Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 597912 times)

SwordGuy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1650 on: April 28, 2017, 05:14:09 PM »
filched from other social media: "one of the most inspiring things iíve ever seen was my co-worker quitting on the spot over an argument and proceeding to purposely make eye contact with my manager as she walked out of the fire exit, making the entire stores alarm go off. itís was on a level of spite i can only dream of achieving."

Seams very appropriate :)
Only if she worked at JoAnn Fabrics ;-P

Your pun has me in stitches.

If you cross your fingers after surgery you'll heal faster. Or maybe it's just super-stitchin.

We're supposed to be polite to one another.  Stop needling people over their mistakes!
And no more puns on this topic or the thread count will get too high.

G-dog

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1651 on: April 28, 2017, 05:26:59 PM »
filched from other social media: "one of the most inspiring things iíve ever seen was my co-worker quitting on the spot over an argument and proceeding to purposely make eye contact with my manager as she walked out of the fire exit, making the entire stores alarm go off. itís was on a level of spite i can only dream of achieving."

Seams very appropriate :)
Only if she worked at JoAnn Fabrics ;-P

Your pun has me in stitches.

If you cross your fingers after surgery you'll heal faster. Or maybe it's just super-stitchin.

We're supposed to be polite to one another.  Stop needling people over their mistakes!
And no more puns on this topic or the thread count will get too high.
Time to stop hemming and hawing and get back on topic.

Izybat

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1652 on: May 04, 2017, 06:13:43 PM »
Replying mostly to follow, but also to say that I WISH we had FU money at the moment, or as we call it, a Rage Quit Fund.

DH recently left a job at the company we both worked for (I still work there). He got a job with a huge international company that included a 59% pay increase and a sign-on bonus. He's worked there for 5 whole weeks, and it's been crap the entire time. Not enough training, bosses treating him like crap, terrible customers, on and on. He desperately wants to quit, and has had his finger on the resignation button for almost two weeks now.

Unfortunately, we don't have a huge cash cushion to support him leaving. If he quits in less than a year, he'll have to pay back the bonus, including the 40% or so taxes that were taken out (so basically, we'd have to pay out of our small savings to have him quit). But that savings is really the only savings we have to survive for a short time without his paycheck until he finds a new job. I've tried to convince him to stay on at least long enough to save up the money to repay the bonus, but he's not sure he can last that long (it'll take a good couple of months to earn it back, even with the huge raise).

We've been on a huge "pay down the debt" kick for the last two years, and have managed to pay off a ton (probably like $45,000), but the other side of that is that we haven't been saving because I've been shoveling all the extra money towards debt. Situations like this make me really question my financial plan and Dave Ramsey's stupid mini-emergency fund.

iluvzbeach

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1653 on: May 04, 2017, 08:25:19 PM »
Would the company you're with want him to come back bad enough to give him a bonus to come back so he could pay back the sign-on bonus?
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GilbertB

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1654 on: May 05, 2017, 04:21:06 AM »
I think Ramsey recommends to slow down/stop debt payments when you can feel a storm is coming (your case) and put that sum back into the debt only when the storm has passed.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1655 on: May 05, 2017, 04:52:46 AM »
Could he cope better if you both commit to him quitting the very day that he doesn't need to pay back his bonus - exactly one year of crap but no more? You could get a calendar and mark down the days. A year of crap is a lot of crap, but could he do it for all the extra money? Save it all and then maybe book a holiday of some kind or a fancy dinner or tickets for a big concert for right after he quits - give you both something to look forward to, and only takes up a small percent of the extra money. Just don't end up frittering it away during the year because he "deserves" small treats - you'll have one big treat to look forward to. It would be a big sacrifice but it sounds like it would make an enormous difference to your financial position.

TomTX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1656 on: May 05, 2017, 05:30:10 AM »
There is a middle ground between "putting up with all the crap" and "FU NOW"

How about just acting as if he has FU money? Boss goes on a rant? Just walk out and go do the training. Customer is crap? Don't put up with unreasonable demands. Etc.

Empowering.
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radram

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1657 on: May 05, 2017, 07:34:54 AM »
There is a middle ground between "putting up with all the crap" and "FU NOW"

How about just acting as if he has FU money? Boss goes on a rant? Just walk out and go do the training. Customer is crap? Don't put up with unreasonable demands. Etc.

Empowering.

I agree with this approach. I am sure you do not have to pay it back if he gets fired. While I do not advocate trying to get fired, I believe it is very reasonable to take a stand with some of the more crappy parts of the job.

boarder42

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1658 on: May 05, 2017, 07:39:59 AM »
Replying mostly to follow, but also to say that I WISH we had FU money at the moment, or as we call it, a Rage Quit Fund.

DH recently left a job at the company we both worked for (I still work there). He got a job with a huge international company that included a 59% pay increase and a sign-on bonus. He's worked there for 5 whole weeks, and it's been crap the entire time. Not enough training, bosses treating him like crap, terrible customers, on and on. He desperately wants to quit, and has had his finger on the resignation button for almost two weeks now.

Unfortunately, we don't have a huge cash cushion to support him leaving. If he quits in less than a year, he'll have to pay back the bonus, including the 40% or so taxes that were taken out (so basically, we'd have to pay out of our small savings to have him quit). But that savings is really the only savings we have to survive for a short time without his paycheck until he finds a new job. I've tried to convince him to stay on at least long enough to save up the money to repay the bonus, but he's not sure he can last that long (it'll take a good couple of months to earn it back, even with the huge raise).

We've been on a huge "pay down the debt" kick for the last two years, and have managed to pay off a ton (probably like $45,000), but the other side of that is that we haven't been saving because I've been shoveling all the extra money towards debt. Situations like this make me really question my financial plan and Dave Ramsey's stupid mini-emergency fund.

umm what is the rate of the debt you're paying down?  this is one of the reasons i choose not to pay down low interest debt.  also you make more money investing it.
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RWD

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1659 on: May 05, 2017, 07:51:15 AM »
Situations like this make me really question my financial plan and Dave Ramsey's stupid mini-emergency fund.

You're on the MMM forums now, you can (and should) leave the terrible advice of Dave Ramsey behind. Here is a simplified order that you should be prioritizing your extra money (from /r/personalfinance on reddit). Notice that a 3-6 month emergency fund is before everything else. There is a more advanced order of prioritization on the forums here. Again, starts with an emergency fund to your satisfaction. And only then paying down high interest debts after that. Your lower interest debts should wait until you have maxed every tax advantaged account available.

I also agree with TomTX. Most jobs can become much less stressful when you just stop caring about what your coworkers and boss think.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1660 on: May 05, 2017, 08:48:14 AM »
I also agree with TomTX. Most jobs can become much less stressful when you just stop caring about what your coworkers and boss think.

+1, disengaging is the fastest path to less stress.

It may also increase the amount of respect your husband gets at work. 

I don't know anything about your husband's boss, Izybat, but I worked for a director who loved to walk all over weak people.  I truly believe he was a megalomaniac who enjoyed experimenting on his management team.  He set completely unrealistic expectations and then watched what people did.  Some had nervous breakdowns and/or family/relationship breakdowns, putting in so many hours trying to meet expectation they knew were not possible.  Others did what they could reasonably get done and said "that's what you get because that is what is reasonable."  If you stood up to him, whether out of desperation or not, it was seen as a sign of confidence and strength.  Only after that did he listen to your ideas and feedback about how to improve things.  Only after that would he accept push-back on unrealistic expectations.  For me, I stood up and gained respect, but that was too late to make the job situation tolerable.  I had no respect for him and had been through too much unnecessarily inflicted pain and moved on to a MUCH better situation.

If your husband is ready to walk, he should just start standing up to the nonsense.  There is nothing to lose if he's already prepared to walk.  This also gives you extra time at high earnings to build the Emergency Fund which you know you need.

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1661 on: May 05, 2017, 09:29:12 AM »
I'd add to all of the awesome advice ^^above^^ something sassy like, "So this is why the last guy left." Or, "I wonder why this [completely unrealistic expectation] wasn't mentioned in the interviews?" They know they're a toxic environment, that's why they have to pay so much to attract new victims talent.
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CptCool

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1662 on: May 05, 2017, 10:19:00 AM »
Replying mostly to follow, but also to say that I WISH we had FU money at the moment, or as we call it, a Rage Quit Fund.

DH recently left a job at the company we both worked for (I still work there). He got a job with a huge international company that included a 59% pay increase and a sign-on bonus. He's worked there for 5 whole weeks, and it's been crap the entire time. Not enough training, bosses treating him like crap, terrible customers, on and on. He desperately wants to quit, and has had his finger on the resignation button for almost two weeks now.

Unfortunately, we don't have a huge cash cushion to support him leaving. If he quits in less than a year, he'll have to pay back the bonus, including the 40% or so taxes that were taken out (so basically, we'd have to pay out of our small savings to have him quit). But that savings is really the only savings we have to survive for a short time without his paycheck until he finds a new job. I've tried to convince him to stay on at least long enough to save up the money to repay the bonus, but he's not sure he can last that long (it'll take a good couple of months to earn it back, even with the huge raise).

We've been on a huge "pay down the debt" kick for the last two years, and have managed to pay off a ton (probably like $45,000), but the other side of that is that we haven't been saving because I've been shoveling all the extra money towards debt. Situations like this make me really question my financial plan and Dave Ramsey's stupid mini-emergency fund.

I just want to make sure you realize that unless explicitly stated in the employment contract, you DON'T have to pay back the company for the taxes on the bonus. The company is trying to make it easier for themselves and pushing the admin, paperwork, and tax filings onto you. The company is acting as an escrow situation for your income taxes. The money they took out for taxes should be refunded in this case. E.g. if the bonus was $10k, but you only received $7k and $3k was withheld for taxes, you should only have to pay back the $7k and the $3k would be removed from the payroll taxes the company pays to the fed gov. If you were told something else, I'd just tell them to pound sand after quitting and giving back the $7k portion.

Note - this only applies if the final paycheck is less than the amount you have to pay back. In the above example, if your final paycheck is $5k, you'd just write a check to the company for $2k

TomTX

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1663 on: May 05, 2017, 10:36:10 AM »
Replying mostly to follow, but also to say that I WISH we had FU money at the moment, or as we call it, a Rage Quit Fund.

DH recently left a job at the company we both worked for (I still work there). He got a job with a huge international company that included a 59% pay increase and a sign-on bonus. He's worked there for 5 whole weeks, and it's been crap the entire time. Not enough training, bosses treating him like crap, terrible customers, on and on. He desperately wants to quit, and has had his finger on the resignation button for almost two weeks now.

Unfortunately, we don't have a huge cash cushion to support him leaving. If he quits in less than a year, he'll have to pay back the bonus, including the 40% or so taxes that were taken out (so basically, we'd have to pay out of our small savings to have him quit). But that savings is really the only savings we have to survive for a short time without his paycheck until he finds a new job. I've tried to convince him to stay on at least long enough to save up the money to repay the bonus, but he's not sure he can last that long (it'll take a good couple of months to earn it back, even with the huge raise).

We've been on a huge "pay down the debt" kick for the last two years, and have managed to pay off a ton (probably like $45,000), but the other side of that is that we haven't been saving because I've been shoveling all the extra money towards debt. Situations like this make me really question my financial plan and Dave Ramsey's stupid mini-emergency fund.

I just want to make sure you realize that unless explicitly stated in the employment contract, you DON'T have to pay back the company for the taxes on the bonus. The company is trying to make it easier for themselves and pushing the admin, paperwork, and tax filings onto you. The company is acting as an escrow situation for your income taxes. The money they took out for taxes should be refunded in this case. E.g. if the bonus was $10k, but you only received $7k and $3k was withheld for taxes, you should only have to pay back the $7k and the $3k would be removed from the payroll taxes the company pays to the fed gov. If you were told something else, I'd just tell them to pound sand after quitting and giving back the $7k portion.

Note - this only applies if the final paycheck is less than the amount you have to pay back. In the above example, if your final paycheck is $5k, you'd just write a check to the company for $2k

Beyond that, at most pay back a pro rated portion of the $7k. If you were supposed to work a year and worked 5 weeks, that's ~$1000 less (10% of a year, 10% of 10k)
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SwordGuy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1664 on: May 05, 2017, 10:39:01 AM »
Or just tell the company you'll pay back what you owe (over and above the last paycheck, which they'll keep).  You'll put them in their place in line after your other creditors.  :)

Trifele

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1665 on: May 05, 2017, 12:32:45 PM »
Also -- check your state laws on final paychecks.  Some states do not allow employers to withhold from your final paycheck, even when you clearly owe them the money. They require the employer to set up another repayment method with the employee.  Which could be a pay-it-back-over-time scenario.   

Izybat

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1666 on: May 05, 2017, 05:36:57 PM »
Wow! Thanks for all the great advice.

We did check, and it claimed somewhere (in writing) that they can ask for the entire amount, the full $10,000 in the above example, rather than what we actually got. Not sure if they actually would, just that they can.  And given the current situation I am adjusting my 'get out of debt' expectations into a 'savings now' reality, but it's obviously not instantaneous. We aren't completely savings free as I've been working on my 401K all along, and while I'm not quite at the max contribution level, I'm getting closer. I've been inching it up a few percent every few months to make it less painful. We're also down to our last two debts, which if I continued to pay off at the rate we've been going would be gone in a year or less. However, that pace seems like it will have to slow down with the current situation.

As for his work situation, I know he's already pushed back some, not answering some emails/phone calls that seem unreasonable for instance, so we'll see how it goes. We're also just about to head out for a week vacation, so that makes it even better. We'll both have some time to decompress.

JLee

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1667 on: May 07, 2017, 12:23:17 PM »
Situations like this make me really question my financial plan and Dave Ramsey's stupid mini-emergency fund.

You're on the MMM forums now, you can (and should) leave the terrible advice of Dave Ramsey behind. Here is a simplified order that you should be prioritizing your extra money (from /r/personalfinance on reddit). Notice that a 3-6 month emergency fund is before everything else. There is a more advanced order of prioritization on the forums here. Again, starts with an emergency fund to your satisfaction. And only then paying down high interest debts after that. Your lower interest debts should wait until you have maxed every tax advantaged account available.

I also agree with TomTX. Most jobs can become much less stressful when you just stop caring about what your coworkers and boss think.

That reminds me of a day at my last employer when I mentioned I had a flight planned (IIRC it was for a family funeral), and a coworker asked if I already had the time off approved.  I said no, but it didn't really matter because I'd just go anyway.  The stunned look on her face was priceless.

lhamo

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1668 on: May 07, 2017, 01:39:13 PM »
Two books for your DH to consider reading during your vacation:

The No Asshole Rule by Bob Sutton (his blog is also a great resource)

Necessary Endings by Henry Cloud.

Both are great for advice on how to set better boundaries, and deciding when to cut loose.
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COEE

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1669 on: May 07, 2017, 06:07:39 PM »
I don't think it's epic, but it is a FU story...

A couple Friday's back I got my pink slip due to a RIF of 30% of the company.  My first reaction was to ask my boss for a letter of reference, which he said he'd give me.  Immediately after my boss gave me the pink slip he gave me a contract offering to bring me back on as a independent contractor - doing the same job at the same price as a my previous job.  Sounds awesome, right?  Wrong!  The contract wouldn't cover benefits or half of the FICA!  This ends up being a 30% hit in salary if I want to take any vacation - and puts my unemployment benefits in jeopardy!  Pppft!  What a crappy awful deal that only benefits them!  They knew it - no question in my mind.

Fast forward a few days of my lamenting weather or not to take the contract gig (it is money after all).  I eventually try to negotiate a better hourly rate and a severance that makes up for my potential loss of unemployment benefits.  They don't want me that bad!  Shocker!  NOT!  I tell them that I'd rather continue with the layoff as originally intended. 

I start clearing my things.  And my bosses boss wants to talk to me.  The tool starts giving me a sob story about how he was trying to give me a 'soft landing' and how he had a hard time getting me the contract offer to begin with and how it was a good deal... blah, blah, blah.  I think he was trying to change my mind.  I took a deep breath and thanks to my mustachian/frugal ways I told him something along the lines of, "I don't need this job.  In fact, I have never needed this job since the day I walked in the door.  I came to work because I liked my pay, I liked the work, and I liked *most* of the people, but today I need this job less than the first day I started working here."  I basically told him to shove the job up his ass.  That felt good.  I don't think he believed what I was telling him.

As I walked out the door for the last time, my boss hands me a letter of recommendation.

Unfortunately, two of my coworkers took the contract deal.  They are getting screwed, and I'm not sure they even know it.  I'm guessing they are not in a position where they can tell their boss to shove it up their ass.  So sad.

TheBuddha

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1670 on: May 07, 2017, 07:17:25 PM »
Great story! I could read stuff like this all day long.
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Trifele

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1671 on: May 08, 2017, 04:00:44 AM »
I don't think it's epic, but it is a FU story...

A couple Friday's back I got my pink slip due to a RIF of 30% of the company.  My first reaction was to ask my boss for a letter of reference, which he said he'd give me.  Immediately after my boss gave me the pink slip he gave me a contract offering to bring me back on as a independent contractor - doing the same job at the same price as a my previous job.  Sounds awesome, right?  Wrong!  The contract wouldn't cover benefits or half of the FICA!  This ends up being a 30% hit in salary if I want to take any vacation - and puts my unemployment benefits in jeopardy!  Pppft!  What a crappy awful deal that only benefits them!  They knew it - no question in my mind.

Fast forward a few days of my lamenting weather or not to take the contract gig (it is money after all).  I eventually try to negotiate a better hourly rate and a severance that makes up for my potential loss of unemployment benefits.  They don't want me that bad!  Shocker!  NOT!  I tell them that I'd rather continue with the layoff as originally intended. 

I start clearing my things.  And my bosses boss wants to talk to me.  The tool starts giving me a sob story about how he was trying to give me a 'soft landing' and how he had a hard time getting me the contract offer to begin with and how it was a good deal... blah, blah, blah.  I think he was trying to change my mind.  I took a deep breath and thanks to my mustachian/frugal ways I told him something along the lines of, "I don't need this job.  In fact, I have never needed this job since the day I walked in the door.  I came to work because I liked my pay, I liked the work, and I liked *most* of the people, but today I need this job less than the first day I started working here."  I basically told him to shove the job up his ass.  That felt good.  I don't think he believed what I was telling him.

As I walked out the door for the last time, my boss hands me a letter of recommendation.

Unfortunately, two of my coworkers took the contract deal.  They are getting screwed, and I'm not sure they even know it.  I'm guessing they are not in a position where they can tell their boss to shove it up their ass.  So sad.

Good on you COEE!  (And -- if you feel like it -- you could let the DOL know what they are up to . . . )

Pooperman

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1672 on: May 08, 2017, 04:36:29 AM »
Good on you COEE!  (And -- if you feel like it -- you could let the DOL know what they are up to . . . )

Exactly what I was thinking. I'd have been tempted to accept their offer and immediately report to the DOL. What's the worst they can do, fire you...again and get completely screwed by the DOL?

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1673 on: May 08, 2017, 06:01:32 AM »
That reminds me of a day at my last employer when I mentioned I had a flight planned (IIRC it was for a family funeral), and a coworker asked if I already had the time off approved.  I said no, but it didn't really matter because I'd just go anyway.  The stunned look on her face was priceless.

When I was a teacher, school policy was no approved absences before/after a holiday break.

I requested to be off Wednesday before the week of thanksgiving, for my brother's wedding.

Principal denied. I told her "I acknowledge that you denied the request, however, I'm letting you know, that I will not be here, and that a sub will be in my place".

I got a note "in my file", and the matter was never brought up again. No consequences whatsoever. I think Principal was secretly cool with it, just couldn't say so, because she'd already denied a dozen other teacher absence requests for that same week.

I was definitely at FU stage, and the job was pretty stress-free, when I stopped playing by all the dumb rules.
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COEE

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1674 on: May 08, 2017, 12:26:42 PM »
Good on you COEE!  (And -- if you feel like it -- you could let the DOL know what they are up to . . . )

Exactly what I was thinking. I'd have been tempted to accept their offer and immediately report to the DOL. What's the worst they can do, fire you...again and get completely screwed by the DOL?

Why do you think I agonized about what whether or not to take the contract work? 

Also, Let's just say I don't think the fat lady has finished singing.

Trifele

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1675 on: May 08, 2017, 03:58:18 PM »
Good on you COEE!  (And -- if you feel like it -- you could let the DOL know what they are up to . . . )

Exactly what I was thinking. I'd have been tempted to accept their offer and immediately report to the DOL. What's the worst they can do, fire you...again and get completely screwed by the DOL?

Why do you think I agonized about what whether or not to take the contract work? 

Also, Let's just say I don't think the fat lady has finished singing.

:)

One thing about DOL audits -- they come in to look at one thing, and often end up seeing other issues too.  Some common ones: 

--  Misclassifying employees as salaried/exempt from overtime (when really they are hourly/non-exempt).  The definitions are NOT straightforward/intuitive, and this type of misclassification happens all the time. 

--  Failure to pay overtime to people who were due it.  Say the employer had someone misclassified as exempt for years, but the employee was consistently working over 40 hours a week.  The DOL goes back and makes the employer fork over the time-and-a-half for the whole time the employee was misclassified (up to two or three years), plus fines

-- There are some new federal minimum salaries for many exempt employees (~$47k) and some employers don't know about it, or just aren't complying 

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1676 on: May 08, 2017, 04:42:14 PM »
-- There are some new federal minimum salaries for many exempt employees (~$47k) and some employers don't know about it, or just aren't complying

Wait, so if you make less than ~$47k/year, your employer probably needs to make you hourly and pay overtime?
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Smokystache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1677 on: May 08, 2017, 04:50:32 PM »
-- There are some new federal minimum salaries for many exempt employees (~$47k) and some employers don't know about it, or just aren't complying

Wait, so if you make less than ~$47k/year, your employer probably needs to make you hourly and pay overtime?

If we're all talking about the same thing, that got blocked just before it was supposed to take effect:
http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/barack-obama/obama-s-plan-extend-overtime-pay-blocked-federal-court-n687541

Trifele

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1678 on: May 08, 2017, 05:04:53 PM »
-- There are some new federal minimum salaries for many exempt employees (~$47k) and some employers don't know about it, or just aren't complying

Wait, so if you make less than ~$47k/year, your employer probably needs to make you hourly and pay overtime?

Oops.  Spoke too soon. A federal lawsuit has it on hold right now.  www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/flsa-overtime-rule-resources.aspx

And yes -- you've got it.  For many jobs (but not sales or computer programmers), under this new regulation if you earn less than $47k then the employer has to pay you OT.  So if/when this goes through the employer has to choose between raising salaries to that level or paying OT. 

My employer had gone ahead and made the changes (gave some people raises and reclassified others as hourly) before the lawsuit  hit.   Interesting!  I suppose with the new administration anything is possible now. The new rules could go through as is, die, or be modified. 

JLee

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1679 on: May 08, 2017, 05:41:08 PM »
Good on you COEE!  (And -- if you feel like it -- you could let the DOL know what they are up to . . . )

Exactly what I was thinking. I'd have been tempted to accept their offer and immediately report to the DOL. What's the worst they can do, fire you...again and get completely screwed by the DOL?

Why do you think I agonized about what whether or not to take the contract work? 

Also, Let's just say I don't think the fat lady has finished singing.

:)

One thing about DOL audits -- they come in to look at one thing, and often end up seeing other issues too.  Some common ones: 

--  Misclassifying employees as salaried/exempt from overtime (when really they are hourly/non-exempt).  The definitions are NOT straightforward/intuitive, and this type of misclassification happens all the time. 

--  Failure to pay overtime to people who were due it.  Say the employer had someone misclassified as exempt for years, but the employee was consistently working over 40 hours a week.  The DOL goes back and makes the employer fork over the time-and-a-half for the whole time the employee was misclassified (up to two or three years), plus fines

-- There are some new federal minimum salaries for many exempt employees (~$47k) and some employers don't know about it, or just aren't complying

My former employer is getting sued right now for this exact situation.

ducky19

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1680 on: May 11, 2017, 11:19:03 AM »
Having a really shitty day at work right now... would love to hear some more stories if anyone has one!

MNBen

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1681 on: May 11, 2017, 12:28:31 PM »
Having a really shitty day at work right now... would love to hear some more stories if anyone has one!

Only because you need it, as I don't think it's super EPIC, but I do like telling it....

Background:  I had a job where I could not stand the boss and it only peaked at the end and I did end up walking out one day and taking the entire summer off before looking for a new job.  I actually didn't know what FU money was, or even FIRE, but knew I was 'different' than the rest and had no issues taking a summer off working on fixing up a home I had just purchased in bankruptcy to start renting.

Also he was actually pretty easy to work around because he was spineless and mostly left me alone, but he was so incompetent it was still tough when he'd get an idea in his head and insist he was right.  And I loved the team I had trained myself and they were some of my favorite workers of any job.   It was also an IT job, I was their lead, and we helped support a warehouse, and the warehouse staff was absolutely amazing!  So I really enjoyed the job, except for the boss.

Story:  So many (too many) years before I eventually walked out, and I was pretty much a one-man team, there was a day when my boss stopped by and told me he was buying me a company cell phone to be carried in case an emergency came up after hours.   This was probably around 2005 when most people had cells phones, but I was a late adapter as I truly didn't need one.

Because I knew that the product I supported was pretty stable and I should seldom need a phone call, I told him I'd agree to carry a cell phone as long as he drafted up rules for when they could call me and what had to wait until the next day.  He agreed.

A few weeks later a cell phone box showed up at my desk.  I tossed it in a drawer and left it there. 

About six months later he stops by and mentions accounting is checking the cell phone bills and there has been zero activity on this number and he shows me the bill with what I guess is my cell's phone number.   

I reach down and pull out the box still sitting in my drawer and ask him if this is that phone.  He asks me why I'm not using it.  I told him I said I'd use it when he drafted up rules for when they could and couldn't call me. 

Needless to say there were rules drafted later that day, but still it made for a great story that still makes me laugh today!

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1682 on: May 11, 2017, 01:09:00 PM »
Quote
About six months later he stops by and mentions accounting is checking the cell phone bills and there has been zero activity on this number and he shows me the bill with what I guess is my cell's phone number.   

I reach down and pull out the box still sitting in my drawer and ask him if this is that phone.  He asks me why I'm not using it.  I told him I said I'd use it when he drafted up rules for when they could and couldn't call me. 

Needless to say there were rules drafted later that day, but still it made for a great story that still makes me laugh today!
  That's a brilliant story!  Thanks for sharing!

Liberty Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1683 on: May 11, 2017, 01:34:54 PM »
Having a really shitty day at work right now... would love to hear some more stories if anyone has one!

I'll give you one too. This one might even help you out...

A few months back my direct manager mentioned to me that he wanted me to take on a Really Shitty Responsibility (RSR) on top of my current work load. I've watched this specific RSR make three of my peers leave the company/leave the work group. I obviously wanted nothing to do with this RSR and it looked like I didn't really have a choice. I had pre-aligned with my DW that I'd leave the company if I got RSR. Before he had the change to formally give me the RSR, I had a conversation with the executive sponsor (ES) on the company's largest project which I am working on and kinda-sorta dotted line report to him. I told the ES that I was getting the RSR and that while I really enjoyed working on the large project and at the company, I probably wouldn't last at the company for very long after I got the RSR. He had personally saw what the RSR did to two out of the three other peers and understood completely.

Within a week, ES went to the CEO of the company and stated that one of his major project risks was needing to keep me focused on the large project. The CEO gave direction to my direct management to NOT give me the RSR. To this day my manager hasn't a clue that I influenced the ES to make this happen.

Morals of the story:
-Don't be afraid to walk away from a job once you have a level of FU money.
-There is typically someone around you in the organization that has interests that align with yours, learn to leverage them.
"Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears, while the used key is always bright" ~Benjamin Franklin, The Way to Wealth

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1684 on: May 11, 2017, 07:10:38 PM »
^I used to call that kind of stuff poison pumpkins (after the Pumpkin Plan book, which I haven't read, but I get the idea from the quick summary provided by my brother.) Now I'm going to start calling them RSR's.

gerardc

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1685 on: May 11, 2017, 09:47:33 PM »
^I used to call that kind of stuff poison pumpkins (after the Pumpkin Plan book, which I haven't read, but I get the idea from the quick summary provided by my brother.) Now I'm going to start calling them RSR's.

What would be examples of RSR so shitty as to make your job miserable?

Trifele

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1686 on: May 12, 2017, 05:22:06 AM »
^I used to call that kind of stuff poison pumpkins (after the Pumpkin Plan book, which I haven't read, but I get the idea from the quick summary provided by my brother.) Now I'm going to start calling them RSR's.

What would be examples of RSR so shitty as to make your job miserable?

Not sure if this was what Liberty had in mind by a RSR, but -- at my workplace there is this one division that is notorious for chewing through senior managers. No one lasts.  The middle managers and line employees in this Shitty Division have a reputation for being a tough bunch -- I've heard the words "sneaky" and "backstabbers" used before.   Guess what? Yesterday the senior manager for Shitty Division resigned.  And guess what?   There are discussions of yours truly being given this RSR.   I am thinking hard about how to respond to this.   On the one hand, I am only two years from FIRE.  On the other hand, I really like my current job and had no intentions of spending my last couple of years stressed out.   More to come, I am sure.   

Liberty Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1687 on: May 12, 2017, 06:56:57 AM »
^I used to call that kind of stuff poison pumpkins (after the Pumpkin Plan book, which I haven't read, but I get the idea from the quick summary provided by my brother.) Now I'm going to start calling them RSR's.

What would be examples of RSR so shitty as to make your job miserable?

In this case, my past peers were given the responsibility of a certain area, but not allows to make any decisions regarding that area (e.g. you are held responsible for the mistakes of your leadership). My past peers were regularly cut out of meetings/discussions with both internal and with external stakeholders, even when they demanded to be a part of them, and then they were reprimanded when things went wrong from the decisions made in that meeting. It's a complete scapegoat position with really low level work for my (and my peers) level.
"Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears, while the used key is always bright" ~Benjamin Franklin, The Way to Wealth

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1688 on: May 12, 2017, 07:33:31 AM »
Quote
About six months later he stops by and mentions accounting is checking the cell phone bills and there has been zero activity on this number and he shows me the bill with what I guess is my cell's phone number.   

I reach down and pull out the box still sitting in my drawer and ask him if this is that phone.  He asks me why I'm not using it.  I told him I said I'd use it when he drafted up rules for when they could and couldn't call me. 

Needless to say there were rules drafted later that day, but still it made for a great story that still makes me laugh today!
  That's a brilliant story!  Thanks for sharing!
love this!  It's even better than an FU story. It's a "noBS" story.
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

Reynold

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1689 on: May 12, 2017, 09:17:44 AM »
A couple Friday's back I got my pink slip due to a RIF of 30% of the company.  My first reaction was to ask my boss for a letter of reference, which he said he'd give me.  Immediately after my boss gave me the pink slip he gave me a contract offering to bring me back on as a independent contractor - doing the same job at the same price as a my previous job. 

[snip]

Unfortunately, two of my coworkers took the contract deal.  They are getting screwed, and I'm not sure they even know it.  I'm guessing they are not in a position where they can tell their boss to shove it up their ass.  So sad.

Reminds me of a situation with a friend of mine.  He worked at an emergency notification service, the kind of place that sets up calls to surrounding areas if a nuke plant is melting down or something.  It involved rotating shift work in programming/monitoring the systems, with weekends where you couldn't go more than 15 minutes response time from work.  Most people didn't last there, so he was senior, and usually training one or two others for the other spots at any one time. 

A new outfit bought the company, and laid everyone off, wanting to make them contract employees instead.  He basically looked at the contract, which as in your example didn't include any raise, and said "I'm not willing to take the liability risk for emergency notifications as a contract employee." so he left.  He had mentioned in another context that he had several years of living expenses saved up, so that let him spend 6 months or so job hunting to find something in his somewhat specialized field in a smaller city without having to worry about it.  He now doesn't have to do rotating shifts or weekends. 

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1690 on: May 12, 2017, 03:56:33 PM »
It's clear that some management has the viewpoint that there is always someone else willing to step in and fill the job, so why keep current employees (even top performers) happy? This is a terrible business philosophy, of course, but I see it more and more.

There is tremendous beauty in reaching a point where you just don't have to put up with any BS at work. I haven't had to quit a job over it yet, but I've done things recently like just decide to take 3 days off in the middle of the week to avoid looming BS. Of course, I make an effort not to inconvenience others with my whims, but staying home to chill with the dog really is as simple as turning on my email's "out of office" autoreply. The last time I had a boss who declared that she needed to give "approval" for any of my time off, I would just call in sick instead.

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1691 on: May 12, 2017, 04:15:44 PM »
It's clear that some management has the viewpoint that there is always someone else willing to step in and fill the job, so why keep current employees (even top performers) happy? This is a terrible business philosophy, of course, but I see it more and more.

I agree, there is some of that element.  At the other end of the spectrum, there are others that will keep someone around who does little or nothing, because finding someone to replace that person is too much trouble.  Neither is good!
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

Rowellen

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1692 on: May 12, 2017, 07:24:05 PM »
The last time I had a boss who declared that she needed to give "approval" for any of my time off, I would just call in sick instead.

My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

nnls

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1693 on: May 12, 2017, 07:52:52 PM »

My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

The last time I had a boss who declared that she needed to give "approval" for any of my time off, I would just call in sick instead.


In the USA is sick leave and annual leave come out of the same days off? Like you just get four weeks off per year and can use it how ever you want?

I don't know how to word my question properly, but in Australia for example you get a minimum four weeks annual leave and two weeks sick/carers leave, they aren't really interchangeable though. Though if you run out of sick leave you can sometimes use your annual leave for it.

But at every place I have worked, annual leave needs permission, sick leave is what you would just call in and take off as required.

tiger002

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1694 on: May 12, 2017, 08:50:30 PM »

My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

The last time I had a boss who declared that she needed to give "approval" for any of my time off, I would just call in sick instead.


In the USA is sick leave and annual leave come out of the same days off? Like you just get four weeks off per year and can use it how ever you want?

I don't know how to word my question properly, but in Australia for example you get a minimum four weeks annual leave and two weeks sick/carers leave, they aren't really interchangeable though. Though if you run out of sick leave you can sometimes use your annual leave for it.

But at every place I have worked, annual leave needs permission, sick leave is what you would just call in and take off as required.

It depends on the job. Some places have separate sick and annual leave pools while others combine them into PTO.

nnls

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1695 on: May 12, 2017, 08:55:14 PM »

My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

The last time I had a boss who declared that she needed to give "approval" for any of my time off, I would just call in sick instead.


In the USA is sick leave and annual leave come out of the same days off? Like you just get four weeks off per year and can use it how ever you want?

I don't know how to word my question properly, but in Australia for example you get a minimum four weeks annual leave and two weeks sick/carers leave, they aren't really interchangeable though. Though if you run out of sick leave you can sometimes use your annual leave for it.

But at every place I have worked, annual leave needs permission, sick leave is what you would just call in and take off as required.

It depends on the job. Some places have separate sick and annual leave pools while others combine them into PTO.

PTO?

jfolsen

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1696 on: May 12, 2017, 09:01:28 PM »
Paid Time Off. They pool the sick leave and vacation together. Usually it is a bit less than the sum would have been.

nnls

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1697 on: May 12, 2017, 09:05:21 PM »
Paid Time Off. They pool the sick leave and vacation together. Usually it is a bit less than the sum would have been.

Oh ok makes sense.

With This Herring

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1698 on: May 12, 2017, 10:32:19 PM »
^I used to call that kind of stuff poison pumpkins (after the Pumpkin Plan book, which I haven't read, but I get the idea from the quick summary provided by my brother.) Now I'm going to start calling them RSR's.

What would be examples of RSR so shitty as to make your job miserable?

At OldFirm, there was a particular huge client that was a disastrous combination of minimum bookkeeping ability, complex company structure, lender interest in financials, and crushing deadlines.  Said client had issues year-round.  Additionally, client was a significant portion of OldFirm's billing, enough so that one person would be assigned to work primarily on client.  I was not that person.  That person ended up crushed by the incessant demands of client and rapidly multiplying financials when client's lending needs increased.  That person ended up working Tax Season-type hours for months and months extra during the year, when none of the rest of OldFirm faced similar time commitments.  That person ended up never taking anywhere near all vacation time permitted (with no rollovers or payouts of unused time), taking client calls while on vacation, missing out on chances for more varied work, and seriously falling behind in necessary professional development.  I saw two that-persons quickly come and go during my time there, and the third was in the middle of burning out when I left.  When the number of financials per year kept multiplying to the point where it looked like I was going to be a second person on that client, that was one of the things that pushed me to leave.
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MrMoogle

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1699 on: May 17, 2017, 10:50:56 AM »
Paid Time Off. They pool the sick leave and vacation together. Usually it is a bit less than the sum would have been.

Oh ok makes sense.
It definitely depends on the industry.  My mom works at a hospital, for sick leave you practically need a doctor's note.  Vacation and holidays you need advance approval.

I'm an engineer, I get PPL (paid personal leave, which is just another name for PTO), and as long as I get my work done, I can take PPL whenever I want with little to no notice.