Author Topic: Australian Gardening Thread  (Read 27378 times)

Sapphire

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #400 on: March 19, 2017, 01:37:58 AM »
Hello Aussie & Kiwi Gardeners, a Melbourne-ite here...

I got up early this morning to play in my garden so was rewarding myself on the inter-web and found this lovely thread.

I live on a very small block (under 500m square, in fact probably under 400m square).

After renting the Jewel Box for many years, DH and I had the opportunity to buy our place a few years ago and I quickly planted 2 apple, 1 pear (at the time I didn't realise it needed a mate to cross pollinate); an apricot; 2 lemon trees, a mandarin, 2 peaches and 2 blueberry bushes. 

To be perfectly honest, there was no real thought process in this.  My local nursery was having a wonderful sale (think $5 and $10 twig like trees) so I just bought whatever took my fancy (this was pre-MMM).  On reflection I have planted them all much too close together, but will keep trimming them to keep them under control and see what happens.  Miraculously my apple trees produced small (but edible) apples; the blueberries had blueberries on them; and all the twigs looked lovely in blossom in Spring.

I've been procrastinating about getting the veggie garden going.  I've got a few pots of herbs growing and even have a Diggers membership...does that count??... but just need to give it a go.  I've been able to grow the usual summer salady stuff (think lettuce etc), but would like to expand my repartee.  I have a long term plan to have a thriving fruit and veggie garden going in our retirement (still about 6 years away) so need to get with the program.

This weekend, I planted a new pear tree to hopefully pollinate the other one; mowed a small 6.5m x 2.5m square patch of grass; contemplated whether I should put raised veggie garden beds where the grass is....; deadheaded a whole lot of roses (we inherited some of my late mother-in-law's roses) and generally seasol'ed everything in sight. 

It has been very hot here over the last couple of weeks and I think long term I will need to look at a water tank...it might need to go underground given the lack of space!  Hope everyone's garden are going well.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #401 on: March 19, 2017, 02:38:20 AM »
Hi Sapphire, nice to see you here.

At my place its still raining.  So far we've had at least 291mm, which is 1mm over record maximum. The weather station is a bit further south from me, so we've actually likely had more than that.  Previous months when I was complaining about not enough rain, the fall  was around 10-20mm. So I haven't done much in the garden. And weeds are growing and things are rotting!
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

Sapphire

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #402 on: March 19, 2017, 03:07:51 AM »
Hi Happy, 32 degrees here today, been very warm all week.  Please send rain down our way.

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #403 on: March 23, 2017, 03:32:09 AM »
I bought joy today, in the form of pansies and more marigolds! I'm hoping at least something will self-seed once they're done.

I also bought the courtyard tree that I've been debating. I hope i picked the right one, because it was what i knew grew well in full sun, I've seen plenty of healthy ones in our neighbourhood, and i know DH likes them - but it wasn't an ornamental fruit tree like I'd planned. I opted for a small ficus.

englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #404 on: March 23, 2017, 07:41:21 PM »
!!! I was very glad to hear you bought a tree but eek ficus. They usually have very invasive, large roots that crack walls and raised beds and even houses if too close. It's possible that some varieties don't and you've got one of them, but... unless the nursery has told you this is the case and you're very confident they're right (many nursery staff are not really very knowledgeable, I had a guy at Better Pets the other day trying to tell me that manure did the same thing as trace elements) , I'd be trying to swap it.

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #405 on: March 23, 2017, 08:43:41 PM »
Mmmm ficus... Our ficus benjamina was probably planted as a small shrub or grew from a seed dropped by a bird. It's doubled in size in 4 years that we've been here, the roots take all the nutrients and moisture and have torn up our yard. If it's a benjamina you have, don't plant it! Our tree guy said he cuts down ones and finds remnants of the tiny pots they came in - they just bust out!

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #406 on: March 23, 2017, 08:58:02 PM »
Dang, and I was pleased with myself. I'll leave it in it's pot and stew over it a bit.

It was this one (but the tag said full sun was fine..?)
https://www.bunnings.com.au/170mm-ficus-bushy-prince-benjamin-fig-bushy-prince_p3757185

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #407 on: March 23, 2017, 09:00:54 PM »
I can't upload a photo, but trust me if you saw mine... They are great for a patio pot or indoors.

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #408 on: March 23, 2017, 09:13:22 PM »
Would one of these work? We've got camellias along the patio, and a neighbour has a magnolia (a bit of branch sticks over the fence).

https://www.bunnings.com.au/5l-fairy-magnolia-blush_p3723852

englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #409 on: March 23, 2017, 09:43:07 PM »
yep, benjamina = benjamin, by the looks of it. Avoid. Sorry.

I have no experience with magnolias but don't see any problem with that idea, other than that the soggy petals are a bit of a pain to sweep up off paths and things. Watercorp says they are waterwise, which is a good sign for likely future health of plant: https://www.watercorporation.com.au/save-water/waterwise-plants-search/plants-details/figo

After the third attempt to plant marigold seeds, I now finally have one (1) flower. It is quite pretty.
On the other hand, I have pumpkin vines EVERYWHERE. I picked my first pumpkin today, not sure whether it's fully ripe but going to eat it anyway.

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #410 on: March 23, 2017, 09:47:09 PM »
yep, benjamina = benjamin, by the looks of it. Avoid. Sorry.

I have no experience with magnolias but don't see any problem with that idea, other than that the soggy petals are a bit of a pain to sweep up off paths and things. Watercorp says they are waterwise, which is a good sign for likely future health of plant: https://www.watercorporation.com.au/save-water/waterwise-plants-search/plants-details/figo

After the third attempt to plant marigold seeds, I now finally have one (1) flower. It is quite pretty.
On the other hand, I have pumpkin vines EVERYWHERE. I picked my first pumpkin today, not sure whether it's fully ripe but going to eat it anyway.
Ooh, yum! My mum had a bumper crop of pumpkins this year so we'll be getting free ones in a few weeks.

Bugger about my plant-purchasing attempt, but I'll either return it or stick it in a pot because the mister is a fan of them. Glad that a magnolia should work. Learning is good for me :D

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #411 on: March 23, 2017, 10:18:10 PM »
I think we have two camellias and they are v dense so great screening. Plus! We have a possum nest in one. Although I hate them for their thieving, I can see them while they are sleeping and it's very cute :)

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #412 on: March 23, 2017, 10:27:23 PM »
https://www.dropbox.com/pri/get/image.jpeg?_subject_uid=366559273&w=AAChtfzvCg_XsBqJIOywuT4VHVH8xNx180PoeDDi7mByvg

Hoping this link to my ficus image works.

ETA: for scale, I think the raised bed in front is about 1.4m wide.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2017, 10:30:51 PM by Freshwater »

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #413 on: March 25, 2017, 04:31:07 AM »


On the other hand, I have pumpkin vines EVERYWHERE. I picked my first pumpkin today, not sure whether it's fully ripe but going to eat it anyway.

Leave the pumpkin to cure for a few weeks before eating,  in a well ventilated area out of the sun.
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #414 on: March 25, 2017, 04:35:07 AM »
Still raining :(....garden becoming buried in moist green stuff and I can't get out to weed.

I've had no luck with marigolds. I bought some seedlings and planted them to deter pests, but the pests ate them.  I sowed  a whole pack seeds another time, got 1 scraggy plant, that put out 1 sad flower and died.  One time soon I'll have another go!
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HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #415 on: March 25, 2017, 05:23:08 AM »
Planted the red grapefruit, dug in the in-ground worm farms and mulched the bed. That's two garden beds redone now; two to go.

Had a rough week and did not water at all. Some of the half-dead tomatoes out the back are now looking even more dead. Everything else is fine. Zucchini needs more milk spray for powdery mildew.

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #416 on: March 25, 2017, 01:38:23 PM »
Pumpkins are an amazing vegetable in that they are quite edible no matter what stage of development they are at (similar to zucchinis), so your pumpkin is edible.



Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #417 on: March 25, 2017, 05:19:14 PM »
Short version of story: our avocado tree has been cut down and we have 13 avos of various sizes. A few will probably ripen ok but has anyone ever picked a too small avo and have it ripen / be edible? And do you think avo / guac would freeze :)? I could try to swap these for something on FB but they are quite stringy and watery (plus they fell into a muddy pool before we could retrieve them!)

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englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #419 on: March 26, 2017, 08:48:40 PM »
I don't usually get full cream milk, which is what you're supposed to use for powdery mildew.
However it just occurred to me yesterday that full cream milk made up from powdered milk is probably the same thing. And it is cheap and will keep in the cupboard until I need it and we already had some.
I have now sprayed All The Things.

I did a couple of garden tasks yesterday that I had been putting off for ages, soldered and waterproofed the retic wires, fitted the box to cover the valves, and chopped the tops of the IBCs I'm going to use as wicking beds. More garden space, here I come. Maybe I can get them finished over Easter.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #420 on: April 05, 2017, 06:03:58 PM »
I had one tiny eggplant growing, but something (a rat?) has nipped it right off the plant!

Hand-fertilised a zucchini flower the other day. Hoping for my first homegrown zucchini.

I don't usually get full cream milk, which is what you're supposed to use for powdery mildew.
However it just occurred to me yesterday that full cream milk made up from powdered milk is probably the same thing. And it is cheap and will keep in the cupboard until I need it and we already had some.
I have now sprayed All The Things.

I wonder if previously-frozen milk would work? I buy full-cream just for this, so maybe I should try freezing it in small portions until the next time I need it...

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #421 on: April 06, 2017, 06:15:38 AM »
Still raining here:(.  Garden is overgrown,  and I've lost my sowing rhythm. More weeds than you can poke a stick at.

Harvesting beans, - yay for snake beans! a bit of lettuce and lots of basil. Mmmm several more batches of pesto.

Harvested some mature lazyhousewife's beans to save for seed.

Otherwise, I'm suffering gardening withdrawals.


Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #422 on: April 06, 2017, 06:23:02 AM »
I'm hanging out for the weekend when I have muscle available to help me purchase my courtyard tree (take 2) and some pots, and re-pot a bunch of stuff. Hoping for a cool day tomorrow so I can get rid of some weeds in the meantime.

I hope the rain lets up for you soon, happy. I'm already missing it here...

englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #423 on: April 06, 2017, 09:25:32 PM »
I'm hanging out for the weekend, too, hoping to assemble a couple of my new ibc wicking beds.

I got behind in my seed planting, I don't have much to plant out into the new bed and the big space in the old bed where I pulled the finished squash out. I did chuck in one silverbeet and some parsley that'd been in seed raising pots too long plus some beans (ditto) in the other bed earlier this week. And planted out seeds of broad beans, leek, and ... one other thing I can't remember right now.

I've recently read that oyster mushrooms are easy to grow and I'm very tempted, but not sure I have enough time in a day...

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #424 on: April 06, 2017, 09:34:57 PM »
Worm farms are now set up and ready for food scraps! Let's see if I'm a capable enough worm farmer to get worm wee and castings for my plants to eat.

Englyn, the worm farm people at last night's workshop use homemade wicking beds! They looked good.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #425 on: April 06, 2017, 11:31:45 PM »
Ooh, I must remember to take some progress photos.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #426 on: April 09, 2017, 01:56:44 AM »
Commenting from Melbourne to come back, read and learn! We have some water tanks (ibc thingys) waiting to become wicking beds and a backyard to overhaul.

Fairly new to gardening, but am looking forward to hopping in more and more as we approach FIRE :)
« Last Edit: April 09, 2017, 02:05:27 AM by AussieCat »
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happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #427 on: April 09, 2017, 05:53:03 AM »
Today it was sunny ( until it rained again), so I caught up a bit.  The wicking beds are now sown out with lettuce, a few spring onions and a leek, broccoli and kale, bok choy, tatsoi , chioggia, and chard. Looks like a couple more carrots might be germinating, and last years chervil is coming back.

Containers in Zone1 were updated..planted out with chard and lettuce, in with some broccoli and sliver beet ( giant fordhook).

In the nursery I sowed miniwombok, borage and mexican coriander.

I'm working over my garden beds to a more permie style..with diversity, mixing flowers, soil improvers and food crops, interplanted highly piggly, not in rows. Today I concentrated on one bed: dug out a section with noxious weeds, planted some daylilies, removed spent sunflowers, and sprinkled remaining seed, pulled out buckwheat and mung beans - chop and drop for soil improvement, cut back wild roquette ( using chop and drop so it reseeds) planted out silver beet and some cosmos flowers. Fertilised the beans.

Havesting: beans..a few scarlet runner beans and enough snake beans for me to eat every day I steam veges, and then some. Yum I love snake beans.  I had 200g excess today so I blanched and froze them in packs of 50g - enough for a serve for me at tea.

Its garlic painting time, but I've held off so far. So much rain, I'm worried the bulbs will just rot.
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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #428 on: April 11, 2017, 01:18:27 AM »
Still getting a few strawberries! Seems far too late in the year for them, but I'm not arguing.

The zucchini flower I hand pollinated less than a week ago is already a half-sized zucchini. Keeping a close eye on it. I pollinated another flower this morning, so hopefully that one will set fruit too.

I was so happy to use my very first batch of worm wee this morning on an apple tree. I'm hoping to keep getting free (ish) liquid fertiliser for years to come from my worm farm :-)

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #429 on: April 11, 2017, 02:04:01 AM »
Latest enthusiasm: I'm growing mushrooms!
Oyster mushrooms are supposed to be pretty easy to grow. I'm working on producing a jar of spawn, I boiled coffee grounds and shredded newspaper and layered it with some pieces of stem of bought oyster mushrooms in a large glass jar. They are starting to grow mycelium!! This is the white fluffy looking underground "body" of the plant, the mushrooms themselves are the fruiting part.
Once I have a jar of mycelium spawn, assuming it doesn't rot or grow the wrong kind of mould, I'll break it up and chuck it in a large lidded bucket with holes in the sides to fruit. Not sure what the soil/substrate will be yet, maybe straw/newspaper mix.

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #430 on: April 19, 2017, 05:50:49 PM »
I have just seen two posts from GT in two different threads that I wanted to respond to, so I chose to come here:

Worm farms: How to use the worm wee
@ Deborah and GT, thanks - I already do this - I have a bucket under the tap which collects the pee.

Due to photobucket doing maintenance yesterday I missed posting this.  Worm farm, jar, watering can and compost head, all within range of each other.  Note spare third tray for worm farm in the background.

http://i1301.photobucket.com/albums/ag105/geofftewierik/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_20170120_172211_zpshsbu01rp.jpg
That is an awesome bamboo in the background. Is it a clumping bamboo, and do you know what it is?

Seeds:
I should send you an Eden Seeds/Select Organics catalogue from down here.
Now, I got put off Diggers some years ago - I used to join them for a few years, accumulate too many seeds and then stop my membership. Rinse and repeat. They also didn't always stock what I wanted, so I started looking around. Then I found that their prices weren't that good either. Which seed companies do people use, and why?



GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #431 on: April 19, 2017, 06:10:52 PM »
I have just seen two posts from GT in two different threads that I wanted to respond to, so I chose to come here:

Worm farms: How to use the worm wee
@ Deborah and GT, thanks - I already do this - I have a bucket under the tap which collects the pee.

Due to photobucket doing maintenance yesterday I missed posting this.  Worm farm, jar, watering can and compost head, all within range of each other.  Note spare third tray for worm farm in the background.

http://i1301.photobucket.com/albums/ag105/geofftewierik/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_20170120_172211_zpshsbu01rp.jpg
That is an awesome bamboo in the background. Is it a clumping bamboo, and do you know what it is?

It's actually a Golden Cane Palm, Dypsis lutescens.  We have them all along our WNW boundary fence and a few more dotted around the block.

Seeds:
I should send you an Eden Seeds/Select Organics catalogue from down here.
Now, I got put off Diggers some years ago - I used to join them for a few years, accumulate too many seeds and then stop my membership. Rinse and repeat. They also didn't always stock what I wanted, so I started looking around. Then I found that their prices weren't that good either. Which seed companies do people use, and why?

A friend had bought a subscription to Diggers for me years ago, I wasn't a fan of their marketing/seeds sent and have always bought seeds I need from places like Eden Seeds/Select Organic when living up here in QLD as they're climate appropriate.  When I lived in VIC I bought seeds from New Gippsland Seeds & Bulbs.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #432 on: April 20, 2017, 05:43:32 AM »
I've been gifted a 5 year subscription to Digger's, so I do buy some things from them if it looks unique and economical, but I wouldn't pay to renew. I'm in a subtropical rainforest and I find their offerings/seeds are slanted towards a more Victorian climate.  I prefer to buy from Green Harvest, Eden seeds and Daley's Fruit Tree nursery.
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #433 on: April 23, 2017, 02:56:50 PM »
Woodbridge Fruit Trees have now opened their catalogue (they grow trees - mainly apples - and mail order, on a first come first served basis after opening their catalogue). The trees are sent in winter, and they say (in the e-mail they sent to me) they now send to WA (even though some parts of the site still say they don't). https://www.woodbridgefruittrees.com.au/



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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #434 on: April 23, 2017, 05:42:35 PM »
Woodbridge Fruit Trees have now opened their catalogue (they grow trees - mainly apples - and mail order, on a first come first served basis after opening their catalogue). The trees are sent in winter, and they say (in the e-mail they sent to me) they now send to WA (even though some parts of the site still say they don't). https://www.woodbridgefruittrees.com.au/

thanks Deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #435 on: May 07, 2017, 01:23:58 AM »
So today was a permaculture open gardens day - I toured 3 local gardens and learnt about keeping native and honey bees, growing coffee and a bunch of other things. It was really fantastic to see what was doing well in gardens in my area. We need to plant bananas! And papaya! And all the berries. Another interesting factoid - no one really bothers growing big tomatoes because of fruit fly. They stick with cherry toms and if they do grow regular ones, plan for fruit in v early summer and autumn, it just is too humid in summer.

I am going to get a native stingless bee hive, they are minimal care and you get a litre of honey each year. Interesting factoid - native stingless don't pollinate pumpkins... And given that I haven't seen one native bee in my garden in months, it's hand pollination only round here.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #436 on: May 07, 2017, 01:30:03 AM »
One of my blueberries has started flowering. It's MAY. Goddamn climate change. Anyone want to weigh in on whether I should pull off the buds?

I am going to get a native stingless bee hive, they are minimal care and you get a litre of honey each year.

That is very, very cool.

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #437 on: May 07, 2017, 01:47:34 AM »
One of my blueberries has started flowering. It's MAY. Goddamn climate change. Anyone want to weigh in on whether I should pull off the buds?

Something else I learnt today - nothing seems to fruit when it's supposed to round here and all sorts of things were fruiting twice. Either it's climate change or the gardening world is AWASH WITH LIARS! I'd say just go with it.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #438 on: May 07, 2017, 03:05:39 AM »
Where do you get native bee hives from?



Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #439 on: May 07, 2017, 04:30:03 AM »
Where do you get native bee hives from?

I haven't researched all the options yet. There is a provider in Sydney and a great one from Brissie that spoke at a garden today. Both charge ~$500 for a hive incl bees and you get them by courier. It's steep and you can get a pound dog for less but you don't have to walk the bees. Plus there's the environmental benefit.

Keeping them is literally choosing the right spot (dry and shaded) and then let them do their thing. Collecting honey is easy and optional, very little processing compared to euro bees but you don't get a lot. I think if you're keeping them in Canberra you might have extra work to keep them warm in winter.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #440 on: May 07, 2017, 01:12:42 PM »
European bees have been an environmental disaster for things like native bees, so I am keen to have natives. They are using them in Japan in greenhouses because they don't sting.



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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #441 on: May 09, 2017, 12:47:25 AM »
Where do you get native bee hives from?

I haven't researched all the options yet. There is a provider in Sydney and a great one from Brissie that spoke at a garden today. Both charge ~$500 for a hive incl bees and you get them by courier. It's steep and you can get a pound dog for less but you don't have to walk the bees. Plus there's the environmental benefit.

Keeping them is literally choosing the right spot (dry and shaded) and then let them do their thing. Collecting honey is easy and optional, very little processing compared to euro bees but you don't get a lot. I think if you're keeping them in Canberra you might have extra work to keep them warm in winter.

A dry spot could be an issue for me... But keeping them warm wouldn't be an issue in Perth.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #442 on: May 09, 2017, 12:52:50 AM »
I now own a dwarf pomegranate! It already has two little fruits starting. I love the foliage, and I'm reliably informed that it will happily grow into a small bush in a pot. I have no idea what I'll do with pomegranates, but I'll find out.

And the blueberry bushes at the nursery were flowering too. So it's not just mine.

GT

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #443 on: May 09, 2017, 07:07:26 PM »
Pomegranates are cut in half, have the flesh covered seeds knocked out with the edge of a spoon over a leafy green salad.  Provides a tangy crunch.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #444 on: May 09, 2017, 07:12:50 PM »
Pomegranates are cut in half, have the flesh covered seeds knocked out with the edge of a spoon over a leafy green salad.  Provides a tangy crunch.

Yeah, but then you have to eat SALAD.

I'm thinking, cheesecake topping.

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #445 on: May 10, 2017, 12:27:16 AM »
I have planted some lemongrass at the front of my house which is north facing. I don't think I prepped the sandy soil that well so I am clinging to hope that it does in fact grow like a weed as I was told at the weekend. I was given a clump with roots which I split into three. The advice said plant three metres apart so I planted it about one metre apart.

Uses for lemongrass - not only can you cut the stem near the base and use in cooking, but you can also trim the leaves and steep them for tea. One very useful plant. I am already visualizing having people over and asking if they'd like lemongrass or mint tea and then stepping out with my scissors.

Now to find a free a watering can to get rainwater from the tank at the back of the house to the front garden...

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #446 on: May 10, 2017, 02:00:53 AM »
I once planted lemon grass. It grew into an enormous clump. Someone said it was the biggest clump he had seen in Canberra. Then I decided it was in the wrong spot. So I moved it. It died of frost. I have tried growing lemon grass in the better spot several times since, but they all died of frost. This year I planted some lemon grass in the original spot. Hopefully it will last through winter.



Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #447 on: May 10, 2017, 02:14:32 AM »
I once planted lemon grass. It grew into an enormous clump. Someone said it was the biggest clump he had seen in Canberra. Then I decided it was in the wrong spot. So I moved it. It died of frost. I have tried growing lemon grass in the better spot several times since, but they all died of frost. This year I planted some lemon grass in the original spot. Hopefully it will last through winter.

All the clumps I've seen here have been very big, I'm really hoping it takes off! Good luck with the original spot. All I've read suggests they like full sun, well drained soil and regular watering.

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #448 on: May 10, 2017, 02:25:57 AM »
I once planted lemon grass. It grew into an enormous clump. Someone said it was the biggest clump he had seen in Canberra. Then I decided it was in the wrong spot. So I moved it. It died of frost. I have tried growing lemon grass in the better spot several times since, but they all died of frost. This year I planted some lemon grass in the original spot. Hopefully it will last through winter.

All the clumps I've seen here have been very big, I'm really hoping it takes off! Good luck with the original spot. All I've read suggests they like full sun, well drained soil and regular watering.
Where it grew well gets little sun, and no watering but it is well drained.



Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #449 on: May 10, 2017, 02:46:41 AM »
I once planted lemon grass. It grew into an enormous clump. Someone said it was the biggest clump he had seen in Canberra. Then I decided it was in the wrong spot. So I moved it. It died of frost. I have tried growing lemon grass in the better spot several times since, but they all died of frost. This year I planted some lemon grass in the original spot. Hopefully it will last through winter.

All the clumps I've seen here have been very big, I'm really hoping it takes off! Good luck with the original spot. All I've read suggests they like full sun, well drained soil and regular watering.
Where it grew well gets little sun, and no watering but it is well drained.

I am really starting to think we should ignore most location advice because just about everything seems to prefer the shade, and I don't blame them. I put an avo tree pip seedling on my front northish facing porch, granted in a pot but with the correct soil mix as prescribed by the internets, but it hates it. The seedling planted in the ground and located behind the garbage bins (and therefore forgotten about and overgrown with weeds) is going gangbusters. It's actually too near the fence and the gas and water lines so we'll unfortunately need to move it.