Author Topic: Australian Gardening Thread  (Read 93244 times)

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #500 on: September 30, 2017, 03:13:54 AM »
Potted seed tubers for oca and Jerusalem artichokes today. Hoping for big crops of both.

It's been interesting to see how much the soil in my garden beds has improved, compared to two years ago when we moved in. I don't feel like I've done all that much to the soil, but I have mulched, added worms and worm wee+castings from my freestanding worm farm.

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #501 on: September 30, 2017, 03:33:35 AM »
Realised this week that our previous system of active worm farm and compost bin worked well for us.  The current worm farm cant cope with the amount of vegetable green waste we produce, so it looks like I'll have to start another one tomorrow.

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #502 on: October 01, 2017, 10:46:50 PM »
Worm farm number 2 has been started.  It may get a bit more sun than number 1, so that might be an issue.  They're tucked away on the north side of the house (with the fence a metre away and the neighbours house a metre the other side of that) around a corner, at the moment number 2 is in full sun which won't be awesome for it.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #503 on: October 03, 2017, 03:59:09 AM »
All my wicking beds are now packed away:( . I harvested the last of the silver beet. In desperation trying to get rid of all my containers/pots I planted out some society garlic and harvested the remains of the tumeric.

Ascotillion

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #504 on: October 04, 2017, 11:11:18 PM »
I'm getting ready to start a garden for the first time! We moved to a new apartment a few months back and now instead of a tiny cement balcony, we have a much larger tiled balcony.

My partner is much more experienced in gardening so I'm going to let him take the reins in the planning but I'm really excited to get my hands dirty, especially with herbs and some vegetables. We're in Melbourne and looking at getting a bunch of herb seedlings from Bunnings, then trying a few seeds from scratch as well. Wish me luck!

Fresh Bread

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #505 on: October 05, 2017, 10:07:36 PM »
I started this thread to help us munch through the kale / triffids ;)

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/throw-down-the-gauntlet/eat-5-serves-of-vegetables-and-2-serves-of-fruit-a-day/

Might be an incentive to get some more things in the ground if the food bill escalates. At moment we have three strawberries, I don't think that counts as a serve of veg...

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #506 on: October 05, 2017, 11:39:11 PM »
The potatoes are hilled up and are now flowering nicely. The mulberry tree is fruiting happily, and looks set to drop a lot of fruit exactly when we'll be away in New Zealand. The elderberry tree is putting up another series of flowerheads, so I might get a second batch of cordial from them as well.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #507 on: October 07, 2017, 04:23:14 AM »
My lime tree is flowering! It's a kaffir lime so I don't expect any fruit, but the flowers are nice and accompanied by fresh new leaves I can add to curry :)

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #508 on: October 08, 2017, 05:16:03 AM »
Picked eight ripe lemons from the tree yesterday - DELICIOUS! It's so exciting to have something homegrown.

In other exciting news, some of my seeds have finally sprouted. Plus fruit has set on the more established mandarin. Really hoping I get at least one homegrown mandarin!

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #509 on: October 08, 2017, 06:17:36 AM »
My non producing lemon tree has more blossom on it than ever before - here's hoping it will finally make some lemons...just after I sell the place doh!- but something for the new owners.

I have some elephant garlic planted under the mulberry tree - some of it seems to be surviving... might get to harvest it before I leave.

Ascotillion

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #510 on: October 08, 2017, 04:24:06 PM »
Picked eight ripe lemons from the tree yesterday - DELICIOUS! It's so exciting to have something homegrown.
Congrats! What are you going to do with them?

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #511 on: October 09, 2017, 04:17:22 AM »
Picked eight ripe lemons from the tree yesterday - DELICIOUS! It's so exciting to have something homegrown.
Congrats! What are you going to do with them?

Juiced them and used the juice in cocktails with homemade blackberry liqueur! Delicious. Pretty sure the juice tasted better than juice from store bought lemons...

Fresh Bread

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #512 on: October 14, 2017, 11:06:56 PM »
Omg guys, GUYS!

We have our first passionfruit. Let's hope it ripens and we get it before the possums/rats.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #513 on: October 15, 2017, 12:50:32 AM »
Omg guys, GUYS!

We have our first passionfruit. Let's hope it ripens and we get it before the possums/rats.

Yay! Fingers crossed!!

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #514 on: October 15, 2017, 04:08:41 PM »
Oooh. when I was a kid passionfruit grew wild down our backyard and we feasted on them.  At my first house there was a passionfruit but I never got it to bear.  I think in the right spot they go great, but otherwise are finicky...so well done.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #515 on: October 15, 2017, 04:40:26 PM »
Oooh. when I was a kid passionfruit grew wild down our backyard and we feasted on them.  At my first house there was a passionfruit but I never got it to bear.  I think in the right spot they go great, but otherwise are finicky...so well done.

Hubby's been peeing on it :)

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #516 on: October 15, 2017, 09:42:57 PM »
No joy with our bean seed planting, my guess that they were too old has come to fruition.  So last night I placed an order with Eden Seeds/Select Organics for some fresh seed and well have another crack at it.

Also located some tomatillo seeds at another online seed catalogue, confirming which ones J_S recommends before going down that path.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #517 on: October 15, 2017, 11:37:17 PM »
GT which site has tomatillo seeds??

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #518 on: October 16, 2017, 12:42:17 AM »
DH and I have no spare spoons for growing zuchini or cherry tomatoes this year so we'll skip it for just this summer. However, we're hoping to get nectarines and a few apples this year. Grapevine is 5yo and has never grown any fruit.

The actual reason I'm posting is to ask a question. About 4 years ago I planted a pineapple guava bush thingy in the back corner of the garden hoping it would a) grow to 3-5 metres to block the view into a neighbour's balcony (we live in medium density townhouses with lowish fences) and b) maybe get some fruit. Despite fertilising, mulching and watering a bit during summer, it's only grown to about 80 cm high and stopped, and we've had some flowers but zero fruit.

I want to pull out the pineapple guava and plant it with a fast growing wattle or somthing so at least we get some privacy. Would it be worthwhile offering to someone to transplant it to their garden or will it just die and be a waste of time? (I'm inland, clay soils, frosty winters and dry hot summers if that makes any difference)


GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #520 on: October 18, 2017, 10:59:37 PM »
Faced with a dilemma in the rental.  Not sure what I can do with this front yard space in the way of productive gardening without infringing on the landlords already planted plants.

Pix:

Looking east out the front door.



Looking north at the front door.



Looking northeast at the front door, showing the park one house away that locked us into renting the place.



Looking northwest fron the front path.



Looking south west from the front path.



Looking west from the front path, note that the bins need to travel along that garden bed to get to the street.



Looking south from the front path northeast corner of the block.




One low impact option is planter boxes along the white fence on the south side, and hanging a second lot from the top of the fence.  Would use self watering pots due to the north facing situation, to enable plant survival in full sun.

Fresh Bread

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #521 on: October 20, 2017, 09:01:37 PM »
GT I would definitely put planters along the fence. Not sure what else to suggest other than putting raised beds on the mulch and agreeing to move other plants back when you leave. Would only work with those non-hedging ones though. Or maybe just plant perennial  things like lemongrass inbetween the plants?

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #522 on: October 21, 2017, 02:50:38 AM »
I like the idea of planter boxes and hanging baskets!

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #523 on: October 22, 2017, 02:16:49 AM »
I started this thread to help us munch through the kale / triffids ;)

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/throw-down-the-gauntlet/eat-5-serves-of-vegetables-and-2-serves-of-fruit-a-day/

Might be an incentive to get some more things in the ground if the food bill escalates. At moment we have three strawberries, I don't think that counts as a serve of veg...

Ha ha, I shall follow you over there...!

GT, I'd go the planters - as long as it all looks much the same when you leave the house, landlord shouldn't worry.

My apricot tree has some green apricots on it which is quite exciting.

However peach trees, which were looking all beautiful and bloomy have suddenly become all leaf wilty...not sure if it's some sort of peachy disease...will have to visit local nursery for advice.  My neighbour who has a weekender property elsewhere suggested it happened to her peach trees also, so maybe they got blasted with some hot weather (we did have a couple of suddenly warm days recently).

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #524 on: October 22, 2017, 02:32:41 AM »
I also agree with the planter boxes and hanging baskets...it seems most renters do some sort of container gardening.

How long do you plan to be in the rental?

You could just interplant the current planting with appropriate herbs/veges - I can't see what the plants are - they might not like the rich soil one would create for veges.. 

Or, you could try making a decorative foodscape - if it looks good will the landlord mind? You could ask. You could pot up whatever is planted and replant on moving out, or just replace them ( wouldn't be that much). But not too much you can do with the bed that will have bins dragged over it.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #525 on: October 22, 2017, 03:37:57 AM »
My lime tree has kept its flowers and some look like tiny limes! This is not supposed to happen, I was pretty sure kaffir limes rarely fruit. Exciting anyway, I hope that means it likes the spot it's in.

My garden is otherwise a big task of pruning, deadheading and weeding that stares at me every time I leave the house. Maybe next weekend...

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #526 on: October 28, 2017, 05:33:01 AM »
Went with some planters along the south fence to start with.  Yesterday kid #1 helped me plant some snow peas, sugar snap peas, corn, butter and normal beans as well as re-potted some Gerberas for colour.





We'd also bought some Petunias and Violas but ran out of space to fit them in so today I bought some more planters and soil and planted them out as well and placed them along the front path.  Could probably fit two more planters across the front if we wanted to.



The trays the flowers came in were then used to plant out some old tomato and chilli seeds I had saved from plants, in the off chance they're viable.  Kid #1 had fun peeling the seeds off the paper towel they'd been dried on and sticking them into the seed raising mix.

Still thinking about hanging baskets for on top of the south fence, it would definitely interfere with the corn and may get in the way of the peas and beans, so we're holding off for now.

Oh and the lawn got a haircut as well ;)

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #527 on: October 29, 2017, 02:44:45 AM »
Looks great GT.

My lawn had a haircut this morning too - I always feel so virtuous when it's mowed. 

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #528 on: October 29, 2017, 02:53:24 AM »
The two tomato seedlings I purchased (as opposed to raising from seed) already have tiny tomatoes on them!

Everything raised from seed is growing sooooo slowly.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #529 on: October 31, 2017, 05:08:02 AM »
We're getting our first harvest of strawberries from the mega plant in the front yard! They're not great strawberries but fine for chopping up and having on cereal for brekkie or putting into smoothies. Last year we were getting approx 1 kg of strawberries per week (I think?) and we could be on track for something similar. Unfortunately the glut is always shortlived - only a month or less.

There are also lots and lots of baby nectarines on the nectarine tree in the front yard. Hopefully can protect them from the birds this year, or at least some. Not sure if we will get many apples this year. I have 3 small columnar apple trees in the backyard and haven't seen many flowers.

Some of our herbs have survived and thrived on our neglect - rosemary, oregano, thyme and tarragon. The parsley is mostly self-seeded and unfortunately bolts faster and faster to seed with each generation so I want to plant at least one new seedling this spring. The chives are still chugging along but the sage seems to have carked it.

Astatine

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #530 on: November 03, 2017, 02:37:29 AM »
Today's harvest of strawberries!! DH has been chopping them up and putting them on our breakfast cereal. They're also fine for smoothies (but less good for just eating straight).

:D

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #531 on: November 03, 2017, 03:04:09 AM »
Today's harvest of strawberries!! DH has been chopping them up and putting them on our breakfast cereal. They're also fine for smoothies (but less good for just eating straight).

:D

They look so good, I really must try growing strawberries

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #532 on: November 03, 2017, 03:26:18 AM »
Today's harvest of strawberries!! DH has been chopping them up and putting them on our breakfast cereal. They're also fine for smoothies (but less good for just eating straight).

:D

They look so good, I really must try growing strawberries

I find they're really hit and miss for productivity. We have another 2 or 3 plants in the backyard which give us maybe one or two strawberries per year and they're not much bigger than when we first planted them (at least they haven't died, I guess).

This one is out the front facing north with a bit of shade during the day. It's a similar micro-cliamte that the rosemary bush thrives in, if that helps with choosing a location for planting it.

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #533 on: November 03, 2017, 04:45:43 AM »
I seem to recall strawberries get worse each year, and only the first year is good.  That's why dad used to propagate new plants from the runners that would then be next years 1yr old plants to ensure we always had a good supply.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #534 on: November 03, 2017, 04:53:04 AM »
I harvested half a bucket of worm castings today...the first time I've really done it. I'll put some of them on my new compost heap that's growing pumpkins.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #535 on: November 03, 2017, 04:57:27 AM »
I seem to recall strawberries get worse each year, and only the first year is good.  That's why dad used to propagate new plants from the runners that would then be next years 1yr old plants to ensure we always had a good supply.

I've read that too, but not this mega-strawberry plant. It's been there for quite a few years (maybe 4 years, maybe 6? can't remember) and just keeps spreading out and going for world domination of the front yard. It's thriving on neglect, apart from a bit of water in the hot dry summer months.

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #536 on: November 03, 2017, 05:04:53 AM »
I seem to recall strawberries get worse each year, and only the first year is good.  That's why dad used to propagate new plants from the runners that would then be next years 1yr old plants to ensure we always had a good supply.

I've read that too, but not this mega-strawberry plant. It's been there for quite a few years (maybe 4 years, maybe 6? can't remember) and just keeps spreading out and going for world domination of the front yard. It's thriving on neglect, apart from a bit of water in the hot dry summer months.

Could explain why they don't taste awesome though?

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #537 on: November 03, 2017, 05:07:42 AM »
I seem to recall strawberries get worse each year, and only the first year is good.  That's why dad used to propagate new plants from the runners that would then be next years 1yr old plants to ensure we always had a good supply.

I've read that too, but not this mega-strawberry plant. It's been there for quite a few years (maybe 4 years, maybe 6? can't remember) and just keeps spreading out and going for world domination of the front yard. It's thriving on neglect, apart from a bit of water in the hot dry summer months.

Could explain why they don't taste awesome though?

Possibly. They're good enough on cereal etc though so we're usually just pretty stoked to have huge volumes from our garden.

Northern gal

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #538 on: November 03, 2017, 07:54:32 PM »
The two tomato seedlings I purchased (as opposed to raising from seed) already have tiny tomatoes on them!

Everything raised from seed is growing sooooo slowly.

Same here!

We have a self seeded tomato go gangbusters under the peach (I hope they are yellow heirlooms we got from the Margaret Riverfarmers markets).then some Roma seedlings DH got (don't like them). My beefsteak heirloom mortgage lifters are tiny and many did not make it as DH kept replanting them in the hydroponics grow bed grrrh.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #539 on: November 03, 2017, 07:56:09 PM »
Today's harvest of strawberries!! DH has been chopping them up and putting them on our breakfast cereal. They're also fine for smoothies (but less good for just eating straight).

:D

That's amazing! We killed all our strawberries for three years straight. But still trying.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #540 on: November 03, 2017, 07:56:55 PM »
Omg guys, GUYS!

We have our first passionfruit. Let's hope it ripens and we get it before the possums/rats.

Whoop!

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #541 on: November 03, 2017, 08:14:02 PM »
Rats stripped the bottom leaves from the kale. Didn't even eat them so doubly frustrating... We've put a cage over the top from another bed, doesn't quite fit but might deter them. I think they were attracted by some not quite rotten avo pips and egg shells from the worm castings.

I think we should just plant avo pips and grind egg shells?

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #542 on: November 04, 2017, 01:28:57 AM »
I'm starting to think about my new garden. Its a bit challenging since we will move from this house to another on the property in 1-2 years. The garden around this current house is already landscaped and planted - a bit busy and a bit neglected. My plan will be  just to clean it up and consolidate on whats already there. Sadly stuff I want in zone 1 like my wicking beds, can't be there, since they really are not portable.  I decided I'd start off with a little round bed - currently has bromeliads, (and weeds), move the bromeliads and plant it out with herbs.  The broms are struggling a bit, its quite sunny, so it seems the thing to do.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #543 on: November 04, 2017, 02:36:34 AM »
Impulse bought some seedlings at the farmers' market this morning: pineapple sage, cherry tomato, Lebanese cucumber, jalapeno, and two strawberries.

Based on what everyone is saying about strawberries, I need to learn how to propogate them and get in the habit of turning over my plants every year... Bugger.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #544 on: November 04, 2017, 09:28:28 PM »
Peas of both varieties are up, looks like just one failed germination in all those new seeds.  They've been given a water now that they're up and green shoots are seen everywhere.



Couple of corn have poked through the top.



The beans continue to struggle their way through the top of the soil, but they're getting there.  Good strike rate for them too.  Probably two days away from giving them their first water.



Colour out the front looks good.


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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #545 on: November 04, 2017, 10:51:41 PM »
Cool, GT!

We've got a friend coming over this arvo to take away our 5yo pineapple guava bush. We bought a variegated tarata to plant in its place to hopefully grow up to 8m high as a screening plant. There is one in the neighbour's backyard growing well so fingers crossed it grows well and fast!

We also bought a cherry tomato plant, a flat leaf parsley plant and some water crystals.

Yesterday we also bought 2x curly leaf parsley and a random tomato plant from a fete.

We haven't done much gardening for the past couple of years so our 1mx1m herb garden had lost all its mulch, still had some self down parsley (but not much) plus a bunch of self sown things

We'll hold off on planting the tomato plants for 2 days because the location is exposed and the forecast for Monday is 40mm of rain (which is a lot for us) and then severe weather warning for wind on Tuesday. Ah, spring.


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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #546 on: November 04, 2017, 11:27:16 PM »
Planted an eggplant seedling. We've been roasting a bit of eggplant lately and I've never really had success with growing it before so thought I'd give it a go. Long skinng ones.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #547 on: November 05, 2017, 01:12:15 AM »
Home again, and the garden desperately needs weeding - as well as a lot of other things! But my white peony has flowered for the first time!

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #548 on: November 05, 2017, 01:31:40 AM »
Home again, and the garden desperately needs weeding - as well as a lot of other things! But my white peony has flowered for the first time!

Welcome home Deborah!

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #549 on: November 05, 2017, 01:40:47 AM »
Home again, and the garden desperately needs weeding - as well as a lot of other things! But my white peony has flowered for the first time!

Welcome home Deborah!
And your posts are working again! Brilliant!