Poll

Do you like to camp?

I like to camp any chance I can get.
129 (41.5%)
I like to camp, but only very occasionally.
129 (41.5%)
I don't like to camp, but I'll go with friends or family that wants to.
29 (9.3%)
I don't like to camp and I refuse to ever go.
24 (7.7%)

Total Members Voted: 311

Author Topic: Camping...why or why not?  (Read 6735 times)

dude

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #50 on: June 25, 2018, 08:52:42 AM »
Tell us more dude, how long do you go for etc ?  Presumably you bring books and other sorts to keep you stimulated?

My backcountry camping trips are typically a function of alpine rock climbing trips I do every summer. Locations have included the Tetons (my favorite), the Wind River Range, the Sierra and the Cascades. Typically spend 3-5 days out for each objective, with a day back out to recharge and then hike in to the next climbing objective (for another multi-day backcountry stay). Last year's trip was a 20-mile jaunt into a very remote section of the Winds (Downs Fork area) to climb an obscure peak with a route put up by legendary climber (and prolific first ascensionist) Fred Beckey. The goal was to top out the formation via that climb to be in place for the total solar eclipse. Spent 4 days back there. It was absolutely amazing.

Dragonswan

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #51 on: June 25, 2018, 08:54:30 AM »
I am NOT an outdoor person.  Watching nature shows on TV is as close as I need to get.  Although I consider having lived in the rurals of New England (in a house) for 4.5 years camping out. ;)

Roadrunner53

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #52 on: June 25, 2018, 09:26:12 AM »
I am NOT an outdoor person.  Watching nature shows on TV is as close as I need to get.  Although I consider having lived in the rurals of New England (in a house) for 4.5 years camping out. ;)

Watched any Swamp People episodes or Swamp Mysteries?

Laserjet3051

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #53 on: June 25, 2018, 09:41:34 AM »
The fewer humans i have to encounter while backpacking deep in the remote back country the better. So i fully support folks embracing their "i hate camping" sentiment. fewer people mean less litter, more wildlife to be seen, less noise, less obnoxious attitudes. And bathing stark naked in the river on Day 3 into the hike is a lot less troublesome when there arent swarms of families and kids gawking at every turn

mak1277

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #54 on: June 25, 2018, 09:54:45 AM »
I don't love to camp, per se.  But there are a lot of things I do love that camping makes possible.  I love being in the woods as the sun rises and the world wakes up.  There are a lot of amazing places that couldn't be accessed without camping...river trips, backpacking destinations, streams to fish.  To me, a tent and a sleeping bag are tools to get me to places and things I want to experience.  "camping" is a means to an end...rarely is it the "end" itself.

Dragonswan

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #55 on: June 25, 2018, 09:56:31 AM »
I am NOT an outdoor person.  Watching nature shows on TV is as close as I need to get.  Although I consider having lived in the rurals of New England (in a house) for 4.5 years camping out. ;)

Watched any Swamp People episodes or Swamp Mysteries?
Yes.  They might be part of the problem.

CptCool

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #56 on: June 25, 2018, 10:21:19 AM »
I used to love camping and we took at least two long camping trips per year, until I got Lyme and Erlichiosis and was sick for two years. Now I never camp, because it's impossible to take the necessary precautions against tick bites when you're crawling into and out of a tent.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0048EY6KY/

Mix that up to the proper dilution and spray your tent, socks, pants, etc before you go. Stops all mosquitos & ticks.

DireWolf

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #57 on: June 25, 2018, 10:45:03 AM »
We camped a lot when I was a kid. Started in a big family tent, then a pop-up, and then a VW minibus. I joined Boy Scouts and started backpacking and absolutely loved that. Then I moved away from home and the nearby mountains for college. The friends I fell in with did not have much experience camping and hiking like I did, and my experiences thru my 20s were few and far between. Then in my late 20s I met my now DW, who had a similar childhood. Our big vacation every year, for close to 15 years, involved camping. On many of the trips, we'd fly to some cool location (usually with at least one national park) with our gear, rent a car, then car camp. Sometimes we'd try to sneak in a night or two of backpacking. My DW was not nearly as big a fan as I was of having all that gear on our backs though. Moab, Acadia, Banff, Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, Zion, Great Smokies, Grand Tetons, Mesa Verde, Monument Valley, Jasper, Shenandoah, The Outer Banks of NC, Bryce, Durango, plus tons of trips to the Blue Ridge Parkway. We finally started branching out our travel and visiting various spots in (mostly) Europe about 5 years ago, although we did throw in a return to Moab once in that timeframe (our 3rd visit). But we've supplemented those vacation with various long weekends camping closer to home.

Driving to camping spot has allowed us to really up our car camping game. Instead of small, easily packable backpacking tents, we now have a giant multi-room family tent and cots. Comfy camp chairs for sitting around camp. I even realized we could bring a coffee maker and run it off the lithium ion battery pack I use for my photography studio lights when I need to shoot somewhere remote. We've thought about a camper/rv, but the economics just don't work with us still working.

While we've upped our car camping, I've also found a new back-to-the-basics thing I love. I'm too old (50) to really want to backpack anymore, but with bikepacking/bike touring I don't need that weight on my back. Yeah, peddling up a mountain with all that gear on a bike is a challenge, but still easier than carrying it on my back. I've only done a few short trips. Looking forward to FIRE and having the time to do a month+ tour. It's hard to describe the serenity of traveling by myself this way. The camping aspect is pretty spartan. Small one man ultralight weight tent. A "quilt" instead of a full size sleeping bag. A blow up mattress for comfort and warmth. So far I usually just buy what I need at gas station convenience stores, so don't even bring cooking gear. That may mean eating Clif Bars for a couple of days if I ever wind up somewhere remote.


erutio

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #58 on: June 25, 2018, 11:01:03 AM »

skekses

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #59 on: June 25, 2018, 11:35:45 AM »
I used to love camping when I was younger, but I find that I no longer enjoy sleeping on the ground. I say sleeping, but really, I don't sleep well which is the problem. I also remember the eating part being more enjoyable, but for the life of me I cannot remember what we used to make. These days I end up eating simple, quick meals (sandwiches, oatmeal, soups, etc.) which are boring or going out to civilization for the main meal of the day. Often I'm so tired by the end of day that I don't want to spend the time cooking and cleaning up.

That doesn't mean I never go camping. In fact, I go several times a year. However, it's usually because I want to go do something out in nature (climb or hike something) and I don't feel like paying $100+ for a hotel room, if a hotel is even available nearby. The campsites vary widely from no amenities, to maybe an outhouse/portable toilet with sometimes a fire ring, to full showers/flushing toilets/bear boxes/fire rings. These latter campgrounds always feel so luxurious compared to the other end of the spectrum. Even at these luxurious campgrounds, I can only stand them for a few nights before I start to really miss my bed.

Later this year I'm going backpacking for the first time in ages. Maybe it will give me a whole new perspective on camping. Or maybe I will hate it. I'll continue to car camp either way, regardless of my lack of enthusiasm for it.

OtherJen

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #60 on: June 25, 2018, 12:03:04 PM »
No.  Because people will shoot you (unless you shoot first!)

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/06/25/authorities-seek-clues-in-fatal-shooting-at-california-campsite.html

By that logic, no one in the USA should ever send their kids to school; attend college; go to church, the mall, the airport, a nightclub, Waffle House, the grocery store, or an open-air festival; put their kids in home daycares; go to work; or even drive. Maybe we should all stay home, but then again, plenty of people are shot in their homes.

Edited to add: maybe avoid senior citizen housing or being a firefighter. CA Firefighter Killed in Senior Facility Shooting
« Last Edit: June 25, 2018, 03:55:47 PM by OtherJen »

Gone Fishing

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #61 on: June 25, 2018, 01:50:48 PM »
Currently packing for 28 days of camping in the PNW...

peeps_be_peeping

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #62 on: June 25, 2018, 02:08:09 PM »
Love backpacking and camping for the quiet, the solitude, the time away from WiFi, the little nature sounds, etc. I like feeling that I have mastered a set of skills that is completely different from "normal" life skills. I even enjoy the discomfort.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #63 on: June 25, 2018, 02:45:43 PM »
I don't have to go anywhere to experience nature. This morning two giant racoons skittered across my front lawn, birds are singing and all over my yard, Squirrels are running around. Little chipmunks are dashing here and there and today when I was coming home from the doctor's I saw a wild turkey in the road! Not to mention a herd of deer that occasionally roam thru my yard and the neighbors. Hawks flying above and the hoot of an owl! There is also a farm down the road with milking cows.

I have an awning on my deck so that is as close to camping as I get!

CheapScholar

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #64 on: June 25, 2018, 03:19:08 PM »
I think the problem that we have these days with the word "camping" is that most people equate that with the most common type of camping, which is a campground.  These experiences almost always include people in other campsites merely yards away, noise from those camping neighbors, litter, views of cars/campers.  To me, that is just an awful experience.  The one exception I can think of is the campgrounds at Zion that are very nice and not too crowded.  But, you're in Zion and you're obviously there for the views.  Anyone who has been to Yosemite and seen their campgrounds knows they look like Tent City homeless colonies.

I'll agree with others.  Backcountry camping is a totally different experience.  I've had some great trips and the solitude you usually get with that is a polar opposite of being stuck at a campground surrounded by intoxicated people making noise constantly.

Anyone who does not like traditional camping but likes nature and self reliance should consider a real backcountry experience.  Obviously, be smart and know your limitations.

OtherJen

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #65 on: June 25, 2018, 03:58:19 PM »
I think the problem that we have these days with the word "camping" is that most people equate that with the most common type of camping, which is a campground.  These experiences almost always include people in other campsites merely yards away, noise from those camping neighbors, litter, views of cars/campers.  To me, that is just an awful experience.  The one exception I can think of is the campgrounds at Zion that are very nice and not too crowded.  But, you're in Zion and you're obviously there for the views.  Anyone who has been to Yosemite and seen their campgrounds knows they look like Tent City homeless colonies.

For sure. As much as I want to visit Yosemite, I don't think I would ever want to camp there. I didn't grow up camping and am still a bit of a wuss—hence the state parks—but we purposely try to visit more remote parks and go during the off-season to avoid crowds. We made the mistake of camping in the Traverse City state park just once; never again. *shudder*

CheapScholar

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #66 on: June 25, 2018, 05:15:52 PM »
I think the problem that we have these days with the word "camping" is that most people equate that with the most common type of camping, which is a campground.  These experiences almost always include people in other campsites merely yards away, noise from those camping neighbors, litter, views of cars/campers.  To me, that is just an awful experience.  The one exception I can think of is the campgrounds at Zion that are very nice and not too crowded.  But, you're in Zion and you're obviously there for the views.  Anyone who has been to Yosemite and seen their campgrounds knows they look like Tent City homeless colonies.

For sure. As much as I want to visit Yosemite, I don't think I would ever want to camp there. I didn't grow up camping and am still a bit of a wuss—hence the state parks—but we purposely try to visit more remote parks and go during the off-season to avoid crowds. We made the mistake of camping in the Traverse City state park just once; never again. *shudder*

I live in northern Indiana but do most of my hiking and camping in Michigan, which I consider the greatest state in the union.  Have you looked into the Manitou Islands (part of Sleeping Bear Nat'l Lakeshore)?  Perfect backcountry camping because there is no wildlife that can hurt you!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Manitou_Island
« Last Edit: June 25, 2018, 05:22:25 PM by CheapScholar »

OtherJen

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #67 on: June 25, 2018, 05:52:58 PM »
I think the problem that we have these days with the word "camping" is that most people equate that with the most common type of camping, which is a campground.  These experiences almost always include people in other campsites merely yards away, noise from those camping neighbors, litter, views of cars/campers.  To me, that is just an awful experience.  The one exception I can think of is the campgrounds at Zion that are very nice and not too crowded.  But, you're in Zion and you're obviously there for the views.  Anyone who has been to Yosemite and seen their campgrounds knows they look like Tent City homeless colonies.

For sure. As much as I want to visit Yosemite, I don't think I would ever want to camp there. I didn't grow up camping and am still a bit of a wuss—hence the state parks—but we purposely try to visit more remote parks and go during the off-season to avoid crowds. We made the mistake of camping in the Traverse City state park just once; never again. *shudder*

I live in northern Indiana but do most of my hiking and camping in Michigan, which I consider the greatest state in the union.  Have you looked into the Manitou Islands (part of Sleeping Bear Nat'l Lakeshore)?  Perfect backcountry camping because there is no wildlife that can hurt you!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Manitou_Island

I’ve been fascinated with those islands and the Sleeping Bear legend since I was little, but have never been. I agree, that would be an ideal trial run once we have some backpacking gear.

We’re heading to Muskallonge Lake State Park next month. Remote, quiet, dark sky. The campground is never full. It’s one of my favorite places in the world.

CheapScholar

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #68 on: June 25, 2018, 06:30:46 PM »
Oh, wow, Muskallonge looks amazing!  I hope you make your way to North Manitou eventually.  The legend of Sleeping Bear is special.  And, the history on the island is fascinating.  Also, while you will get isolation on North Manitou, you will meet some very interesting people on the boat and on the dock waiting for the return boat.  A lot of serious backcountry campers from the Midwest go there.

Circling back to my comments on Yosemite, I do suggest a trip there as well.  Yosemite is hands down the most beautiful place I've ever seen in my life.  Try to go when it's not too crowded (late spring before schools get out or early fall after they start).  Well worth the trip IMO.

Happy trails!

OtherJen

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #69 on: June 25, 2018, 06:59:55 PM »
Oh, wow, Muskallonge looks amazing!  I hope you make your way to North Manitou eventually.  The legend of Sleeping Bear is special.  And, the history on the island is fascinating.  Also, while you will get isolation on North Manitou, you will meet some very interesting people on the boat and on the dock waiting for the return boat.  A lot of serious backcountry campers from the Midwest go there.

Circling back to my comments on Yosemite, I do suggest a trip there as well.  Yosemite is hands down the most beautiful place I've ever seen in my life.  Try to go when it's not too crowded (late spring before schools get out or early fall after they start).  Well worth the trip IMO.

Happy trails!

Thanks, you too!

DireWolf

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #70 on: June 26, 2018, 07:20:44 AM »
I think the problem that we have these days with the word "camping" is that most people equate that with the most common type of camping, which is a campground.  These experiences almost always include people in other campsites merely yards away, noise from those camping neighbors, litter, views of cars/campers.  To me, that is just an awful experience.  The one exception I can think of is the campgrounds at Zion that are very nice and not too crowded.  But, you're in Zion and you're obviously there for the views.  Anyone who has been to Yosemite and seen their campgrounds knows they look like Tent City homeless colonies.

I'll agree with others.  Backcountry camping is a totally different experience.  I've had some great trips and the solitude you usually get with that is a polar opposite of being stuck at a campground surrounded by intoxicated people making noise constantly.

Anyone who does not like traditional camping but likes nature and self reliance should consider a real backcountry experience.  Obviously, be smart and know your limitations.

I love backcountry camping, but since you mention Zion, I thought I'd point out that the southern Utah/Northern Arizona area has so many great places to car camp, it isn't just Zion. To be sure, there are also fairly generic "campground loops in a forest" like you find all over (for instance, Zion's nearby neighbor Bryce Canyon has these). The last time we visited Moab, we stayed at a motel in town. Driving around I kept seeing amazing campsite after amazing campsite by the river, and I really regretted that we weren't camping. Arches, Kodachrome, Calf Creek, The Needles, and Valley of the Gods are all places that I remember having beautiful places to car camp. The best site I *ever* had was along the cliffs at Monument Valley, where I could unzip my tent and watch the sun rise over the Mittens in the morning. Sadly they wised up to that belng a $$$$ view and built an expensive lodge there.

Duchess of Stratosphear

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #71 on: June 26, 2018, 07:55:30 AM »
Oh, wow, Muskallonge looks amazing!  I hope you make your way to North Manitou eventually.  The legend of Sleeping Bear is special.  And, the history on the island is fascinating.  Also, while you will get isolation on North Manitou, you will meet some very interesting people on the boat and on the dock waiting for the return boat.  A lot of serious backcountry campers from the Midwest go there.

Circling back to my comments on Yosemite, I do suggest a trip there as well.  Yosemite is hands down the most beautiful place I've ever seen in my life.  Try to go when it's not too crowded (late spring before schools get out or early fall after they start).  Well worth the trip IMO.

Happy trails!

I mainly camp when I do a bike tour, and the UP is one of my favorite places to bike tour. I stayed at Muskallonge over Labor Day Weekend a few years ago, and the campground was definitely full! But I can imagine that after Labor Day it settled down and was quite nice. You can walk across the road to the shore of Lake Superior and look for agates. There isn't much going on up there. There's one little store near the campground and that's about it. I also recommend Grand Marais which is just a few miles to the west. There's a great campground there that is right in town. You won't get as much solitude, but there is a great brewery literally around the corner, and I think the town is just adorable. I favor a hot shower after a day of biking, so I didn't stay at any national forest campgrounds, but I rode through one of those one day, and I think that's where you would really find some peace and quiet. It was pretty empty.

Sorry to run on, but I just love the UP.

swampwiz

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #72 on: June 26, 2018, 08:27:25 AM »
Call me soft, but I like the idea of modern hygiene technology - i.e., The Throne.

Camarillo Brillo

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #73 on: June 26, 2018, 08:30:37 AM »
I'm 59 and still love camping.  I camp twice a year with a group of guys that has been getting together for about 10 years.  We mix it up - - - sometimes loading up boats and cruising down a river for several miles and then camping on the shore while we spend several days fishing; sometimes dragging our boats to the Mighty Mississippi and camping along that shore; and sometimes loading all our gear on a small plane and getting dropped off on a remote, secluded island far into Canada for a week. But, when we go to Canada we bunk in very primitive cabins that are really nothing more than a shelter.

I also take my two sons camping in the Boundary Waters nearly every year for 5 - 6 days.  We portage all our gear including canoes and food for several miles or so, paddle to an isolated camping spot, and then spend our days fishing, hiking, swimming and just hanging out.

We are so experienced in this all that cooking and setting up camp is second nature.  My older son loves it so much that when he went off to college in CO this past year he took a full set of gear and would occasionally go camping overnight in the mountains not far from Fort Collins.

Throughout it all, the best times have been when we're hunkered down in our tents riding out a ferocious storm, and when we've been out on the water experiencing an incredible day.  Absolutely love it.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2018, 08:32:17 AM by Camarillo Brillo »

tyrannostache

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #74 on: June 26, 2018, 10:28:13 AM »
The fewer humans i have to encounter while backpacking deep in the remote back country the better. So i fully support folks embracing their "i hate camping" sentiment. fewer people mean less litter, more wildlife to be seen, less noise, less obnoxious attitudes. And bathing stark naked in the river on Day 3 into the hike is a lot less troublesome when there arent swarms of families and kids gawking at every turn

I'm with you, laserjet, though you'll probably run into me and my kids gawking down remote trails in a few years.

I love camping. I grew up tent camping with my family at least a few times every year and, eventually, going on regular canoe trips to the Boundary Waters.

I take a yearly backcountry backpacking trip with a group of friends, and I wouldn't trade that for anything.

I moved to my current Western state because it has access to some of the most spectacular outdoor recreation around. We didn't do much camping last year because of widespread smoke and a new baby, but DH did take the 5-year-old on some short backpacking trips. She loves to camp, and I'm looking forward to getting the 1-year-old out, too. We have a few favorite small campgrounds just an hour or two from home, and we do a lot of dispersed camping on BLM or National Forest Land. We have yet to do a whole-family backpacking trip, but will hopefully do that by the end of this summer.

I'm not a fan of huge park-style campgrounds. They tend to be crowded and overpopulated by large fifth-wheels with noisy generators. Unless you're living in it long-term, I don't really get why you would want to drag around a small apartment--and spend the money on the truck you need to haul it (why not just rent a cabin or hotel?). One of the things that attracts me to camping is that it forces you to pare down to the essentials.

That said, I could be converted to a simple campervan to extend our camping season into the colder parts of the year. Early this spring, we borrowed a bunks-only campervan for a trip to Utah, and it allowed us to get out much earlier than we would have been able to do in a tent. DH and I don't mind the cold, but the kids still need some toughening up...


HipGnosis

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #75 on: June 26, 2018, 10:29:52 AM »
The poll is missing my answer:  I use to enjoy camping, but not any more.

I was a boy scout, then an explorer.   I hiked 50 miles in one (long) day.   I spent an awesome 2 weeks canoeing the boarder waters of Minn & Canada.  Wisc. winter camping was more of a challenge.
Then I joined the Air Force.  Survival training was a camping vacation for me  (and the rain kept the bugs away!).

Then I married and had kids.  Camping changed to accommodate the family, which meant more work for me - and less enjoyment.
The biggest change was that it meant camping where we could park the car.   Which limited where.    And it's more expensive.   
The biggest negative was the crowded campgrounds with loud and drunk 'neighbors'.  Couldn't even go for a walk or hike w/o having to put all the camping gear in the car or tent.  I had firewood and a rain fly stolen.

We went RV 'camping' with friends once. Calling it camping was delusional.  The 'campground' was a seasonal mobile home park.  The noise was worse with all the generators, and everyone dealing with it by turning up their music.

MDfive21

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #76 on: June 26, 2018, 10:52:42 AM »
i sleep poorly to begin with and sleeping on uneven ground, in a constricting polyester bag, choking on campfire smoke without a shower just sucks.  :)

Candace

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #77 on: June 26, 2018, 11:09:54 AM »
I sleep poorly as well. Add to that the necessity of putting on clothes and shoes and getting up off the ground to go to the potty during the night, and I'm just miserable the next day. Plus as I get older, even one drink in the evening means I pee 5-6 times during the night. If I don't drink, it's still 2-3 times. I might as well sleep in the bathroom, or next to the outdoor latrine.

I also am one of those people who attracts mosquitoes, even while using bug spray, and then deals with itchy welts that last five or six weeks.

I wish I liked camping. But I just hate it due to those things.

Many years ago I did a "baby trek" in the Himalayas. It was a seven-day trek with every night at a campground. I put up with the camping for the trek experience. No bugs, because of the environment and time of year. And the trek staff made everything as easy as possible (though they couldn't go to the bathroom for me). Just the lack of bugs made it much more tolerable. I live in Virginia though, so it's hard to camp here without bugs being a factor -- unless it's raining the whole time.

neophyte

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #78 on: June 26, 2018, 04:48:54 PM »
I didn't do a lot of camping as a kid, but now I'm a fan of backpacking and backcountry camping. I'll do car camping and canoe camping too, but my preference is for hiking.  I used to enjoy everything except sleeping on the ground, so discovering hammock camping was a major turning point for me. I highly recommend it. Now I get to go backpacking and sleep soundly too.  One disadvantage of being carless is that I do depend on my friends wanting to go backpacking with me..

littlebird

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #79 on: June 27, 2018, 06:41:25 AM »
I love camping! I find it so much more relaxing than just spending a day in the woods and driving back. Part of it is that I also love gear (to my mustachian shame, thankfully I have pretty much everything I could need now) so I get a lot of joy from setting up camp and planning what to take. We have a cushy, heavy setup for car camping and a cushy, light setup for backpacking so I sleep well. Good sleep is so important for my enjoyment. Part of it is I like to drink around a campfire with friends. It's almost like sleepovers from when I was a kid, nobody has to go home and nobody has to be a designated driver! Part of it is I have a camp dutch oven and enjoy camp cooking so we eat really well.

Sometimes we'll camp instead of renting a hotel when we're traveling, mostly because I have a severe dust mite allergy so I always feel sick sleeping in hotel rooms. Also, hotel rooms skeeve me out a little, other people's dirt and all that. That part is somewhat irrational.

When we lived out west we would backpack a lot and it was so great to get away from everyone but the people I brought with me. Now that we're living back east we haven't backpacked because it's so much more crowded. I'm not as interested in carrying all my shit up a mountain on my back just to camp next to a stranger. Also we have a baby and although I've seen people backpack with a baby I'm not sure how they pull that off logistically. She has a lot of stuff and doesn't sleep well out of her routine. Car camping will have to do for now. 

Teachstache

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #80 on: June 27, 2018, 06:44:04 AM »
I didn't do a lot of camping as a kid, but now I'm a fan of backpacking and backcountry camping. I'll do car camping and canoe camping too, but my preference is for hiking.  I used to enjoy everything except sleeping on the ground, so discovering hammock camping was a major turning point for me. I highly recommend it. Now I get to go backpacking and sleep soundly too.  One disadvantage of being carless is that I do depend on my friends wanting to go backpacking with me..

Similar for me. I grew up going on biannual vacations to resorts around the US & internationally. Not that I'm complaining about my experiences as a kid, but now that I'm an adult, I really value the simplicity that camping provides. Plus, it's a way for my spouse and I to give our son amazing vacations filled with sightseeing and hopefully fun adventures. I'm also easily skeeved out by sleeping on mattresses that other people who I don't know have slept on (hotels). I'd honestly rather sleep on a sleeping mat on the ground than sleep on most hotel mattresses.

the_fixer

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Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #81 on: June 27, 2018, 07:26:18 AM »
I am done with tent camping and finally gave in last October and purchased a little camper.

Loved tent camping as a kid / teen but as the years have gone on we have become soft and camp in our little 13ft fiberglass camper.

Last October we did 18 days straight in Florida

So far this year we spent a week in Anza Borrego and have been trying to go ever other weekend here in Colorado this summer.






As for why, many of my favorite places  in the mountains are 3 or 4 hours away and you miss out on a lot if you do not stay overnight such as sunrise, sunset and sitting around the campfire.

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« Last Edit: June 27, 2018, 07:36:00 AM by the_fixer »

OtherJen

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #82 on: June 27, 2018, 07:44:56 AM »
Gorgeous photos, @the_fixer ! I agree that there’s something really special about experiencing a beautiful place after the day tourists have left.

Husband and I are in our early 40s and just replaced out tent last year. We’ll probably upgrade to a small trailer when this tent wears out. Little ones like Casita are appealing, but we’re also slightly obsessed with the little teardrop campers.

GreenSheep

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #83 on: June 27, 2018, 01:27:22 PM »
Some of my best memories are from backcountry camping in a beautiful spot, in a tent (or multiple tents), with people whose company I enjoy, doing things that remind me that I'm more self-reliant than I usually remember I am. Camping allows you to get away from everyone else and spend time in areas that you'd never get to by car or dayhike. Some of my favorite spots: Horseshoe Bend in Arizona (reached by kayak), Iceland's Westfjords (after a 6-day hike), Kaibab National Forest just outside the Grand Canyon (granted, this was car camping, but no one else was around for seemingly miles).

I tried the RV thing with a friend once and just didn't see the appeal. But to each his own.

JoJo

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #84 on: June 27, 2018, 05:39:22 PM »
Buying my van has made camping so much more enjoyable.  A real bed + roof over my head so never wet makes all the difference in the world!  Planning a month in So Cal in December to see how it goes.

oldmachines

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #85 on: June 27, 2018, 09:04:06 PM »
I camp because I like it. If you don't like it, then don't do it. It really is that simple.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #86 on: June 28, 2018, 05:19:11 AM »
I camp because I like it. If you don't like it, then don't do it. It really is that simple.

Yes, perfectly said. I hate it and will not do it. You like it and do it. Simple!

It is better those of us who hate it stay home otherwise we will make the person who loves it miserable!

bognish

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #87 on: June 28, 2018, 12:40:58 PM »
To the Yosemite comment, the Valley and Tuolomne campgrounds are a noisy zoo, but there are quieter ones too. White Wolf, Tamarak Flat, Porcupine Flat, and Yosemite Creek are pretty nice. Great uncrowded hikes right from the campground. We just got back from BLM camping in ID. Breeze through the sage brush, birds & butterflies, so many stars and not another car driving past our spot all weekend.

accolay

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #88 on: June 28, 2018, 05:46:57 PM »
The fewer humans i have to encounter while backpacking deep in the remote back country the better. So i fully support folks embracing their "i hate camping" sentiment. fewer people mean less litter, more wildlife to be seen, less noise, less obnoxious attitudes. And bathing stark naked in the river on Day 3 into the hike is a lot less troublesome when there arent swarms of families and kids gawking at every turn

Right on. The worst is when some dick makes a pattern with stones on the ground, or rock cairns in the middle of nowhere for everybody, or also I'm thinking about those dumbasses who toppled over rock formations in Utah. They just can't enjoy the scenery without shitting on it for every other visitor. And I'm the guy who kicks that shit over and removes it from where I find it. I also pick up garbage in the wilderness.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #89 on: June 29, 2018, 02:52:41 AM »
The fewer humans i have to encounter while backpacking deep in the remote back country the better. So i fully support folks embracing their "i hate camping" sentiment. fewer people mean less litter, more wildlife to be seen, less noise, less obnoxious attitudes. And bathing stark naked in the river on Day 3 into the hike is a lot less troublesome when there arent swarms of families and kids gawking at every turn

Right on. The worst is when some dick makes a pattern with stones on the ground, or rock cairns in the middle of nowhere for everybody, or also I'm thinking about those dumbasses who toppled over rock formations in Utah. They just can't enjoy the scenery without shitting on it for every other visitor. And I'm the guy who kicks that shit over and removes it from where I find it. I also pick up garbage in the wilderness.

In Norway we have a category of people who always need to make a new campfire place, and put some rocks in a circle. They never use the earlier campfire place that was already there when they arrived. No, they build a new one a few meters away.

imustachemystash

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #90 on: June 29, 2018, 09:39:46 PM »
I have 2 boys ages 9 and 6.  Camping with them is a lot of fun because they get so excited about it.  We are heading over to Mt. St. Helen's to camp tomorrow.  We car camp.  It's easier that way.

Cookie78

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #91 on: June 29, 2018, 10:07:52 PM »
Count me in the backcountry camping as far away from other people as possible club. No cell reception, but I bring my phone for backup map apps, and to connect to inreach for emergency or logistics messages.

I'll go camping in regular campsites if it's with friends, but I certainly don't prefer it.
I try to avoid hotels whenever possible, they generally make me uncomfortable.

Being away from home's conveniences resets the hedonic treadmill. A shower feels so much more luxurious when you're first home. AC takes on a near-holy presence when you've been timing jumping into a river/lake/pond to stay cool.

I'm amazed and thankful for running water for days after camping for 2 weeks without it, lol. It makes me grin to just turn on the tap. And hot running water in the shower?? Miracle! But I also love my pocket shower nearly as much while I'm camping.

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #92 on: June 29, 2018, 11:07:56 PM »
I grew up camping. My first camping trip was when I was 6 weeks old. My parents tent camped at the time. By the time I was 3, they had a truck with a topper and sleeping platforms in the bed. By 7 we had our first small camper, but the kids still tented it outside. It was usually state or national park camping.

In high school I discovered backpacking with friends. In my twenties I had less friends interested in the woods, so I discovered backpacking on my own (much to my friends' chagrin and worry- seems girls aren't supposed to be in the woods alone). I met my spouse, who hated camping without amenities. I went back to state park camping in a tent, but with bathhouses and hot showers nearby.

My eldest takes after my spouse, but my youngest is my boy through and through. He's 13, so I have a few more years with my best backpacking buddy before he moves out. We are planning to attempt the PCT as a mother-son team the year before he starts college. Fortunately, over the years my spouse has begun to come around. I have her hiking every weekend now and car camping in nearly empty park campgrounds -- some without shower houses. I've gotten her hooked on kayaking as well, and she's open to a multi-day paddling trip.  I may not have to go back to camping alone, but of course it's safer now with modern spot devices at least.

We're also making plans to add a few alterations to our Prius to make it a mini-RV so we can do car camping mini-trips for fun and so I can use it during summer field work. Mainly some inverter stuff and storage additions, as well as making window shades and screens. DS and I have slept in the back a few times after astronomy events, and it's roomy enough for a comfortable night's sleep for two.

EscapeVelocity2020

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #93 on: June 29, 2018, 11:33:09 PM »
I love camping!  Mostly posting to follow, but no matter how high end we have gone in the past, there is still plenty of merit in roughing it.  Maybe I'll get more antagonistic in my older age, but being able to throw down an inflatable mattress and sleep either under the stars or in a simple tent is pretty cool.
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kpd905

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #94 on: July 01, 2018, 10:04:56 AM »

I live in northern Indiana but do most of my hiking and camping in Michigan, which I consider the greatest state in the union.  Have you looked into the Manitou Islands (part of Sleeping Bear Nat'l Lakeshore)?  Perfect backcountry camping because there is no wildlife that can hurt you!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Manitou_Island

Whoa, thanks for the link to this.  Now I have another backpacking trip to plan in Michigan.  We are in Wisconsin, but have done trips in the Porkies, Pictured Rocks, and the Manistee River Trail/North Country Trail loop.  Are there any other places you'd recommend for a 3-5 day backpacking trip?
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Hula Hoop

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #95 on: July 01, 2018, 12:59:24 PM »
I just got back from 3 days camping in a tent at the beach with my best friend and 4 kids between us.  This being Europe it wasn't rough - there were hot and cold showers, normal toilets and even a bar and restaurant where we got coffee in the morning and pizza at night.  But it was definitely the mustachian option.  Our friend rented a bungalow on the same campsite and paid more than twice what we paid per night. 

My best friend, who is mustachian/frugal like me, bought a ton of food before we left at the supermarket that she kept in a cooler so that we didn't have to buy breakfast, snacks for the kids or lunch at the bar/restaurant - just pizza for dinner.  We rotated the ice paks through our friend with the bungalow's freezer and our cooler and everything stayed fine.

I slept on a knock off thermarest type thing which was pretty comfy and my kids were on the cheapo rubber mats from the camping store.  I probably wouldn't want to do a week on the thermarest knock off but two days was totally fine.

And it was nice being able to be mustachian while staying literally 1 minute's walk from the beach.

gaja

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #96 on: July 01, 2018, 03:08:29 PM »
The kids and I are currently driving around the UK in our campervan. We have tried different options; tents, hammocks, etc, but always go back to the van. My hayfever acts up horribly if I try sleeping on the ground. I have done a lot of tent camping as a kid and youth, and would be happy to do it again if it didn’t cause my eyes to swell shut and give my breath that annoying whistling sound.

We joined an English camping club before arriving here, and it is working out very well. It gives us access to a large network of small and cheap campgrounds, often local farm fields. They have an upper limit of 5-10 campers, which limits the noise. Yesterday we were one of three in a large field, and if we didn’t want to be close to the toilet, we could have parked out of sight of everyone.

We're actually contemplating going camping near the beach next weekend with some friends.  Only problem is that we don't own a tent so we'll have to buy one.  Here in Europe, camping is completely different from the US and many other places though.  Europe is really crowded and there is very little wilderness left so when you go camping it's on an established campground with lots of other people close by.  The upside is that even when you're hiking you can usually stop off for a nice meal and a decent cup of coffee.  The downside is the same - you're not really away from civilization no matter how far you hike.
The Norwegian Department for Nature defines wilderness as 5 km (straight line) from human interference. We have 37 000 km2 of the stuff, and I guess Sweden and Finland are quite similar. Most of Iceland is also pretty wild. In Northern Europe you can hike for a long time without meeting people or anything resembling civilization. (Some people claim the civilization ends just north of Oslo).

On our way to the uk we drove through Germany and the Netherlands, and I agree that the camping places there were more like small cities than wilderness.

Funny, people who like camping will sleep in a tent on the ground. Leave home with a comfy bed, microwave, heat or ac, clean bathroom a freezer full of food but would they leave their cell phone home or at the very least turn it off unless needed for an emergency?

We used to have a “no electronics” rule for our summer holidays, and the 10 year old still follows that guideline (by choice). The oldest, however, reads so much and so fast, that it made more sense to let her phone with a library app, and otherwise keep it in flight mode.
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Hula Hoop

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #97 on: July 01, 2018, 03:21:29 PM »
We're actually contemplating going camping near the beach next weekend with some friends.  Only problem is that we don't own a tent so we'll have to buy one.  Here in Europe, camping is completely different from the US and many other places though.  Europe is really crowded and there is very little wilderness left so when you go camping it's on an established campground with lots of other people close by.  The upside is that even when you're hiking you can usually stop off for a nice meal and a decent cup of coffee.  The downside is the same - you're not really away from civilization no matter how far you hike.
The Norwegian Department for Nature defines wilderness as 5 km (straight line) from human interference. We have 37 000 km2 of the stuff, and I guess Sweden and Finland are quite similar. Most of Iceland is also pretty wild. In Northern Europe you can hike for a long time without meeting people or anything resembling civilization. (Some people claim the civilization ends just north of Oslo).

On our way to the uk we drove through Germany and the Netherlands, and I agree that the camping places there were more like small cities than wilderness.

Funny, people who like camping will sleep in a tent on the ground. Leave home with a comfy bed, microwave, heat or ac, clean bathroom a freezer full of food but would they leave their cell phone home or at the very least turn it off unless needed for an emergency?


I'm in Italy.  I guess I should have said "this being the non-Scandinavian part of Europe..."  I find both the beach and camping here total culture shock being from the US originally.  People everywhere here.  There is some untouched nature in places like Abruzzo and the Dolomites but you have to hike quite a long way to get away from people, roads, little houses (rifugi), cell phone signals etc.

gaja

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #98 on: July 01, 2018, 04:30:16 PM »
We're actually contemplating going camping near the beach next weekend with some friends.  Only problem is that we don't own a tent so we'll have to buy one.  Here in Europe, camping is completely different from the US and many other places though.  Europe is really crowded and there is very little wilderness left so when you go camping it's on an established campground with lots of other people close by.  The upside is that even when you're hiking you can usually stop off for a nice meal and a decent cup of coffee.  The downside is the same - you're not really away from civilization no matter how far you hike.
The Norwegian Department for Nature defines wilderness as 5 km (straight line) from human interference. We have 37 000 km2 of the stuff, and I guess Sweden and Finland are quite similar. Most of Iceland is also pretty wild. In Northern Europe you can hike for a long time without meeting people or anything resembling civilization. (Some people claim the civilization ends just north of Oslo).

On our way to the uk we drove through Germany and the Netherlands, and I agree that the camping places there were more like small cities than wilderness.

Funny, people who like camping will sleep in a tent on the ground. Leave home with a comfy bed, microwave, heat or ac, clean bathroom a freezer full of food but would they leave their cell phone home or at the very least turn it off unless needed for an emergency?


I'm in Italy.  I guess I should have said "this being the non-Scandinavian part of Europe..."  I find both the beach and camping here total culture shock being from the US originally.  People everywhere here.  There is some untouched nature in places like Abruzzo and the Dolomites but you have to hike quite a long way to get away from people, roads, little houses (rifugi), cell phone signals etc.

Or you could just have said “Italy”. Sorry, but this is one of my pet peeves. Europe is not a country, or a union of countries (although many of the countries choose to cooperate through the EU). For us in the north, Italian culture is probably more foreign than Canadian, or Midwest USA. The same goes for Germans and Greek, Polish and Portuguese. 

There are wilderness areas scattered around most of Europe, not just the north: https://goo.gl/images/MwhsSE





(And since Denmark has almost nothing, while Finland has a lot, fennoscandia would be more correct than Scandinavia /nitpicking).
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BudgetSlasher

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Re: Camping...why or why not?
« Reply #99 on: July 01, 2018, 05:59:00 PM »
I dislike camping for the sake of camping; the "hey lets not hang out at Bob's house this weekend and drink beer, but spend hours setting up and taking down tents in the woods by a pond to drink beer and poop in the woods" style of camping.

Now if camping in necessary either as a way of keeping the budget under control while traveling or the only way to see or experience something is several days of hiking and the only accommodations are camping. I will not be dissuaded.