, and will make my own list of priorities, and a list of items I'm not able to handle due to not enough time. Then, I find an email on the company printer: boss thinks I'm not loyal and am slacking, and wants to fire me (printed by HR! Who I have taught each one individually how to use secure print!). I have a bad night's sleep, but husband supports me, I start calling law firms, unions, and social security organisations to get all my ducks in a row, and wait for the exit interview. I clear my computer and desk, and collect private contact info of the few colleagues I would like to stay in touch with.

Interview comes, I am still in shock, but at least don't have the first wave of emotions and manage to handle it well. I hand in my phone and laptop immediately, to no longer be connected to them. Second meeting with HR a week later to discuss severance pay and I manage to negotiate 11 months pay (1 month for every year I worked there), outplacement services on top from reputed agency (by law, they have to offer, but only basic, and they can deduct it from the severance pay), health insurance until the end of the year, glowing letter of recommendation, certificate that I was fired due to a reorganisation (which allows me to claim unemployment benefits later).

I have now been home for 3 months and am destressing. The outplacement project has started, but I'm not really in a rush to start working again; I'd like to go back to University and finish my MA. The house is finally properly clean, kids are happy that I can pick them up and have the energy to play and discuss things eith them, husband is happy that he can now fully concentrate on his carreer (he picked dds up fromschool and cooked every night), I have time to contact old friends, and just walk outside as soon as the sun shines.

Imma

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2588 on: February 11, 2019, 05:17:30 AM »
@Siebrie that's a pretty epic story! You turned a situation that could potentially have been devastating into something positive. They must have been surprised that you weren't emotional at all and handed in all your belongings right away - did they ever suspect you already knew?

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2589 on: February 11, 2019, 09:24:17 AM »
@Siebrie  quite the story and you got of out there with a decent deal.   Whether or not they suspect you knew ahead of time, you gotta thank whoever didn't follow the secure print procedure.  Because no doubt getting a heads up on what they were planning gave you the chance to plan and be prepared when it finally happened.   Knowledge is power!

Sad how many corporations go down with new CEOs desperately pushing people into the water and re-arranging deck chairs with whomever remains while demanding the band play faster.  That's such an easy band aid and it looks good to investors.  For once I'd like to see a company say "Fuck that.  We're going to hold on to the employees we have, cut other stuff that genuinely won't hurt (like executive bonuses), and shit a product that works and sells.  If we die trying it's better to go falling off a cliff than by a thousand cuts."  Not going to hold my breath though.

Congrats to saguaro for breaking free.

@EricL  thanks.  I will say that many of my coworkers, who were really vested in working for TBC (and the fact that it was supposed to be a different company from all others) were shocked that TBC would fall into such a typical way of downsizing themselves out of existence.   

There were a few folks who actually left the acquired Division A, as soon as it was legally possible, to rejoin TBC.   Hope springs eternal, I guess, but to me it was like escaping the sinking Titanic only to turn around and climb back on board. 


mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2590 on: February 11, 2019, 10:26:50 AM »
Quote
I have now been home for 3 months and am destressing. The outplacement project has started, but I'm not really in a rush to start working again; I'd like to go back to University and finish my MA. The house is finally properly clean, kids are happy that I can pick them up and have the energy to play and discuss things eith them, husband is happy that he can now fully concentrate on his carreer (he picked dds up fromschool and cooked every night), I have time to contact old friends, and just walk outside as soon as the sun shines.

This is glorious.

I wonder how buried your old boss is.  Ha!

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2591 on: February 11, 2019, 02:52:50 PM »
Interview comes, I am still in shock, but at least don't have the first wave of emotions and manage to handle it well. I hand in my phone and laptop immediately, to no longer be connected to them. Second meeting with HR a week later to discuss severance pay and I manage to negotiate 11 months pay (1 month for every year I worked there), outplacement services on top from reputed agency (by law, they have to offer, but only basic, and they can deduct it from the severance pay), health insurance until the end of the year, glowing letter of recommendation, certificate that I was fired due to a reorganisation (which allows me to claim unemployment benefits later).
That is an awesome story!  Thanks for sharing!  Have you heard at all how things have been running without you, or have you completely disconnected?

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2592 on: February 11, 2019, 08:11:39 PM »
Interview comes, I am still in shock, but at least don't have the first wave of emotions and manage to handle it well. I hand in my phone and laptop immediately, to no longer be connected to them. Second meeting with HR a week later to discuss severance pay and I manage to negotiate 11 months pay (1 month for every year I worked there), outplacement services on top from reputed agency (by law, they have to offer, but only basic, and they can deduct it from the severance pay), health insurance until the end of the year, glowing letter of recommendation, certificate that I was fired due to a reorganisation (which allows me to claim unemployment benefits later).
That is an awesome story!  Thanks for sharing!  Have you heard at all how things have been running without you, or have you completely disconnected?
Oh, I'm wondering the same thing! Do tell @Siebrie.

force majeure

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2593 on: February 17, 2019, 09:11:01 AM »
I am getting ready to quit work, but this happened to me recently...

I was checking my stash on Yahoo Finance, and a co-worker saw my "number"
I am getting vibes in my team, that I have been found out.
Was my own fault, as I dont have wing mirrors on my desk.
Anyone dealt with co-worker envy?

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2594 on: February 17, 2019, 11:42:36 AM »
I am getting ready to quit work, but this happened to me recently...

I was checking my stash on Yahoo Finance, and a co-worker saw my "number"
I am getting vibes in my team, that I have been found out.
Was my own fault, as I dont have wing mirrors on my desk.
Anyone dealt with co-worker envy?
Can you compensate by moaning about how much money you still owe in SL, mortgage, car, boat, toys, etc. debt? You could claim you're trying to save enough to pay everything off at once a la the Defeat the Net Debt thread.
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/throw-down-the-gauntlet/defeat-the-delta/

I personally wouldn't care that much, but it might be fun to mess with them since you've been "found out".

Rosy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2595 on: February 17, 2019, 01:26:48 PM »
I am getting ready to quit work, but this happened to me recently...

I was checking my stash on Yahoo Finance, and a co-worker saw my "number"
I am getting vibes in my team, that I have been found out.
Was my own fault, as I dont have wing mirrors on my desk.
Anyone dealt with co-worker envy?

It depends - on the atmosphere at work in general and how well you get along with your co-workers. Could be a teaching opportunity to open someone's eye to the opportunity of FIRE or just smile mysteriously and don't engage when asked:)
Either option would make me feel good and proud:) - but there are a myriad of other responses incl some fun snarky ones as well of course.

I'd own it or aren't you proud and happy to be in a position to pull the plug? I can understand stealth wealth to a degree, but I would not go as far as lying about my circumstances - whatever for? You made the most out of your own opportunities and now you can finally say FU or express yourself in an adult way if you so choose.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2596 on: February 18, 2019, 09:32:53 AM »
I am getting ready to quit work, but this happened to me recently...

I was checking my stash on Yahoo Finance, and a co-worker saw my "number"
I am getting vibes in my team, that I have been found out.
Was my own fault, as I dont have wing mirrors on my desk.
Anyone dealt with co-worker envy?

It depends - on the atmosphere at work in general and how well you get along with your co-workers. Could be a teaching opportunity to open someone's eye to the opportunity of FIRE or just smile mysteriously and don't engage when asked:)
Either option would make me feel good and proud:) - but there are a myriad of other responses incl some fun snarky ones as well of course.

I'd own it or aren't you proud and happy to be in a position to pull the plug? I can understand stealth wealth to a degree, but I would not go as far as lying about my circumstances - whatever for? You made the most out of your own opportunities and now you can finally say FU or express yourself in an adult way if you so choose.
I can see and appreciate your points, Rosy, but the specific question was how to deal with co-worker envy. Pride of accomplishment doesn't seem to be the issue here.

Chaplin

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2597 on: February 18, 2019, 12:42:11 PM »
I am getting ready to quit work, but this happened to me recently...

I was checking my stash on Yahoo Finance, and a co-worker saw my "number"
I am getting vibes in my team, that I have been found out.
Was my own fault, as I dont have wing mirrors on my desk.
Anyone dealt with co-worker envy?

If it's not too late, you could say it's a practice trading account. Lots of brokerages have practice accounts where you can make imaginary trades with imaginary money.

grantmeaname

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2598 on: February 18, 2019, 03:14:20 PM »
But 1) that's a lie, and 2) it's a lie that will become brazen and obvious when OP FIREs in the near future

markbike528CBX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2599 on: February 18, 2019, 07:05:54 PM »
But 1) that's a lie, and 2) it's a lie that will become brazen and obvious when OP FIREs in the near future

But there is something literary about a brazen lie.

Mark Twain did it (the Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County) and was thought quite the charming journalist. http://twain.lib.virginia.edu/projects/price/frog.htm