Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 1715377 times)

Trifele

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1650 on: May 08, 2017, 05:04:53 PM »
-- There are some new federal minimum salaries for many exempt employees (~$47k) and some employers don't know about it, or just aren't complying

Wait, so if you make less than ~$47k/year, your employer probably needs to make you hourly and pay overtime?

Oops.  Spoke too soon. A federal lawsuit has it on hold right now.  www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/flsa-overtime-rule-resources.aspx

And yes -- you've got it.  For many jobs (but not sales or computer programmers), under this new regulation if you earn less than $47k then the employer has to pay you OT.  So if/when this goes through the employer has to choose between raising salaries to that level or paying OT. 

My employer had gone ahead and made the changes (gave some people raises and reclassified others as hourly) before the lawsuit  hit.   Interesting!  I suppose with the new administration anything is possible now. The new rules could go through as is, die, or be modified. 

JLee

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1651 on: May 08, 2017, 05:41:08 PM »
Good on you COEE!  (And -- if you feel like it -- you could let the DOL know what they are up to . . . )

Exactly what I was thinking. I'd have been tempted to accept their offer and immediately report to the DOL. What's the worst they can do, fire you...again and get completely screwed by the DOL?

Why do you think I agonized about what whether or not to take the contract work? 

Also, Let's just say I don't think the fat lady has finished singing.

:)

One thing about DOL audits -- they come in to look at one thing, and often end up seeing other issues too.  Some common ones: 

--  Misclassifying employees as salaried/exempt from overtime (when really they are hourly/non-exempt).  The definitions are NOT straightforward/intuitive, and this type of misclassification happens all the time. 

--  Failure to pay overtime to people who were due it.  Say the employer had someone misclassified as exempt for years, but the employee was consistently working over 40 hours a week.  The DOL goes back and makes the employer fork over the time-and-a-half for the whole time the employee was misclassified (up to two or three years), plus fines

-- There are some new federal minimum salaries for many exempt employees (~$47k) and some employers don't know about it, or just aren't complying

My former employer is getting sued right now for this exact situation.

ducky19

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1652 on: May 11, 2017, 11:19:03 AM »
Having a really shitty day at work right now... would love to hear some more stories if anyone has one!

MNBen

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1653 on: May 11, 2017, 12:28:31 PM »
Having a really shitty day at work right now... would love to hear some more stories if anyone has one!

Only because you need it, as I don't think it's super EPIC, but I do like telling it....

Background:  I had a job where I could not stand the boss and it only peaked at the end and I did end up walking out one day and taking the entire summer off before looking for a new job.  I actually didn't know what FU money was, or even FIRE, but knew I was 'different' than the rest and had no issues taking a summer off working on fixing up a home I had just purchased in bankruptcy to start renting.

Also he was actually pretty easy to work around because he was spineless and mostly left me alone, but he was so incompetent it was still tough when he'd get an idea in his head and insist he was right.  And I loved the team I had trained myself and they were some of my favorite workers of any job.   It was also an IT job, I was their lead, and we helped support a warehouse, and the warehouse staff was absolutely amazing!  So I really enjoyed the job, except for the boss.

Story:  So many (too many) years before I eventually walked out, and I was pretty much a one-man team, there was a day when my boss stopped by and told me he was buying me a company cell phone to be carried in case an emergency came up after hours.   This was probably around 2005 when most people had cells phones, but I was a late adapter as I truly didn't need one.

Because I knew that the product I supported was pretty stable and I should seldom need a phone call, I told him I'd agree to carry a cell phone as long as he drafted up rules for when they could call me and what had to wait until the next day.  He agreed.

A few weeks later a cell phone box showed up at my desk.  I tossed it in a drawer and left it there. 

About six months later he stops by and mentions accounting is checking the cell phone bills and there has been zero activity on this number and he shows me the bill with what I guess is my cell's phone number.   

I reach down and pull out the box still sitting in my drawer and ask him if this is that phone.  He asks me why I'm not using it.  I told him I said I'd use it when he drafted up rules for when they could and couldn't call me. 

Needless to say there were rules drafted later that day, but still it made for a great story that still makes me laugh today!

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1654 on: May 11, 2017, 01:09:00 PM »
Quote
About six months later he stops by and mentions accounting is checking the cell phone bills and there has been zero activity on this number and he shows me the bill with what I guess is my cell's phone number.   

I reach down and pull out the box still sitting in my drawer and ask him if this is that phone.  He asks me why I'm not using it.  I told him I said I'd use it when he drafted up rules for when they could and couldn't call me. 

Needless to say there were rules drafted later that day, but still it made for a great story that still makes me laugh today!
  That's a brilliant story!  Thanks for sharing!

Guesl982374

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1655 on: May 11, 2017, 01:34:54 PM »
Having a really shitty day at work right now... would love to hear some more stories if anyone has one!

I'll give you one too. This one might even help you out...

A few months back my direct manager mentioned to me that he wanted me to take on a Really Shitty Responsibility (RSR) on top of my current work load. I've watched this specific RSR make three of my peers leave the company/leave the work group. I obviously wanted nothing to do with this RSR and it looked like I didn't really have a choice. I had pre-aligned with my DW that I'd leave the company if I got RSR. Before he had the change to formally give me the RSR, I had a conversation with the executive sponsor (ES) on the company's largest project which I am working on and kinda-sorta dotted line report to him. I told the ES that I was getting the RSR and that while I really enjoyed working on the large project and at the company, I probably wouldn't last at the company for very long after I got the RSR. He had personally saw what the RSR did to two out of the three other peers and understood completely.

Within a week, ES went to the CEO of the company and stated that one of his major project risks was needing to keep me focused on the large project. The CEO gave direction to my direct management to NOT give me the RSR. To this day my manager hasn't a clue that I influenced the ES to make this happen.

Morals of the story:
-Don't be afraid to walk away from a job once you have a level of FU money.
-There is typically someone around you in the organization that has interests that align with yours, learn to leverage them.

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1656 on: May 11, 2017, 07:10:38 PM »
^I used to call that kind of stuff poison pumpkins (after the Pumpkin Plan book, which I haven't read, but I get the idea from the quick summary provided by my brother.) Now I'm going to start calling them RSR's.

gerardc

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1657 on: May 11, 2017, 09:47:33 PM »
^I used to call that kind of stuff poison pumpkins (after the Pumpkin Plan book, which I haven't read, but I get the idea from the quick summary provided by my brother.) Now I'm going to start calling them RSR's.

What would be examples of RSR so shitty as to make your job miserable?

Trifele

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1658 on: May 12, 2017, 05:22:06 AM »
^I used to call that kind of stuff poison pumpkins (after the Pumpkin Plan book, which I haven't read, but I get the idea from the quick summary provided by my brother.) Now I'm going to start calling them RSR's.

What would be examples of RSR so shitty as to make your job miserable?

Not sure if this was what Liberty had in mind by a RSR, but -- at my workplace there is this one division that is notorious for chewing through senior managers. No one lasts.  The middle managers and line employees in this Shitty Division have a reputation for being a tough bunch -- I've heard the words "sneaky" and "backstabbers" used before.   Guess what? Yesterday the senior manager for Shitty Division resigned.  And guess what?   There are discussions of yours truly being given this RSR.   I am thinking hard about how to respond to this.   On the one hand, I am only two years from FIRE.  On the other hand, I really like my current job and had no intentions of spending my last couple of years stressed out.   More to come, I am sure.   

Guesl982374

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1659 on: May 12, 2017, 06:56:57 AM »
^I used to call that kind of stuff poison pumpkins (after the Pumpkin Plan book, which I haven't read, but I get the idea from the quick summary provided by my brother.) Now I'm going to start calling them RSR's.

What would be examples of RSR so shitty as to make your job miserable?

In this case, my past peers were given the responsibility of a certain area, but not allows to make any decisions regarding that area (e.g. you are held responsible for the mistakes of your leadership). My past peers were regularly cut out of meetings/discussions with both internal and with external stakeholders, even when they demanded to be a part of them, and then they were reprimanded when things went wrong from the decisions made in that meeting. It's a complete scapegoat position with really low level work for my (and my peers) level.

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1660 on: May 12, 2017, 07:33:31 AM »
Quote
About six months later he stops by and mentions accounting is checking the cell phone bills and there has been zero activity on this number and he shows me the bill with what I guess is my cell's phone number.   

I reach down and pull out the box still sitting in my drawer and ask him if this is that phone.  He asks me why I'm not using it.  I told him I said I'd use it when he drafted up rules for when they could and couldn't call me. 

Needless to say there were rules drafted later that day, but still it made for a great story that still makes me laugh today!
  That's a brilliant story!  Thanks for sharing!
love this!  It's even better than an FU story. It's a "noBS" story.

Reynold

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1661 on: May 12, 2017, 09:17:44 AM »
A couple Friday's back I got my pink slip due to a RIF of 30% of the company.  My first reaction was to ask my boss for a letter of reference, which he said he'd give me.  Immediately after my boss gave me the pink slip he gave me a contract offering to bring me back on as a independent contractor - doing the same job at the same price as a my previous job. 

[snip]

Unfortunately, two of my coworkers took the contract deal.  They are getting screwed, and I'm not sure they even know it.  I'm guessing they are not in a position where they can tell their boss to shove it up their ass.  So sad.

Reminds me of a situation with a friend of mine.  He worked at an emergency notification service, the kind of place that sets up calls to surrounding areas if a nuke plant is melting down or something.  It involved rotating shift work in programming/monitoring the systems, with weekends where you couldn't go more than 15 minutes response time from work.  Most people didn't last there, so he was senior, and usually training one or two others for the other spots at any one time. 

A new outfit bought the company, and laid everyone off, wanting to make them contract employees instead.  He basically looked at the contract, which as in your example didn't include any raise, and said "I'm not willing to take the liability risk for emergency notifications as a contract employee." so he left.  He had mentioned in another context that he had several years of living expenses saved up, so that let him spend 6 months or so job hunting to find something in his somewhat specialized field in a smaller city without having to worry about it.  He now doesn't have to do rotating shifts or weekends. 

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1662 on: May 12, 2017, 03:56:33 PM »
It's clear that some management has the viewpoint that there is always someone else willing to step in and fill the job, so why keep current employees (even top performers) happy? This is a terrible business philosophy, of course, but I see it more and more.

There is tremendous beauty in reaching a point where you just don't have to put up with any BS at work. I haven't had to quit a job over it yet, but I've done things recently like just decide to take 3 days off in the middle of the week to avoid looming BS. Of course, I make an effort not to inconvenience others with my whims, but staying home to chill with the dog really is as simple as turning on my email's "out of office" autoreply. The last time I had a boss who declared that she needed to give "approval" for any of my time off, I would just call in sick instead.

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1663 on: May 12, 2017, 04:15:44 PM »
It's clear that some management has the viewpoint that there is always someone else willing to step in and fill the job, so why keep current employees (even top performers) happy? This is a terrible business philosophy, of course, but I see it more and more.

I agree, there is some of that element.  At the other end of the spectrum, there are others that will keep someone around who does little or nothing, because finding someone to replace that person is too much trouble.  Neither is good!

Rowellen

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1664 on: May 12, 2017, 07:24:05 PM »
The last time I had a boss who declared that she needed to give "approval" for any of my time off, I would just call in sick instead.

My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

nnls

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1665 on: May 12, 2017, 07:52:52 PM »

My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

The last time I had a boss who declared that she needed to give "approval" for any of my time off, I would just call in sick instead.


In the USA is sick leave and annual leave come out of the same days off? Like you just get four weeks off per year and can use it how ever you want?

I don't know how to word my question properly, but in Australia for example you get a minimum four weeks annual leave and two weeks sick/carers leave, they aren't really interchangeable though. Though if you run out of sick leave you can sometimes use your annual leave for it.

But at every place I have worked, annual leave needs permission, sick leave is what you would just call in and take off as required.

tiger002

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1666 on: May 12, 2017, 08:50:30 PM »

My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

The last time I had a boss who declared that she needed to give "approval" for any of my time off, I would just call in sick instead.


In the USA is sick leave and annual leave come out of the same days off? Like you just get four weeks off per year and can use it how ever you want?

I don't know how to word my question properly, but in Australia for example you get a minimum four weeks annual leave and two weeks sick/carers leave, they aren't really interchangeable though. Though if you run out of sick leave you can sometimes use your annual leave for it.

But at every place I have worked, annual leave needs permission, sick leave is what you would just call in and take off as required.

It depends on the job. Some places have separate sick and annual leave pools while others combine them into PTO.

nnls

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1667 on: May 12, 2017, 08:55:14 PM »

My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

The last time I had a boss who declared that she needed to give "approval" for any of my time off, I would just call in sick instead.


In the USA is sick leave and annual leave come out of the same days off? Like you just get four weeks off per year and can use it how ever you want?

I don't know how to word my question properly, but in Australia for example you get a minimum four weeks annual leave and two weeks sick/carers leave, they aren't really interchangeable though. Though if you run out of sick leave you can sometimes use your annual leave for it.

But at every place I have worked, annual leave needs permission, sick leave is what you would just call in and take off as required.

It depends on the job. Some places have separate sick and annual leave pools while others combine them into PTO.

PTO?

NoVa

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1668 on: May 12, 2017, 09:01:28 PM »
Paid Time Off. They pool the sick leave and vacation together. Usually it is a bit less than the sum would have been.

nnls

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1669 on: May 12, 2017, 09:05:21 PM »
Paid Time Off. They pool the sick leave and vacation together. Usually it is a bit less than the sum would have been.

Oh ok makes sense.

With This Herring

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1670 on: May 12, 2017, 10:32:19 PM »
^I used to call that kind of stuff poison pumpkins (after the Pumpkin Plan book, which I haven't read, but I get the idea from the quick summary provided by my brother.) Now I'm going to start calling them RSR's.

What would be examples of RSR so shitty as to make your job miserable?

At OldFirm, there was a particular huge client that was a disastrous combination of minimum bookkeeping ability, complex company structure, lender interest in financials, and crushing deadlines.  Said client had issues year-round.  Additionally, client was a significant portion of OldFirm's billing, enough so that one person would be assigned to work primarily on client.  I was not that person.  That person ended up crushed by the incessant demands of client and rapidly multiplying financials when client's lending needs increased.  That person ended up working Tax Season-type hours for months and months extra during the year, when none of the rest of OldFirm faced similar time commitments.  That person ended up never taking anywhere near all vacation time permitted (with no rollovers or payouts of unused time), taking client calls while on vacation, missing out on chances for more varied work, and seriously falling behind in necessary professional development.  I saw two that-persons quickly come and go during my time there, and the third was in the middle of burning out when I left.  When the number of financials per year kept multiplying to the point where it looked like I was going to be a second person on that client, that was one of the things that pushed me to leave.

MrMoogle

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1671 on: May 17, 2017, 10:50:56 AM »
Paid Time Off. They pool the sick leave and vacation together. Usually it is a bit less than the sum would have been.

Oh ok makes sense.
It definitely depends on the industry.  My mom works at a hospital, for sick leave you practically need a doctor's note.  Vacation and holidays you need advance approval.

I'm an engineer, I get PPL (paid personal leave, which is just another name for PTO), and as long as I get my work done, I can take PPL whenever I want with little to no notice.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1672 on: May 17, 2017, 11:39:02 AM »
Paid Time Off. They pool the sick leave and vacation together. Usually it is a bit less than the sum would have been.

Oh ok makes sense.
It definitely depends on the industry.  My mom works at a hospital, for sick leave you practically need a doctor's note.  Vacation and holidays you need advance approval.

I'm an engineer, I get PPL (paid personal leave, which is just another name for PTO), and as long as I get my work done, I can take PPL whenever I want with little to no notice.
That's one of the reasons DH is still working. He earns 2.7 vacation days per month. A typical month is 18 working days. Overtime is completely optional; he only takes it when he needs it to complete a specific project. He takes his compensation in PTO/Comp Time. He recently did a project which required two non-consecutive weekend days. He netted a week of PTO for his efforts. He's never called in sick in his career, thanks to PTO. Sick days accrue until retirement. They don't pay it out, exactly. Once you declare retirement, you can stop working and start using up your sick days, getting paid at your current rate. This allows you to continue to stay on the company health plan, avoid a lump-sum payout, and unbelievably, continue to accrue vacation hours. Amaze-balls!

His sweet spot of age/years of service will hit in about three years. He will be able to stop working nearly a year before that. Since he loves his job, and we can't travel now anyway, because his mom and her pal, Al Z, live with us, he might as well keep working until we can enjoy a little more control over our lives.

In my working days, I earned a little more than he did , but he has far better benefits, including a defined benefit pension plan and nearly free healthcare.

Sorry if this veered a little off topic, but we have plenty of FU money available to deploy. I keep hoping he'll decide to say "Fuck it" and pull the plug sooner, but he'd go nuts if we were stuck at home.

fattest_foot

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1673 on: May 17, 2017, 11:39:59 AM »
My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.

mtn

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1674 on: May 17, 2017, 12:15:16 PM »
My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.

"Not feeling good"

I didn't say I'm not feeling good because I'm feeling bad about my dog. I just said I'm not feeling good. Not a lie!

My boss mentioned that he took a mental health day the other day. Made me feel good about it. I've done it once before at this company--not because I was sick or stressed or needed a day away, I had just slept terribly and didn't want to go in. I wouldn't have been an asset that day anyways.

PhrugalPhan

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1675 on: May 17, 2017, 12:29:11 PM »
This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.
Employers can be crazy on the "rules".  Where I work they allow you to donate sick leave to other workers (as well you can use it to take care of family members).  So about 6 years ago my co-worker buddy "R" was going to get surgery where he couldn't drive and would need therapy multiple times a week.   So I was going to pick him up on the way to work, and then leave an hour early on therapy days to drop him off at the therapist (his wife would pick him up later). 

So I apply to donate sick time for the days I would be leaving work early to take him to therapy.  Sorry, no can do, that's not allowed.  You can donate sick leave, but you can't use sick leave to help a co-worker.  After being in a meeting with my buddy and some higher ups apologizing and saying they would look into what else could be done, I finally say forget it I will just use my annual leave on the days I leave early for him.   Afterwards R comes up to me and looks worried about what I said in the meeting.  I tell him not to worry about it, if I feel the need, I will just call in sick on a day I want to take off, and everything will be the same in the end, except now they can feel great about following the rules.

So yeah, I have learned to be quiet in certain situations.  It doesn't help anything when they are crazy about the rules.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1676 on: May 17, 2017, 12:39:30 PM »
^Good for you!^ I hope your friend is fine now.

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1677 on: May 17, 2017, 12:43:13 PM »
This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.
Employers can be crazy on the "rules".  Where I work they allow you to donate sick leave to other workers (as well you can use it to take care of family members).  So about 6 years ago my co-worker buddy "R" was going to get surgery where he couldn't drive and would need therapy multiple times a week.   So I was going to pick him up on the way to work, and then leave an hour early on therapy days to drop him off at the therapist (his wife would pick him up later). 

So I apply to donate sick time for the days I would be leaving work early to take him to therapy.  Sorry, no can do, that's not allowed.  You can donate sick leave, but you can't use sick leave to help a co-worker.  After being in a meeting with my buddy and some higher ups apologizing and saying they would look into what else could be done, I finally say forget it I will just use my annual leave on the days I leave early for him.   Afterwards R comes up to me and looks worried about what I said in the meeting.  I tell him not to worry about it, if I feel the need, I will just call in sick on a day I want to take off, and everything will be the same in the end, except now they can feel great about following the rules.

So yeah, I have learned to be quiet in certain situations.  It doesn't help anything when they are crazy about the rules.
It took me a really long time to stop trying to "fix" what's broken in places like this and just do my own thing and keep quiet about it. 

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1678 on: May 17, 2017, 04:42:06 PM »
This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.
Employers can be crazy on the "rules".  Where I work they allow you to donate sick leave to other workers (as well you can use it to take care of family members).  So about 6 years ago my co-worker buddy "R" was going to get surgery where he couldn't drive and would need therapy multiple times a week.   So I was going to pick him up on the way to work, and then leave an hour early on therapy days to drop him off at the therapist (his wife would pick him up later). 

So I apply to donate sick time for the days I would be leaving work early to take him to therapy.  Sorry, no can do, that's not allowed.  You can donate sick leave, but you can't use sick leave to help a co-worker.  After being in a meeting with my buddy and some higher ups apologizing and saying they would look into what else could be done, I finally say forget it I will just use my annual leave on the days I leave early for him.   Afterwards R comes up to me and looks worried about what I said in the meeting.  I tell him not to worry about it, if I feel the need, I will just call in sick on a day I want to take off, and everything will be the same in the end, except now they can feel great about following the rules.

So yeah, I have learned to be quiet in certain situations.  It doesn't help anything when they are crazy about the rules.
It took me a really long time to stop trying to "fix" what's broken in places like this and just do my own thing and keep quiet about it.
Yes.  I'm exempt.  At a job long ago and far away, I worked long hours.  And if I needed to leave early, or go to the doctor, I didn't take vacation or sick time ... why would I?  Back then, I easily worked 45-47 hours a week.  Our time card system (because we charged to contracts) was online.  It only cared if the total was 80 in 2 weeks.  Back then, sick time was separate, and unlimited.

I had coworkers whose bosses were sticklers.  As in, they would require their employees to take vacation if they left 2 hours early on a Friday.  Now mind you, these same coworkers would still have 95 hours of work on the books for the 2 weeks.  I simply said "just fill in what you worked and submit".  "But when I asked my boss, he said..."  Oh hon, that's your problem.  Don't ask, just do.  The computer doesn't care where the hours come from.  Is it more than 80?  Does your boss REALLY look to see that each day is >8, or does he see 95 and hit submit?

Took several years before they finally pulled the trigger and stopped taking an hour or two of vacation.

GreenSheep

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1679 on: May 18, 2017, 11:26:20 AM »
So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.

This is so true. The more you tell people, the more ammunition they have against you, even if you've done nothing wrong. It's amazing how people twist things for their own benefit or just because their favorite pastime is Being Offended.

It's also helpful to keep your mouth shut if you want to look really smart. I have a friend who's a neurosurgeon who thinks I'm super smart simply because when we were in school together, I only spoke up if I was 100% sure I knew the right answer, while other people just blurted out whatever came to mind for every question.

scottish

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1680 on: May 18, 2017, 03:35:29 PM »
So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.

This is so true. The more you tell people, the more ammunition they have against you, even if you've done nothing wrong. It's amazing how people twist things for their own benefit or just because their favorite pastime is Being Offended.

It's also helpful to keep your mouth shut if you want to look really smart. I have a friend who's a neurosurgeon who thinks I'm super smart simply because when we were in school together, I only spoke up if I was 100% sure I knew the right answer, while other people just blurted out whatever came to mind for every question.

This.   Better to look calm and remain silent until you have something to say that will have a meaningful impact.

Nudelkopf

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1681 on: May 18, 2017, 11:51:15 PM »
Meh, I have zero qualms about calling in sick. As a teacher we don't get to choose when to have annual leave, so if something comes up during term, I just call and say, "I'm not coming in today. I'm using sick leave." It's not like they're gonna ask for proof.

tickledginger

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1682 on: May 23, 2017, 09:36:12 AM »
I'd been holding off on posting to this thread, dreaming of the day where I could tell my own epic FU story. Now, of course, the tale is over - but I can't share details for privacy reasons!

Essentially, we're yet another successful tale of how that FU money supports freedom. My spouse has been holding down a survival job for years that has slowly tipped over from useful and supportive to an absolute nightmare. Spouse, despite his training and desire to pursue his artisic dreams, has an incredible work ethic and just. would. not. leave. There were all sorts of justifications - the health insurance, the other benefits, his retirement fund...all of which really were representing his fear that he didn't deserve a better job. It took almost a year, but I finally convinced him that this job was detrimental to his health and our marriage. I even used language from this thread, telling him that yes, eventually he'd have to have a job, but he didn't have to have THIS job! We set a FU fund goal and set a timeline, after which he had to leave this employer...if not for him, for my sanity! (I was going to grad school full time and working full time. It's been a serious couple of years.) And right after I submitted my thesis, he did it!

Our happy ending(ish - we're still adjusting to our new world, so it's not an ending) is that the FU fund gave him the confidence to leave and even negotiate favorable terms. Knowing that he could just walk away was so empowering, and has also jumpstarted his creative pursuits. He's got an opportunity to think and breathe for the first time in almost fifteen years, and I can already see the improvement in his mental and physical health. Our marriage is stronger. I'm about to graduate, and it feels like we have possibilities and are in charge of our future. Thanks to planning and frugality and that crucial FU fund, we are able to focus on the things that really matter...and one day, I look forward to sharing this story with glorious details!

I remain grateful to this thread for the inspiration. Thanks, all!

Laura33

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1683 on: May 23, 2017, 10:06:50 AM »
. . . .

Congratulations!  Wow, what a relief for you! 

I will have to tell my DH that he has done good in this world and his words will live on after him.  :-)

runewell

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1684 on: May 23, 2017, 10:48:05 AM »

This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.

Sick leave probably has a specific definition of what it is intended for.  If taking your animal to the vet does not fall under the definition, then you should not have done what you did. 

NESailor

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1685 on: May 23, 2017, 11:28:21 AM »

This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.


Sick leave probably has a specific definition of what it is intended for.  If taking your animal to the vet does not fall under the definition, then you should not have done what you did.

Hahaha, exactly.  Look, you even get reprimanded on an Internet forum when you don't ;).  I had an HR colleague tell me one thing that's stuck with me since then: "when you need to go, you tell, not ask"   And it's a rule I follow to this day.  Fortunately, for a salaried finance professional this is not a big deal.  Work gets done on time and in acceptable quality so when I need time for whatever, I just take it.  If I'm really gone out of town for fun I'll make that "vacation".

Guesl982374

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1686 on: May 23, 2017, 01:22:49 PM »
Having a really shitty day at work right now... would love to hear some more stories if anyone has one!

I'll give you one too. This one might even help you out...

A few months back my direct manager mentioned to me that he wanted me to take on a Really Shitty Responsibility (RSR) on top of my current work load. I've watched this specific RSR make three of my peers leave the company/leave the work group. I obviously wanted nothing to do with this RSR and it looked like I didn't really have a choice. I had pre-aligned with my DW that I'd leave the company if I got RSR. Before he had the change to formally give me the RSR, I had a conversation with the executive sponsor (ES) on the company's largest project which I am working on and kinda-sorta dotted line report to him. I told the ES that I was getting the RSR and that while I really enjoyed working on the large project and at the company, I probably wouldn't last at the company for very long after I got the RSR. He had personally saw what the RSR did to two out of the three other peers and understood completely.

Within a week, ES went to the CEO of the company and stated that one of his major project risks was needing to keep me focused on the large project. The CEO gave direction to my direct management to NOT give me the RSR. To this day my manager hasn't a clue that I influenced the ES to make this happen.

Morals of the story:
-Don't be afraid to walk away from a job once you have a level of FU money.
-There is typically someone around you in the organization that has interests that align with yours, learn to leverage them.

I apologize for the boasting but I can't exactly talk about this anywhere else.

It turns out that there was a second part to this story that I didn't realize at the time. Fast forward to today, my manager unexpectedly gives me a large, off cycle raise. Apparently, when my line leadership got wind that I might leave they decided to throw more money at me as a retention plan even though I didn't have a competing offer.

So ... I avoided the RSR and was given more money?? Turns out that's one of the many benefits of FU money...

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1687 on: May 23, 2017, 02:04:00 PM »
I apologize for the boasting but I can't exactly talk about this anywhere else.

It turns out that there was a second part to this story that I didn't realize at the time. Fast forward to today, my manager unexpectedly gives me a large, off cycle raise. Apparently, when my line leadership got wind that I might leave they decided to throw more money at me as a retention plan even though I didn't have a competing offer.

So ... I avoided the RSR and was given more money?? Turns out that's one of the many benefits of FU money...
This just made my day.  Thanks for sharing!

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1688 on: May 23, 2017, 04:44:10 PM »
I apologize for the boasting but I can't exactly talk about this anywhere else.

It turns out that there was a second part to this story that I didn't realize at the time. Fast forward to today, my manager unexpectedly gives me a large, off cycle raise. Apparently, when my line leadership got wind that I might leave they decided to throw more money at me as a retention plan even though I didn't have a competing offer.

So ... I avoided the RSR and was given more money?? Turns out that's one of the many benefits of FU money...
This just made my day.  Thanks for sharing!
Yup. Funny I don't consider stating facts, particularly in this context, boasting. Carry on, good Liberty Stache. And congratulations on that raise. You know what to do with it. Feel free to share the details if you wish. That won't be considered boasting here, either.

pennyhandlebar

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1689 on: May 24, 2017, 02:38:19 AM »
I don't think this story qualifies as "epic," but it was definitely a reminder of how nice it is to not be dependent on a salary. As background, my wife and I are about 75% of the way to our target number -- we still have a ways to go, but one of us being out of work for few months (or even a year) would not be a big deal.

My company, which we'll call "Boutique Inc" has been acquired by a much larger company we'll call "Mega Co." The acquisition went through years ago, and change was pretty minimal for several years after the transaction closed. But now, Mega Co is working on rolling out standardized systems and processes across all its acquisitions globally. In theory, this makes sense and will be a positive change, but some of the global systems and processes are inferior to our existing solutions. For example, the SLAs for Mega Co's approach to one business critical process  would have gotten Boutique Inc's vendors laughed out of the room.

With that background, you can understand there was some tension in the air as we gathered in the conference room for a global conference call covering additional new systems and processes that would be rolled out at Boutique Inc. A number of people raised objections with our leaders from Mega Co during the call and tempers were getting a bit strained. One of my coworkers unfortunately asked a perfectly innocuous question that -- apparently -- was the final straw, because it triggered an angry speech about Boutique Inc's substandard financial performance (this is true, we are not having a great year), and a statement that Mega Co's processes would help us return to profitability and keep Mega Co from closing Boutique Inc down.

When this speech concluded, I said something smart to the effect of "Gee, Boutique Inc is such a badly run business that it would be ridiculous to acquire us!" I didn't realize when I said this that our conference room mic was on -- I thought we were on mute. Fortunately or not, I wasn't close enough to the mic for it to pick me up though. :-)

Immediately after this call, a number of the junior staff were worried about their jobs, and I realized I was completely unworried. I think there's some more mature perspective to thank, but being 75% of the way to FIRE has to help too!

APowers

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1690 on: June 02, 2017, 10:59:14 PM »
Not epic, but still a little bit exciting.

A couple months ago, I asked my boss at Domino's to take me off the schedule, as I have a house to remodel, and over full-time projects at my day job. I told him that I'd be available to come in if they had someone call in sick and they couldn't find anyone else.

They called me a couple days ago to come in; it didn't conflict with what I had going on, so I agreed. About an hour into the shift, the shift manager asked which of us closers (me and the other scheduled closing driver) was going to drive the company car....

The company car. This franchise has a company car, which the owner requires to be driven daily. It's terrible. Relatively uncomfortable, no cupholder large enough for my drink, no flashlight/spotlight for finding house numbers in the dark, TINTED WINDOWS (seriously, who puts tinted windows in a late-night pizza delivery vehicle?), and no mileage reimbursement (important, since I drive a Civic and actually make money on this). AND, the last time I drove it, I had two separate orders of pizza slip off the seat onto the floor (no, I wasn't braking hard); I already hated driving it, but after that incident, I decided I was not driving it again.

I calmly told her that I was not going to drive it (citing the most relevant-to-the-business reason of "I'm not driving a car that throws pizzas off the seat; that's bad customer service"). I thought about it as I was refusing-- what's the worst that can happen? They cut my hours...to what, zero? I'm already there. They fire me....and then the whole closing shift is screwed over by being shorthanded? I don't have to be there, but they need me.

It's not because I have enough money in the bank to not need a job, but being in a position where my other job is already giving me over full-time hours, meant I had power to make this job not suck. Seriously, though-- delivering pizzas is fun. Driving the company car is...not fun.

Epilogue...they also called me the next day, and the shift manager, in trying to convince me to come in, specifically said "I promise I won't ask you to drive the company car."


radram

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1691 on: June 03, 2017, 05:59:01 AM »
Not epic, but still a little bit exciting.

A couple months ago, I asked my boss at Domino's to take me off the schedule, as I have a house to remodel, and over full-time projects at my day job. I told him that I'd be available to come in if they had someone call in sick and they couldn't find anyone else.

They called me a couple days ago to come in; it didn't conflict with what I had going on, so I agreed. About an hour into the shift, the shift manager asked which of us closers (me and the other scheduled closing driver) was going to drive the company car....

The company car. This franchise has a company car, which the owner requires to be driven daily. It's terrible. Relatively uncomfortable, no cupholder large enough for my drink, no flashlight/spotlight for finding house numbers in the dark, TINTED WINDOWS (seriously, who puts tinted windows in a late-night pizza delivery vehicle?), and no mileage reimbursement (important, since I drive a Civic and actually make money on this). AND, the last time I drove it, I had two separate orders of pizza slip off the seat onto the floor (no, I wasn't braking hard); I already hated driving it, but after that incident, I decided I was not driving it again.

I calmly told her that I was not going to drive it (citing the most relevant-to-the-business reason of "I'm not driving a car that throws pizzas off the seat; that's bad customer service"). I thought about it as I was refusing-- what's the worst that can happen? They cut my hours...to what, zero? I'm already there. They fire me....and then the whole closing shift is screwed over by being shorthanded? I don't have to be there, but they need me.

It's not because I have enough money in the bank to not need a job, but being in a position where my other job is already giving me over full-time hours, meant I had power to make this job not suck. Seriously, though-- delivering pizzas is fun. Driving the company car is...not fun.

Epilogue...they also called me the next day, and the shift manager, in trying to convince me to come in, specifically said "I promise I won't ask you to drive the company car."

Great story. Did you go back? Would you go back in the future?

Freedomin5

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1692 on: June 03, 2017, 08:01:10 AM »
Finally have one to contribute.

A few years ago, the company was acquired. They wanted all employees to sign new contracts with the new company as old company technically no longer existed. Many of us were contract employees at the time and paid only for the hours we work. The good consultants were working many hours and billing for more hours. The incompetent ones were working fewer hours and billing less.

So new company decides they want everyone on salary. Except they set the salary structure based on averaging the billing hours of all employees. This meant that the good ones were offered packages that were worth a lot less than they were currently making, and the incompetent ones were offered packages that were a lot more lucrative than their current situation.

You can probably predict what happened. The bad ones jumped at the opportunity. The good ones without FU money reluctantly signed and have been complaining since. The good ones with FU money asked, "You know my current package. If you were me, would you sign this?" HR had no good response to this, stopped responding to our emails and basically left us alone keeping the terms of the old contract.

APowers

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1693 on: June 03, 2017, 08:07:57 AM »
Not epic, but still a little bit exciting.

A couple months ago, I asked my boss at Domino's to take me off the schedule, as I have a house to remodel, and over full-time projects at my day job. I told him that I'd be available to come in if they had someone call in sick and they couldn't find anyone else.

They called me a couple days ago to come in; it didn't conflict with what I had going on, so I agreed. About an hour into the shift, the shift manager asked which of us closers (me and the other scheduled closing driver) was going to drive the company car....

The company car. This franchise has a company car, which the owner requires to be driven daily. It's terrible. Relatively uncomfortable, no cupholder large enough for my drink, no flashlight/spotlight for finding house numbers in the dark, TINTED WINDOWS (seriously, who puts tinted windows in a late-night pizza delivery vehicle?), and no mileage reimbursement (important, since I drive a Civic and actually make money on this). AND, the last time I drove it, I had two separate orders of pizza slip off the seat onto the floor (no, I wasn't braking hard); I already hated driving it, but after that incident, I decided I was not driving it again.

I calmly told her that I was not going to drive it (citing the most relevant-to-the-business reason of "I'm not driving a car that throws pizzas off the seat; that's bad customer service"). I thought about it as I was refusing-- what's the worst that can happen? They cut my hours...to what, zero? I'm already there. They fire me....and then the whole closing shift is screwed over by being shorthanded? I don't have to be there, but they need me.

It's not because I have enough money in the bank to not need a job, but being in a position where my other job is already giving me over full-time hours, meant I had power to make this job not suck. Seriously, though-- delivering pizzas is fun. Driving the company car is...not fun.

Epilogue...they also called me the next day, and the shift manager, in trying to convince me to come in, specifically said "I promise I won't ask you to drive the company car."

Great story. Did you go back? Would you go back in the future?
I did. The money's not bad (ends up netting about $15/hr), and it's fun... at least when I'm not being made to do stupid stuff. I'm still on call for them, and they *love* me-- seriously, they act like I'm some kind of returning messiah when I come in.

FIREby35

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1694 on: June 04, 2017, 08:01:27 AM »
Not epic, but still a little bit exciting.

A couple months ago, I asked my boss at Domino's to take me off the schedule, as I have a house to remodel, and over full-time projects at my day job. I told him that I'd be available to come in if they had someone call in sick and they couldn't find anyone else.

They called me a couple days ago to come in; it didn't conflict with what I had going on, so I agreed. About an hour into the shift, the shift manager asked which of us closers (me and the other scheduled closing driver) was going to drive the company car....

The company car. This franchise has a company car, which the owner requires to be driven daily. It's terrible. Relatively uncomfortable, no cupholder large enough for my drink, no flashlight/spotlight for finding house numbers in the dark, TINTED WINDOWS (seriously, who puts tinted windows in a late-night pizza delivery vehicle?), and no mileage reimbursement (important, since I drive a Civic and actually make money on this). AND, the last time I drove it, I had two separate orders of pizza slip off the seat onto the floor (no, I wasn't braking hard); I already hated driving it, but after that incident, I decided I was not driving it again.

I calmly told her that I was not going to drive it (citing the most relevant-to-the-business reason of "I'm not driving a car that throws pizzas off the seat; that's bad customer service"). I thought about it as I was refusing-- what's the worst that can happen? They cut my hours...to what, zero? I'm already there. They fire me....and then the whole closing shift is screwed over by being shorthanded? I don't have to be there, but they need me.

It's not because I have enough money in the bank to not need a job, but being in a position where my other job is already giving me over full-time hours, meant I had power to make this job not suck. Seriously, though-- delivering pizzas is fun. Driving the company car is...not fun.

Epilogue...they also called me the next day, and the shift manager, in trying to convince me to come in, specifically said "I promise I won't ask you to drive the company car."

Great story. Did you go back? Would you go back in the future?
I did. The money's not bad (ends up netting about $15/hr), and it's fun... at least when I'm not being made to do stupid stuff. I'm still on call for them, and they *love* me-- seriously, they act like I'm some kind of returning messiah when I come in.

I delivered pizza for five years to pay for community college and university. The last job I had before making it "big time" into the biggest corporate law firm in my region was delivering for Pizza Hut. That was a big jump! Now you are making me wax nostalgic about my pizza delivery days :)

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1695 on: June 05, 2017, 06:05:58 AM »
Pizza delivery drivers represent! One of the more fun jobs in my life . . . and it made me appreciate the value of tipping the delivery driver. The irony is that I only get pizza delivered about once or twice a year now . . .

Maenad

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1696 on: June 06, 2017, 09:57:29 AM »
I finally have an FU money story, not sure how epic it is...

I work in a regulated industry, we have numerous countries that send auditors to our site, as well as companies that audit to various ISO standards for use elsewhere in the world.

Last week, one of the auditing companies sent in an auditor that we've had visit us before, but this time was... different. First, he started talking politics. Like, obvious-what-his-views-were politics. And much like the complaints about professors pushing their political views on their students, we weren't really able to complain, since if you make an auditor cranky, you get lots of findings/observations/non-conformities.

Then it got worse. He threw out a couple of racist/xenophobic shots over the bow. Again, we can't say anything due to the power imbalance.

The FU money comes in today. I set up a meeting with my boss, and said that I think we should "fire" this auditor for his obvious misalignment with our company's values (the racism part, not the politics part), and regardless of what they do, I will not work another audit where he's the auditor. I knew there was a risk of being punished professionally for my refusal to work audits, since it's part of my core job function, but my FU money put me in the position to take a stand here.

My boss made the right noises, at least, about addressing this. What's important to me is that I can still look myself in the mirror tomorrow, and the FU money really helped with that.

NoVa

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1697 on: June 06, 2017, 10:46:20 AM »
I finally have an FU money story, not sure how epic it is...

I work in a regulated industry, we have numerous countries that send auditors to our site, as well as companies that audit to various ISO standards for use elsewhere in the world.

Last week, one of the auditing companies sent in an auditor that we've had visit us before, but this time was... different. First, he started talking politics. Like, obvious-what-his-views-were politics. And much like the complaints about professors pushing their political views on their students, we weren't really able to complain, since if you make an auditor cranky, you get lots of findings/observations/non-conformities.

Then it got worse. He threw out a couple of racist/xenophobic shots over the bow. Again, we can't say anything due to the power imbalance.

The FU money comes in today. I set up a meeting with my boss, and said that I think we should "fire" this auditor for his obvious misalignment with our company's values (the racism part, not the politics part), and regardless of what they do, I will not work another audit where he's the auditor. I knew there was a risk of being punished professionally for my refusal to work audits, since it's part of my core job function, but my FU money put me in the position to take a stand here.

My boss made the right noises, at least, about addressing this. What's important to me is that I can still look myself in the mirror tomorrow, and the FU money really helped with that.

You did the right thing! I am not sure of your specific situation, but usually the ISO audits are handled through a registrar, who sends out the external auditors. Your company is free to pick another registrar, so while an auditor has a lot of "tactical" power, and it's good to not piss them off during the audit, the company has the "strategic" power to dump that registrar, or at least complain and make sure that person is never sent to you again.

Guesl982374

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1698 on: June 06, 2017, 02:29:38 PM »
I finally have an FU money story, not sure how epic it is...

I work in a regulated industry, we have numerous countries that send auditors to our site, as well as companies that audit to various ISO standards for use elsewhere in the world.

Last week, one of the auditing companies sent in an auditor that we've had visit us before, but this time was... different. First, he started talking politics. Like, obvious-what-his-views-were politics. And much like the complaints about professors pushing their political views on their students, we weren't really able to complain, since if you make an auditor cranky, you get lots of findings/observations/non-conformities.

Then it got worse. He threw out a couple of racist/xenophobic shots over the bow. Again, we can't say anything due to the power imbalance.

The FU money comes in today. I set up a meeting with my boss, and said that I think we should "fire" this auditor for his obvious misalignment with our company's values (the racism part, not the politics part), and regardless of what they do, I will not work another audit where he's the auditor. I knew there was a risk of being punished professionally for my refusal to work audits, since it's part of my core job function, but my FU money put me in the position to take a stand here.

My boss made the right noises, at least, about addressing this. What's important to me is that I can still look myself in the mirror tomorrow, and the FU money really helped with that.

Well done!

Nangirl17

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1699 on: June 07, 2017, 12:10:06 PM »
....but my FU money put me in the position to take a stand here.


This is epic.