Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 1725846 times)

DeepEllumStache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2550 on: February 08, 2019, 10:12:11 AM »
I often wonder how much idiocy is just the natural response to a doomed situation because the world has changed and there isn't a market to support TBC's business any more.  If nothing will save the company, then no matter what corporate does on the final downhill, it'll look like idiocy in the long run.

This.

When it’s really going downhill, there aren’t many good choices since everyone brought in is supposed to fix something that needed to have been fixed ten years ago. This creates a fabulous opportunity for idiocy. And because we want to blame someone, we look for the idiocy as the cause when it’s more of a symptom of the decline.

Even if management lets it die gracefully, there comes a point where it’s still going to die. I worked in a portion of the business that was going downhill gracefully (surprising since we’re not know for that). Nothing would save it and everyone knew this was the Titanic. There was the element of fatalism among the employees since no one was trying for the magical Hail Mary. It was probably more efficient since everyone was willing to do what was necessary to prolong the sink versus attempting the latest cool management process, but people still lost their jobs in the end.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2551 on: February 08, 2019, 10:34:17 AM »
I agree with @DeepEllumStache. Here is a very recent example:

"The chief executive of California’s largest electric utility has quit as the company faces bankruptcy and possible criminal charges in the wake of last year’s deadly Camp Fire. Geisha Williams—the first Latina chief executive of a Fortune 500 company—has been in charge of Pacific Gas & Electric since March 2017. "

OMG, these fires were believed to be caused by years of mismanagement and neglect by PG&E and she gets the blame after a comparitive nanosecond in the job.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/head-of-california-electric-utility-quits-after-camp-fire-fallout


Curmudgeon

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2552 on: February 08, 2019, 02:03:53 PM »
DW and I are FIRE'd, but neither of us is opposed to working, assuming it's something we enjoy.  DW enjoys working with special needs students, and so took a position that allowed her to do that, paid a small salary, and provided healthcare benefits.  But after about a year, some structural changes were made, which resulted in many more kids in the same space, with a higher kid-to-instructor ratio.  Some of these kids have behavioral issues (they throw things, grab people, etc.), and being crowded into a small space seemed certain to exacerbate these issues. That, combined with having fewer instructors, made the situation feel unsafe to her, and so she gave notice and quit. 

A few weeks later she found a new position, that also let her work with special needs children, but in a much better environment.  However, the pay is lower, with no benefits. The physical location of the new office was adjacent to the space used by her former employer, so all her former co-workers and old boss can see her working this new job.  They're all scratching their heads, wondering why she would take such a big pay cut to do this. 

Fast-forward a few weeks:  One of her former co-workers is in the hospital, and another on medical leave, recovering from injuries suffered at the hands of the students.  A third employee has quit, not wanting to be the next one.

Working is not so bad, when you don't HAVE to work.

 

happyuk

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2553 on: February 08, 2019, 02:09:44 PM »
An opposite take on the purpose of the FU fund.  I understand the satisfaction in being in a position to say "stuff you" to any deeply unsatisfactory situation you may find yourself in.

Years ago, circa 1990 I was a young low-paid apprentice.  Even so I was quite a little saver even then, still unaware of index funds, and it was to be another 6 years before I began using the power of the internet to alleviate my incredible ignorance on finance and how the world works in general.

The building firm I worked had for some time been taking a hammering during an ongoing recession and I knew redundancies were on the cards.  I also knew that my employer, a forceful bear of man, who was sometimes prone to loud outbursts and other regrettable behavior was also struggling with creditors and wages etc.

One week he was delayed in obtaining the cash to pay us, and came to me apologizing for the late payment in a state of utter humiliation and misery.  I had by then saved quite a substantial amount of cash, enough to keep me going for at least a year and a half.  I told him not to worry, and offered to work at a reduced rate given that I was still learning a lot of skills.  He was utterly disarmed, muttering something to the effect "no, no it's no sweat". I swear I detected a tear in his eye.

About two years after I had been let go, and at which point I was fine for  work, he rang me offering my old job back, now that he had managed to build his company back up again.  I still think having a good stash of cash enabled me to let go of any underlying resentments I might have had  and do an opposite display of kindness instead.

Frugality works.



« Last Edit: February 08, 2019, 02:12:32 PM by happyuk »

Gone_Hiking

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2554 on: February 09, 2019, 03:12:07 PM »
@happyuk that's an awesome story how you not only saved your sanity but left a relationship with a person who was in over his head intact.  Kudos.

Siebrie

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2555 on: February 11, 2019, 03:38:34 AM »
I was hired as Admin (Legal) 11 years ago, by a boss who the interim agency described as 'difficult', so I upped my requested salary by $700/month, and she agreed :) (I should have asked for more). The job was fulltime and permanent from day one. I was trained for a week by the guy that was leaving (his 6-month temp job wasn't prolonged), then I worked on my own for a week, then I had to train my new colleague Admin. We work for the Department (proofreading, layout, filing, corporate housekeeping, Board of Directors support, odd jobs for boss directly).

I worked for that boss for 6 years, and I had 5 Admin colleagues in that time; they all left more or less quickly due to my difficult boss. I could not leave, because my boyfriend/fiance/husband was still studying or in lowpaying jobs, we had two children (2x16wks paid maternity leave), and bought a house, and we needed my income. Then, my boss was fired! Joy!

No boss for 6 months, the whole Department (4 lawyers at different levels of seniority) lightened up. New boss for 2 years, until she got promoted back to her old company (European-American MSA affair). Wonderful boss, great fun to work for, but she thought I was her PA .....

In the meantime, husband has work experience and changes jobs twice, and now earns a normal income (nothing crazy, but decent). Also, in the meantime, company is acquired by Chinese, and company culture changes from family business vibe to strictly commercial/no mercy.

New boss comes in, thinks I'm her PA only, gives my Admin colleague a well-deserved promotion, and then doesn't replace her! I'm now on my own, trying to handle a workload even the two of us couldn't handle, working with a boss who refuses to hear that I'm not happy booking her private family vacation flights and visas to China when there is a proper work backlog. I hate booking flights, I'm a much better proofreader and librarian then I am a travel agent. Boss works from home two days a week, travels a lot, and when in the office, is in meetings all the time.

I run the numbers with husband; we will be able to cope on his salary alone, and he's behind me if I want to leave. I decide to stop pandering to boss, and will make my own list of priorities, and a list of items I'm not able to handle due to not enough time. Then, I find an email on the company printer: boss thinks I'm not loyal and am slacking, and wants to fire me (printed by HR! Who I have taught each one individually how to use secure print!). I have a bad night's sleep, but husband supports me, I start calling law firms, unions, and social security organisations to get all my ducks in a row, and wait for the exit interview. I clear my computer and desk, and collect private contact info of the few colleagues I would like to stay in touch with.

Interview comes, I am still in shock, but at least don't have the first wave of emotions and manage to handle it well. I hand in my phone and laptop immediately, to no longer be connected to them. Second meeting with HR a week later to discuss severance pay and I manage to negotiate 11 months pay (1 month for every year I worked there), outplacement services on top from reputed agency (by law, they have to offer, but only basic, and they can deduct it from the severance pay), health insurance until the end of the year, glowing letter of recommendation, certificate that I was fired due to a reorganisation (which allows me to claim unemployment benefits later).

I have now been home for 3 months and am destressing. The outplacement project has started, but I'm not really in a rush to start working again; I'd like to go back to University and finish my MA. The house is finally properly clean, kids are happy that I can pick them up and have the energy to play and discuss things eith them, husband is happy that he can now fully concentrate on his carreer (he picked dds up fromschool and cooked every night), I have time to contact old friends, and just walk outside as soon as the sun shines.

Imma

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2556 on: February 11, 2019, 05:17:30 AM »
@Siebrie that's a pretty epic story! You turned a situation that could potentially have been devastating into something positive. They must have been surprised that you weren't emotional at all and handed in all your belongings right away - did they ever suspect you already knew?

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2557 on: February 11, 2019, 09:24:17 AM »
@Siebrie  quite the story and you got of out there with a decent deal.   Whether or not they suspect you knew ahead of time, you gotta thank whoever didn't follow the secure print procedure.  Because no doubt getting a heads up on what they were planning gave you the chance to plan and be prepared when it finally happened.   Knowledge is power!

Sad how many corporations go down with new CEOs desperately pushing people into the water and re-arranging deck chairs with whomever remains while demanding the band play faster.  That's such an easy band aid and it looks good to investors.  For once I'd like to see a company say "Fuck that.  We're going to hold on to the employees we have, cut other stuff that genuinely won't hurt (like executive bonuses), and shit a product that works and sells.  If we die trying it's better to go falling off a cliff than by a thousand cuts."  Not going to hold my breath though.

Congrats to saguaro for breaking free.

@EricL  thanks.  I will say that many of my coworkers, who were really vested in working for TBC (and the fact that it was supposed to be a different company from all others) were shocked that TBC would fall into such a typical way of downsizing themselves out of existence.   

There were a few folks who actually left the acquired Division A, as soon as it was legally possible, to rejoin TBC.   Hope springs eternal, I guess, but to me it was like escaping the sinking Titanic only to turn around and climb back on board. 


mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2558 on: February 11, 2019, 10:26:50 AM »
Quote
I have now been home for 3 months and am destressing. The outplacement project has started, but I'm not really in a rush to start working again; I'd like to go back to University and finish my MA. The house is finally properly clean, kids are happy that I can pick them up and have the energy to play and discuss things eith them, husband is happy that he can now fully concentrate on his carreer (he picked dds up fromschool and cooked every night), I have time to contact old friends, and just walk outside as soon as the sun shines.

This is glorious.

I wonder how buried your old boss is.  Ha!

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2559 on: February 11, 2019, 02:52:50 PM »
Interview comes, I am still in shock, but at least don't have the first wave of emotions and manage to handle it well. I hand in my phone and laptop immediately, to no longer be connected to them. Second meeting with HR a week later to discuss severance pay and I manage to negotiate 11 months pay (1 month for every year I worked there), outplacement services on top from reputed agency (by law, they have to offer, but only basic, and they can deduct it from the severance pay), health insurance until the end of the year, glowing letter of recommendation, certificate that I was fired due to a reorganisation (which allows me to claim unemployment benefits later).
That is an awesome story!  Thanks for sharing!  Have you heard at all how things have been running without you, or have you completely disconnected?

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2560 on: February 11, 2019, 08:11:39 PM »
Interview comes, I am still in shock, but at least don't have the first wave of emotions and manage to handle it well. I hand in my phone and laptop immediately, to no longer be connected to them. Second meeting with HR a week later to discuss severance pay and I manage to negotiate 11 months pay (1 month for every year I worked there), outplacement services on top from reputed agency (by law, they have to offer, but only basic, and they can deduct it from the severance pay), health insurance until the end of the year, glowing letter of recommendation, certificate that I was fired due to a reorganisation (which allows me to claim unemployment benefits later).
That is an awesome story!  Thanks for sharing!  Have you heard at all how things have been running without you, or have you completely disconnected?
Oh, I'm wondering the same thing! Do tell @Siebrie.

force majeure

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2561 on: February 17, 2019, 09:11:01 AM »
I am getting ready to quit work, but this happened to me recently...

I was checking my stash on Yahoo Finance, and a co-worker saw my "number"
I am getting vibes in my team, that I have been found out.
Was my own fault, as I dont have wing mirrors on my desk.
Anyone dealt with co-worker envy?

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2562 on: February 17, 2019, 11:42:36 AM »
I am getting ready to quit work, but this happened to me recently...

I was checking my stash on Yahoo Finance, and a co-worker saw my "number"
I am getting vibes in my team, that I have been found out.
Was my own fault, as I dont have wing mirrors on my desk.
Anyone dealt with co-worker envy?
Can you compensate by moaning about how much money you still owe in SL, mortgage, car, boat, toys, etc. debt? You could claim you're trying to save enough to pay everything off at once a la the Defeat the Net Debt thread.
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/throw-down-the-gauntlet/defeat-the-delta/

I personally wouldn't care that much, but it might be fun to mess with them since you've been "found out".

Rosy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2563 on: February 17, 2019, 01:26:48 PM »
I am getting ready to quit work, but this happened to me recently...

I was checking my stash on Yahoo Finance, and a co-worker saw my "number"
I am getting vibes in my team, that I have been found out.
Was my own fault, as I dont have wing mirrors on my desk.
Anyone dealt with co-worker envy?

It depends - on the atmosphere at work in general and how well you get along with your co-workers. Could be a teaching opportunity to open someone's eye to the opportunity of FIRE or just smile mysteriously and don't engage when asked:)
Either option would make me feel good and proud:) - but there are a myriad of other responses incl some fun snarky ones as well of course.

I'd own it or aren't you proud and happy to be in a position to pull the plug? I can understand stealth wealth to a degree, but I would not go as far as lying about my circumstances - whatever for? You made the most out of your own opportunities and now you can finally say FU or express yourself in an adult way if you so choose.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2564 on: February 18, 2019, 09:32:53 AM »
I am getting ready to quit work, but this happened to me recently...

I was checking my stash on Yahoo Finance, and a co-worker saw my "number"
I am getting vibes in my team, that I have been found out.
Was my own fault, as I dont have wing mirrors on my desk.
Anyone dealt with co-worker envy?

It depends - on the atmosphere at work in general and how well you get along with your co-workers. Could be a teaching opportunity to open someone's eye to the opportunity of FIRE or just smile mysteriously and don't engage when asked:)
Either option would make me feel good and proud:) - but there are a myriad of other responses incl some fun snarky ones as well of course.

I'd own it or aren't you proud and happy to be in a position to pull the plug? I can understand stealth wealth to a degree, but I would not go as far as lying about my circumstances - whatever for? You made the most out of your own opportunities and now you can finally say FU or express yourself in an adult way if you so choose.
I can see and appreciate your points, Rosy, but the specific question was how to deal with co-worker envy. Pride of accomplishment doesn't seem to be the issue here.

Chaplin

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2565 on: February 18, 2019, 12:42:11 PM »
I am getting ready to quit work, but this happened to me recently...

I was checking my stash on Yahoo Finance, and a co-worker saw my "number"
I am getting vibes in my team, that I have been found out.
Was my own fault, as I dont have wing mirrors on my desk.
Anyone dealt with co-worker envy?

If it's not too late, you could say it's a practice trading account. Lots of brokerages have practice accounts where you can make imaginary trades with imaginary money.

grantmeaname

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2566 on: February 18, 2019, 03:14:20 PM »
But 1) that's a lie, and 2) it's a lie that will become brazen and obvious when OP FIREs in the near future

markbike528CBX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2567 on: February 18, 2019, 07:05:54 PM »
But 1) that's a lie, and 2) it's a lie that will become brazen and obvious when OP FIREs in the near future

But there is something literary about a brazen lie.

Mark Twain did it (the Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County) and was thought quite the charming journalist. http://twain.lib.virginia.edu/projects/price/frog.htm

DadJokes

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2568 on: February 19, 2019, 07:21:25 AM »
I am getting ready to quit work, but this happened to me recently...

I was checking my stash on Yahoo Finance, and a co-worker saw my "number"
I am getting vibes in my team, that I have been found out.
Was my own fault, as I dont have wing mirrors on my desk.
Anyone dealt with co-worker envy?

I guess it depends on how long before you plan to quit, but you could use it as an opportunity to teach them about FIRE. I know that usually falls on deaf ears or is met with an endless list of excuses as to why you could save that much but they can't, but if you are quitting soon, their envy wouldn't really matter.

talltexan

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2569 on: February 19, 2019, 11:54:22 AM »
I have a nice template for calculating mortgage payments in the same file as a whole series of FIRE planning spreadsheets. One of my co-workers asked for my mortgage template today, and I was checking and re-checking to make sure I didn't send her my FIRE calculations as well.

JGS1980

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2570 on: February 21, 2019, 09:41:48 AM »
PTF

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2571 on: February 24, 2019, 03:47:24 AM »
I'm not sure if this is a good story about FU money or a bad one. About 18 months ago I left a job I'd been at for several years (3) because it was AWFUL. I found another job, which paid a lot more but was slightly insane from the get go - the HR manager that hired me was fired for bullying a month after I arrived. It got worse. And worse. Last thursday there were two seriously last straw moments, and I left mid shift. I'd been there just on a year. Anyhoo, the FU money has given me the freedom to walk, and the leverage to negotiate that I leave immediately and they pay me out four weeks leave. Probably not good for a career, whatever that is (!) but absolutely fantastic for my mental health. I actually feel euphoric. So I guess the bad side of FU money is that you can use it???? I'm a fairly tough broad but I ate of looooooot of shit in this job before I left. I did not have fucks left to give, as the song goes......

radram

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2572 on: February 24, 2019, 07:43:52 AM »
I'm not sure if this is a good story about FU money or a bad one. About 18 months ago I left a job I'd been at for several years (3) because it was AWFUL. I found another job, which paid a lot more but was slightly insane from the get go - the HR manager that hired me was fired for bullying a month after I arrived. It got worse. And worse. Last thursday there were two seriously last straw moments, and I left mid shift. I'd been there just on a year. Anyhoo, the FU money has given me the freedom to walk, and the leverage to negotiate that I leave immediately and they pay me out four weeks leave. Probably not good for a career, whatever that is (!) but absolutely fantastic for my mental health. I actually feel euphoric. So I guess the bad side of FU money is that you can use it???? I'm a fairly tough broad but I ate of looooooot of shit in this job before I left. I did not have fucks left to give, as the song goes......

Is this an Epic FU money story? Fuck yeah it is!

Congratulations on the ability to prioritize your sanity and well being. Keep us posted.

CowboyAndIndian

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2573 on: February 24, 2019, 07:44:11 AM »
I'm not sure if this is a good story about FU money or a bad one. About 18 months ago I left a job I'd been at for several years (3) because it was AWFUL. I found another job, which paid a lot more but was slightly insane from the get go - the HR manager that hired me was fired for bullying a month after I arrived. It got worse. And worse. Last thursday there were two seriously last straw moments, and I left mid shift. I'd been there just on a year. Anyhoo, the FU money has given me the freedom to walk, and the leverage to negotiate that I leave immediately and they pay me out four weeks leave. Probably not good for a career, whatever that is (!) but absolutely fantastic for my mental health. I actually feel euphoric. So I guess the bad side of FU money is that you can use it???? I'm a fairly tough broad but I ate of looooooot of shit in this job before I left. I did not have fucks left to give, as the song goes......

Good for you Anna.
 
You used FU money to save your sanity and well being!!! Exactly how FU money should be used.

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2574 on: February 24, 2019, 03:06:44 PM »
Thanks, above posters. I did intend to find another job before I left but I probably waited too long to make that decision, too close to the last straw! So.... job hunting again. I can amp the sideline while I'm looking for jobs, and that will mean a little less eating into the FU fund. Just once I'd like to work in a pleasant, well run company, with nice people!

Sugaree

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2575 on: February 25, 2019, 07:46:04 AM »
I don't know if this is actually epic, but here goes.  My husband's job...sucks.  He does groundskeeping for a 180 unit apartment complex.  He likes the job, and it paid decently well.  His boss has hated him ever since he was offered (and turned down) the GM job at another complex.  She has done everything she can over the last two years to make him quit.  Changing his time card and cheating him of time?  Check.  Making him buy back vacation days in cash only days before the start of scheduled trip and still telling him that they couldn't guarantee that he'd have a job when he got back?  Check.  Suspending him for two days because he couldn't/wouldn't rake leaves in a thunderstorm?  Check. 

So, it turns out that she was trying to get him to quit because the company is trying to cut payroll.  It was announced Friday afternoon that everyone was being cut to minimum wage.  That's something like a 40% pay cut for everyone.  Effective today.  He'll be tendering his resignation this morning and we have every intention of fighting them on a constructive dismissal unemployment claim.  They're lucky I can't prove the wage theft. 

The FU part comes in because we don't actually need his job to pay the bills.  The lights aren't going to get cut off.  We're not going to eat ramen noodles for three meals a day.  We probably won't even adjust the amount going into my retirement accounts.  The only part that sucks is that for all their BS, they had a decent 401(k) plan with low-cost Vanguard funds and they matched 50 cents on the dollar up to 16.66%.

Pooperman

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2576 on: February 25, 2019, 09:01:55 AM »
I don't know if this is actually epic, but here goes.  My husband's job...sucks.  He does groundskeeping for a 180 unit apartment complex.  He likes the job, and it paid decently well.  His boss has hated him ever since he was offered (and turned down) the GM job at another complex.  She has done everything she can over the last two years to make him quit.  Changing his time card and cheating him of time?  Check.  Making him buy back vacation days in cash only days before the start of scheduled trip and still telling him that they couldn't guarantee that he'd have a job when he got back?  Check.  Suspending him for two days because he couldn't/wouldn't rake leaves in a thunderstorm?  Check. 

So, it turns out that she was trying to get him to quit because the company is trying to cut payroll.  It was announced Friday afternoon that everyone was being cut to minimum wage.  That's something like a 40% pay cut for everyone.  Effective today.  He'll be tendering his resignation this morning and we have every intention of fighting them on a constructive dismissal unemployment claim.  They're lucky I can't prove the wage theft. 

The FU part comes in because we don't actually need his job to pay the bills.  The lights aren't going to get cut off.  We're not going to eat ramen noodles for three meals a day.  We probably won't even adjust the amount going into my retirement accounts.  The only part that sucks is that for all their BS, they had a decent 401(k) plan with low-cost Vanguard funds and they matched 50 cents on the dollar up to 16.66%.

You don't have to prove the wage theft yourself. You report it and the state (or federal, depending) agency will investigate on your behalf. I would report it anyway.

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2577 on: February 25, 2019, 11:18:22 AM »
Not an epic story but it appears DH's days are numbered at his current job.  It's not completely unexpected.   In a nutshell, the company has not been doing well in recent years, in part due to being in a declining industry but also some really bad management decisions have not helped.   Just about every day someone from one of the offices is let go and management pretty much is throwing everything at the wall to see what sticks. 

DH was pulled into a meeting, being advised that the company is "restructuring" for the umpteenth time but this time, they want to move him into another position instead of changing bosses.  The job involves working nights and weekends, doing some work that he isn't remotely qualified for (editorial work for a newspaper, he's one of their web developers for the online editions), in an nearly empty building in an industrial area with no security, all for the same pay he is making now.   He actually had to "interview" for this job.    He doesn't think he will get it nor does he want it, though he's concerned they might insist that he try it out for a few weeks.  He mentioned the security concerns as well has he has limited night vision for driving at dark.   He's fully prepared to leave today if they tell him. 

Thanks to FU money (plus DH is eligible take his social security though we won't need it right now) so we will be all right.  In fact, over the weekend he started calculating the cost savings of not working this job like gas, etc.  Not to mention a lot less stress.  DH is 63, he was hoping to make it to 65 but in the last few months started realizing the end of his current employment might come sooner.   He's got a couple of other income streams that he could devote more time to.  He still plans to keep an eye out for job openings as he is willing to take the right opportunity if it presents itself but it's not urgent. 

Funny that they noticed that DH is not particularly upset.  Someone asked if he won the lottery or something.



FIRE Artist

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2578 on: February 25, 2019, 11:50:13 AM »


Funny that they noticed that DH is not particularly upset.  Someone asked if he won the lottery or something.

It is insane that normal the expectation now is that someone 2 years out from normal retirement age would be stressed about a layoff. 

Livingthedream55

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2579 on: February 25, 2019, 11:51:53 AM »
Not an epic story but it appears DH's days are numbered at his current job.  It's not completely unexpected.   In a nutshell, the company has not been doing well in recent years, in part due to being in a declining industry but also some really bad management decisions have not helped.   Just about every day someone from one of the offices is let go and management pretty much is throwing everything at the wall to see what sticks. 

DH was pulled into a meeting, being advised that the company is "restructuring" for the umpteenth time but this time, they want to move him into another position instead of changing bosses.  The job involves working nights and weekends, doing some work that he isn't remotely qualified for (editorial work for a newspaper, he's one of their web developers for the online editions), in an nearly empty building in an industrial area with no security, all for the same pay he is making now.   He actually had to "interview" for this job.    He doesn't think he will get it nor does he want it, though he's concerned they might insist that he try it out for a few weeks.  He mentioned the security concerns as well has he has limited night vision for driving at dark.   He's fully prepared to leave today if they tell him. 

Thanks to FU money (plus DH is eligible take his social security though we won't need it right now) so we will be all right.  In fact, over the weekend he started calculating the cost savings of not working this job like gas, etc.  Not to mention a lot less stress.  DH is 63, he was hoping to make it to 65 but in the last few months started realizing the end of his current employment might come sooner.   He's got a couple of other income streams that he could devote more time to.  He still plans to keep an eye out for job openings as he is willing to take the right opportunity if it presents itself but it's not urgent. 

Funny that they noticed that DH is not particularly upset.  Someone asked if he won the lottery or something.

Might he be eligible for unemployment (even if declining this "opportunity")?

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2580 on: February 25, 2019, 12:02:04 PM »
I thought I'd share an FU money story that is my mom's.   She was reliving it again to me, when I finally saw it for what it is:  an FU story. 

Now, I'll start by saying that mom did not actually have FU money, but she did eventually learn her worth in the market -- and that became her FU currency

Background:  Mom is widowed with 5 children to feed.  Money is extremely tight in the household.   Certified as a teacher, a teachers' strike makes finding a job impossible, so mom begins baking cakes and selling them to local restaurants.  After 5-6 months, she has 4-5 fancy restaurants on her daily rotation.  She's making 15-20 cakes and pies per day out of our home kitchen. 

One of her restaurants is a mob-run place at a racetrack.  She despises working with them because they treat her badly and wait weeks to pay her what she's owed -- very difficult when trying to buy supplies. There is a miscommunication over an error and the big boss mobster fires mom -- but makes the bookkeeper do it.  Mom was secretly relieved.  The mobsters were not professional and always ran on emotions. 

4 days later, the bookkeeper comes sniveling back and says the big boss wants her to come back and bake the desserts again. Mom raises the price on some of her desserts and then says she never wants to have to ask to get paid again.  All money is due at delivery or she's taking her cakes with her and never stepping foot inside again. 

I was about 11-12 when this happened, and I still remember the worry she had over how to pay bills and how empowered she was when she came home that day after setting her foot down. 

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2581 on: February 25, 2019, 12:17:22 PM »
Not an epic story but it appears DH's days are numbered at his current job.  It's not completely unexpected.   In a nutshell, the company has not been doing well in recent years, in part due to being in a declining industry but also some really bad management decisions have not helped.   Just about every day someone from one of the offices is let go and management pretty much is throwing everything at the wall to see what sticks. 

DH was pulled into a meeting, being advised that the company is "restructuring" for the umpteenth time but this time, they want to move him into another position instead of changing bosses.  The job involves working nights and weekends, doing some work that he isn't remotely qualified for (editorial work for a newspaper, he's one of their web developers for the online editions), in an nearly empty building in an industrial area with no security, all for the same pay he is making now.   He actually had to "interview" for this job.    He doesn't think he will get it nor does he want it, though he's concerned they might insist that he try it out for a few weeks.  He mentioned the security concerns as well has he has limited night vision for driving at dark.   He's fully prepared to leave today if they tell him. 

Thanks to FU money (plus DH is eligible take his social security though we won't need it right now) so we will be all right.  In fact, over the weekend he started calculating the cost savings of not working this job like gas, etc.  Not to mention a lot less stress.  DH is 63, he was hoping to make it to 65 but in the last few months started realizing the end of his current employment might come sooner.   He's got a couple of other income streams that he could devote more time to.  He still plans to keep an eye out for job openings as he is willing to take the right opportunity if it presents itself but it's not urgent. 

Funny that they noticed that DH is not particularly upset.  Someone asked if he won the lottery or something.

Might he be eligible for unemployment (even if declining this "opportunity")?

He is hoping to get out of there being eligible for unemployment.  He's not sure how they got the idea that he could do this job as it requires a whole different skillset from anything he has done during his career.  Working editorial on the high school newspaper was a loooonggg time ago.   His hours are limited to daylight hours because of issues with night vision, meaning his hours shift with the fall Daylight Savings time change.     

HR was at this first meeting.  Welp, he just learned the sole HR person is out of the office for 2 weeks so maybe he gets to stick around a bit longer. 

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2582 on: February 25, 2019, 01:30:21 PM »


Funny that they noticed that DH is not particularly upset.  Someone asked if he won the lottery or something.

It is insane that normal the expectation now is that someone 2 years out from normal retirement age would be stressed about a layoff.
In my company we have many people of this age. 

Half wouldn't give a shit.
The other half would be freaking out.

It comes down to medical.  Those eligible for Medicare, or with a working spouse with insurance?  Don't care.

Those with pre-existing expensive conditions?  They care, but mostly for medical reasons.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2583 on: February 25, 2019, 01:57:25 PM »
I don't know if this is actually epic, but here goes.  My husband's job...sucks.  He does groundskeeping for a 180 unit apartment complex.  He likes the job, and it paid decently well.  His boss has hated him ever since he was offered (and turned down) the GM job at another complex.  She has done everything she can over the last two years to make him quit.  Changing his time card and cheating him of time?  Check.  Making him buy back vacation days in cash only days before the start of scheduled trip and still telling him that they couldn't guarantee that he'd have a job when he got back?  Check.  Suspending him for two days because he couldn't/wouldn't rake leaves in a thunderstorm?  Check. 

So, it turns out that she was trying to get him to quit because the company is trying to cut payroll.  It was announced Friday afternoon that everyone was being cut to minimum wage.  That's something like a 40% pay cut for everyone.  Effective today.  He'll be tendering his resignation this morning and we have every intention of fighting them on a constructive dismissal unemployment claim.  They're lucky I can't prove the wage theft. 

The FU part comes in because we don't actually need his job to pay the bills.  The lights aren't going to get cut off.  We're not going to eat ramen noodles for three meals a day.  We probably won't even adjust the amount going into my retirement accounts.  The only part that sucks is that for all their BS, they had a decent 401(k) plan with low-cost Vanguard funds and they matched 50 cents on the dollar up to 16.66%.

You don't have to prove the wage theft yourself. You report it and the state (or federal, depending) agency will investigate on your behalf. I would report it anyway.
@Sugaree , just want to up the odds that (a) you see this so you can take action and (b) to help you stick it to the man, because this particular employer deserves it.

Sugaree

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2584 on: February 25, 2019, 03:25:42 PM »
I don't know if this is actually epic, but here goes.  My husband's job...sucks.  He does groundskeeping for a 180 unit apartment complex.  He likes the job, and it paid decently well.  His boss has hated him ever since he was offered (and turned down) the GM job at another complex.  She has done everything she can over the last two years to make him quit.  Changing his time card and cheating him of time?  Check.  Making him buy back vacation days in cash only days before the start of scheduled trip and still telling him that they couldn't guarantee that he'd have a job when he got back?  Check.  Suspending him for two days because he couldn't/wouldn't rake leaves in a thunderstorm?  Check. 

So, it turns out that she was trying to get him to quit because the company is trying to cut payroll.  It was announced Friday afternoon that everyone was being cut to minimum wage.  That's something like a 40% pay cut for everyone.  Effective today.  He'll be tendering his resignation this morning and we have every intention of fighting them on a constructive dismissal unemployment claim.  They're lucky I can't prove the wage theft. 

The FU part comes in because we don't actually need his job to pay the bills.  The lights aren't going to get cut off.  We're not going to eat ramen noodles for three meals a day.  We probably won't even adjust the amount going into my retirement accounts.  The only part that sucks is that for all their BS, they had a decent 401(k) plan with low-cost Vanguard funds and they matched 50 cents on the dollar up to 16.66%.

You don't have to prove the wage theft yourself. You report it and the state (or federal, depending) agency will investigate on your behalf. I would report it anyway.
@Sugaree , just want to up the odds that (a) you see this so you can take action and (b) to help you stick it to the man, because this particular employer deserves it.

I totally agree.  It has been one thing after another for months now.  This probably isn't even the half of it.  What sucks is that he really liked his job.  The hours were good.  He loves the tenants.  He liked most of his co-workers.  But local management was allowed to run roughshod over their little fiefdoms. 

AMandM

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2585 on: February 25, 2019, 04:17:58 PM »
BlueHouse, that is epic. I am full of admiration for you mother!

TomTX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2586 on: February 25, 2019, 07:26:31 PM »
He is hoping to get out of there being eligible for unemployment.  He's not sure how they got the idea that he could do this job as it requires a whole different skillset from anything he has done during his career.  Working editorial on the high school newspaper was a loooonggg time ago.   His hours are limited to daylight hours because of issues with night vision, meaning his hours shift with the fall Daylight Savings time change.     

HR was at this first meeting.  Welp, he just learned the sole HR person is out of the office for 2 weeks so maybe he gets to stick around a bit longer.

I think "applying for" or accepting the crap job is bad move. If they don't want him, they can fire him, and he should ask for significant severance.

Then file for UI.

Trifele

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2587 on: February 26, 2019, 02:12:54 AM »
BlueHouse, that is epic. I am full of admiration for your mother!

+1.  Your mom showed epic backbone @BlueHouse.  And what a fantastic example for her kids.   

Sugaree

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2588 on: February 26, 2019, 04:06:01 AM »
I don't know if this is actually epic, but here goes.  My husband's job...sucks.  He does groundskeeping for a 180 unit apartment complex.  He likes the job, and it paid decently well.  His boss has hated him ever since he was offered (and turned down) the GM job at another complex.  She has done everything she can over the last two years to make him quit.  Changing his time card and cheating him of time?  Check.  Making him buy back vacation days in cash only days before the start of scheduled trip and still telling him that they couldn't guarantee that he'd have a job when he got back?  Check.  Suspending him for two days because he couldn't/wouldn't rake leaves in a thunderstorm?  Check. 

So, it turns out that she was trying to get him to quit because the company is trying to cut payroll.  It was announced Friday afternoon that everyone was being cut to minimum wage.  That's something like a 40% pay cut for everyone.  Effective today.  He'll be tendering his resignation this morning and we have every intention of fighting them on a constructive dismissal unemployment claim.  They're lucky I can't prove the wage theft. 

The FU part comes in because we don't actually need his job to pay the bills.  The lights aren't going to get cut off.  We're not going to eat ramen noodles for three meals a day.  We probably won't even adjust the amount going into my retirement accounts.  The only part that sucks is that for all their BS, they had a decent 401(k) plan with low-cost Vanguard funds and they matched 50 cents on the dollar up to 16.66%.

You don't have to prove the wage theft yourself. You report it and the state (or federal, depending) agency will investigate on your behalf. I would report it anyway.
@Sugaree , just want to up the odds that (a) you see this so you can take action and (b) to help you stick it to the man, because this particular employer deserves it.

I totally agree.  It has been one thing after another for months now.  This probably isn't even the half of it.  What sucks is that he really liked his job.  The hours were good.  He loves the tenants.  He liked most of his co-workers.  But local management was allowed to run roughshod over their little fiefdoms.

Quoting myself to say that they gave him the choice to take minimum wage with no benefits or be "laid off."  He chose laid off.  Unemployment payments are crap here, but he should still get one more paycheck before we have to worry about that.  In theory, he has a week of PTO that should be paid out too, but I'm betting we will have to fight for that and I don't know if it will be worth it.  He has some side gigs lined up already, so I think everything's going to be okay.

Pooperman

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2589 on: February 26, 2019, 05:28:59 AM »
I don't know if this is actually epic, but here goes.  My husband's job...sucks.  He does groundskeeping for a 180 unit apartment complex.  He likes the job, and it paid decently well.  His boss has hated him ever since he was offered (and turned down) the GM job at another complex.  She has done everything she can over the last two years to make him quit.  Changing his time card and cheating him of time?  Check.  Making him buy back vacation days in cash only days before the start of scheduled trip and still telling him that they couldn't guarantee that he'd have a job when he got back?  Check.  Suspending him for two days because he couldn't/wouldn't rake leaves in a thunderstorm?  Check. 

So, it turns out that she was trying to get him to quit because the company is trying to cut payroll.  It was announced Friday afternoon that everyone was being cut to minimum wage.  That's something like a 40% pay cut for everyone.  Effective today.  He'll be tendering his resignation this morning and we have every intention of fighting them on a constructive dismissal unemployment claim.  They're lucky I can't prove the wage theft. 

The FU part comes in because we don't actually need his job to pay the bills.  The lights aren't going to get cut off.  We're not going to eat ramen noodles for three meals a day.  We probably won't even adjust the amount going into my retirement accounts.  The only part that sucks is that for all their BS, they had a decent 401(k) plan with low-cost Vanguard funds and they matched 50 cents on the dollar up to 16.66%.

You don't have to prove the wage theft yourself. You report it and the state (or federal, depending) agency will investigate on your behalf. I would report it anyway.
@Sugaree , just want to up the odds that (a) you see this so you can take action and (b) to help you stick it to the man, because this particular employer deserves it.

I totally agree.  It has been one thing after another for months now.  This probably isn't even the half of it.  What sucks is that he really liked his job.  The hours were good.  He loves the tenants.  He liked most of his co-workers.  But local management was allowed to run roughshod over their little fiefdoms.

Quoting myself to say that they gave him the choice to take minimum wage with no benefits or be "laid off."  He chose laid off.  Unemployment payments are crap here, but he should still get one more paycheck before we have to worry about that.  In theory, he has a week of PTO that should be paid out too, but I'm betting we will have to fight for that and I don't know if it will be worth it.  He has some side gigs lined up already, so I think everything's going to be okay.

Just make sure one of you reports the wage theft. It may take a while, but he worked hard for that money... and if they're doing that to him, he's probably not the only one. There can be a finder's fee as well depending on the circumstances. Another agency that might be interested is the IRS (or the state equivalen). When someone messes with wages, there's a decent chance they're also screwing with taxes.

Trifele

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2590 on: February 26, 2019, 06:04:53 AM »
I don't know if this is actually epic, but here goes.  My husband's job...sucks.  He does groundskeeping for a 180 unit apartment complex.  He likes the job, and it paid decently well.  His boss has hated him ever since he was offered (and turned down) the GM job at another complex.  She has done everything she can over the last two years to make him quit.  Changing his time card and cheating him of time?  Check.  Making him buy back vacation days in cash only days before the start of scheduled trip and still telling him that they couldn't guarantee that he'd have a job when he got back?  Check.  Suspending him for two days because he couldn't/wouldn't rake leaves in a thunderstorm?  Check. 

So, it turns out that she was trying to get him to quit because the company is trying to cut payroll.  It was announced Friday afternoon that everyone was being cut to minimum wage.  That's something like a 40% pay cut for everyone.  Effective today.  He'll be tendering his resignation this morning and we have every intention of fighting them on a constructive dismissal unemployment claim.  They're lucky I can't prove the wage theft. 

The FU part comes in because we don't actually need his job to pay the bills.  The lights aren't going to get cut off.  We're not going to eat ramen noodles for three meals a day.  We probably won't even adjust the amount going into my retirement accounts.  The only part that sucks is that for all their BS, they had a decent 401(k) plan with low-cost Vanguard funds and they matched 50 cents on the dollar up to 16.66%.

You don't have to prove the wage theft yourself. You report it and the state (or federal, depending) agency will investigate on your behalf. I would report it anyway.
@Sugaree , just want to up the odds that (a) you see this so you can take action and (b) to help you stick it to the man, because this particular employer deserves it.

I totally agree.  It has been one thing after another for months now.  This probably isn't even the half of it.  What sucks is that he really liked his job.  The hours were good.  He loves the tenants.  He liked most of his co-workers.  But local management was allowed to run roughshod over their little fiefdoms.

Quoting myself to say that they gave him the choice to take minimum wage with no benefits or be "laid off."  He chose laid off.  Unemployment payments are crap here, but he should still get one more paycheck before we have to worry about that.  In theory, he has a week of PTO that should be paid out too, but I'm betting we will have to fight for that and I don't know if it will be worth it.  He has some side gigs lined up already, so I think everything's going to be okay.

Just make sure one of you reports the wage theft. It may take a while, but he worked hard for that money... and if they're doing that to him, he's probably not the only one. There can be a finder's fee as well depending on the circumstances. Another agency that might be interested is the IRS (or the state equivalen). When someone messes with wages, there's a decent chance they're also screwing with taxes.

Agree.  Sounds like a phone call to your state Department of Labor (DOL) is in order.

Sugaree

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2591 on: February 26, 2019, 06:21:55 AM »
I don't know if this is actually epic, but here goes.  My husband's job...sucks.  He does groundskeeping for a 180 unit apartment complex.  He likes the job, and it paid decently well.  His boss has hated him ever since he was offered (and turned down) the GM job at another complex.  She has done everything she can over the last two years to make him quit.  Changing his time card and cheating him of time?  Check.  Making him buy back vacation days in cash only days before the start of scheduled trip and still telling him that they couldn't guarantee that he'd have a job when he got back?  Check.  Suspending him for two days because he couldn't/wouldn't rake leaves in a thunderstorm?  Check. 

So, it turns out that she was trying to get him to quit because the company is trying to cut payroll.  It was announced Friday afternoon that everyone was being cut to minimum wage.  That's something like a 40% pay cut for everyone.  Effective today.  He'll be tendering his resignation this morning and we have every intention of fighting them on a constructive dismissal unemployment claim.  They're lucky I can't prove the wage theft. 

The FU part comes in because we don't actually need his job to pay the bills.  The lights aren't going to get cut off.  We're not going to eat ramen noodles for three meals a day.  We probably won't even adjust the amount going into my retirement accounts.  The only part that sucks is that for all their BS, they had a decent 401(k) plan with low-cost Vanguard funds and they matched 50 cents on the dollar up to 16.66%.

You don't have to prove the wage theft yourself. You report it and the state (or federal, depending) agency will investigate on your behalf. I would report it anyway.
@Sugaree , just want to up the odds that (a) you see this so you can take action and (b) to help you stick it to the man, because this particular employer deserves it.

I totally agree.  It has been one thing after another for months now.  This probably isn't even the half of it.  What sucks is that he really liked his job.  The hours were good.  He loves the tenants.  He liked most of his co-workers.  But local management was allowed to run roughshod over their little fiefdoms.

Quoting myself to say that they gave him the choice to take minimum wage with no benefits or be "laid off."  He chose laid off.  Unemployment payments are crap here, but he should still get one more paycheck before we have to worry about that.  In theory, he has a week of PTO that should be paid out too, but I'm betting we will have to fight for that and I don't know if it will be worth it.  He has some side gigs lined up already, so I think everything's going to be okay.

Just make sure one of you reports the wage theft. It may take a while, but he worked hard for that money... and if they're doing that to him, he's probably not the only one. There can be a finder's fee as well depending on the circumstances. Another agency that might be interested is the IRS (or the state equivalen). When someone messes with wages, there's a decent chance they're also screwing with taxes.

Yep.  He wants to wait for the letter or recommendation from his manager.  I think that's a mistake given how much she seemed to dislike him, but whatever.

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2592 on: February 26, 2019, 07:14:38 AM »
BlueHouse, that is epic. I am full of admiration for your mother!

+1.  Your mom showed epic backbone @BlueHouse.  And what a fantastic example for her kids.

Thanks AMandM and Trifele! 
This was back in the late 70s.  People have a hard time understanding just how difficult it was for women to stand up for themselves in those times.  So witnessing her feeling as if she had some control over her own business was incredibly eye-opening for me as a pre-teen girl.  She always told me I could be anything I wanted to be, but I also watched her struggle, so I do believe that small wins like that make a difference. 


fuzzy math

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2593 on: February 26, 2019, 07:38:19 AM »
BlueHouse, that is epic. I am full of admiration for your mother!

+1.  Your mom showed epic backbone @BlueHouse.  And what a fantastic example for her kids.

Thanks AMandM and Trifele! 
This was back in the late 70s.  People have a hard time understanding just how difficult it was for women to stand up for themselves in those times.  So witnessing her feeling as if she had some control over her own business was incredibly eye-opening for me as a pre-teen girl.  She always told me I could be anything I wanted to be, but I also watched her struggle, so I do believe that small wins like that make a difference.

That is not a small win! Your mom told the mob to accept her terms or shove it. She might have the most epic story here!

radram

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2594 on: February 26, 2019, 08:46:06 AM »
BlueHouse, that is epic. I am full of admiration for your mother!

+1.  Your mom showed epic backbone @BlueHouse.  And what a fantastic example for her kids.

Thanks AMandM and Trifele! 
This was back in the late 70s.  People have a hard time understanding just how difficult it was for women to stand up for themselves in those times.  So witnessing her feeling as if she had some control over her own business was incredibly eye-opening for me as a pre-teen girl.  She always told me I could be anything I wanted to be, but I also watched her struggle, so I do believe that small wins like that make a difference.

That is not a small win! Your mom told the mob to accept her terms or shove it. She might have the most epic story here!

Agreed. In fact, I think this story is in the wrong thread. It is one thing to say shove it because I have some money and don't have to take any crap (true epic FU money stories). It is another thing entirely to have NOTHING, need EVERYTHING, and STILL say FU ...... to the fucking MOB!

Just WOW. How incredibly inspiring. Thank you for sharing.

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2595 on: February 26, 2019, 09:53:37 AM »
BlueHouse, that is epic. I am full of admiration for your mother!

+1.  Your mom showed epic backbone @BlueHouse.  And what a fantastic example for her kids.

Thanks AMandM and Trifele! 
This was back in the late 70s.  People have a hard time understanding just how difficult it was for women to stand up for themselves in those times.  So witnessing her feeling as if she had some control over her own business was incredibly eye-opening for me as a pre-teen girl.  She always told me I could be anything I wanted to be, but I also watched her struggle, so I do believe that small wins like that make a difference.

@BlueHouse  What your mom did was indeed epic.   And I agree, back in the late 70s it was not easy for women to stand up for themselves, it was overcoming a lot of societal programming.  At that same time, my mom had just gone back to work and she had her moments of having to stand up to doctors (who were pretty much male) as a nurse (who were still generally female).  It was not easy for her but she did it.  Good for your mom!


Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2596 on: February 26, 2019, 09:54:59 AM »
@BlueHouse

Your mom's baking must have been great . . . I'm sure that mobster was kicking himself pretty quick as soon as he was missing the taste of the pie (not to mention that I bet a bunch of customers were complaining that the good cake and pie had disappeared!)

Proud of her for sticking up for herself.

okits

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2597 on: February 26, 2019, 06:37:46 PM »
BlueHouse, that is epic. I am full of admiration for your mother!

+1.  Your mom showed epic backbone @BlueHouse.  And what a fantastic example for her kids.

Thanks AMandM and Trifele! 
This was back in the late 70s.  People have a hard time understanding just how difficult it was for women to stand up for themselves in those times.  So witnessing her feeling as if she had some control over her own business was incredibly eye-opening for me as a pre-teen girl.  She always told me I could be anything I wanted to be, but I also watched her struggle, so I do believe that small wins like that make a difference.

That is not a small win! Your mom told the mob to accept her terms or shove it. She might have the most epic story here!

Agreed. In fact, I think this story is in the wrong thread. It is one thing to say shove it because I have some money and don't have to take any crap (true epic FU money stories). It is another thing entirely to have NOTHING, need EVERYTHING, and STILL say FU ...... to the fucking MOB!

Just WOW. How incredibly inspiring. Thank you for sharing.

radram is right, @BlueHouse .  Your mom kicks some serious ass.

saguaro

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2598 on: February 27, 2019, 03:43:29 PM »
Update on DH: his last day in the clusterf**k that is his company is next Friday.   He is leaving with severance plus he can get UI and then social security after that. 

Unlike 10 years ago, when he lost his job in the thick of the Great Recession, this is not a shock.  He's been prepared for the possibility and he is looking forward to working his income streams and get some work done around the house that he's put off because he was too tired and stressed out.   He will look for work just to see if there's something he might be interested in but this time around find a job is not something he's going to be desperately hoping for, it will be a bonus and something he wants to do, not needs to do.   He's on my health insurance so that's not a problem.
 
Interesting that there was nothing more about this so-called "opportunity" that he interviewed for.  And more interesting that there is no talk about getting a person at the management level taking over his responsibilities and then some.  Nope, no sign of Superman, as he calls it.  One of his coworkers called BS on them hiring anyone to do anything.   They just simply lay off people and spread the work to everyone else.   Another funny thing, he was seen as "critical" to the organization so there's a bit of shock that they are actually letting him go.   There are some people who told him they would jump ship if he ever left.  So I think some will be making for the lifeboats if they can find one with their name on it.
 

 

Sibley

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2599 on: February 28, 2019, 07:20:31 PM »
I don't know if this is actually epic, but here goes.  My husband's job...sucks.  He does groundskeeping for a 180 unit apartment complex.  He likes the job, and it paid decently well.  His boss has hated him ever since he was offered (and turned down) the GM job at another complex.  She has done everything she can over the last two years to make him quit.  Changing his time card and cheating him of time?  Check.  Making him buy back vacation days in cash only days before the start of scheduled trip and still telling him that they couldn't guarantee that he'd have a job when he got back?  Check.  Suspending him for two days because he couldn't/wouldn't rake leaves in a thunderstorm?  Check. 

So, it turns out that she was trying to get him to quit because the company is trying to cut payroll.  It was announced Friday afternoon that everyone was being cut to minimum wage.  That's something like a 40% pay cut for everyone.  Effective today.  He'll be tendering his resignation this morning and we have every intention of fighting them on a constructive dismissal unemployment claim.  They're lucky I can't prove the wage theft. 

The FU part comes in because we don't actually need his job to pay the bills.  The lights aren't going to get cut off.  We're not going to eat ramen noodles for three meals a day.  We probably won't even adjust the amount going into my retirement accounts.  The only part that sucks is that for all their BS, they had a decent 401(k) plan with low-cost Vanguard funds and they matched 50 cents on the dollar up to 16.66%.

You don't have to prove the wage theft yourself. You report it and the state (or federal, depending) agency will investigate on your behalf. I would report it anyway.
@Sugaree , just want to up the odds that (a) you see this so you can take action and (b) to help you stick it to the man, because this particular employer deserves it.

I totally agree.  It has been one thing after another for months now.  This probably isn't even the half of it.  What sucks is that he really liked his job.  The hours were good.  He loves the tenants.  He liked most of his co-workers.  But local management was allowed to run roughshod over their little fiefdoms.

Quoting myself to say that they gave him the choice to take minimum wage with no benefits or be "laid off."  He chose laid off.  Unemployment payments are crap here, but he should still get one more paycheck before we have to worry about that.  In theory, he has a week of PTO that should be paid out too, but I'm betting we will have to fight for that and I don't know if it will be worth it.  He has some side gigs lined up already, so I think everything's going to be okay.

Just make sure one of you reports the wage theft. It may take a while, but he worked hard for that money... and if they're doing that to him, he's probably not the only one. There can be a finder's fee as well depending on the circumstances. Another agency that might be interested is the IRS (or the state equivalen). When someone messes with wages, there's a decent chance they're also screwing with taxes.

Yep.  He wants to wait for the letter or recommendation from his manager.  I think that's a mistake given how much she seemed to dislike him, but whatever.

I would snip, but would mess up the formatting somehow.

Anyway, a family member's former employer was screwing up the wages/overtime/etc rules for years. Someone reported it to the state's DOL, and while I think it took a year or more, all the impacted employees eventually got back pay (up to $20k for some), then they all got recategorized so that they're getting salary + overtime pay. (Please don't ask details, I have no idea.) Messing up wages is a big deal. If it's deliberate, even more so.