Author Topic: cfiresim Question  (Read 219 times)

Peter Parker

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cfiresim Question
« on: October 12, 2017, 06:46:43 PM »
I got on the sight and was playing around with it, but had a question....

When it ask for pension information is that a YEARLY amount or MONTHLY.  I'm assuming it is YEARLY as they ask or the yearly amount of Soc. Security.

Also, I have no idea how to read the charts that come up after running simulations--is there an explanation sheet that I'm missing?

Thanks!
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 06:49:18 PM by Peter Parker »

secondcor521

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Re: cfiresim Question
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2017, 07:21:02 PM »
Yes, yearly.

The top chart that comes up shows how a "theoretical you" would have done historically starting in 1871 with your assets, spending, and asset allocation and going forward for 30 years (or whatever you chose) and subtracting your spending, and adding in your theoretical investment returns based on what actually happened during those 30 years.  Then it does the same thing starting in 1872, then 1873, and so on.

Each line represents how your net worth would have risen or fell during each 30 year period.

Since the 30 year period starting in 1871 and the 30 year period starting in 1872 overlap by 29 years, you'll see the lines zig and zag next to each other.

Any line that goes below zero is considered a failure as "theoretical you" ran out of money in that particular scenario.

Hope that helps.
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Peter Parker

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Re: cfiresim Question
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2017, 07:49:20 PM »
Yes, yearly.

The top chart that comes up shows how a "theoretical you" would have done historically starting in 1871 with your assets, spending, and asset allocation and going forward for 30 years (or whatever you chose) and subtracting your spending, and adding in your theoretical investment returns based on what actually happened during those 30 years.  Then it does the same thing starting in 1872, then 1873, and so on.

Each line represents how your net worth would have risen or fell during each 30 year period.

Since the 30 year period starting in 1871 and the 30 year period starting in 1872 overlap by 29 years, you'll see the lines zig and zag next to each other.

Any line that goes below zero is considered a failure as "theoretical you" ran out of money in that particular scenario.

Hope that helps.

YES!  Thanks secondcor521.  Much appreciated!