Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 490816 times)

hettie1

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1450 on: January 19, 2017, 07:47:30 PM »
Hettie, I have been looking at assisted living facilities for my mom recently.   Your story is one of the reasons we chose that route, rather than adult family homes.  My state regulates things fairly well, but if none of the patients or caregivers can speak for themselves, it is scary how things can spin out of control.  On behalf of the medically vulnerable and their family and friends, thank you for taking a stand.

Good choice!  Having worked in several home situations over the last decades I HIGHLY recommend one-on-one care or an actual assisted living home.  Group homes have some great staff, but they can go wrong quickly and its so sad.

Laura33

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1451 on: January 19, 2017, 09:04:57 PM »
Holy effing hell, Hettie.  I am glad there are people like you in this world.
Laugh while you can, monkey-boy

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1452 on: January 19, 2017, 09:35:00 PM »
Holy effing hell, Hettie.  I am glad there are people like you in this world.
Amen to that!

Also, hugs to you, BlueHouse. I have soooo been there, done that. I am four years post-FIRE and every damn shit sandwich was worth it. I now have no memory of how bad they tasted way back when. Yours is definitely a FU story, because your stash keeps you from ever having to eat another one. You have a choice, and you will prevail in the end. You've got this.
I did it! I have a journal!
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And hell yes, I am still moving confidently in the direction of my dreams...

jlajr

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1453 on: January 19, 2017, 10:12:44 PM »
It's great when FU money saves you, but so much better when it saves someone else!

+1 to that, G-dog!

Also, before seeing BlueHouse's post and the comments to it, the thought occurred to me that having at least some FU money kind of forces us to think: When are the shit sandwiches are too big that it becomes worth taking action that could lead to using that FU money before complete FIRE?

Without FU money, we might be able to simply accept that we have to eat the shit sandwiches being served to us in our current situations, unless or until someone offers to serve us something else that might look nice now but could turn into more shit sandwiches.

Is this is a case of "With great power, comes great responsibility" or could it be "Mo' money, mo' problems"? :)

Metric Mouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1454 on: January 20, 2017, 12:37:43 AM »
It's great when FU money saves you, but so much better when it saves someone else!

Right?
Give me one fine day of plain sailing weather and I can mess up anything.

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mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1455 on: January 20, 2017, 10:35:23 AM »
It's great when FU money saves you, but so much better when it saves someone else!
YES

Bicycle_B

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1456 on: January 20, 2017, 05:38:08 PM »
Holy shit, Hettie.  That is some serious and sad stuff. Glad you were there to do the right thing.
Indeed.  Thanks for doing the right thing, Hettie!
+1

SEAKSR

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1457 on: January 23, 2017, 03:36:29 PM »
P2F...

No epic stories here... I've largely gotten lucky, and just found other employment when the going was looking potentially rough. But each and every one of your stories helps me remember why I maintain my funds, just in case. Thanks everyone!

talltexan

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1458 on: February 01, 2017, 07:50:56 AM »
Bluehouse, hang in there. In my previous job (some years ago, before I learned the ways of the mustache), my wife happened to download mint right about the time things started getting really horrible. I was shocked when she showed me that our net worth was $400,000. I couldn't imagine that kind of money at the time, it seemed so far removed from any reality. It's not enough for us to retire, but I realized how silly I was worrying about one job when we had accumulated that kind of stash seemingly by accident.


Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1459 on: February 01, 2017, 11:26:27 AM »
Bluehouse, hang in there. In my previous job (some years ago, before I learned the ways of the mustache), my wife happened to download mint right about the time things started getting really horrible. I was shocked when she showed me that our net worth was $400,000. I couldn't imagine that kind of money at the time, it seemed so far removed from any reality. It's not enough for us to retire, but I realized how silly I was worrying about one job when we had accumulated that kind of stash seemingly by accident.
And that kind of peace of mind is priceless.
I did it! I have a journal!
http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/journals/a-lot-like-this/
And hell yes, I am still moving confidently in the direction of my dreams...

privateer

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1460 on: February 05, 2017, 12:10:41 AM »
after spending some time reading through this thread I think I should toss a few in:

1) The first time I realized the power of being flexible and financially secure was about a year after starting my first real engineering gig at company "A"... I had a bachelors degree at the time and was on hiatus from an integrated masters program that I had to finish within 2 years of finishing my bachelors (basically you tag on a year of graduate classes to the end of an intense bachelors for a masters degree).  I went to my manager and asked if I could have a leave of absence approved to go back to school.  My manager at the time (a nice guy actually, but under pressure to get products shipped) thought it would be very unlikely that I could get one approved and discouraged it.... until of course about 2 minutes later when he did a 180 when I suggested that if it wasn't possible I'd need to get the paperwork together for quitting because I had to go back to finish my masters.   educational leave approved :)


2) years later at the same company "A" I had drifted away from my specialty and wanted to get back into it. I found a sweet gig internally in the research division that was interesting, prestigious, and likely to pay a little better to boot.  The hiring manager gave me the thumbs up, however my existing management chain wouldn't approve my transfer saying I was critical and they needed me to stay on 9 more months to finish current projects (of course no promotion or salary bump for said critical engineer :) ). 

Knowing that sweet research gig would be filled in a month or two I started looking around outside and soon found a nice job at a competitor for a 25% salary bump. My old management tried to counter, but I never gave them a number and their counter offer came in under what the competitor was offering so no deal (which also helped avoid the awkwardness of still working there after threatening to leave).

  So off I went to company "B" after 2 weeks notice ! I half expected to be frog marched out the door when I gave notice, but it didn't happen... In fact I still remember one of the project managers asking me to write engineering change orders on my very last day, and eventually having to excuse myself to go to my goodbye party :)


on to FU money tale number 3:
After working at company "B"  for about 10 years I got caught up in a layoff.  My boss several years earlier tried to do something good for me that turned out quite bad.  He gave me a 15% raise one year, but to equal things out, gave me a low amount of stock... no worries, I was fat dumb and happy until 2 years later they needed to layoff 15% of the company, and because they hadn't handed out  bad annual reviews to 15% of the staff, they went back and decided that anyone who had low stock awards in the last few years were underperformers and needed to go. 

Getting the notice was a shock, but at least they gave me 30 days to find a different position internally. Luckily my specialty is in demand and I'm not a total jerk to work with so in the course of 2-3 weeks I had 6 different managers interested in hiring me (but only 2-3 actually had open positions given the tight head count due to the layoff). I also looked around externally, but at the time wasn't interested in moving for family reasons. I eventually ended up taking a job in one of those other divisions in company "B".

fast forward 3 months and my old manager lands a huge secret project in my specialty and needs to staff up significantly. not only that, but said huge project for company "C" is to replace a product that was built at company "A" (where I previously worked). because I understood how things worked at these two different companies I could translate the specs written for Company "A" into the design methodologies of company "B".  I got informally lent to this project and started working on it for about a month when my old manager started asking about transfering me back...

Meanwhile, some of my earlier inquiries made in the heat of potentially being layed off at another company "D" started to circulate internally (my specialty is a relatively small world).  A different manager at company "D" heard I was looking and offered me a gig that would let me work from home. After interviewing with them I negotiated an offer with about a 30%  compensation boost.

so, I called a meeting with my old boss (the one who had to lay me off 3 months earlier) to talk about transfering back to formally start helping out with the secret project. In the room I lay out the fact that I have an offer, and am planning on leaving company "B" unless he can bump me a grade level and match the 30% raise in the external offer.  He promises to work with HR to see what they can do before my offer expires.  Eventually HR drags it out to the last possible second and then comes up with something underwhelming (no grade change and only 15% raise).  So off I go.

Funny enough I don't really harbor any ill will to my old manager (he was really just a technical guy trying to do a managers job at a company that had severe HR and organizational shortcomings).  That said, I'd be lying if I didn't say I felt a sense of Shadenfreude over the whole turn of events.

Cork

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1461 on: February 05, 2017, 09:23:39 PM »
after spending some time reading through this thread I think I should toss a few in:

1) The first time I realized the power of being flexible and financially secure was about a year after starting my first real engineering gig at company "A"... I had a bachelors degree at the time and was on hiatus from an integrated masters program that I had to finish within 2 years of finishing my bachelors (basically you tag on a year of graduate classes to the end of an intense bachelors for a masters degree).  I went to my manager and asked if I could have a leave of absence approved to go back to school.  My manager at the time (a nice guy actually, but under pressure to get products shipped) thought it would be very unlikely that I could get one approved and discouraged it.... until of course about 2 minutes later when he did a 180 when I suggested that if it wasn't possible I'd need to get the paperwork together for quitting because I had to go back to finish my masters.   educational leave approved :)

This ones my favorite, so I summarized it for you:

Manager: "I have control over your future."   
You: "No you don't." 
Manager: "Dammit, please still work for us."
Prost!

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1462 on: February 06, 2017, 11:08:11 AM »
after spending some time reading through this thread I think I should toss a few in:

1) The first time I realized the power of being flexible and financially secure was about a year after starting my first real engineering gig at company "A"... I had a bachelors degree at the time and was on hiatus from an integrated masters program that I had to finish within 2 years of finishing my bachelors (basically you tag on a year of graduate classes to the end of an intense bachelors for a masters degree).  I went to my manager and asked if I could have a leave of absence approved to go back to school.  My manager at the time (a nice guy actually, but under pressure to get products shipped) thought it would be very unlikely that I could get one approved and discouraged it.... until of course about 2 minutes later when he did a 180 when I suggested that if it wasn't possible I'd need to get the paperwork together for quitting because I had to go back to finish my masters.   educational leave approved :)

This ones my favorite, so I summarized it for you:

Manager: "I have control over your future."   
You: "No you don't." 
Manager: "Dammit, please still work for us."
also least confusing

Liberty Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1463 on: February 06, 2017, 01:23:32 PM »
after spending some time reading through this thread I think I should toss a few in:

1) The first time I realized the power of being flexible and financially secure was about a year after starting my first real engineering gig at company "A"... I had a bachelors degree at the time and was on hiatus from an integrated masters program that I had to finish within 2 years of finishing my bachelors (basically you tag on a year of graduate classes to the end of an intense bachelors for a masters degree).  I went to my manager and asked if I could have a leave of absence approved to go back to school.  My manager at the time (a nice guy actually, but under pressure to get products shipped) thought it would be very unlikely that I could get one approved and discouraged it.... until of course about 2 minutes later when he did a 180 when I suggested that if it wasn't possible I'd need to get the paperwork together for quitting because I had to go back to finish my masters.   educational leave approved :)

This ones my favorite, so I summarized it for you:

Manager: "I have control over your future."   
You: "No you don't." 
Manager: "Dammit, please still work for us."

Funny how that works. I love it.
"Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears, while the used key is always bright" ~Benjamin Franklin, The Way to Wealth

solon

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1464 on: February 06, 2017, 04:05:16 PM »
Posting to follow.

These stories are great motivation to stay at work and build up some FU money.

privateer

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1465 on: February 06, 2017, 08:34:13 PM »
after spending some time reading through this thread I think I should toss a few in:

1) The first time I realized the power of being flexible and financially secure was about a year after starting my first real engineering gig at company "A"... I had a bachelors degree at the time and was on hiatus from an integrated masters program that I had to finish within 2 years of finishing my bachelors (basically you tag on a year of graduate classes to the end of an intense bachelors for a masters degree).  I went to my manager and asked if I could have a leave of absence approved to go back to school.  My manager at the time (a nice guy actually, but under pressure to get products shipped) thought it would be very unlikely that I could get one approved and discouraged it.... until of course about 2 minutes later when he did a 180 when I suggested that if it wasn't possible I'd need to get the paperwork together for quitting because I had to go back to finish my masters.   educational leave approved :)

This ones my favorite, so I summarized it for you:

Manager: "I have control over your future."   
You: "No you don't." 
Manager: "Dammit, please still work for us."
also least confusing

sorry for the rambling nature.... the 3rd is actually my personal favorite. it summarizes to:

manager: you're laid off but eligible for rehire
(I find someplace else in the company)
(3 months later I start informally helping old manager)
Manager: can you move back to help us officially??
me: only if you match this external offer of a big raise that I got because I was threatened with a layoff a few months ago.
HR: ummmm??
me: bye!

Metric Mouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1466 on: February 06, 2017, 08:37:21 PM »
after spending some time reading through this thread I think I should toss a few in:

1) The first time I realized the power of being flexible and financially secure was about a year after starting my first real engineering gig at company "A"... I had a bachelors degree at the time and was on hiatus from an integrated masters program that I had to finish within 2 years of finishing my bachelors (basically you tag on a year of graduate classes to the end of an intense bachelors for a masters degree).  I went to my manager and asked if I could have a leave of absence approved to go back to school.  My manager at the time (a nice guy actually, but under pressure to get products shipped) thought it would be very unlikely that I could get one approved and discouraged it.... until of course about 2 minutes later when he did a 180 when I suggested that if it wasn't possible I'd need to get the paperwork together for quitting because I had to go back to finish my masters.   educational leave approved :)

This ones my favorite, so I summarized it for you:

Manager: "I have control over your future."   
You: "No you don't." 
Manager: "Dammit, please still work for us."
Nice. Would even fit in a Dilbert panel.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2017, 11:26:23 PM by Metric Mouse »
Give me one fine day of plain sailing weather and I can mess up anything.

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zinny1

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1467 on: February 06, 2017, 09:11:39 PM »
Mine's fairly tame but reading this forum and particularly this thread over the last few months helped me calmly and fearlessly negotiate my recent position change.

I have been employed in my company for ~10 years, underpaid significantly for at least 6 of them due to restrictive 'levels' and 'ceilings'. A number of employees including myself changed to different type of contract which was less secure but had more flexibility for salary negotiations about 3 years ago. I was finally paid a fair salary, at least initially. Recently my responsibilities and the scope of my role have increased significantly and I was doing a lot more work that other co-workers at a similar salary level.

End of contract was 31 December and I received my offer late November. I was offered about $5K more which only put me on a par with the long-termers at my previous level of responsibility and didn't reflect the extra work I had been doing nor the work they were expecting me to take on from January 2017 after a structure change. I refused to sign. Cue lots of flapping about from HR and my manager trying to scare me into signing by saying things like; 'if you want your salary to reflect the next level up your position will have to be re-advertised and you might not get it' and 'your position is not indispensible you know'.

Because I knew I could live for at least two years on savings, plus I knew that my skills and expertise are actually hard to replace due to the systems and processes we use at work, I stood firm. Polite but immoveable. I won't sign for less than the next level up. And I want my salary reviewed in two years, not four. And I want a title change (didn't actually care about that but I thought I may as well ask for everything).

Lots of sighing and frowning and 'I'll see what I can do for you but don't hold your breath' type comments ensued and I quietly went about my business. I returned the following week to a freshly printed contract, increased salary, better benefits and a new title! All because I wasn't afraid to walk away. And also largely because to train someone up would take literally years and make the bosses lives much harder in the interim.

Thank the universe for FU money and lazy employers.


Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1468 on: February 06, 2017, 10:23:26 PM »
Mine's fairly tame but reading this forum and particularly this thread over the last few months helped me calmly and fearlessly negotiate my recent position change.

I have been employed in my company for ~10 years, underpaid significantly for at least 6 of them due to restrictive 'levels' and 'ceilings'. A number of employees including myself changed to different type of contract which was less secure but had more flexibility for salary negotiations about 3 years ago. I was finally paid a fair salary, at least initially. Recently my responsibilities and the scope of my role have increased significantly and I was doing a lot more work that other co-workers at a similar salary level.

End of contract was 31 December and I received my offer late November. I was offered about $5K more which only put me on a par with the long-termers at my previous level of responsibility and didn't reflect the extra work I had been doing nor the work they were expecting me to take on from January 2017 after a structure change. I refused to sign. Cue lots of flapping about from HR and my manager trying to scare me into signing by saying things like; 'if you want your salary to reflect the next level up your position will have to be re-advertised and you might not get it' and 'your position is not indispensible you know'.

Because I knew I could live for at least two years on savings, plus I knew that my skills and expertise are actually hard to replace due to the systems and processes we use at work, I stood firm. Polite but immoveable. I won't sign for less than the next level up. And I want my salary reviewed in two years, not four. And I want a title change (didn't actually care about that but I thought I may as well ask for everything).

Lots of sighing and frowning and 'I'll see what I can do for you but don't hold your breath' type comments ensued and I quietly went about my business. I returned the following week to a freshly printed contract, increased salary, better benefits and a new title! All because I wasn't afraid to walk away. And also largely because to train someone up would take literally years and make the bosses lives much harder in the interim.

Thank the universe for FU money and lazy employers.
Don't forget to thank yourself there, zinny1. Wouldn't have happened without your past self making good decisions.
I did it! I have a journal!
http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/journals/a-lot-like-this/
And hell yes, I am still moving confidently in the direction of my dreams...

nnls

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1469 on: February 06, 2017, 10:31:01 PM »
Mine's fairly tame but reading this forum and particularly this thread over the last few months helped me calmly and fearlessly negotiate my recent position change.

I have been employed in my company for ~10 years, underpaid significantly for at least 6 of them due to restrictive 'levels' and 'ceilings'. A number of employees including myself changed to different type of contract which was less secure but had more flexibility for salary negotiations about 3 years ago. I was finally paid a fair salary, at least initially. Recently my responsibilities and the scope of my role have increased significantly and I was doing a lot more work that other co-workers at a similar salary level.

End of contract was 31 December and I received my offer late November. I was offered about $5K more which only put me on a par with the long-termers at my previous level of responsibility and didn't reflect the extra work I had been doing nor the work they were expecting me to take on from January 2017 after a structure change. I refused to sign. Cue lots of flapping about from HR and my manager trying to scare me into signing by saying things like; 'if you want your salary to reflect the next level up your position will have to be re-advertised and you might not get it' and 'your position is not indispensible you know'.

Because I knew I could live for at least two years on savings, plus I knew that my skills and expertise are actually hard to replace due to the systems and processes we use at work, I stood firm. Polite but immoveable. I won't sign for less than the next level up. And I want my salary reviewed in two years, not four. And I want a title change (didn't actually care about that but I thought I may as well ask for everything).

Lots of sighing and frowning and 'I'll see what I can do for you but don't hold your breath' type comments ensued and I quietly went about my business. I returned the following week to a freshly printed contract, increased salary, better benefits and a new title! All because I wasn't afraid to walk away. And also largely because to train someone up would take literally years and make the bosses lives much harder in the interim.

Thank the universe for FU money and lazy employers.

yay this is an awesome story. well done and congratulations on your payrise / title change

mikefixac

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1470 on: February 07, 2017, 06:10:45 PM »
What the hell, this thread's been around awhile, I'll add my $.02. (If I haven't already).

I've had my own business (appliance repair) since 1989. Always did OK, but never set the world on fire. In fact, for me, doing just ok was setting the world on fire. I was totally responsible for how I survived, and I liked that.

A few years ago business dropped and I sought and got a job. All the years of working for myself I envied those who were part of a team. I had a good boss, good pay, good relations with the other employees, and new vehicle. Problem though is I just don't work well as an employee. So after just a few weeks, I drove truck over to bosses house, gave the vehicle and tools back, and quit.

Leaving his house I was jumping up and down clicking my heels I was so happy. 

Evgenia

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1471 on: February 07, 2017, 06:39:30 PM »
I have one.

Context: I was an engineering director down in Silicon Valley. All engineering programs reported in to me. I was in very good standing, got promotions every 6-12 months, year after year, more responsibility, yada yada all that. But, I'd hit the glass ceiling, having been told there was nowhere for me to go. Coincidentally, I was the only female director in the entire, vast place.

My MIL had died after a grueling bout with cancer, hospice, that whole shitty, undeserved kind of end. My husband was unemployed, as he'd quit his job (also in engineering) to take care of his mother in another part of the state (as others have pointed out, another key thing that FU money enables you to do).

It was a busy Software Season at my job, so we cut our annual (and, as you can probably gather, desperately needed) vacation with friends short, returning home on Thursday instead of Sunday.

Lesson #1: Everything bad happens when you go on vacation.

Lesson #2: Never, ever, EVER cut your vacation short. Ever.

I returned to work on Friday and, by 10 AM, was in a meeting with my (guilty, semi freaked out looking) boss explaining that, in the few days I'd been gone, some man had been interviewed and hired to take a brand new VP level position over me, *and* take over my team.

But it gets better... wait for it... My boss said he "hoped I'd stay on" and "could still be the new guy's assistant."

I said "I am no one's assistant. I'm leaving." And then I walked right out of the room and over to my desk, where I realized I probably should have asked my husband about this first, seeing as how we now had no income, him not having a job at the time and all. I texted him and said "Got a sec? Think I just quit my job." He called me and the very first words out of his mouth were, "Want me to come and help pack up your desk? Nothing would give me greater satisfaction than seeing you walk the fuck out of that place."

And that, ladies, is the moment you KNOW you married the perfect man. Unconditional support, he didn't even need to know why, and income, we could figure that out.

The details that emerged in the hours after my boss's announcement were priceless, and even more damning. It turned out my boss's boss had not even interviewed and was totally clueless about this hire (who would report to him), and instantly started fighting it like mad. Someone leaked the results of the new guy's interview and found the majority of people had recommended "No hire" and done so STRONGLY. On, and on. Unmitigated disaster, and nice to watch from afar, happily ensconced in my FU fund.

FIRE since June 2015. Chronicling the post-FIRE transition at: https://evgeniagotfi.wordpress.com/

Sydneystache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1472 on: February 07, 2017, 06:42:52 PM »
Awesome! Well done - wow. I agree, never cut your holiday short for some mess that happened while you're away and good on your hubby for supporting you no qs asked.

Very sneaky of your company too. What happened to the hire? Did he last long? Did the company contact you again to come back?

Adventine

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1473 on: February 07, 2017, 06:58:11 PM »
Evgenia, we need to know what happened next!

Evgenia

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1474 on: February 07, 2017, 07:11:22 PM »
You guys make me laugh! The hire was allowed to come in on contract, as a contract-to-hire. It was an abysmal failure and, after a few months of his saying things to employees like "I've never met a black person before!" (really) and always asking women on the campus if they were married, he was not hired permanently.

I stayed gone and had a much nicer job (with signing bonus, and lots of other bonuses, and $30k additional salary) in days, from a former colleague who'd moved on a year or so previously.

And I did that until we went FIRE not quite two years ago! :-) THE END. :-)
FIRE since June 2015. Chronicling the post-FIRE transition at: https://evgeniagotfi.wordpress.com/

Hvillian

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1475 on: February 07, 2017, 07:18:01 PM »
Awesome Evegenia, every part (except how you were treated).  Thank you for sharing.

CowboyAndIndian

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1476 on: February 07, 2017, 08:00:12 PM »
Evegenia, the power of FU money and a Spouse who has your back is mighty powerful.

Thanks for sharing

Metric Mouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1477 on: February 07, 2017, 08:01:40 PM »
You guys make me laugh! The hire was allowed to come in on contract, as a contract-to-hire. It was an abysmal failure and, after a few months of his saying things to employees like "I've never met a black person before!" (really) and always asking women on the campus if they were married, he was not hired permanently.

I stayed gone and had a much nicer job (with signing bonus, and lots of other bonuses, and $30k additional salary) in days, from a former colleague who'd moved on a year or so previously.

And I did that until we went FIRE not quite two years ago! :-) THE END. :-)
Great story. (For you)
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Laura33

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1478 on: February 07, 2017, 08:04:22 PM »
You guys make me laugh! The hire was allowed to come in on contract, as a contract-to-hire. It was an abysmal failure and, after a few months of his saying things to employees like "I've never met a black person before!" (really) and always asking women on the campus if they were married, he was not hired permanently.

I stayed gone and had a much nicer job (with signing bonus, and lots of other bonuses, and $30k additional salary) in days, from a former colleague who'd moved on a year or so previously.

And I did that until we went FIRE not quite two years ago! :-) THE END. :-)

You are officially awesome - glad you got the last laugh!
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lhamo

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1479 on: February 07, 2017, 09:34:04 PM »
I love you, Evgenia!

I had the whole "hire a man in over your head and expect you to do all his work for him" thing pulled on me twice.   The first time, I finished up some projects that were personally important to me, and then quit.  The second time, I kept working for a few months to bump up the savings until my return to the US, and then FIREd.    I still kind of wish I had walked out immediately both times, though.   It sucks when companies pull that glass ceiling shit....
Wherever you go, there you are

snapperdude

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1480 on: February 07, 2017, 09:56:42 PM »
I love you, Evgenia!

I had the whole "hire a man in over your head and expect you to do all his work for him" thing pulled on me twice.   The first time, I finished up some projects that were personally important to me, and then quit.  The second time, I kept working for a few months to bump up the savings until my return to the US, and then FIREd.    I still kind of wish I had walked out immediately both times, though.   It sucks when companies pull that glass ceiling shit....

Sucks when countries do too.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2017, 01:58:32 AM by snapperdude »

Evgenia

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1481 on: February 07, 2017, 09:58:59 PM »
I love you, Evgenia!

I had the whole "hire a man in over your head and expect you to do all his work for him" thing pulled on me twice.   The first time, I finished up some projects that were personally important to me, and then quit.  The second time, I kept working for a few months to bump up the savings until my return to the US, and then FIREd.    I still kind of wish I had walked out immediately both times, though.   It sucks when companies pull that glass ceiling shit....

Love you too! I have to say, awesome as it sounds, I only knew to walk *because* it had happened to me before. I did not, regretfully, walk the first time it happened.
FIRE since June 2015. Chronicling the post-FIRE transition at: https://evgeniagotfi.wordpress.com/

Adventine

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1482 on: February 07, 2017, 11:38:46 PM »
You guys make me laugh! The hire was allowed to come in on contract, as a contract-to-hire. It was an abysmal failure and, after a few months of his saying things to employees like "I've never met a black person before!" (really) and always asking women on the campus if they were married, he was not hired permanently.

I stayed gone and had a much nicer job (with signing bonus, and lots of other bonuses, and $30k additional salary) in days, from a former colleague who'd moved on a year or so previously.

And I did that until we went FIRE not quite two years ago! :-) THE END. :-)

Revenge is so, so sweet :D

PaulMaxime

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1483 on: February 08, 2017, 12:07:38 AM »
My story is this:

I worked at a large Internet company from 2007-2015. During the last 3 years at that company I found my way on to a special project that was run as an "internal startup" Now in Sept of 2015 our group spun off to an independent company.

Most of the other engineers were too scared to make the move. The large company is very stable and pays well and has great benefits. From a team of 80 we ended up with 37 people (only 6 engineers!)

I was able to take the risk and join the spinoff because I am 99% FI at this point. Our little company has become hugely successful in one year and now I'm looking to make real $$$ off of the very large equity grant I got as part of joining the new company.

FU Money == freedom to take risks.
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Metric Mouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1484 on: February 08, 2017, 12:18:08 AM »
My story is this:

I worked at a large Internet company from 2007-2015. During the last 3 years at that company I found my way on to a special project that was run as an "internal startup" Now in Sept of 2015 our group spun off to an independent company.

Most of the other engineers were too scared to make the move. The large company is very stable and pays well and has great benefits. From a team of 80 we ended up with 37 people (only 6 engineers!)

I was able to take the risk and join the spinoff because I am 99% FI at this point. Our little company has become hugely successful in one year and now I'm looking to make real $$$ off of the very large equity grant I got as part of joining the new company.

FU Money == freedom to take risks.

This is exciting! So you 'looted' 37 people from a team of 80? That's quite impressive
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Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1485 on: February 08, 2017, 12:57:51 AM »
I love you, Evgenia!

I had the whole "hire a man in over your head and expect you to do all his work for him" thing pulled on me twice.   The first time, I finished up some projects that were personally important to me, and then quit.  The second time, I kept working for a few months to bump up the savings until my return to the US, and then FIREd.    I still kind of wish I had walked out immediately both times, though.   It sucks when companies pull that glass ceiling shit....

Love you too! I have to say, awesome as it sounds, I only knew to walk *because* it had happened to me before. I did not, regretfully, walk the first time it happened.
Ah, but you learned and you were prepared when it happened again. I love you at least as much as lhamo does, maybe even a tiny bit more.
I did it! I have a journal!
http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/journals/a-lot-like-this/
And hell yes, I am still moving confidently in the direction of my dreams...

MrsWhipple

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1486 on: February 08, 2017, 01:14:45 PM »
My very first (and only) FU story was when I was 16 and had just gotten my first job at an ice cream shop over the summer. After a month or so of working, my mom told me I could go on a trip by myself to visit family in France... I was ecstatic! But when I told the manager and asked for two weeks off, she said I couldn't have it.

What? This was the first job I'd ever had, and it seemed strange to me that I wasn't allowed to come and go as I pleased, and I said, quite surprisedly, that I was going no matter what. The manager made a big fuss about it and said that I wasn't responsible, blah blah blah, you're fired! I went home and cried, but decided to go on the trip - not much of a decision really, as I didn't NEED the money. I worked up until I left, and the manager seemed almost happy to see me "fired."

And then when I came back from vacation, I went back to the ice cream place, where they were still hiring. The owner was surprised to see me, hadn't I been fired? I said yes, but I'm a good worker and I just wanted to take a trip so you should hire me back. And they did, haha! The manager was so butthurt to see me back on the schedule, but I was the only employee that would show up on time and do the work so there was really nothing she could say about it.

Suck it, TCBY!

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1487 on: February 08, 2017, 02:08:02 PM »
I have one.

Context: I was an engineering director down in Silicon Valley. All engineering programs reported in to me. I was in very good standing, got promotions every 6-12 months, year after year, more responsibility, yada yada all that. But, I'd hit the glass ceiling, having been told there was nowhere for me to go. Coincidentally, I was the only female director in the entire, vast place.

My MIL had died after a grueling bout with cancer, hospice, that whole shitty, undeserved kind of end. My husband was unemployed, as he'd quit his job (also in engineering) to take care of his mother in another part of the state (as others have pointed out, another key thing that FU money enables you to do).

It was a busy Software Season at my job, so we cut our annual (and, as you can probably gather, desperately needed) vacation with friends short, returning home on Thursday instead of Sunday.

Lesson #1: Everything bad happens when you go on vacation.

Lesson #2: Never, ever, EVER cut your vacation short. Ever.

I returned to work on Friday and, by 10 AM, was in a meeting with my (guilty, semi freaked out looking) boss explaining that, in the few days I'd been gone, some man had been interviewed and hired to take a brand new VP level position over me, *and* take over my team.

But it gets better... wait for it... My boss said he "hoped I'd stay on" and "could still be the new guy's assistant."

I said "I am no one's assistant. I'm leaving." And then I walked right out of the room and over to my desk, where I realized I probably should have asked my husband about this first, seeing as how we now had no income, him not having a job at the time and all. I texted him and said "Got a sec? Think I just quit my job." He called me and the very first words out of his mouth were, "Want me to come and help pack up your desk? Nothing would give me greater satisfaction than seeing you walk the fuck out of that place."

And that, ladies, is the moment you KNOW you married the perfect man. Unconditional support, he didn't even need to know why, and income, we could figure that out.

The details that emerged in the hours after my boss's announcement were priceless, and even more damning. It turned out my boss's boss had not even interviewed and was totally clueless about this hire (who would report to him), and instantly started fighting it like mad. Someone leaked the results of the new guy's interview and found the majority of people had recommended "No hire" and done so STRONGLY. On, and on. Unmitigated disaster, and nice to watch from afar, happily ensconced in my FU fund.
OMFG. 

That was epic, and your husband is awesome.

Also, glass ceiling sucks rocks.  I hit it a few years ago (at manager level, not director level in engineering but not software), but have since seen new directors hired, whee!  Whatever.  Recently, boss said "you know I can't give you a raise, and we keep hiring expensive people elsewhere.  So, if you need time off without taking PTO, go ahead and take it."  Basically giving me permission to work 6 hour days when I need to.  (Which, with 2 kids, both of whom seem to love getting the stomach flu, is often!)

Also NEVER cut your vacation short!
« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 02:14:21 PM by mm1970 »

mtn

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1488 on: February 08, 2017, 02:22:52 PM »
I have one.

Context: I was an engineering director down in Silicon Valley. All engineering programs reported in to me. I was in very good standing, got promotions every 6-12 months, year after year, more responsibility, yada yada all that. But, I'd hit the glass ceiling, having been told there was nowhere for me to go. Coincidentally, I was the only female director in the entire, vast place.

My MIL had died after a grueling bout with cancer, hospice, that whole shitty, undeserved kind of end. My husband was unemployed, as he'd quit his job (also in engineering) to take care of his mother in another part of the state (as others have pointed out, another key thing that FU money enables you to do).

It was a busy Software Season at my job, so we cut our annual (and, as you can probably gather, desperately needed) vacation with friends short, returning home on Thursday instead of Sunday.

Lesson #1: Everything bad happens when you go on vacation.

Lesson #2: Never, ever, EVER cut your vacation short. Ever.

I returned to work on Friday and, by 10 AM, was in a meeting with my (guilty, semi freaked out looking) boss explaining that, in the few days I'd been gone, some man had been interviewed and hired to take a brand new VP level position over me, *and* take over my team.

But it gets better... wait for it... My boss said he "hoped I'd stay on" and "could still be the new guy's assistant."

I said "I am no one's assistant. I'm leaving." And then I walked right out of the room and over to my desk, where I realized I probably should have asked my husband about this first, seeing as how we now had no income, him not having a job at the time and all. I texted him and said "Got a sec? Think I just quit my job." He called me and the very first words out of his mouth were, "Want me to come and help pack up your desk? Nothing would give me greater satisfaction than seeing you walk the fuck out of that place."

And that, ladies, is the moment you KNOW you married the perfect man. Unconditional support, he didn't even need to know why, and income, we could figure that out.

The details that emerged in the hours after my boss's announcement were priceless, and even more damning. It turned out my boss's boss had not even interviewed and was totally clueless about this hire (who would report to him), and instantly started fighting it like mad. Someone leaked the results of the new guy's interview and found the majority of people had recommended "No hire" and done so STRONGLY. On, and on. Unmitigated disaster, and nice to watch from afar, happily ensconced in my FU fund.
OMFG. 

That was epic, and your husband is awesome.

Also, glass ceiling sucks rocks.  I hit it a few years ago (at manager level, not director level in engineering but not software), but have since seen new directors hired, whee!  Whatever.  Recently, boss said "you know I can't give you a raise, and we keep hiring expensive people elsewhere.  So, if you need time off without taking PTO, go ahead and take it."  Basically giving me permission to work 6 hour days when I need to.  (Which, with 2 kids, both of whom seem to love getting the stomach flu, is often!)

Also NEVER cut your vacation short!

Another example of A glass ceiling (not the same that you're talking about here) sucking: A woman in my old job was amazing. Did way more work than anyone on the team, had knowledge that no one else did--she wasn't irreplaceable, but she wasn't someone you'd want to replace.

At a performance review, she basically asked why she wasn't the next level up. They told her that they don't promote to that level. She prodded further and found it was that that department didn't promote to that level. Within 4 months, 4 of us out of 12 had left that team, in part because of that knowledge.

arebelspy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1489 on: February 09, 2017, 03:18:00 AM »
This is one of my favorite threads. Thanks to all who shared their stories in the last few days. I loved each one of them! :)
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paddedhat

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1490 on: February 09, 2017, 04:50:12 AM »
My very first (and only) FU story was when I was 16 and had just gotten my first job at an ice cream shop over the summer. After a month or so of working, my mom told me I could go on a trip by myself to visit family in France... I was ecstatic! But when I told the manager and asked for two weeks off, she said I couldn't have it.

What? This was the first job I'd ever had, and it seemed strange to me that I wasn't allowed to come and go as I pleased, and I said, quite surprisedly, that I was going no matter what. The manager made a big fuss about it and said that I wasn't responsible, blah blah blah, you're fired! I went home and cried, but decided to go on the trip - not much of a decision really, as I didn't NEED the money. I worked up until I left, and the manager seemed almost happy to see me "fired."

And then when I came back from vacation, I went back to the ice cream place, where they were still hiring. The owner was surprised to see me, hadn't I been fired? I said yes, but I'm a good worker and I just wanted to take a trip so you should hire me back. And they did, haha! The manager was so butthurt to see me back on the schedule, but I was the only employee that would show up on time and do the work so there was really nothing she could say about it.

Suck it, TCBY!

My son, at the same tended age, seemed to have inherited similar values. At 14 YO and after a vigorous search, he found a job at a local Subway shop. Sadly, the franchisee turned out to be pretty mentally ill. She was obsessed with winning some kind of secret shopper, corporate award for cleanliness, or something. She was also obsessed with the fact that every minimum wage serf of hers had to be in motion, every second on the clock. She had her management obsessively controlled to the point that they were terrified of her, and were flat out neurotic, as if she could physically harm them for not giving 100% every moment.  He put up with the very unhealthy environment for about six weeks. One evening I picked him up for a ride home, and he told me he was done with the whole psycho scene, and quit. He was sent out into the empty dining area to rewipe tables that were already clean to operating room standards, He then got called into the office, and told that he was slacking off, and was observed leaning against a table in the dining area, a moment ago. He asked the assistant manager how she could possibly know that, since she was in a closet sized office, in the  back of the store, with the door closed? After a bit of hesitation, she admitted that the owner spent her off hours, at home on her laptop, watching mutiple hidden cameras, and called constantly to bitch about whatever didn't suit her. He then said, "I'm done with you fruit loops, I quit".  His mom was furious, and believed like a good worker drone, that you should never just quit a job. ( like a fourteen year old could damage their CV, FFS) He told his mom that it wasn't up for debate, he was done. He quickly got a job at a local diner, and worked there until he left for college. The owner of the diner later told me he was the hardest working local kid he ever hired. He is now a well paid Engineer, and his mom and I are real proud of him.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2017, 04:52:43 AM by paddedhat »

theadvicist

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1491 on: February 09, 2017, 05:26:54 AM »
Not so much a FU money story, as a 'I have a job elsewhere and don't need you' story, but I'm enjoying this thread so much I wanted to contribute.

My first day at University I ordered drinks at a bar (come on now, I wasn't there to study!), and chatted with the barman, who turned out to be the owner, who offered me a job. Of course I said yes! More drinking money.

It turned out to be a pretty bad job. Three hour shifts, so I gave up my whole evening for like 14 and came home stinking of beer and smoke, so always had to have a shower. They also made me (non-smoker) clean out the ashtrays, gag.

I hated the job, but not working wasn't an option. I opened a yellow pages and looked for insurance brokers, since I'd done call-centre work before. I just called each one and said, "Hi, I'm an undergrad new to the area looking for part-time admin work". Called all 6 places, left messages. Turns out one lady called me back, called me in for an interview, and said, "I really need someone! I was just so busy I didn't have time to think about advertising!". I worked there the whole time I was at Uni and learnt SO MUCH from that lovely lady.

Meanwhile at the bar, the fired us all (sent P45s and everything) every holiday so that we didn't accrue holiday pay. When I went in all surprised at having been fired (wtf!) I was told they did that to everyone, every holiday, don't worry, come back for my usual shift in January, the bar was quiet when there were no students in town, so they didn't need us student staff then anyway.

I also once got told off for spending too long in the loo, and didn't get paid to clear up at the end of the night, even though it took a good 20 mins. We were allowed to stay on after for one free drink, but you know what? I don't want my payment in alcohol, with co-workers I don't particularly like, meaning I have to stay even later and walk home alone at midnight. Why do I want a drink anyway, I'm showering and going straight to bed!

I served my notice at the bar, of course. But they were seriously shocked when I resigned. What? You don't want to clean gum out of ashtrays full of cigarettes for minimum wage? And be told how long you can spend in the bathroom?

Thank goodness for jobs like that though. Makes me smile every day I come to a tidy clean office and get paid to drink coffee and quietly get on with things.

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1492 on: February 09, 2017, 12:55:12 PM »
Quote
Another example of A glass ceiling (not the same that you're talking about here) sucking: A woman in my old job was amazing. Did way more work than anyone on the team, had knowledge that no one else did--she wasn't irreplaceable, but she wasn't someone you'd want to replace.

At a performance review, she basically asked why she wasn't the next level up. They told her that they don't promote to that level. She prodded further and found it was that that department didn't promote to that level. Within 4 months, 4 of us out of 12 had left that team, in part because of that knowledge.
Yeah, I've been there too.  About 9 years ago, I quit a job.  I was working 30 hours a week and had 2 people working for me.  Due to some changes, my company decided to close down our project at our site.  They offered the 5 of us a job at the same site but in a different group.

The problem: I didn't like that group.  The other problem: I'd been trying to get promoted for 2 years.  I'd had a response of "yes of course!" but then that boss left.  I had three bosses in a year and a half and the newest one (who was very green) was working on it when this change happened.  So I was to get ANOTHER new boss.

I finally went to his boss (the VP) and said "okay, I am due for a promotion and have been working at the next level up for 2 years".  I got "well, that shouldn't be an issue, and why does the title matter?" (because: pay dude, I'm already at the top of the lower pay grade).  So I got a non-answer.  Also, they didn't "believe in part time work so you'll have to work full time, but whatever hours you want".  Uh, thanks?  So, I said "pick one: promotion or let me stay part time".  I got neither.  So I left.

Lather, rinse, repeat for 2 of the next 3 women engineers at the company.  I think they finally learned on #3!

omachi

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1493 on: February 09, 2017, 03:31:30 PM »
Not mine, but DW's, but let's keep the story train rolling.

She worked for a small company, maybe a dozen people total. It was owned by three guys, with one of them controlling the majority of the company and, of course, doing none of the work. She got an internship there as she was finishing up her undergrad and was hired on full time when she graduated. She went pretty quickly from doing production work to management, as nobody there could manage their way out of a wet paper sack. Majority owner was happy to have somebody doing his job and to actually and finally be making a profit. She kept track of all the clients, jobs, workers, etc. for a while and they actually started to make real money. She wasn't being paid much, since the company couldn't afford much when she was hired, so time to ask for a raise and proper title. She knows how the financials look and what she's contributed, going from something like $200K in revenue to $1M without changing company size, so she knows it is both deserved and in the budget.

It would have been so easy for them to just bump her pay by like 50% and say good job, keep it up. She wasn't making much. But no, the majority owner didn't like that she had the gall to ask. She was told she could have a 3% raise and that the owners had been thinking about bringing her in on ownership, but now they weren't going to. Classic BS, but maybe think because she's only a few years out of school at this point that it'd work. She comes home rightfully upset, says she doesn't feel respected and doesn't like working for this jerk. Then she asks point blank "Can I just quit?" to which the response was of course! "Really?" She has nothing lined up and is worried about it, but we have our FU money and my salary covered all our expenses and then some anyway. Immediate relief on her part.

She gives notice and they freak out. One of the minority owners (a decent guy) breaks down in tears, knowing what they're losing and being unable to stop it. Majority owner slings crap about how she's destroying what she worked for and that he'd give her a chance to rescind her resignation and maybe they could work out a little bit larger of a raise. After refusing she's told she can just leave.

A few months later she'd over doubled her salary elsewhere. Small company ends up being audited for shady tax practices. Blessing in disguise, really, and having FU money made it all possible and stress-free.

Tasty Pinecones

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1494 on: February 10, 2017, 10:06:53 AM »
FU money is nice and so is enough networking to have a job to return to when the new one goes south. I was able to do that when I was younger. Was working a "little" job for average pay while going to college. When the BS got too deep I quit and returned to a previous job making less money but much less BS too. No days off.

All very important learning exercises to me at that point in time. There were some real small town characters in those chapters. What came of that was a desire to focus on engineering and not dealing with people.

nippycrisp

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1495 on: February 10, 2017, 11:35:52 AM »
OK, I'll chip in and contribute ours: My SO is an emergency room veterinarian who sees some crazy stuff. Two years ago, in the middle of the night on Christmas Eve, a guy comes in with a Sphynx (a hairless cat) that has a severely broken femur, 90-degree break on the X-ray. According to the owner, the cat ran out the front door and was hit by a car. It's a little unusual story; this is December, and hairless cats in Chicago rarely race into the street. Plus, the cat has no signs of road rash from skidding on pavement after an impact. SO can't reset the bone manually and tells the owner that the cat needs surgery to insert a plate in his leg. Costs maybe $3K. "Too much," the client says. SO suggests amputating the cat's leg, which is only several hundred dollars. No go again. SO then refers him to a low-cost clinic. Client declines again, ardently insisting he wants his animal euthanized.

The plot thickens somewhat when SO offers him the option of opening Care Credit (this is a credit card for medical or vet care, allowing him to pay in installments if money is tight). The client reveals he's married and claims his wife in on safari in Africa. It seems money isn't much of an issue to these folks, but the guy doesn't want to pay anything to repair his easily-fixable cat. All he wants is to put him to sleep before the wife comes home. SO had already noticed that the injury (and lack of road rash) matches the result of the cat being kicked, possibly by the client who now wants the cat dead*.

The thing is, this is a really sweet kitty. Despite being in significant pain, he's purring and nuzzling anyone who gets in range. So makes one more try to save his life: since this is an exotic pet that will have no trouble being adopted, she offers to have the guy relinquish his rights to the cat. In about two seconds, the guy signs the cat over and is out the door, and my SO finds herself with a sweet, broken-legged cat. I learn of this at 7 AM the next morning, when SO pokes me awake and informs me we have a new guest living in a crate in our second bedroom.

Flash forward three months. We'd paid an orthopedic surgeon to patch the cat back together and he's almost totally recovered. As you might be able to guess, we've bonded with the cat during his convalescence; the plan to find someone else to adopt him is pretty much in the bin at this point - Hamlet is now the newest member of our family.

You know what happens next: At some point, the client's wife returned from Africa and was (understandably) distraught at the absence of her pet. Who knows what the husband told her, but after several months the story of the missing cat finds its way to the couples normal (non-emergency) veterinarian. This vet tells the couple he'll get their cat back and calls the ER, claiming that the case was mishandled and that he should have been consulted (in the middle of the night on Christmas Eve, not bloody likely). Here's the thing: this guy runs a decent-sized practice in the city and refers a good bit of business to the emergency hospital. Management of the hospital reviews the case and finds a well-documented record of what happened. Even so, management promises that they'll get my SO to return the cat immediately. Cue our ringing phone. A truncated version of the conversation that followed:

ER: We need you to return the cat.
Us: Why?
ER: It's their pet.
Us: Not anymore - the guy signed him over. Now he wants it back... after several months? 
ER: We need to keep the business of (angry vet).
Us: I don't think you understand - the cat would be dead if we hadn't stepped in. We paid to bring the cat back to health.
ER: We get it; in fact, we'll pay for the treatment if you return the cat.
Us: He signed it over legally.
ER: We already promised (angry vet) you'd return the cat.
Us: You shouldn't have done that, eh?
ER: You need to return this cat. If you don't, you're risking your job.

Like many responsible adults, SO had never been fired and took the threat very seriously. I, on the other hand, was pissed off. The client had readily signed over the cat - he'd even returned later to drop off some sweaters for him, so there wasn't some last-second change of heart. Moreover, they'd waited months to ask. A cynical man might say that they did this deliberately, to give us time to fix their pet before asking for its return. The ER management was also on my shit list - they were willing to override their own employee - not to mention go into their own pocket - to keep a referrer who was making unreasonable demands - happy. That was hard to respect. I almost wanted them to fire my SO so she wouldn't have to work with such spineless cowards.

I stepped in and told the ER's director that, as one of the cat's co-owners, I wasn't willing to return the cat. If they wanted to try, go ahead and sue me. They reminded me that I was putting SO's job at risk. This was the equivalent of them folding their hand; in addition to having sufficient savings to last a couple of decades, vets are in very high demand; she'd have another gig in a day or two. We had the pleasure of telling them to pound sand. To be honest, I thought it would be more satisfying to watch the medical director bluster and fold, but the guy was too nice - he was just doing what his corporate overlords demanded. It was kind of sad, watching his half-hearted efforts. Naturally, nothing came of it - my SO continued working there and the newest member of our family continued rubbing his face against my stubble whenever he could.   

Picture of outcome attached (I hope).

*I'm not for sure saying the animal was abused, but it's a definite possibility, according to SO.

G-dog

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1496 on: February 10, 2017, 11:40:14 AM »
So glad you saved the cat! Had it gone back, the abuse would have continued.

No doubt the other folks have already gotten another cat.

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1497 on: February 10, 2017, 11:51:00 AM »
What a great story!  I'm not a fan of hairless cats, but that one looks adorable (the sweater covering him up helps ;-).  How many people would have caved and sent the him back into an abusive home...

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1498 on: February 10, 2017, 12:00:37 PM »
What a great story!  I'm not a fan of hairless cats, but that one looks adorable (the sweater covering him up helps ;-).  How many people would have caved and sent the him back into an abusive home...
I am going to love all hairless cats from now on because they could be Hamlet.  Good job on saving his life (both times).
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1499 on: February 10, 2017, 12:05:19 PM »
Awww, great story, nippycrisp!
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