Author Topic: Australian Gardening Thread  (Read 96047 times)

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #700 on: May 07, 2018, 05:14:20 PM »
Quote
About the rats - we have a cat prowling our garden. He just appeared this week and he is very interested in the rat runs and hangouts and is spending a lot of time here! Not the most humane solution but I hope he gets them.
My brother had a rat and mouse problem and "got" (i.e. it arrived) a feral cat and it worked a treat.

Quote
I have black aphids on my garlic chives. I've grown them indoors years ago and never had aphids on them or any other herbs I was growing that time. So I don't know why it's happening now. I sprayed them with a water, oil and baking soda solution as per a recipe I found online, then I got impatient because they weren't falling off immediately and just snipped the garlic chives off and threw them out with the rubbish. Figured that would be the end of it. But now the new growth has black aphids on them too. :(((  Where are they coming from? Are they hiding away in the soil just waiting to jump on any new growth? How do I eradicate them without using stuff that's toxic to humans?
I had this happen to me too - I had clumps of chives and garlic chives flourishing - then the black aphids moves in, and despite my best effort one by one the clumps got infected and died off. Agree with GT, go for white oil.
The permie solution is to never completely eliminate pests, and encourage beneficial predators - in theory eventually a balance will be achieved. i suspect it takes years of organics/diversity  to achieve thisetc

limeandpepper

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #701 on: May 08, 2018, 06:52:59 PM »
Straight up white oil does the job for me.  They're an issue on my Camelias, so they get fortnightly sprays of white oil to keep them at bay.

Ugh so I have to spray them regularly? I want to eat these garlic chives so not really keen on spraying them with a mixture that contains dishwashing liquid. Maybe I should just give up on them and plant something that insects hate.

I wonder where they're coming from though? I cut everything down to almost the roots and the first sign of new growth they're back. So some are hiding in the roots or in the soil I'm assuming? Something else I'm considering is buying diatomaceous earth and mixing them into my soil.

Interesting thing I learned about aphids at the weekend (although not helpful for indoors):

I had this happen to me too - I had clumps of chives and garlic chives flourishing - then the black aphids moves in, and despite my best effort one by one the clumps got infected and died off. Agree with GT, go for white oil.
The permie solution is to never completely eliminate pests, and encourage beneficial predators - in theory eventually a balance will be achieved. i suspect it takes years of organics/diversity  to achieve thisetc

So sad, in the other apartment I stayed in I grew garlic chives for years and they were fine. Maybe I was on a higher floor so insects are less likely to make it that high up?

Yeah, given everything of mine is completely indoors (no balcony, no courtyard) I just prefer not to have any insects at all, beneficial or not lol.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2018, 06:57:52 PM by limeandpepper »

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #702 on: June 04, 2018, 03:36:59 AM »
I planted salad greens (cos, beets, spinach) right before the storm hit today. Fingers crossed they get watered in nicely with no effort on my part!

I also bought a random assortment of shade/indoor plants that looked nice, so I'll pot those up over the next week. My carport has a garden bed adjacent that is perfect for shade plants, so I'm currently collecting ideas on how to turn it into a green wall.

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #703 on: June 04, 2018, 03:53:42 AM »
Tree ferns and a fernery?

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #704 on: June 08, 2018, 12:08:07 AM »
For the first time, I have an overwintering tomato! I've thought it might be theoretically possible in my climate, but at my old house by autumn the tomatoes got infested with a mould/fungus and even if I got the plants to survive the tomatoes were affected as well. After researching I just used to pull them up and try to reduce the spore load in the garden.

So this is the tomato plant that grew as a volunteer in one of my compost bays. It has 3 tomatoes slowly ripening, and last week it started setting flower. Its looking healthy - and hasn't got the mildew, possibly because its not prevalent at this site, or because we've only had a third of our usual rainfall this year.  I assume it has a warm microclimate being surrounded by corrugated iron. The only downside is that it is occupying one of my compost bays that I'd like to use...but I'm loathe to pull a productive plant and am now very interested in following through to see what happens. BTW I picked 2 of the tomatoes as they were starting to colour change and experience shows something will come eat them once this happens (?possums). They'll ripen safely inside.


deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #705 on: June 08, 2018, 12:44:20 AM »
Wow! Thatís fantastic. Iíve heard it can be done, and that tomatoes are actually perennials, but I havenít known anyone who has. Well done!

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #706 on: June 08, 2018, 01:12:00 AM »
Well its only June so we'll see what happens. Its looking good so far.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #707 on: June 08, 2018, 03:37:17 AM »
Thatís amazing Happy, well done!  Very low chance of that happening down here...

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #708 on: June 08, 2018, 06:52:30 AM »
Our tomatoes go all year round but it's colder where you are than where I am, happy. I have heard from our local gardening group that winter tomatoes are sometimes not sweet. I have left one volunteer that produces big tomatoes for sauce etc and one producing the yellow grape kind as its hanging over the fence so I thought it would be nice for the neighbours to pilfer some if they get there before the rats.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #709 on: June 08, 2018, 06:09:32 PM »
Interesting - it would make sense if they are not so sweet. What a thoughtful neighbour you are!

Absolute record minimum low  temp here is 5C, and it wouldn't go under 6C most years, and even then only a few nights a year would be less than 7 or 8 C. So I knew they should survive the winter in theory. I was however, gobsmacked to see it setting flower...I assumed  if they survived they'd be nonproductive until the weather warms up.

I'll save some seeds and maybe even strike some cuttings, particularly if it manages to produce some fruit over winter.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #710 on: June 20, 2018, 03:27:46 AM »
I have a mystery citrus tree. Looks lemony, very juicy, but a smooth skin like an orange. Possibly a Meyer lemon, but I thought those were small and these fruit are reasonably sized. My MIL has informed me the fruit are amazing and I'm never to get rid of the tree :)

Our veggie patch is going well. Duckling's peas are still alive, despite routine pluckings and helpful digging with his tiny shovel. My peas, meanwhile, have all been chopped off. Maybe a bird? They were cut to exactly the same height all the way along the row.

Our leafy greens look great, though, and Duckling had his first lettuce leaf. Success!

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #711 on: June 20, 2018, 07:01:18 AM »
Sounds like a Meyer to me.

Pics and dimensions would help confirm.

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #712 on: July 06, 2018, 12:07:56 AM »
Went to Seasol the garden today and realised I didn't have any Seasol, just some Charlie Carp, so now out the front of the house smells like a bait bucket. :(

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #713 on: July 23, 2018, 01:55:48 PM »
Hi all! Another Canberra based Peep who likes to garden but doesnít get to spend enough time doing it.

I just finished making a little greenhouse thingy (from old Canberra red bricks and a bit of leftover suntuff panel) to raise seedling in. Well not really a green house. Only 1m by a half.

Looking forward to trying it with a few tomato seeds in mid August.

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #714 on: July 25, 2018, 01:01:50 AM »
Deadhead bulbs like daffodils once the flowers start dying off and before they set seed, yes/no?

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #715 on: July 25, 2018, 05:17:27 AM »
You are supposed to. I never have the energy to do it, and my daffodils and jonquils definitely donít mind.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #716 on: August 04, 2018, 11:57:07 PM »
For people that have bought fruit trees and bushes recently - where from? I was at the garden centre today and got a lemon and a finger lime. The other dwarf citrus looked a bit sad so I looked online but there doesn't appear to be anything in stock at Daley's or Diggers. Do people normally just join the waiting list for stock?

I'm after a dwarf mandarin, and anything else that might survive in a pot for now. I saw Diggers Club had a choc pudding tree so that's tempting.

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #717 on: August 05, 2018, 12:14:29 AM »
I just go visit ALL THE NURSERIES, helps that I've got the free time to do that.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #718 on: August 05, 2018, 12:26:18 AM »
I sign up for stock notifications at Diggers for the trees I want. Usually a lot of stock becomes available at once, and being a member helps keep the price down. Diggers might seem like they are out of stock of everything, but my experience has been that they still have better availability overall than many nurseries here - it's impossible to get the same range of avocados elsewhere, for example.

I have bought quite a few fruit trees at Bunnings, but it's not my favourite option. I'd rather not support a huge chain when there are better alternatives, Bunnings doesn't have a great range and their plants aren't always in the best condition.

Here we have Dawson's nurseries, which are great for fruit trees, but they're not at all convenient for me so we don't end up getting out there often. Their range doesn't entirely overlap with Diggers, so in an ideal world I would buy from them more regularly as well as ordering from Diggers.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #719 on: August 05, 2018, 05:01:16 AM »
There's a few nurseries far out that I will be making plans to visit because they're such a long drive, Dawson's is also a bit tricky for me and Waldecks has a few things. Not that I've bought anything beyond a small young blueberry from Waldecks yet.

We've gotten 70% of our new paved path down, which means I know where the garden bed is in the backyard now! All the plants along a 8m stretch have been removed since we moved in, including a frangipani, 2 big hibiscus stumps and a grevillea. Planning to try a trellis with native climbing flame pea and native clematis, if we can find the second.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #720 on: August 16, 2018, 02:08:10 AM »
Waldecks had a couple of mature sunshine blue :D :D :D

Of course I bought one. I was only supposed to be picking up some native violets. Also bought strawberry. Did not buy plum, nectarine, pear or apple trees but they had ones I really wanted...

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #721 on: August 16, 2018, 04:09:22 AM »
Woohoo.  Awesome on getting a mature one.

I avoided buying a bunch of discounted bare rooted fruit trees today.  Instead buying more pots and rose/gardenia mix and planting out 6 of my blueberry bushes.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #722 on: August 30, 2018, 06:06:52 AM »
Does anyone have big garden plans for the weekend?

Mine will involve dragging the various plants we've chopped up/ pulled out/ decimated over the past 5 months and stashed around the house onto the verge for green waste pickup. Hopefully the yard will look a heck of a lot tidier afterwards.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #723 on: August 30, 2018, 06:22:15 AM »
Yup. Hoping to mulch citrus trees, repot an asparagus crown, turn some compost, start to set up a small straw bale garden. I want to compost and mulch  and plant out a garden bed. And sow some more seeds. Probably some lettuce, leafy greens and more flowers.

middo

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #724 on: August 30, 2018, 06:00:47 PM »
Does making garden beds count. We have about 10m cubed of soil/clay to hide, so some raised garden beds are coming.  We also have a pile of compost that needs moving before Monday so the guys coming to remove the asbestos can do their job.  If we remove it, we don't have to pay them to do so.

Attachment doesn't work. Probably too big.  You can see it here:

https://belgraverebuild.com/2018/08/27/7-the-garden-taking-shape/





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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #725 on: August 30, 2018, 06:47:49 PM »
Hoping to shift some roses and maybe even do a bit of weeding (unlikely).

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #726 on: September 21, 2018, 09:02:54 PM »
I like the look of your raised veggie patch middo! We have a heap of dirt and bricks that I'm considering using to make raised beds. I have to pull up more paving to do that, though, so I'll probably still end up with an excess of bricks...

Today I took the kid to the local garden store, a Waldecks. They have Digger's Club seedlings! I got some heirloom tomato varieties, plus some fun plants like rockmelon, watermelon, pumpkins, and herbs like thyme and basil. Thought I might try growing the herbs at the base of my dwarf trees in the pots. They also had a Loquat and two dwarf nectarines (early season and a mid/late season) that I really wanted, but I promised the hubby I wouldn't get more trees because I can't fit them in the car! Dawson's delivers trees and plants, though, so we'll make a trek down there to pick the ones we want and arrange delivery. Nectarines were Tuscany and Royal Gem.

This is my first spring with a garden I own, so I'm getting seedlings and next year I'll try growing from seed.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #727 on: October 27, 2018, 05:42:18 PM »
We were at Bunnings yesterday to buy some other stuff and got sucked in and looked at their plants. We bought Diggers yellow zucchini plants (4 in a small pot) that will go in our little veggie garden bed out the back. 4 plants will be far too much but I'm gonna assume that possums or something will eat at least one or two of them. Our self-seeding parsley occasionally gets eaten down to the stalk overnight.

And I bought another Pittosporum to plant along the back fence. I have mixed experience with 'fast-growing' screening plants. Some die, some grow slowly and the occasional one will actually grow tall. We live in medium density housing so screening plants are important.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #728 on: January 02, 2019, 11:17:00 PM »
Does anyone here have a West Indian lime? I have two Tahitian lime trees, but am considering a West Indian lime as apparently they fruit all year round.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #729 on: January 07, 2019, 04:07:22 AM »
Hi, Australian gardening peeps, how's it going! I'm getting to the last of my dwarf and snake beans, not sure what I'm going to do with all of these beans but at the moment they're being casseroled. I was given a whole bunch of basil seedlings and a raised bed for a birthday present, so now I have a flourishing garden bed covered in various types of basil. It's all gone to seed, but I let it flower because the bees liked it. Now I have lots of basil seeds, which may or may not come up.

Marigold is also self-seeding in another garden bed, and the cherry tomatoes are happily fruiting away. Brisbane weather is great, lots of sun but not a lot of water right now.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #730 on: January 11, 2019, 03:40:05 PM »
Yup. Hoping to mulch citrus trees, repot an asparagus crown, turn some compost, start to set up a small straw bale garden. I want to compost and mulch  and plant out a garden bed. And sow some more seeds. Probably some lettuce, leafy greens and more flowers.

updating:
-citrus trees mulched and fertilised, but the bed under the lemon remains incomplete, still growing weeds since I never get to sheet mulching. Lemons forming, but not much fruit apparent on the mandarin tree.
-asparagus was repotted, and the 2 asparagus pots seems to be doing well.
- hot and cold compost has been made, with more on the way...
- the few lettuces I managed to grow stayed small and have now run to seed. So not much productivity there, but I'm dreaming that they will start self seeding round the garden like Deborahs.
- flowers from seed included a few nasturtiums, borage and calendar, just 3 or 4 of each.


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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #731 on: January 11, 2019, 10:51:50 PM »
We planted several edible flowers and herbs in a toddler-level pot this week. Also finally mulched the garden beds, so maybe plants will not wilt quite so much as they have been.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #732 on: January 12, 2019, 12:24:32 AM »
Gardening this week is just keeping pot plants watered and alive. Iíve some plants that are 5+ years old and been waiting for their forever home. Soon my pretties, soon. Also been reading all the gardening magazines online from the library and reserving sustainability/gardening books. Planning out my 4 bed raised vege garden.

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #733 on: January 12, 2019, 02:33:19 AM »
Gardening this week is just keeping pot plants watered and alive. Iíve some plants that are 5+ years old and been waiting for their forever home. Soon my pretties, soon. Also been reading all the gardening magazines online from the library and reserving sustainability/gardening books. Planning out my 4 bed raised vege garden.

Make it 6.  Some things just take too long to grow to make a 4 bed system workable, i.e. onions, potatoes, corn, garlic.

PDM

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #734 on: January 12, 2019, 02:51:52 AM »
Gardening this week is just keeping pot plants watered and alive. Iíve some plants that are 5+ years old and been waiting for their forever home. Soon my pretties, soon. Also been reading all the gardening magazines online from the library and reserving sustainability/gardening books. Planning out my 4 bed raised vege garden.

Make it 6.  Some things just take too long to grow to make a 4 bed system workable, i.e. onions, potatoes, corn, garlic.

I'm more worried about only really wanting to grow tomatoes, capsicum and egg plant. Tough to do crop rotation when you focus on the one family. I guess I'll grow zucchini and beans too. Root crops don't really do it for me. Leafy greens too.

middo

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #735 on: January 12, 2019, 03:10:07 AM »
We have tomatoes and pumpkin coming on in Melbourne.  The cherry tomatoes are eating now, the others in a couple of weeks.  We also have chillies getting close to eating. Many herbs for our more italian dishes (sage, basil, oregano).

We have found the local wallabies are very partial to our beetroot leaves, so the beetroot are suffering. Netting (or dogs) will fix this issue.

My wife is starting a potato bed for next winter. Something removeable and cheap and easy.  I'll let everyone know how it goes.