Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 534080 times)

Trudie

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #200 on: June 16, 2014, 05:29:39 PM »
I read this whole thread from start to finish today.  Very inspirational and funny.

I don't have FU money yet, but I think almost everyone fantasizes about being able to tell their crappy managers off.  What strikes me about this forum is how dehumanizing and rude so many managers are.  I think this is due to the "every person for him/herself" ethic that is so pervasive in the work force.  It's the "eat or be eaten" mentality.  I manage a department at a small company.  My peers and I know that if push came to shove our general manager would throw any of us under the bus.  Especially if his future, job, or compensation were threatened.  He views us all as replaceable cogs in a wheel, but I know that he would have difficulty replacing any one of us.  He can, but it would be expensive and involve using consultants.  Since we're publicly-owned and in a small community I don't think shareholders would stand for it.  In my first month on the job he told me that "We don't really have any exceptional employees here."

My dream -- which I will never realize -- is to give him my two week notice at a difficult time (like before the audit) then basically say, "Fuck you fucker!" 

It will never happen, but it makes me laugh.  It is very likely that I will someday have the great joy of handing in my notice and making his life difficult, however.  And it will piss him off all the more because I don't NEED him, and I don't NEED the job.  Quite honestly, taking the high road and just walking out and making it clear that he doesn't have power over me and I don't owe him anything will be infinitely more satisfying.  That's liberation!


« Last Edit: June 16, 2014, 05:31:24 PM by Trudie »

DutchMustachian

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #201 on: June 17, 2014, 05:50:49 AM »
These are all very cool FU stories, love them!

Anyone keeping a "FU resignment" letter under a shortcut on their desktop or hard-copy around at work? Just in case you'll need it and have a FU stash?

dragoncar

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #202 on: June 17, 2014, 09:00:12 AM »
These are all very cool FU stories, love them!

Anyone keeping a "FU resignment" letter under a shortcut on their desktop or hard-copy around at work? Just in case you'll need it and have a FU stash?

Nope, just a bottle of jack and a parachute.

Trudie

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #203 on: June 17, 2014, 10:47:33 AM »
These are all very cool FU stories, love them!

Anyone keeping a "FU resignment" letter under a shortcut on their desktop or hard-copy around at work? Just in case you'll need it and have a FU stash?

Nope, just a bottle of jack and a parachute.

"Just a bottle of jack and a parachute..."  Laughing my ass off at that one.

Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #204 on: June 17, 2014, 11:37:20 AM »
Spartana has a(nother) forum to gloat, errr, inspire!  Whoopieeee!  I've been reading her gloats with envy for many years!
And now that Iris-Lily will be joining me on the darkside and into ER soon you're next!

I feel so left out. I just met you and haven't read your gloats for too long yet, but I would like to receive the ER-prodding encouragement from the Queen of Gloat for my ER in the next few years.

marty998

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #205 on: June 17, 2014, 04:40:43 PM »
What strikes me about this forum is how dehumanizing and rude so many managers are. 

This is the fault of management consultants and the HR industry. Staff are not referred to as people anymore. We are simply "resources" no different than say computers.

It's less of an emotional burden to fire, allocate and restructure resources than it is to do the same with people. Another piece of evidence in favour of the idea you need to be a dispassionate, unfeeling psychopath to be a "good" executive.

DMoney

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #206 on: June 17, 2014, 07:28:01 PM »
Awesome thread. Enjoying reading all the stories.  Raised some good discussions with my SO this evening.

Our take aways: Neither of us are really into burning bridges, especially since we work in rather small fields.  And luckily right now have pretty good bosses.  BUT I do like the idea that FU money gives you more leverage.  For instance, I'm hoping in a year or two my SO can ask to work from home 1-2 days a week in the event we move closer to my new assignment (which would result in a long commute for him).  Reading all these posts has let me know we probably have some leverage in that request.


Chippewa

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #207 on: June 17, 2014, 08:54:36 PM »
It's not epic but I have quit on a whim more-or-less and immediately walked out of the building. It was very satisfying. Nothing soothes the soul like quitting a toxic job.

Love the last sentence. And while I love my career, I can't wait for the day I can make an on-the-whim decision like that without hurting me financially.
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Lifestyle Deflation

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #208 on: June 17, 2014, 09:01:38 PM »
About ~3-4 years ago I was working at a consulting firm and working about 80-90 hours a week. The workload was flat-out ridiculous and I was also on-call 24/7. Every other night I'd get a page at 2 AM that I'd have to respond to. I was about 25 at the time and it was my first "real" job. I'd had it for 3-4 years so I was loyal and didn't rock the boat.

The biggest issue? I made about $50,000. One day I decided to look up what the average consultant in my field was making in my area. It was $100,000. I thought about it for a week or two and decided to ask my boss for a raise to $100,000, printing out the article that said what the average salary was. He made some excuses about "seniority" and other crap and gave me a raise to $55,000.

A month later, still stressed out and feeling like shit, I decided to give my 2 weeks notice without having another job lined up. I had about $10k in savings and I could not take it anymore, I was turning into an alcoholic, stressed out nightmare. After a week of decompression, I tailored my resume and started listening to offers from recruiters.

After 3 job interviews, I got 3 offers and I took a job paying $112k ($150k with bonuses). With a much better work/life balance. I work 45 hours a week today as opposed to 80 then. It was that day I realized how true it is that you have to change companies to move up in pay and in status. You can accept meager raises from one company or get yourself out there and make real money. It's a sad fact of today's corporate climate.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #209 on: June 18, 2014, 12:33:13 PM »
Spartana has a(nother) forum to gloat, errr, inspire!  Whoopieeee!  I've been reading her gloats with envy for many years!
And now that Iris-Lily will be joining me on the darkside and into ER soon you're next!

I feel so left out. I just met you and haven't read your gloats for too long yet, but I would like to receive the ER-prodding encouragement from the Queen of Gloat for my ER in the next few years.
Ha Ha! I'm always happy to oblige :-)! The gloat-joke started at another forum because a guy there wanted to retire and we had a sort of poke-fun-at-each-other thing going where I would post something gloaty about early retirement and he would scream loudly :-)! Of course now he is retired and off doing all sorts of adventures - most involving travellin to various part of the world for months on end bike touring. So every few days he sends me a gloaty e-mail and now I'm the one who's screaming. Paybacks are, as they say, a bee-ach!

Liberty Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #210 on: June 18, 2014, 02:00:39 PM »
No ridiculous FU money story here. Actually I had the opposite experience.

My wife and I have FU money and I took a stretch role where I took on a very large responsibilty. I was underpaid initially because I was still learning and proving myself at the next level. I had a horrible manager that drove me to initially work 70-80 hours / week for the first 6 months of the assignment. He delayed a promotion even though I was outperforming and my workload was heavier than the majority at the next level). It culminated when he literally had the balls to yell at me after my honeymoon that I should have been working DURING my honeymoon stating "I don't understand why you [Investor814] don't care enough". I immediately walked out of the office at 2pm that day and did not come back. I gave serious thought on quiting the next morning just because I could but decided not to. I realized that I could leverage my FU money even better.

I stayed an additional year+ getting great experience while cutting back my hours to ~45hrs/week. It drove him crazy that he couldn't force me to work more hours or make me work on projects that I did not want to work on. However once I hit what the job marketplace considered as an acceptable amount of experience I lined up another job at a 40% pay increase in a different company and left two weeks later. No big exit, no ridiculous story, just the satisfaction that my family was significantly better off.

FU money gave me leverage to completely move past a horrible manager and end up in a much better spot professionally and financially. Without the FU safety net, I would have either quit and not gotten the great resume builder or I would have had to suffer another 1.5-2 years of 70+hrs/wk hell to keep the job. It allowed me to stand toe to toe to my horrible manager for 1.5-2 years and hold my ground.
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arebelspy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #211 on: June 18, 2014, 02:22:54 PM »
No ridiculous FU money story here. Actually I had the opposite experience.

...

I stayed an additional year+ getting great experience while cutting back my hours to ~45hrs/week. It drove him crazy that he couldn't force me to work more hours or make me work on projects that I did not want to work on. However once I hit what the job marketplace considered as an acceptable amount of experience I lined up another job at a 40% pay increase in a different company and left two weeks later. No big exit, no ridiculous story, just the satisfaction that my family was significantly better off.

That's exactly what FU money is - it lets you do what you want at work.  It doesn't mean you have to say FU and have a big quitting story, but it was your cash cushion (FU money) that let you cut back to 45 hrs/week without caring what the boss thought.

Awesome story, thanks for sharing!
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jfer_rose

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #212 on: June 18, 2014, 02:40:30 PM »
Posting for no other reason than wanting to make sure I don't miss future replies.

That said, my coworker just quit her job without having another job lined up. She said she has a year's worth of savings to get her through until she figures out what is next. I ran into her the other day and she said AirBnB rental income might even extend that time. Despite the fact she and I shared a fantastic supervisor and immediate coworkers, the work environment has been extremely stressful for all of us the past year or so. So it's very inspirational to me that she quit without knowing what she wants to do next.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 03:04:10 PM by jfer_rose »

RootofGood

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #213 on: June 18, 2014, 02:55:31 PM »
Not exactly throwing my FU money in their faces, but I got let go very suddenly and decided to call it retirement.  I didn't realize I was retired until the next day when I started crunching the numbers to make sure I'm good.  Then everyone in the office found out I had retired at 33.  That's what happens when you start a blog and facebook exists apparently. :)

 Some (like the 50-60-somethings that will never be able to retire) thought it was all a joke.  Months after I got let go, I bumped into my asshole manager that fired me.  I couldn't wipe the smug smile off my face.  When he asked what I was up to these days I just said "you know, hanging out, having a good time, catching up on some reading, playing with the kids".  Asshole manager got shit canned right after he fired me because he didn't hire the right people to replace me (the jobs I left behind were political candy to be handed out by the governor's office to faithful helpers as it turns out).
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DeepEllumStache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #214 on: June 18, 2014, 03:08:40 PM »
At a company my sister worked for, they randomly announced one morning that there would be drug testing for all employees that afternoon.  More than 1/2 of the guys working at the loading dock left for lunch and never came back.  Not particularly epic but the company probably learned to not schedule across the board drug testing unless they were willing to risk losing entire departments.
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Trudie

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #215 on: June 18, 2014, 03:31:02 PM »
Really, someone could write a book on this topic.  It's that awesome.

Makes me realize, also, how many turd managers there are.

Chloe358

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #216 on: June 18, 2014, 05:00:23 PM »
Longtime listener, first time caller......Or long time lurker, first time poster.

No epic story just yet, but boss asks why I didn't apply for promotional opportunity.  I say well, I don't know if I want the additional hassle, and really, I'm not going to work here forever.  He says he's not either.  I tell him my plan is 5 years and I'm out.  (My boss and I are both 41).  He says well I'd like to be out of here in 5 years but it's just not possible for me.  I say nothing and he says, so it's possible for you?  I respond and said, not sure, it could be 5 1/2, could be 6, maybe 4, we'll see, but somewhere around there.  He then tells me all the reasons why unexpected things are going to happen and how that will blow my plan around, etc etc.  so I nod my head and inside I'm thinking, well if you got yourself on scorched earth you could be gone in the same time I could.   It was a nice smug feeling anyway.

Primm

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #217 on: June 18, 2014, 07:32:50 PM »
Mine isn't my FU money (well, it kind of is) but my husbands. Several years ago he was in a really shitty job, and one closer to home and with far less stress came up. So he applied for and took it.

He is a born organiser - not like me, I might add. When doing training for his new company they recognised this and asked if he wanted to go in as manager for a storefront that needed serious restructure and help, as opposed to the one just down the street that was already functioning well. He said yes. Six months later, once he got the first place up and running nicely and got rid of the dead wood, they "offered" him a transfer to a further away location. He told them he wanted to go back to the original place they'd hired him for. Seriously, it was so close he could have walked home and back for his 1/2 hour lunch break. They told him it was the one hour commute each way place or nothing. So he chose nothing. They countered with "but you have a mortgage! And four teenage children! You can't afford that on your wife's income!"

They were sort of right - we had to cut back the 50% savings rate we were working on for the six months he was out of work (having an awesome time playing with the house and the kids, by the way. And the live-in housekeeper and chef I had - I could get used to that!). But we didn't actually use any of our savings or FU money in the end. And they certainly didn't expect the "no, actually you're wrong, I'm leaving then" response that they got.


Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #218 on: June 18, 2014, 08:18:34 PM »
At a company my sister worked for, they randomly announced one morning that there would be drug testing for all employees that afternoon.  More than 1/2 of the guys working at the loading dock left for lunch and never came back.  Not particularly epic but the company probably learned to not schedule across the board drug testing unless they were willing to risk losing entire departments.

Your story reminds me of a really funny thing that happened at work once. There was a guy who was known for being not-too-bright and everyone suspected dabbled in some illegal drugs. We used to have random drug tests. Well, one morning he received notice that he had to report to the nurse's office for a random drug test that afternoon. A co-worker pulled his leg and said that not only would they do a urine test, but that they would also take a strand of his hair to test. Well, this guy goes out to lunch and comes back with a shaved head. He must have still failed the drug test because he was gone soon thereafter.

Trudie

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #219 on: June 18, 2014, 08:20:21 PM »
Mine isn't my FU money (well, it kind of is) but my husbands. Several years ago he was in a really shitty job, and one closer to home and with far less stress came up. So he applied for and took it.

He is a born organiser - not like me, I might add. When doing training for his new company they recognised this and asked if he wanted to go in as manager for a storefront that needed serious restructure and help, as opposed to the one just down the street that was already functioning well. He said yes. Six months later, once he got the first place up and running nicely and got rid of the dead wood, they "offered" him a transfer to a further away location. He told them he wanted to go back to the original place they'd hired him for. Seriously, it was so close he could have walked home and back for his 1/2 hour lunch break. They told him it was the one hour commute each way place or nothing. So he chose nothing. They countered with "but you have a mortgage! And four teenage children! You can't afford that on your wife's income!"

They were sort of right - we had to cut back the 50% savings rate we were working on for the six months he was out of work (having an awesome time playing with the house and the kids, by the way. And the live-in housekeeper and chef I had - I could get used to that!). But we didn't actually use any of our savings or FU money in the end. And they certainly didn't expect the "no, actually you're wrong, I'm leaving then" response that they got.

Thanks for sharing this.  It's good to hear others' stories and realize that we probably have more choices than we think we do.  Makes me ponder how many decisions - including my own - are made based on fear.

Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #220 on: June 18, 2014, 08:22:21 PM »
They told him it was the one hour commute each way place or nothing. So he chose nothing. They countered with "but you have a mortgage! And four teenage children! You can't afford that on your wife's income!"

Wow! That took a lot of nerve on their part and was very intrusive. It's like they try to use people's weaknesses to manipulate them to act as they want. I think this is exactly why FU money is needed. It should be no one's business what your financial situation is.

Primm

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #221 on: June 18, 2014, 11:40:33 PM »
Yep, we couldn't believe they even went there. Ultimately the 6 months he took off didn't really affect our RE date because he probably avoided a hospital admission for depression, which has happened in the past. So we made less but spent less as well.

SisterX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #222 on: June 19, 2014, 11:39:54 AM »
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #223 on: June 19, 2014, 12:21:08 PM »
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.

EPIC! just scrolled through the blog and that is some priceless experience.. good for him!

Wolf_Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #224 on: June 19, 2014, 01:46:16 PM »
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.

Ok, this is awesome! I've been reading his blog, not very far yet, but I'm jealous. Is he still single? LOL

jordanread

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #225 on: June 19, 2014, 04:11:15 PM »
I was originally going to just comment because I keep missing the updates, but realized something kind of cool.

I've never (until recently) had FU money, but I've always had a kind of life rule where "If I don't like what I'm doing, I do something else or go somewhere else).
One job I had when I was 17 (fast food). The money didn't bug me, but it was really soul crushing. Decided I was done. Turned in my two weeks at the beginning of the shift. The manager was extremely surprised because apparently nobody every did that while making minimum wage. Got put on shitty duty, and I realized that this is how the next two weeks were going to be. Walked up to her and told her I made a mistake. She got all smug and said I could stay. I looked at her, and said "Oh no. I just meant that even though that letter said two week notice, it was more like a two minute warning..." I know I stole that from somewhere, but it was still fun.
Had another job the next day.
Another time I worked as the lead baker. Fun work, biked in, and was on my own until about 6am when everyone else showed up. After some changes in management, they screwed up my check (by shorting me about 50%). I asked the new management what I needed to do to get it fixed, and they said deal with it. As I walked out, I accidentally had my knife open, and cut a 50lb bag of flour open...in front of a giant fan...that was on.

Those were fun, but not a huge deal. However, my most recent position was a bit more serious. I worked at a really cool cable company. Worked my way into a junior application dev role, and slowly worked my way up until I was a full developer with 6 years of professional experience. Lot's of reorganization happened, and the company turned into something like a shinier version of comcast...not pleasant. My boss left, followed shortly thereafter by the rest of my department. New boss came in, and while he was a good politician, not that great at anything else...like managing, or technology, or being smart. I knew I should leave, but was scared to death. I was making like $45K/year!!! I'd be stupid to give that up!! At this time, I also had just found MMM and read every article, plus I had my old boss cheering me on, saying that I was worth a lot more than what I was getting. Thought about looking, so I brushed off the resume, and got the sense of what my skill set was actually worth. The boss called me in, and said (since I was the only one left) that I was invaluable, and they would like to offer me a substantial raise...to $50K.
I realized that invaluable wasn't the right word, and that I wasn't valued at all. I immediately turned in my two weeks notice. 3 days later I got an offer doing work that was really fun, for a substantially larger amount.

So not necessarily an FU money story, but more of an anecdote about how much fear can cost you. You don't even need FU money per se to do the math and know that you'll be okay. FIRE date is within 6 years now, since I almost completely avoided the lifestyle inflation aspect of getting more money.

I'll never forget the day I shot myself in the face with MMM's optimism gun, and got free from that fear.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2014, 05:24:06 PM by jordanread »
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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #226 on: June 19, 2014, 04:40:36 PM »
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.

Ok, this is awesome! I've been reading his blog, not very far yet, but I'm jealous. Is he still single? LOL

Actually, yes he is!  Broke up with another girlfriend a few months ago, albeit on friendlier terms.  And, he lives in Seattle!  I've sometimes thought about trying to set him up with a Seattle Mustachian....

arebelspy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #227 on: June 19, 2014, 05:17:22 PM »
I was originally going to just comment because I keep missing the updates, but realized something kind of cool.

I've never (until recently) had FU money, but I've always had a kind of life rule where "If I don't like what I'm doing, I do something else or go somewhere else).
One job I had when I was 17 (fast food). The money didn't bug me, but it was really soul crushing. Decided I was done. Turned in my two weeks at the beginning of the shift. The manager was extremely surprised because apparently nobody every did that while making minimum wage. Got put on shitty duty, and I realized that this is how the next two weeks were going to be. Walked up to her and told her I made a mistake. She got all smug and said I could stay. I looked at her, and said "Oh no. I just meant that even though that letter said two week notice, it was more like a two minute warning..." I know I stole that from somewhere, but it was still fun.
Had another job the next day.
Another time I worked as the lead baker. Fun work, biked in, and was on my own until about 6am when everyone else showed up. After some changes in management, they screwed up my check (by shorting me about 50%). I asked the new management what I needed to do to get it fixed, and they said deal with it. As I walked out, I accidentally had my knife open, and cut a 50lb bag of flour open...in front of a giant fan...that was on.

Those were fun, but not a huge deal. However, my most recent position was a bit more serious. I worked at a really cool cable company. Worked my way into a junior application dev role, and slowly worked my way up until I was a full developer with 6 years of professional experience. Lot's of reorganization happened, and the company turned into something like a shinier version of comcast...not pleasant. My boss left, followed shortly thereafter by the rest of my department. New boss came in, and while he was a good politician, not that great at anything else...like managing, or technology, or being smart. I new I should leave, but was scared to death. I was making like $45K/year!!! I'd be stupid to give that up!! At this time, I also had just found MMM and read every article, plus I had my old boss cheering me on, saying that I was worth a lot more than what I was getting. Thought about looking, so I brushed off the resume, and got the sense of what my skill set was actually worth. The boss called me in, and said (since I was the only one left) that I was invaluable, and they would like to offer me a substantial raise...to $50K.
I realized that invaluable wasn't the right word, and that I wasn't valued at all. I immediately turned in my two weeks notice. 3 days later I got an offer doing work that was really fun, for a substantially larger amount.

So not necessarily an FU money story, but more of an anecdote about how much fear can cost you. You don't even need FU money per se to do the math and know that you'll be okay. FIRE date is within 6 years now, since I almost completely avoided the lifestyle inflation aspect of getting more money.

I'll never forget the day I shot myself in the face with MMM's optimism gun, and got free from that fear.

Love it!  Those first two are fun, but that third one is life changing. Awesome!
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Spartana

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #228 on: June 19, 2014, 05:24:33 PM »
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

zataks

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #229 on: June 19, 2014, 05:55:23 PM »
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

"I'd prefer not to," may be a bit more apt.  =)

arebelspy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #230 on: June 19, 2014, 06:32:49 PM »
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

Nice.  It may have hurt your "reviews" or ability to get a glowing recommendation, but if you're not worried about that and are confident in your ability to find a job (which you should be - too many people are scared, rather than confident), then that's the perfect way to handle that.

"I was hired under X, I will continue, if you don't like it, fire me."  Love it. :D
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with a kid.
If you want to know more about me, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (occasionally) blog at AdventuringAlong.com.
You can also read my forum "Journal."

Wolf_Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #231 on: June 19, 2014, 09:46:13 PM »
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.

Ok, this is awesome! I've been reading his blog, not very far yet, but I'm jealous. Is he still single? LOL

Actually, yes he is!  Broke up with another girlfriend a few months ago, albeit on friendlier terms.  And, he lives in Seattle!  I've sometimes thought about trying to set him up with a Seattle Mustachian....

I've been reading his blog. Up through his arrival in London. Sounds like an awesome trip! I've dreamed of doing something smaller down the Pacific coast (N. Cali down the coast). I looked at a tour group that did the ride, but even in my pre-mmm days I thought the price was too steep.

I need to hook up with some other bicyclists in the city. my ex was so inactive, and we did so few things together anyway, that I didn't want to add another activity that I did alone. But now that I'm single, I'd love to join a cycling group up here! In Salt Lake I rode with a group called the Sugarhouse Cyclists. We were just a group of people that would go out on group rides all over the city. Loved it!

If you think he'd be up for it, I'd love to meet, even if its just to discuss cycling in the city!

Spartana

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #232 on: June 20, 2014, 12:09:07 AM »
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

Nice.  It may have hurt your "reviews" or ability to get a glowing recommendation, but if you're not worried about that and are confident in your ability to find a job (which you should be - too many people are scared, rather than confident), then that's the perfect way to handle that.

"I was hired under X, I will continue, if you don't like it, fire me."  Love it. :D
Just glad I had keys and the security code to get in there or I would have had to start later like everyone else :-)!

Insanity

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #233 on: June 20, 2014, 04:54:49 AM »
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.

Ok, this is awesome! I've been reading his blog, not very far yet, but I'm jealous. Is he still single? LOL

Actually, yes he is!  Broke up with another girlfriend a few months ago, albeit on friendlier terms.  And, he lives in Seattle!  I've sometimes thought about trying to set him up with a Seattle Mustachian....

I've been reading his blog. Up through his arrival in London. Sounds like an awesome trip! I've dreamed of doing something smaller down the Pacific coast (N. Cali down the coast). I looked at a tour group that did the ride, but even in my pre-mmm days I thought the price was too steep.

I need to hook up with some other bicyclists in the city. my ex was so inactive, and we did so few things together anyway, that I didn't want to add another activity that I did alone. But now that I'm single, I'd love to join a cycling group up here! In Salt Lake I rode with a group called the Sugarhouse Cyclists. We were just a group of people that would go out on group rides all over the city. Loved it!

If you think he'd be up for it, I'd love to meet, even if its just to discuss cycling in the city!

A friend of mine, isn't really an FU story because he would go back to where he worked, just took 3 months off (he is a contractor so essentially he terminated the contract) to bike cross country.  He lives in Philly, but is blogging about it.  I'm jealous.  Number 1, I wish I had the health and ability to do it.  Number 2, I wish I had the time.  I don't want to be away from my kids that long.  My wife and the would have to follow by car or something. My wife doesn't like to ride.

If you ever have the time, do it.  The stories about the ride are amazing.  The scenery (he's riding through the blue ridge mountains, the colorado mountains).  4300 miles in all.

oldtoyota

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #234 on: June 20, 2014, 05:58:50 AM »

I do know of an EPIC quitting story but I got screwed in the process. I bought a motorcycle from a guy who said the title was in his truck and he would get it for me that night. I stupidly believed him and he never gave me the title. He wouldn't answer his phone when I called. He worked at Walmart and one time I spoofed the caller ID so it looked like Walmart was calling. He answered but gave more excuses. A few months later he went into Walmart and shot his boss in the chest with a 44 Mag (he lived) and holed up in the bathroom until cops came. I had to part that bike out on ebay.

You got screwed? What about the guy who got shot? He had it a bit worse than you.

What if the guy had never owned the bike and you were selling stolen parts?


Basenji

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #235 on: June 20, 2014, 06:02:53 AM »
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

"I'd prefer not to,"may be a bit more apt.  =)
Oh hell yeah Bartleby!

oldtoyota

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #236 on: June 20, 2014, 06:10:45 AM »


What kind of mumbo jumbo is that?

In what country do you get un/employment insurance benefits if you quit?  Neither the US nor Canada offers this as far as I'm aware and there are sound policy reasons for not doing so.  The exception is if you can demonstrate you were constructively dismissed.

Now, as far as "asshole managers", in my experience sometimes asshole managers are really fine managers with an asshole employee. It is hard to know without hearing the other side.

In the case where a manager is really unreasonably difficult/harassing they will contravene employment standards and/or human rights protections and you can quit and claim constructive dismissal.  There are often complaints processes that can be accessed in these circumstances as well.

Just meaning to say that since is difficult to quit, employer could use that to enforce a certain stress/abuse because they know that the people CAN'T quit, since they must work to survive paycheck to paycheck.
btw, in most countries in europe you get a unemployment subsidy (if you have worked long enough to have right for) the moment you apply for it: it doesn't matter why you are jobless (even if you quit), just that you are jobless. But many people seek a new job immediately, since the longest you stay on subsidy, the harder it is to find a job since employer will find strange that you are getting the subsidy for so long, and prefer someone else.


I would like to move into the Dream World Totoro describes. I've never seen a company give a lick about a bad boss. If a boss has half a brain, they are not going to put anything bad in writing and they can easily get around being caught in the act. Even in a case when a boss is caught in the act--banging on the office door of an employee while yelling, for instance--I've seen nothing done.






dude

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #237 on: June 20, 2014, 06:31:22 AM »
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

At the risk of being labeled one of those lazy, un-fireable government employees (I'm not), I do have to say that the mere presence in the government workforce of numerous employees who should have been fired years ago but haven't been, kinda gives me a sense of security akin to FU money security.  I mean, so long as I don't do drugs and don't commit any serious crimes, it's pretty fucking hard to get fired here.  But on the flip-side, those golden handcuffs (i.e., the generous LEO pension) keep me here no matter how dull or uninspiring my job is (and it is at times just that), so not having the freedom to just walk away on a whim can be a little stifling at times too.  But I can see the light at the end of the tunnel (and it ain't an oncoming train) just less than 5 years away . . .

Judith681

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #238 on: June 20, 2014, 10:24:39 AM »
Great to hear these stories. I myself do not have too much FU money but enough to last 6 months maybe.

HawkeyeNFO

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #239 on: June 20, 2014, 11:14:19 AM »
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

At the risk of being labeled one of those lazy, un-fireable government employees (I'm not), I do have to say that the mere presence in the government workforce of numerous employees who should have been fired years ago but haven't been, kinda gives me a sense of security akin to FU money security.  I mean, so long as I don't do drugs and don't commit any serious crimes, it's pretty fucking hard to get fired here.  But on the flip-side, those golden handcuffs (i.e., the generous LEO pension) keep me here no matter how dull or uninspiring my job is (and it is at times just that), so not having the freedom to just walk away on a whim can be a little stifling at times too.  But I can see the light at the end of the tunnel (and it ain't an oncoming train) just less than 5 years away . . .
SO FUCKING TRUE!!!!  I'm at the Pentagon, and have run out of fingers counting the people who don't even show up to work but continue to geta a full paycheck.  One guy disappearred for over 3 months, and showed up this past Christmas Eve smelling like a distillery.  Sure, they sent him to rehab twice since then, but he is still getting paid.  Another lady had the NCIS investigating here whereabouts, because she never showed up to work over about a 6 month period.  And this doesn't even cover the people who come to work and do nothing.  As for me, I try my best to get the job done, but my office breeds an unhealthy work ethic because all the BS that is tolerated, and the fact that quality work is rewarded with more work, while the slackers earn the same as everyone else.

Spartana

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #240 on: June 20, 2014, 01:03:58 PM »
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

At the risk of being labeled one of those lazy, un-fireable government employees (I'm not), I do have to say that the mere presence in the government workforce of numerous employees who should have been fired years ago but haven't been, kinda gives me a sense of security akin to FU money security.  I mean, so long as I don't do drugs and don't commit any serious crimes, it's pretty fucking hard to get fired here.  But on the flip-side, those golden handcuffs (i.e., the generous LEO pension) keep me here no matter how dull or uninspiring my job is (and it is at times just that), so not having the freedom to just walk away on a whim can be a little stifling at times too.  But I can see the light at the end of the tunnel (and it ain't an oncoming train) just less than 5 years away . . .
Well quitting was a hard decision to make as a govmint employee. Having to give up those long grueling lunch hours and donut and nap breaks was tough :-)! But seriously, yes it was a tough choice knowing that if I just stayed an extra 8 years until I was 50 I'd have a much bigger pension and if I stayed an additional 5 years beyond that I'd have low cost medical, but I was done so flew the coop. Best decision I made I think.  Now I can nap and eat donuts when ever I want, and take even longer lunches then ever before :-)!

Stache In Training

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #241 on: June 20, 2014, 11:16:01 PM »
So I have an FU Money story that is about to happen.  I won't give too many details, just in case someone from my work reads this forum (though I doubt it).  So I'll provide more details when I have given my notice.

So I currently work at a very anti-mustachian job/company, with a gravely micro-manager owner.  Luckily my immediate supervisor is better, but he is micro-managed a ton, so it trickles down.  Within 2 weeks, I'm going to be giving my two-week notice, with no job lined up (more on what I'll be doing later). 

Everyone who works there is very money oriented; as am I, being a mustachian, although I'm sure you can imagine it's the opposite, because they want more money in order to spend more, as opposed to I am money oriented to achieve FIRE.  So I can't wait to see if I get the, "Wait, you're lying.  Where are you headed?"  Or "How will you make ends meet?"  They have no idea I have FU Money, and don't actually need the job.

So while it's not going to be as awesome as a story as "you want me to do what?! nah, I quit."  It'll still be sweet to flaunt it!  And it probably wouldn't be happening without MMM and me building up some FU money!

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #242 on: June 21, 2014, 12:25:41 AM »
Mine isn't a quitting story, but I once took a 1 month unpaid medical leave, partially to see if my job was the main cause of my depression, and weigh my options.  I got a doctor's note, and the owners were reasonably decent about it (still paid my healthcare while I was gone).  When I returned after my month off, one of my bitchy co-workers asked me how I could afford to take a month off work, without pay, since we had just bought a house the year before, and my husband was in school full time.  I told her I had ~$138,000 in the bank, and she didn't even know what to say, other than 'oh'. 

I left that place a few months later, to become self employed.  The straw that broke this camel's back, was when I was told that I would be in charge of cleaning the client kitchen, in an e-mail, CCed to the rest of the company, from one of the owners.  I was a professional scientist, and the receptionist had always been responsible for the kitchen duties.  The reason I was being assigned them, was as a weird punishment for an ill-timed joke to one of the owners, during lunch, in the staff kitchen. 

I asked my manger if he had a few minutes, and I told him that I wouldn't be back in the new year (it was December 3rd or so).  He understood, and wished me well.  I consulted with a lawyer about filing a constructive dismissal lawsuit against them, but decided that it wasn't worth my time or energy (they had been sued before, and were very leery of it happening again).  I worked a few more days, before they decided to escort me out, and pay me for the month.  And since the Christmas gifts were already ordered, I also got a nice e-reader as a parting gift, along with the smug satisfaction of knowing that I won't ever have to work for someone like that again (if I ever decide to end my self-employment stint).
A small business-owning SWAMI working herself towards FI.

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #243 on: June 21, 2014, 03:51:29 PM »
^As a female scientist being told to clean the kitchen, unless male colleagues were also being assigned kitchen duty, you had a sexual harassment case to file, not just a constructive dismissal case.  That aside, I'm glad things are working out for you.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #244 on: June 21, 2014, 04:05:49 PM »
It has been 4 years, and I am glad everyday that I left when I did.

Thank you for your kind words, I had never thought of it like that.
A small business-owning SWAMI working herself towards FI.

Latwell

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #245 on: June 21, 2014, 06:19:55 PM »
Not an FU money story but recently put my manager in his place.

I work for a small firm (10 employees during the summer, 7 in the winter). The owner is in his very late 60s. Many people who work for the firm (or have left recently) are concerned about my bossss age. My coworkers are afraid of "the unknown". My senior coworker and my manager have work for my boss forever.

My boss hasn't made any clear indications as to when he plans on retiring and/or what will happen to the business afterwards. My manager has made it clear that he does not want to take over the business. At this time, he is the only qualified person to take it over.  Every so often my manager tries to talk about my boss doing succession planning. This is followed by my boss telling my manager, "if you are concerned about the business, write me a check and it is yours". That shuts my manager up for a bit.

My manager has become increasingly annoying about the topic. He will come in my office and spend an hour telling me that we should have a meeting with my boss. He thinks I should be the one to voice the concerns because he thinks my boss "likes me the best" and if my manager mentions anything it just turns into an argument.

I tried to tell my manager that I didn't feel comfortable to have a meeting and be the one to put things on the table when my manager and senior worker have worked for my boss 20 years compared to my 3 years.

A month ago, my manager tried to talk to me again about the topic. I stopped him and pointed out that I will not be the person to discuss the topic with my boss. I explained that the only people who need to be concerned are the workers who feel as if they do not have other options. I went on to tell him that I am more than capable of finding a new employer and it won't take long. I have options. If he doesn't have options, he should start working towards creating options.

He hasn't brought it up since, even now that my boss is getting a surgery.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #246 on: June 22, 2014, 08:32:33 AM »
Not an FU money story but recently put my manager in his place.

I work for a small firm (10 employees during the summer, 7 in the winter). The owner is in his very late 60s. Many people who work for the firm (or have left recently) are concerned about my bossss age. My coworkers are afraid of "the unknown". My senior coworker and my manager have work for my boss forever.

My boss hasn't made any clear indications as to when he plans on retiring and/or what will happen to the business afterwards. My manager has made it clear that he does not want to take over the business. At this time, he is the only qualified person to take it over.  Every so often my manager tries to talk about my boss doing succession planning. This is followed by my boss telling my manager, "if you are concerned about the business, write me a check and it is yours". That shuts my manager up for a bit.

My manager has become increasingly annoying about the topic. He will come in my office and spend an hour telling me that we should have a meeting with my boss. He thinks I should be the one to voice the concerns because he thinks my boss "likes me the best" and if my manager mentions anything it just turns into an argument.

I tried to tell my manager that I didn't feel comfortable to have a meeting and be the one to put things on the table when my manager and senior worker have worked for my boss 20 years compared to my 3 years.

A month ago, my manager tried to talk to me again about the topic. I stopped him and pointed out that I will not be the person to discuss the topic with my boss. I explained that the only people who need to be concerned are the workers who feel as if they do not have other options. I went on to tell him that I am more than capable of finding a new employer and it won't take long. I have options. If he doesn't have options, he should start working towards creating options.

He hasn't brought it up since, even now that my boss is getting a surgery.

Nice way to put it!

I currently work for a small business owned by two older men - one is around 70 something, the other is Japanese and honestly I can't tell how old he is (I know he is over 50 because we had a bday party for him last week, but that is the most I know). One owner had a stroke last October. He has done really well in recovery, but who knows if they have any succession plans in place.

However, as you said above, I'm not too worried. I'm employable - everyone needs accountants/CPAs - and I know if anything does happen I can easily take my time to find another job.

Latwell

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #247 on: June 22, 2014, 02:25:20 PM »
Not an FU money story but recently put my manager in his place.

I work for a small firm (10 employees during the summer, 7 in the winter). The owner is in his very late 60s. Many people who work for the firm (or have left recently) are concerned about my bossss age. My coworkers are afraid of "the unknown". My senior coworker and my manager have work for my boss forever.

My boss hasn't made any clear indications as to when he plans on retiring and/or what will happen to the business afterwards. My manager has made it clear that he does not want to take over the business. At this time, he is the only qualified person to take it over.  Every so often my manager tries to talk about my boss doing succession planning. This is followed by my boss telling my manager, "if you are concerned about the business, write me a check and it is yours". That shuts my manager up for a bit.

My manager has become increasingly annoying about the topic. He will come in my office and spend an hour telling me that we should have a meeting with my boss. He thinks I should be the one to voice the concerns because he thinks my boss "likes me the best" and if my manager mentions anything it just turns into an argument.

I tried to tell my manager that I didn't feel comfortable to have a meeting and be the one to put things on the table when my manager and senior worker have worked for my boss 20 years compared to my 3 years.

A month ago, my manager tried to talk to me again about the topic. I stopped him and pointed out that I will not be the person to discuss the topic with my boss. I explained that the only people who need to be concerned are the workers who feel as if they do not have other options. I went on to tell him that I am more than capable of finding a new employer and it won't take long. I have options. If he doesn't have options, he should start working towards creating options.

He hasn't brought it up since, even now that my boss is getting a surgery.

Nice way to put it!

I currently work for a small business owned by two older men - one is around 70 something, the other is Japanese and honestly I can't tell how old he is (I know he is over 50 because we had a bday party for him last week, but that is the most I know). One owner had a stroke last October. He has done really well in recovery, but who knows if they have any succession plans in place.

However, as you said above, I'm not too worried. I'm employable - everyone needs accountants/CPAs - and I know if anything does happen I can easily take my time to find another job.

That is exactly what I'm working on, my CPA. And because I work in audit, I can always work for one of my clients or in my client's field if needed (which is always tempting because my salary would double but their job isn't what I want to do just yet).

mercenary

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #248 on: June 23, 2014, 04:53:34 AM »
So this story kinda comes out of a financial disaster.  Some folks here might not agree with what happend and the way I handled the situation but here goes....

So at the beginning of 2008, my wife and I were in financial ruin.  I had just lost my high paying mill job, had large amounts of consumer credit debt, and no savings to speak of. Bankruptcy was inevitable at this time and by May we had declared insolvency.  I'm a certified Millwright but work in that field was pretty limited at the time. I also hold a class 1 (CDL) drivers license.  I found a job driving a truck in Alberta's oil patch by the end of July of 2008.

Right off the hop I knew that I was going to have problems working here.  Under the rules of bankrupty you could only earn so much money.  If you made over a certain amount, you had to pay half of that towards your creditors.  I began to save that other half in earnest.

So this company....which is a big player in Alberta's oil patch...played fast and loose with the rules of trucking and the rules of safety...IMO.  It was common for drivers to work all day in the shop and then get dispatched out to a 10-15-20 hour job right at the end of the work day.  Under the trucking rules, you needed to declare all shop time as hours worked, not driving....which counted towards your overall hours worked in a day.  These clowns told all of us not to mark in those hours worked but to instead mark them as time off.  That's a big no no in trucking but no one seemed to care.  They also had non qualified workers performing brake jobs, bearing changes and all sorts of other repairs that required a certified tradesperson to perform.

So I kinda just kept my head down and mouth shut until one particular day when I was asked to go into a confined space.  There are all sorts of safety rules that dictate what sorts of steps you need to perform in order to ensure safety for the workers entering the confined space.  I won't go into them here....but I am well versed in what they are from my years spent working in mills.  Anyway...I refused to do the job.  My boss just explodes in anger in front of me and a couple other guys.  He gets really mad and basically accuses me of being a lazy ass who is trying to skip out on the work.  I told him that I had lots of experience in this area and I'd be happy to go over the proper rules with him but he was having none of it.  He took me off the job and told me to go home.  So I did.  Head down....mouth shut.

Skip forward to the middle of winter.  Some folks here might know that in order to travel down many industrial roads in this neck of the woods you need to chain up the drive wheels on the trucks for traction.  These chains are heavy and awkward to deal with.  Well...long story short I end up tweaking a muscle in my back which takes me out of commission for quite a while.  My boss tells me to take a few days off and see how I feel then.  Screw that. I'm off to the doctor.  The doctor does his thing and he wants me to take a month off work.  I show up back at work with all the doctor's notes and stuff and my boss basically says they don't put much stock in what the doctor's say and he wants me back in the truck the next day.  Again screw that.  Doctors orders.  I take a month off.  My back is still pretty sore by the end of the month so I head back to the doctor and he wants me on light duty for another month.  I head back out to work and MY boss is out for lunch.  HIS boss asks me "What are you doing here?"  I told him that I'm back to work light duty for a month.  He says to me that my boss told him that I quit.  I said I definitely didn't quit and here's all my medical records as proof.  My boss gets back to work and gets reamed out...but not fired over this incident.  It's at this point I know my days are numbered.

So I do a month of light duty work in the shop.  Basic clean up and some light filing.  All in all...just busy work while I'm healing up.  I go back to the doc and get a clean bill of health and am cleared to go back driving the truck.....which I do the next day.  By now I've worked here for 10 months.  In that time I've saved up around 10 grand in cash.  It was tough...but the only way I could do it was because of our bankruptcy.  Remember....I could have saved up 20K but half of that money went to my creditors...which I really didn't mind...as it was my fault I got so far in debt with no emergency funds.  Anyway...I've worked for these guys for 10 rough months and was sticking it out with no intentions of quitting or anything like that.  One day after a job I'm back at the shop running my truck through the truck wash.  My boss comes out and tells me he needs to see me in his office.  Off I go and when I get to his office....he's not there....but there is a nice, shiny layoff notice with my name on it sitting on his desk.  I sit back with a big grin on my face.  Sure I wasn't going to quit....but I didn't like working there anyway.  Besides...with the layoff I qualified for unemployment benefits right away.  So he comes in to the office with the HR person and explains that times are slow and they have to let some guys go.  I'm happy and it shows.  Due to the short notice, they owe me a severance AND all my holiday pay.  I walked out of that office with 10k in the bank, a check for 3500 dollars in holiday pay and severance and a big happy smile on my face.  Sure...some of that money had to go to my creditors due to the bankruptcy but with that 10k nest egg, severance, and unemployment benefits I was able to take my sweet time finding a mcuh better job....with better management :)

All in all...it worked out OK.

warfreak2

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #249 on: June 23, 2014, 08:46:40 AM »
Under the trucking rules, you needed to declare all shop time as hours worked, not driving....which counted towards your overall hours worked in a day.  These clowns told all of us not to mark in those hours worked but to instead mark them as time off.  That's a big no no in trucking but no one seemed to care.  They also had non qualified workers performing brake jobs, bearing changes and all sorts of other repairs that required a certified tradesperson to perform.

So I kinda just kept my head down and mouth shut until one particular day when I was asked to go into a confined space.  There are all sorts of safety rules that dictate what sorts of steps you need to perform in order to ensure safety for the workers entering the confined space.  I won't go into them here....but I am well versed in what they are from my years spent working in mills.  Anyway...I refused to do the job.  My boss just explodes in anger in front of me and a couple other guys.  He gets really mad and basically accuses me of being a lazy ass who is trying to skip out on the work.  I told him that I had lots of experience in this area and I'd be happy to go over the proper rules with him but he was having none of it.
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