Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 1151053 times)

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2350 on: May 13, 2018, 08:45:01 AM »
... I only wanted to work in the evenings so I could snowboard during the day.
 He told me my expectations were ridiculous.


Even though I've been working toward a similar goal (at my advanced age of 50), I STILL think this when I hear it from the younger generations.  Of course, I've only met two People IRL (that I know of) who have their financial shit together and who could pull it off if they wanted to.  Everyone else seems to just think they should be handed everything on a silver platter instead of working hard for it.

I won't be so judgemental in the future though when I hear the dreams though.  When I hear it, I'll say "that's great!  How are you setting yourself up financially to achieve it?" 

What I used to refer to as a "beach bum", I'm slowly realizing should be called "someone who knows when they have enough" . 
Anyway, good story @tedbendixson.  Thanks for sharing!

Dave1442397

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2351 on: May 13, 2018, 10:08:23 AM »
I know a guy who quit college to start a business back in the '80s, and was very successful with it. A few years ago, he wanted his son to go to college, and his son said "Why would I waste four years of my time and your money going to school when you could teach me how to become a millionaire?".

By the time the son's friends were graduating with the usual student loan debt, this kid had become a millionaire, and will never be an employee. FU money at that age is a great way to start out in life.

Bicycle_B

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2352 on: May 13, 2018, 10:42:07 AM »
^wow

bendixso123

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2353 on: May 14, 2018, 08:56:22 PM »
... I only wanted to work in the evenings so I could snowboard during the day.
 He told me my expectations were ridiculous.


Even though I've been working toward a similar goal (at my advanced age of 50), I STILL think this when I hear it from the younger generations.  Of course, I've only met two People IRL (that I know of) who have their financial shit together and who could pull it off if they wanted to.  Everyone else seems to just think they should be handed everything on a silver platter instead of working hard for it.

I won't be so judgemental in the future though when I hear the dreams though.  When I hear it, I'll say "that's great!  How are you setting yourself up financially to achieve it?" 

What I used to refer to as a "beach bum", I'm slowly realizing should be called "someone who knows when they have enough" . 
Anyway, good story @tedbendixson.  Thanks for sharing!

Glad you like the story! I would say "ski bum" doesn't quite fit the sorts of activities my friends and I did (and some of us continue to do) on the slopes.

Frankly, many of the friends I saw each day were pursuing second careers as athletes. We would get up early and hit 60 foot jumps at 9:00 A.M., well before many people had their first cup of coffee. It was really fun and incredibly fulfilling (I still do this when I can but it's different with a full-time job in software).

Anyway, I just wouldn't want to downplay all of the hard work involved in getting to that level athletically, and I think that's a bit of context the guy interviewing me didn't quite have. He didn't see what my friends and I actually did out there. He just saw the typical partier stereotype, which is totally fair because that's what most mountain town 20 somethings are like.

I have a friend who's still really into it. He just turned 30. Lives in Breckenridge, works at the grocery store, makes a great salary, invests a large portion of it, and hits big jumps in the morning before work. We take park laps and discuss early retirement strategies on the chairlift.

If anything, my snowboarding friends are the ones most concerned with getting to FI. We've always known what we want. We opted out of the corporate world and dove right into it after school. It's just that in our 20s, many of us didn't have the financial education to actually achieve it. Now that some of us are waking up to it, our natural inclination is to go all-in. It's what we're used to.

barbaz

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2354 on: May 15, 2018, 12:29:20 AM »
We take park laps and discuss early retirement strategies on the chairlift.

If anything, my snowboarding friends are the ones most concerned with getting to FI. We've always known what we want. We opted out of the corporate world and dove right into it after school. It's just that in our 20s, many of us didn't have the financial education to actually achieve it. Now that some of us are waking up to it, our natural inclination is to go all-in. It's what we're used to.
Being an avid snowboarder is a case where I could understand the old live-now-save-later mentality, but if you manage to do both that qualifies as epic.

Zikoris

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2355 on: June 06, 2018, 07:02:19 PM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.

Luckyvik

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2356 on: June 06, 2018, 08:15:23 PM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.
That's great! Congratulations!


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Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2357 on: June 06, 2018, 11:17:58 PM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.
It counts. Good for you, plural!

former player

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2358 on: June 07, 2018, 02:41:03 AM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.
Not mild at all, but a full working through of the FU money principle.  Congrats to your partner, and to you for having an awesome mustachian partner.

By the River

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2359 on: June 07, 2018, 06:54:41 AM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.
It counts. Good for you, plural!

Wouldn't that be y'all?   

Also great for y'all!

Warlord1986

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2360 on: June 07, 2018, 07:09:55 AM »
I remember back when I was 26. I had something like $5K in savings, and I wanted to spend more of my days snowboarding (basically work in the evenings and snowboard from 9-5).

I had a string of jobs in restaurants for years, most requiring mixed shifts. In my spare time, I was slowly building up a freelance writing clientele, but I didn't really feel comfortable enough to just go without a stable job for any extended period of time. That is, until a certain fateful job interview at the Bubba Gump Shrimp House (or whatever the hell it is) in Breckenridge Colorado.

The interviewer asked me which hours I would like to work. I told him I only wanted to work in the evenings so I could snowboard during the day.

He got really angry about it and treated me like some punk kid (probably with reason since there were a lot of punk kids trying to do the same). He told me my expectations were ridiculous.

At that point, I figured the interview was over. So I just casually said, "Okay, well this freelance writing thing I've been doing seems to be taking off, so I think I'll just keep doing that." I will never forget the puzzled look on that poor soul's face. Dude was speechless.

I ended up spending that winter doing exactly what I had set out to do. I went snowboarding nearly every day, and I worked on freelance writing projects at night. Most days, I only worked 2-3 hours. I ended up doing that for two more years, and I even took trips down to New Zealand in the summer to keep the good times rolling when we didn't have snow up north.

I eventually moved into higher paying jobs in software, but I try to remind myself of that experience every now and again. Back then, I was in a far weaker financial position than I'm in right now, but I had this sort of ballsy confidence that I could build a writing business out of a crowded snowboarding frat house, spending as little as a few hours a day on it.

My cushion is much bigger now, but none of that really matters because I have something no employer can take from me - the ability to spin up a business out of almost nothing. I've done it with iOS apps and recently software development tutoring. If I were ever to lose my high-paying work, I could easily start growing those businesses without skipping a beat. There's really nothing to fear at all.

So while I certainly love the warm and secure feeling that FU money gives me, I kind of think FU confidence is better. Sometimes I need to do a better job of channeling my younger self. I kind of had it together back then, albeit in a strange and offbeat lazy snowboarder kind of way.

I need you to adopt me and teach me your ways.

MrMoogle

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2361 on: June 07, 2018, 08:35:39 AM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.
It counts. Good for you, plural!

Wouldn't that be y'all?   

Also great for y'all!
Y'all can be singular too, in certain areas, so they say "all y'all."

Rural

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2362 on: June 07, 2018, 09:02:13 AM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.
It counts. Good for you, plural!

Wouldn't that be y'all?   

Also great for y'all!
Y'all can be singular too, in certain areas, so they say "all y'all."


Y’all is plural; “all y’all” is for emphasis, as in, “I caint believe all y’all went along with Bob on that one. John and Joe at least shoulda known better.”

MrMoogle

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2363 on: June 07, 2018, 10:58:38 AM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.
It counts. Good for you, plural!

Wouldn't that be y'all?   

Also great for y'all!
Y'all can be singular too, in certain areas, so they say "all y'all."


Y’all is plural; “all y’all” is for emphasis, as in, “I caint believe all y’all went along with Bob on that one. John and Joe at least shoulda known better.”
I've definitely heard it refer to a single person, and I've heard many people use it that way.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2364 on: June 07, 2018, 11:02:50 AM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.
It counts. Good for you, plural!

Wouldn't that be y'all?   

Also great for y'all!
Y'all can be singular too, in certain areas, so they say "all y'all."


Y’all is plural; “all y’all” is for emphasis, as in, “I caint believe all y’all went along with Billy Bob on that one. John Boy and Joe Junior at least shoulda known better.”
FTFY. These may or may not be actual relatives.

solon

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2365 on: June 07, 2018, 11:03:34 AM »
+1 for the singular y'all. It's much rarer than the plural y'all, but it does happen.

ETA: in this Tim Hawkins stand up, Tim uses the singular y'all to poke fun at the Durant, OK Shakespeare Festival. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pk0xOkgGbNY
« Last Edit: June 07, 2018, 11:21:04 AM by solon »

Rural

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2366 on: June 07, 2018, 12:35:10 PM »
+1 for the singular y'all. It's much rarer than the plural y'all, but it does happen.

ETA: in this Tim Hawkins stand up, Tim uses the singular y'all to poke fun at the Durant, OK Shakespeare Festival. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pk0xOkgGbNY


Oh, some comedy routines have it presented as singular, but it’s not an accurate reflection of the dialect.*


@Dicey, I know you didn’t mean to be offensive, but I chose the names I did in order to avoid stereotypes in discussing one of the dialects of American English. [I debated for quite a while at the phonetic spellings, but eventually used them because I was discussing dialect.]


I don’t mean to jump on you, because I know it’s hard to think of a group of largely Caucasian people as having any sort of minority status, but I’d argue that we aren’t doing southerners, Appalachians, or the rest of the country any favors when we** present the first two groups as universally backward, inbred, etc, but then turn around and expect them to avoid/overcome cultural racism, sexism, or whatever.




* One source, admittedly a bit dated but accessible online, that discusses the singular y’all controversy from a linguist’s point of view: https://www.jstor.org/stable/454993?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

**I’m not saying that’s what you were doing, just that the sort of jokes you presented do tend to feed into that sort of thing. Again, I don’t mean to jump on you, just draw it to all of our attention. It’s not something most non- southern or Appalachian Americans have thought about, or have even been asked to think about, but I think it’s one small part of the current divisions in our country.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2018, 12:37:33 PM by Rural »

Rural

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2367 on: June 07, 2018, 12:48:18 PM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.
It counts. Good for you, plural!

Wouldn't that be y'all?   

Also great for y'all!
Y'all can be singular too, in certain areas, so they say "all y'all."


Y’all is plural; “all y’all” is for emphasis, as in, “I caint believe all y’all went along with Bob on that one. John and Joe at least shoulda known better.”
I've definitely heard it refer to a single person, and I've heard many people use it that way.


Sorry for the double post, but I missed this somehow and didn’t want to ignore you. Are you sure the uses you heard weren’t the polite distinction between addressee and referent that the article above discusses? As in I might say to someone I run into at the grocery story, “how are y’all doing these days?” But the question (and usually the answer) will be about how the whole family is doing rather than the one person at the store. So it seems like the word is grammatically singular because only one representative of the family is standing there in front of me when I say it, but I did mean the group. That is very common in my experience as well as in studies like tat one.


It is a controversy, but not all that much of one in linguistics. It’s more debated outside academic circles because it’s been presented as singular, I would argue erroneously, so much in popular culture.

fantabulous

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2368 on: June 07, 2018, 01:28:30 PM »
Y'all is gender neutral, so it's finding use in northern social justice circles as well.

fuzzy math

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2369 on: June 07, 2018, 01:38:21 PM »



Oh, some comedy routines have it presented as singular, but it’s not an accurate reflection of the dialect.*


@Dicey, I know you didn’t mean to be offensive, but I chose the names I did in order to avoid stereotypes in discussing one of the dialects of American English. [I debated for quite a while at the phonetic spellings, but eventually used them because I was discussing dialect.]


I don’t mean to jump on you, because I know it’s hard to think of a group of largely Caucasian people as having any sort of minority status, but I’d argue that we aren’t doing southerners, Appalachians, or the rest of the country any favors when we** present the first two groups as universally backward, inbred, etc, but then turn around and expect them to avoid/overcome cultural racism, sexism, or whatever.

* One source, admittedly a bit dated but accessible online, that discusses the singular y’all controversy from a linguist’s point of view: https://www.jstor.org/stable/454993?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

**I’m not saying that’s what you were doing, just that the sort of jokes you presented do tend to feed into that sort of thing. Again, I don’t mean to jump on you, just draw it to all of our attention. It’s not something most non- southern or Appalachian Americans have thought about, or have even been asked to think about, but I think it’s one small part of the current divisions in our country.

I appreciate you saying this, it's something I've never thought of. When you compare it to making racist/ethnics jokes against non Caucasian minorities and thinking of how offensive it is, I can see how this does create more of a divide.

Rural

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2370 on: June 07, 2018, 02:05:44 PM »
Y'all is gender neutral, so it's finding use in northern social justice circles as well.


That’s pretty cool. It’s fairly universal in the Navy as well, or was some number of years ago when my husband served. The language needs a second person plural.

ETA thanks, fuzzy_math. I’m trying hard not to be offensive myself, which I think would be easy to do in this context.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2018, 02:08:23 PM by Rural »

MrMoogle

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2371 on: June 07, 2018, 02:16:08 PM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.
It counts. Good for you, plural!

Wouldn't that be y'all?   

Also great for y'all!
Y'all can be singular too, in certain areas, so they say "all y'all."


Y’all is plural; “all y’all” is for emphasis, as in, “I caint believe all y’all went along with Bob on that one. John and Joe at least shoulda known better.”
I've definitely heard it refer to a single person, and I've heard many people use it that way.


Sorry for the double post, but I missed this somehow and didn’t want to ignore you. Are you sure the uses you heard weren’t the polite distinction between addressee and referent that the article above discusses? As in I might say to someone I run into at the grocery story, “how are y’all doing these days?” But the question (and usually the answer) will be about how the whole family is doing rather than the one person at the store. So it seems like the word is grammatically singular because only one representative of the family is standing there in front of me when I say it, but I did mean the group. That is very common in my experience as well as in studies like tat one.


It is a controversy, but not all that much of one in linguistics. It’s more debated outside academic circles because it’s been presented as singular, I would argue erroneously, so much in popular culture.
So when I hear it in what I call "singular", it's both singular and plural.  Plural because it water downs the rest of the sentence, but directed to a single person.

For example: "Yall need to watch when you back out" to the driver that just backed into them.  It sounds less aggressive than saying "you."  It makes it sound like it wasn't just that driver's fault, like there's a group at fault.

"Yall need to take out the trash," when I'm the only other one in the room.  Technically, I could have gotten her husband to do it when he got back, but she knew I would do it for her, and this was her way of getting me to do it. 

I guess both cases fit into the article, since the reason it works is because it's plural.

Rural

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2372 on: June 07, 2018, 02:28:58 PM »
Hmm... mild FU Money story?

My partner started up a side gig a couple of months ago, which has been going really well. Yesterday he asked for reduced hours at his day job, since he's getting buried alive in work between the two things. They said no. So he quit. And it won't harm us one penny financially.
It counts. Good for you, plural!

Wouldn't that be y'all?   

Also great for y'all!
Y'all can be singular too, in certain areas, so they say "all y'all."


Y’all is plural; “all y’all” is for emphasis, as in, “I caint believe all y’all went along with Bob on that one. John and Joe at least shoulda known better.”
I've definitely heard it refer to a single person, and I've heard many people use it that way.


Sorry for the double post, but I missed this somehow and didn’t want to ignore you. Are you sure the uses you heard weren’t the polite distinction between addressee and referent that the article above discusses? As in I might say to someone I run into at the grocery story, “how are y’all doing these days?” But the question (and usually the answer) will be about how the whole family is doing rather than the one person at the store. So it seems like the word is grammatically singular because only one representative of the family is standing there in front of me when I say it, but I did mean the group. That is very common in my experience as well as in studies like tat one.


It is a controversy, but not all that much of one in linguistics. It’s more debated outside academic circles because it’s been presented as singular, I would argue erroneously, so much in popular culture.
So when I hear it in what I call "singular", it's both singular and plural.  Plural because it water downs the rest of the sentence, but directed to a single person.

For example: "Yall need to watch when you back out" to the driver that just backed into them.  It sounds less aggressive than saying "you."  It makes it sound like it wasn't just that driver's fault, like there's a group at fault.

"Yall need to take out the trash," when I'm the only other one in the room.  Technically, I could have gotten her husband to do it when he got back, but she knew I would do it for her, and this was her way of getting me to do it. 

I guess both cases fit into the article, since the reason it works is because it's plural.


That’s very interesting. I’d say yes, your trash example falls into the kind of thing I’m talking about, sort of spreading out responsibility. With the backing into someone, I’ve having trouble seeing how it could work that way if there was only one person in the car. Both driver and car need to be more careful? Surely not. Easier to see it working that way if there was a passenger, I suppose. Then it could have been sort of the passenger’s fault if he or she was distracting the driver, and the polite y’all avoids assigning blame to either person directly. But a solo driver, not so much. If that was the case, it sounds a lot closer to a singular y’all than anything else I’ve seen.

MrMoogle

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2373 on: June 07, 2018, 03:05:28 PM »
*snip*
So when I hear it in what I call "singular", it's both singular and plural.  Plural because it water downs the rest of the sentence, but directed to a single person.

For example: "Yall need to watch when you back out" to the driver that just backed into them.  It sounds less aggressive than saying "you."  It makes it sound like it wasn't just that driver's fault, like there's a group at fault.

"Yall need to take out the trash," when I'm the only other one in the room.  Technically, I could have gotten her husband to do it when he got back, but she knew I would do it for her, and this was her way of getting me to do it. 

I guess both cases fit into the article, since the reason it works is because it's plural.


That’s very interesting. I’d say yes, your trash example falls into the kind of thing I’m talking about, sort of spreading out responsibility. With the backing into someone, I’ve having trouble seeing how it could work that way if there was only one person in the car. Both driver and car need to be more careful? Surely not. Easier to see it working that way if there was a passenger, I suppose. Then it could have been sort of the passenger’s fault if he or she was distracting the driver, and the polite y’all avoids assigning blame to either person directly. But a solo driver, not so much. If that was the case, it sounds a lot closer to a singular y’all than anything else I’ve seen.
The driver example is spreading out blame too, it's just ambiguous to who else it is getting spread to.  The group of drivers who back into people, or something like that.  I guess it's a reminder that other people do it too.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2374 on: June 08, 2018, 12:57:56 AM »
There are many long quotes here. I have removed those that do not directly apply for clarity.

Rural said this:
Y’all is plural; “all y’all” is for emphasis, as in, “I caint believe all y’all went along with Bob on that one. John and Joe at least shoulda known better.”

Then Dicey added this:
Y’all is plural; “all y’all” is for emphasis, as in, “I caint believe all y’all went along with Billy Bob on that one. John Boy and Joe Junior at least shoulda known better.”
FTFY. These may or may not be actual relatives.

Now Rural is saying this:

@Dicey, I know you didn’t mean to be offensive, but I chose the names I did in order to avoid stereotypes in discussing one of the dialects of American English. [I debated for quite a while at the phonetic spellings, but eventually used them because I was discussing dialect.]

I don’t mean to jump on you, because I know it’s hard to think of a group of largely Caucasian people as having any sort of minority status, but I’d argue that we aren’t doing southerners, Appalachians, or the rest of the country any favors when we** present the first two groups as universally backward, inbred, etc, but then turn around and expect them to avoid/overcome cultural racism, sexism, or whatever

**I’m not sayilng that’s what you were doing, just that the sort of jokes you presented do tend to feed into that sort of thing. Again, I don’t mean to jump on you, just draw it to all of our attention. It’s not something most non- southern or Appalachian Americans have thought about, or have even been asked to think about, but I think it’s one small part of the current divisions in our country.

I am gobsmacked, Rural. You used "caint" [sic] and "shoulda", so I made the names more Southern sounding, based on my long experience working for companies based in the South. You made a joke and I riffed on it, using my actual life experience. I could literally hear my old boss's voice when I read your post. He was from Rome, GA, and is the first person I ever heard say "cain't". He did it often, but I found it most incongruous when he did it while wearing a suit and tie, giving a sales presentation. His sons may have actually been given double names at birth and been addressed by both names their whole lives. This happens quite often in the South, and far less often elsewhere in the United States. That is simply a fact. I also claimed these type of double names as possibly belonging to family members, which is pretty damn inclusive.

@Rural, you made the joke, I expanded it based on my real life and now I'm being accused (but "not jumped on") of belittling Appalchian Americans and contributing to the "current divisions in our country"? Huh.

If you have any further criticisms, kindly send me a PM. In offering this explanation, if I have somehow managed to offend you further, please know that is not my intention, just as I am positive you did not intend to insult me.

Trifele

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2375 on: June 08, 2018, 04:57:59 AM »
*snip*
So when I hear it in what I call "singular", it's both singular and plural.  Plural because it water downs the rest of the sentence, but directed to a single person.

For example: "Yall need to watch when you back out" to the driver that just backed into them.  It sounds less aggressive than saying "you."  It makes it sound like it wasn't just that driver's fault, like there's a group at fault.

"Yall need to take out the trash," when I'm the only other one in the room.  Technically, I could have gotten her husband to do it when he got back, but she knew I would do it for her, and this was her way of getting me to do it. 

I guess both cases fit into the article, since the reason it works is because it's plural.


That’s very interesting. I’d say yes, your trash example falls into the kind of thing I’m talking about, sort of spreading out responsibility. With the backing into someone, I’ve having trouble seeing how it could work that way if there was only one person in the car. Both driver and car need to be more careful? Surely not. Easier to see it working that way if there was a passenger, I suppose. Then it could have been sort of the passenger’s fault if he or she was distracting the driver, and the polite y’all avoids assigning blame to either person directly. But a solo driver, not so much. If that was the case, it sounds a lot closer to a singular y’all than anything else I’ve seen.
The driver example is spreading out blame too, it's just ambiguous to who else it is getting spread to.  The group of drivers who back into people, or something like that.  I guess it's a reminder that other people do it too.

Thanks @Rural and @MrMoogle -- This is is a super interesting discussion.  I'm a lifetime northerner who moved to the southern appalachians just a few years ago.  I have really been enjoying hearing and learning the dialects here.  (Dialects plural -- there are at least two very distinct ones, which I have had explained to me in various ways.) 

I think I've also heard y'all used singularly, but I can't remember the exact context.  Now thanks to this discussion I will be focused on it.  I love the word y'all and use it often, but I usually pronounce it "you all" because I feel like I sound stupid saying it in one syllable, with my northern accent.

There is another plural you that I hear sometimes in this area as a substitute for y'all -- it sounds like "yewns" or "yuns."  Two of my coworkers use that word, and they say they just grew up with it.  They are both from rural areas, small towns, maybe an hour apart.  I am guessing it is a "rural southern" thing?



dcheesi

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2376 on: June 08, 2018, 06:33:33 AM »
*snip*
So when I hear it in what I call "singular", it's both singular and plural.  Plural because it water downs the rest of the sentence, but directed to a single person.

For example: "Yall need to watch when you back out" to the driver that just backed into them.  It sounds less aggressive than saying "you."  It makes it sound like it wasn't just that driver's fault, like there's a group at fault.

"Yall need to take out the trash," when I'm the only other one in the room.  Technically, I could have gotten her husband to do it when he got back, but she knew I would do it for her, and this was her way of getting me to do it. 

I guess both cases fit into the article, since the reason it works is because it's plural.


That’s very interesting. I’d say yes, your trash example falls into the kind of thing I’m talking about, sort of spreading out responsibility. With the backing into someone, I’ve having trouble seeing how it could work that way if there was only one person in the car. Both driver and car need to be more careful? Surely not. Easier to see it working that way if there was a passenger, I suppose. Then it could have been sort of the passenger’s fault if he or she was distracting the driver, and the polite y’all avoids assigning blame to either person directly. But a solo driver, not so much. If that was the case, it sounds a lot closer to a singular y’all than anything else I’ve seen.
The driver example is spreading out blame too, it's just ambiguous to who else it is getting spread to.  The group of drivers who back into people, or something like that.  I guess it's a reminder that other people do it too.

Thanks @Rural and @MrMoogle -- This is is a super interesting discussion.  I'm a lifetime northerner who moved to the southern appalachians just a few years ago.  I have really been enjoying hearing and learning the dialects here.  (Dialects plural -- there are at least two very distinct ones, which I have had explained to me in various ways.) 

I think I've also heard y'all used singularly, but I can't remember the exact context.  Now thanks to this discussion I will be focused on it.  I love the word y'all and use it often, but I usually pronounce it "you all" because I feel like I sound stupid saying it in one syllable, with my northern accent.

There is another plural you that I hear sometimes in this area as a substitute for y'all -- it sounds like "yewns" or "yuns."  Two of my coworkers use that word, and they say they just grew up with it.  They are both from rural areas, small towns, maybe an hour apart.  I am guessing it is a "rural southern" thing?
I might be mistaken, but I thought "yuins" or "you-uns" was a actually more of an Appalachian thing, as opposed to the mostly Southern "y'all"?

CowboyAndIndian

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2377 on: June 08, 2018, 07:53:41 AM »
Can we please return the subject to Epic FU Stories!!

Rubic

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2378 on: June 08, 2018, 07:59:14 AM »
I might be mistaken, but I thought "yuins" or "you-uns" was a actually more of an Appalachian thing, as opposed to the mostly Southern "y'all"?

I used to hear "you-uns" (and occassionally "we-uns") in rural Eastern Tennessee, but
it doesn't appear to be part of the regional dialect anymore -- at least in the places I travel.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2379 on: June 08, 2018, 11:08:22 AM »
Can we please return the subject to Epic FU Stories!!
Sure. Do you have any?

markbike528CBX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2380 on: June 08, 2018, 11:28:18 AM »
Can we please return the subject to Epic FU Stories!!
Sure. Do you have any?

Un-Epic to set a really low bar to get the thread on track.
Last day, greeting, handshaking, all the way around, smiles.
Semi-Epic (for me), I went out to lunch and had my first work lunch beer ever.
Then, on my drive home listened to Soup Dragons "I'm Free (12" Extended Mix / Remastered)"

There, low bar set y'all.

Rural

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2381 on: June 08, 2018, 02:18:19 PM »
Can we please return the subject to Epic FU Stories!!
Sure. Do you have any?

Un-Epic to set a really low bar to get the thread on track.
Last day, greeting, handshaking, all the way around, smiles.
Semi-Epic (for me), I went out to lunch and had my first work lunch beer ever.
Then, on my drive home listened to Soup Dragons "I'm Free (12" Extended Mix / Remastered)"

There, low bar set y'all.


Congrats!

Bicycle_B

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2382 on: June 08, 2018, 02:59:43 PM »
A friend of mine volunteered helping the homeless. Finally after years of making meals for them, arranging a warm place to sleep on freezing nights, and then setting up a safe space for them to visit on Sunday afternoons with computers to use in addition to a much-needed bathroom, the various donors raised enough money to pay Mr. Friend a small salary.

FU move #1 - no more retail jobs for Mr. F!

FU move #2 - after a year or two of further diligence, Mr. F decided that he deserved this thing rumors call "vacation." Which in his view meant some thrifty but oh so satisfying travel. He searched locations, searched out cheap tickets, found a match, bought the ticket. Then he announced to volunteers and donors when he was going to be out of town, and organized the volunteers to fill in when he was gone.

That was a couple of years ago.  In addition to annual 2 week journeys abroad, Mr. F soon began arranging shorter trips that he could do in between work days. Yesterday, Mr. F returned from what I think is his seventh FU trip. It seems to have been just as satisfying as the first.

CowboyAndIndian

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2383 on: June 10, 2018, 05:06:56 PM »
Can we please return the subject to Epic FU Stories!!
Sure. Do you have any?

I sure do @Dicey Heres the link from my original posting [where I was the one derailing the thread ;-) ]

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/epic-fu-money-stories/msg1172508/#msg1172508
« Last Edit: June 10, 2018, 05:34:23 PM by CowboyAndIndian »

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2384 on: June 11, 2018, 12:14:21 PM »
Can we please return the subject to Epic FU Stories!!
Sure. Do you have any?

I sure do @Dicey Heres the link from my original posting [where I was the one derailing the thread ;-) ]

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/epic-fu-money-stories/msg1172508/#msg1172508
I remember it well because it was epic. That was a you plural plea for new material. I'm just doing my tiny part to keep one of my favorite threads alive. Got any new stories? <Snirt>

I'm <snirting> because I believe you've been an exemplary mustachian and stayed retired. Anyone else?

GeeVee

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2385 on: June 12, 2018, 04:38:30 AM »
Okay, this is the story of my parents. As a background, my father was a factory worker and my mother was a house wife. They were very frugal as they grew up in relative poverty during the crises years and were teenagers during World War II years in the Netherlands. At that time, I am talking mid 1950s, my dad got paid weekly in cash. The factory owner would hand out envelopes with money at the end of the week.

On one Friday afternoon, dad went to the office to get his money. His boss said to him 'Here is your wage for the week, but I don't think you deserve it'. Dad responded by saying 'If you don't think that I worked hard enough to earn my money, I don't want it'. He wished the boss a good weekend and left the office without the cash. The boss' wife then went to see my mother and tried her to give my dad's wages for the week. My mother refused to take the money by saying that if her husband did not want to take his wages home for whatever reason, there was no possible way that she could accept it.

The continuous refusal caused great panic with the boss and his wife. Whatever they said, mum and dad refused to accept the money, until the boss finally admitted that my father had worked hard that week and had deservedly earned his wage.  Boss had miscalculated and thought they were living paycheck to paycheck, whilst my parents always had money in the bank and did not need the cash. They rocked !!

rab-bit

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2386 on: June 12, 2018, 04:45:57 AM »
Love this story, @GeeVee !

NykkiC

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2387 on: June 12, 2018, 09:00:17 AM »
Okay, this is the story of my parents. As a background, my father was a factory worker and my mother was a house wife. They were very frugal as they grew up in relative poverty during the crises years and were teenagers during World War II years in the Netherlands. At that time, I am talking mid 1950s, my dad got paid weekly in cash. The factory owner would hand out envelopes with money at the end of the week.

On one Friday afternoon, dad went to the office to get his money. His boss said to him 'Here is your wage for the week, but I don't think you deserve it'. Dad responded by saying 'If you don't think that I worked hard enough to earn my money, I don't want it'. He wished the boss a good weekend and left the office without the cash. The boss' wife then went to see my mother and tried her to give my dad's wages for the week. My mother refused to take the money by saying that if her husband did not want to take his wages home for whatever reason, there was no possible way that she could accept it.

The continuous refusal caused great panic with the boss and his wife. Whatever they said, mum and dad refused to accept the money, until the boss finally admitted that my father had worked hard that week and had deservedly earned his wage.  Boss had miscalculated and thought they were living paycheck to paycheck, whilst my parents always had money in the bank and did not need the cash. They rocked !!

 Excellent story!

It never ceases to amaze me the difference between how a not insignificant percent of supervisors/bosses/employers will treat someone when they think that person is powerless to leave and how they behave when they realise that the employee doesn’t have to put up with them.

SwordGuy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2388 on: June 12, 2018, 11:29:02 AM »
Okay, this is the story of my parents. As a background, my father was a factory worker and my mother was a house wife. They were very frugal as they grew up in relative poverty during the crises years and were teenagers during World War II years in the Netherlands. At that time, I am talking mid 1950s, my dad got paid weekly in cash. The factory owner would hand out envelopes with money at the end of the week.

On one Friday afternoon, dad went to the office to get his money. His boss said to him 'Here is your wage for the week, but I don't think you deserve it'. Dad responded by saying 'If you don't think that I worked hard enough to earn my money, I don't want it'. He wished the boss a good weekend and left the office without the cash. The boss' wife then went to see my mother and tried her to give my dad's wages for the week. My mother refused to take the money by saying that if her husband did not want to take his wages home for whatever reason, there was no possible way that she could accept it.

The continuous refusal caused great panic with the boss and his wife. Whatever they said, mum and dad refused to accept the money, until the boss finally admitted that my father had worked hard that week and had deservedly earned his wage.  Boss had miscalculated and thought they were living paycheck to paycheck, whilst my parents always had money in the bank and did not need the cash. They rocked !!

 Excellent story!

It never ceases to amaze me the difference between how a not insignificant percent of supervisors/bosses/employers will treat someone when they think that person is powerless to leave and how they behave when they realise that the employee doesn’t have to put up with them.

Classic bully behavior.   Pick on the weak and defenseless.   Step back from those who are willing and able to fight.

Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2389 on: June 12, 2018, 01:18:58 PM »
Can we please return the subject to Epic FU Stories!!

Maybe this thread should be retitled "Epic FY money stories". F y'all!

Disclaimer: I am not southern and don't expect to know all of the nuances of "y'all". But they do all seem to start with the letter Y.

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2390 on: June 12, 2018, 01:28:20 PM »
Okay, this is the story of my parents. As a background, my father was a factory worker and my mother was a house wife. They were very frugal as they grew up in relative poverty during the crises years and were teenagers during World War II years in the Netherlands. At that time, I am talking mid 1950s, my dad got paid weekly in cash. The factory owner would hand out envelopes with money at the end of the week.

On one Friday afternoon, dad went to the office to get his money. His boss said to him 'Here is your wage for the week, but I don't think you deserve it'. Dad responded by saying 'If you don't think that I worked hard enough to earn my money, I don't want it'. He wished the boss a good weekend and left the office without the cash. The boss' wife then went to see my mother and tried her to give my dad's wages for the week. My mother refused to take the money by saying that if her husband did not want to take his wages home for whatever reason, there was no possible way that she could accept it.

The continuous refusal caused great panic with the boss and his wife. Whatever they said, mum and dad refused to accept the money, until the boss finally admitted that my father had worked hard that week and had deservedly earned his wage.  Boss had miscalculated and thought they were living paycheck to paycheck, whilst my parents always had money in the bank and did not need the cash. They rocked !!

This is now one of my favorite stories.  Refusing money being handed to you is even more epic and FU than taking it and quitting.

MrMoogle

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2391 on: June 12, 2018, 01:38:53 PM »
Can we please return the subject to Epic FU Stories!!

Maybe this thread should be retitled "Epic FY money stories". F y'all!

Disclaimer: I am not southern and don't expect to know all of the nuances of "y'all". But they do all seem to start with the letter Y.
I don't recall hearing "F**k yall" although I'm sure it's been said.  It's usually just "bless your heart" around here.

CowboyAndIndian

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2392 on: June 12, 2018, 01:47:38 PM »
I remember it well because it was epic. That was a you plural plea for new material. I'm just doing my tiny part to keep one of my favorite threads alive. Got any new stories? <Snirt>

I'm <snirting> because I believe you've been an exemplary mustachian and stayed retired. Anyone else?

Thanks @Dicey. Appreciate the accolades from MMM royalty (Royal Walrus;-))!

I do have one more. Here it is.

I had taken a job at a Wall St. Firm and the location was 10 minutes from home. After a few years of commuting an hour and a half to work in NYC, I was thrilled with working close by. This was not a great company, but I was willing to accept it due to the number of hours a day I saved. I even took an employee position (all my other stints in Wall St. was as a consultant at much higher pay rates).

The first year there was wonderful. Very low pressure to do anything and I had to create work to keep busy. At the end of the first year, the division was sold to one of the new upstart companies on Wall St. I acquired my division about 15 years from founding and by then had become one of the largest mutual fund companies.

The new company had a reputation for only hiring from college because they were young, hardworking, low paid and did not have a family to interfere with work. They never hired anyone older or with experience. The oldest folks other than those of the founders and the board were in their mid-30's. The majority were young men (very few women) straight out of school and who worked long hours. The type of company where the Vice-Chairman walked the floors at 7 am and 7 pm to see who was at work. The type of company where you got looks when someone walked out at 5 pm. The type of company who would layoff a long-term, high performing employee due to performance issues in the year where he was undergoing chemotherapy.

So, there I was at the age of 48, working for a boss who was around 32 and who had a major chip on his shoulder. He did his best to try and put down the employees who had been acquired. He was hoping to get rid of older employees and when after a year, there were no resignations, he tried to get things moving by giving bad reviews. That was the only bad review  I received in my whole career.

I then decided then that the short commute and low money was not acceptable for harassment and put out a couple of feelers. I had a new job in a week (done with ever being an employee, this was a consultant gig) and quit in the middle of the project.

The boss was quite pissed, but I had FU money and did not give a damn!

okits

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2393 on: June 12, 2018, 01:51:53 PM »
The boss was quite pissed, but I had FU money and did not give a damn!

YEAAAAAAAH!!  Cheering for you!

It's always amusing when they treat you badly and then are shocked when you don't go out of your way for them. 

Good stories, @CowboyAndIndian !  Thank you for sharing.

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2394 on: June 12, 2018, 01:52:19 PM »
Good job, @CowboyAndIndian!

Here is one from a friend:

Friend was in his 20's and working as a waiter at a big resort.
Resort owner was a trust fund baby with a giant blow problem.
To subsidize his addiction, he dabbled in moving product (think of him as a sort of regional manager).
Low level restaurant staff were recruited to make runs, and my friend got lured into one of these trips. Long story short, he and another waiter ended up working all night as the owner's errand boy for the side business . . . besides the sleep deprivation, he was scared out of his wits the whole time. By the time they made it home, he had vowed this was his first and last side trip.
The next morning, he finally got to bed after driving all night, but he ended up oversleeping and was late for his regular shift waiting tables at the resort.
The owner called him in, b*tched him out, and told him that, to punish him for being late for his shift, he would have to work as a bus boy (for no tips) on the next big holiday instead of waiting tables.

My friend's response?
Literally "Fuck you!"
And then he stormed into the kitchen, pointed to different people saying "Fuck you, and fuck you, and fuck you! I'm outta here, and I'm taking this with me!"
He picked up a bottle of Dom Perignon with a dramatic flourish, and marched right out the door.
He said the head chef was completely calm during his tirade and just waved at him with an "Okay, man, have a good one."
 
The worst part of the story is that his friend, the other waiter, eventually got busted on one of the transportation runs and ended up serving time in prison. He did not rat out anyone . . . resort owner still owns the resort. My friend learned in one night that he has way too much anxiety for a life of crime, and he's been on the straight and narrow ever since.

Sibley

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2395 on: June 12, 2018, 02:35:36 PM »
So, I got a new job last December because my old job was giving me issues. There was a whole mental breakdown in fact, that was interesting (it's probably somewhere in this thread actually). Anyway, new job. Great, except for the part where they lied about all the culture problems (previously REALLY toxic, now just messed up), put me on the most dysfunctional team, and that they didn't actually do training. And apparently I hate the whole industry, like really think that it shouldn't exist in current form.

I gave them a chance. I really, really did. But things aren't getting better, they're actually getting worse. I don't want to put up with it. There are more jobs for me than people like me, so I don't need to put up with it.

I got a verbal offer from another company, more money (not really a concern honestly), much better industry, get great vibes from the team. I GRILLED them on culture, morale, training, etc. Really grilled them, to the extent that they seemed surprised. Apparently it worked though, cause they like me.

So, now I get to figure out how to give notice when I've been in the job for 6 months. That should be interesting. Not doing anything until I have the formal, written offer and paperwork is official. So, probably next week.

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2396 on: June 12, 2018, 02:41:06 PM »
Good for you, Sibley!

ambimammular

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2397 on: June 12, 2018, 05:22:25 PM »
Yup, good for you! Life is too short to be miserable.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2398 on: June 12, 2018, 06:54:16 PM »
Yay for you, Sibley! We would be happy to help you find the very best words when the time comes. I have fresh experience in this arena, as you will see...

Here's a mini-FU-story from a former colleague, who's being pursued by another company. Potential boss is promising the sun, moon and stars to get them on board. It sounded too good to be true, so I checked in with a different former colleague who works for the same company, but different region/boss. He systematically reviewed the list of promises the potential boss had made and gave his educated guess on how likely each one was to actually happen, based on the company's corporate culture. Yeah, my friend was getting smoke blown in a major way. It was damn fun to help proof the very polite "thanks, but no thanks" letter. So happy I could help my friend avoid a potential disaster.

tomsang

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #2399 on: June 12, 2018, 07:06:58 PM »
I don't know about Epic, but I have a story about FU money.

We purchased a high end view lot from our builder to build our high end retirement house (Not very Mustachian, but we love it!!).  The house is in a reasonably small town and we are fairly well connected.  Our builder acquired this lot by partnering with a local attorney with the understanding that the builder would build both houses at the same time to save on cost, etc. Our builder is a well known old school reputable builder within the community.  The two of them went into this partnership for the land only with a back of a napkin agreement, maybe slightly more, but not enough. The agreement was pretty fair in theory. Each of them would own a lot.  Builder would sell his lot, attorney would use builder to build his dream retirement house.  Site development, view easements, sharing of community cost, etc.  I am sure our builder did this type of thing with others with no problem.  If both parties are working together you can save a lot of money on the various components.

This attorney put together a standard purchase agreement between the builder and my wife and I.  We agreed to split his attorney fee with the builder(Attorney is not part of the lot sale transaction). Think of a standard form with parcel numbers and a purchase price.  He sent a bill for $10k.  Builder was pissed, I was shocked.  After asking the attorney how many hours did he spend and what was his billing rate (a little late, but they were going to be our neighbors) he informed me that it was based on value not time.  I said this is a standard form.  We have used this form in the past.  Other attorneys charge $300. I told him that I did not think that this was fair, he said send him a check for what I thought was fair.  I sent him a check for $1k for my half. I like to be more than fair in most transactions.  Up until this period, there was no mention that the attorney had this site development agreement with the builder that was supposed to carry over to our lot.

The attorney reached out on a number of things about splitting costs for something and my reply back to him was that as long as it was fair, that I would be happy to partner up to save money.  He never liked that answer. I did not understand why a person would get so frustrated or upset about fairly splitting costs where we can each save money.

About this time I am informed that there is a site development agreement that was not mentioned by the attorney(who drafted the lot purchase or the builder).  The builder, kept saying that the attorney wants to jointly develop the property.  This made sense to me with sewer lines, lot prep, etc.  I did not realize that there was a formal back of the napkin site development agreement.  The attorney never cashed my check, which I understand now why.               

The attorney made the builder's life miserable as everything financial had to go his way.  It started off with demanding the builder to build the house super cheap or he would not give us our view easements.  The view easements were already laid out on the napkin that the builder and attorney put together when they decided to partner on the land.  He was required to give us the easements.  This delayed us, caused us to incur more legal fees than we should have, etc. 

Throughout the build there were a number of items in the early stage, where we were willing to give more than we should with the understanding that we would be living next door to this person for many years.  The asks kept on getting bigger and more unfair as the project would go.  The attorney could look you in the eye and explain to you with a huge smile on his face how this is the way it was meant to be, etc.

When another one of these $3k differences popped up, I said I was not going to pay it.  My builder could see my point, but the attorney was holding up something else, and my builder was going to split the cost with us.  I said I wasn't going to pay it. My builder was going to eat the cost.  I did not like that as well, as the builder and his subcontractors had been abused by this guy during the entire build.

In front of the attorney's wife.  I told our builder that I was not going to pay this and that I would spend up to $100k to take the attorney to court for the previous expenses, get him disbarred, and incur other costs that that we did not need to spend in our construction that they would be obligated to pay half.

The asks stopped occurring. The wife was very concerned about their reputation, which made sense since they screwed over a ton of subcontractors who were already talking about it throughout the town.  We finished the build.  They are a lovely couple, when money is not involved.

The attorney's house was completed over a year ago.  I am not sure if the builder has received final payment.

I am a big believer in fair.  I always would prefer to pay more than my fair share.  Having FU money, allowed me to say that I am willing to spend a ton of money to make you pay a ton of money if you continue to do things that are not fair.   
« Last Edit: June 12, 2018, 07:11:57 PM by tomsang »