Author Topic: Australian Gardening Thread  (Read 17440 times)

Sapphire

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #400 on: March 19, 2017, 01:37:58 AM »
Hello Aussie & Kiwi Gardeners, a Melbourne-ite here...

I got up early this morning to play in my garden so was rewarding myself on the inter-web and found this lovely thread.

I live on a very small block (under 500m square, in fact probably under 400m square).

After renting the Jewel Box for many years, DH and I had the opportunity to buy our place a few years ago and I quickly planted 2 apple, 1 pear (at the time I didn't realise it needed a mate to cross pollinate); an apricot; 2 lemon trees, a mandarin, 2 peaches and 2 blueberry bushes. 

To be perfectly honest, there was no real thought process in this.  My local nursery was having a wonderful sale (think $5 and $10 twig like trees) so I just bought whatever took my fancy (this was pre-MMM).  On reflection I have planted them all much too close together, but will keep trimming them to keep them under control and see what happens.  Miraculously my apple trees produced small (but edible) apples; the blueberries had blueberries on them; and all the twigs looked lovely in blossom in Spring.

I've been procrastinating about getting the veggie garden going.  I've got a few pots of herbs growing and even have a Diggers membership...does that count??... but just need to give it a go.  I've been able to grow the usual summer salady stuff (think lettuce etc), but would like to expand my repartee.  I have a long term plan to have a thriving fruit and veggie garden going in our retirement (still about 6 years away) so need to get with the program.

This weekend, I planted a new pear tree to hopefully pollinate the other one; mowed a small 6.5m x 2.5m square patch of grass; contemplated whether I should put raised veggie garden beds where the grass is....; deadheaded a whole lot of roses (we inherited some of my late mother-in-law's roses) and generally seasol'ed everything in sight. 

It has been very hot here over the last couple of weeks and I think long term I will need to look at a water tank...it might need to go underground given the lack of space!  Hope everyone's garden are going well.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #401 on: March 19, 2017, 02:38:20 AM »
Hi Sapphire, nice to see you here.

At my place its still raining.  So far we've had at least 291mm, which is 1mm over record maximum. The weather station is a bit further south from me, so we've actually likely had more than that.  Previous months when I was complaining about not enough rain, the fall  was around 10-20mm. So I haven't done much in the garden. And weeds are growing and things are rotting!
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

Sapphire

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #402 on: March 19, 2017, 03:07:51 AM »
Hi Happy, 32 degrees here today, been very warm all week.  Please send rain down our way.

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #403 on: March 23, 2017, 03:32:09 AM »
I bought joy today, in the form of pansies and more marigolds! I'm hoping at least something will self-seed once they're done.

I also bought the courtyard tree that I've been debating. I hope i picked the right one, because it was what i knew grew well in full sun, I've seen plenty of healthy ones in our neighbourhood, and i know DH likes them - but it wasn't an ornamental fruit tree like I'd planned. I opted for a small ficus.

englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #404 on: March 23, 2017, 07:41:21 PM »
!!! I was very glad to hear you bought a tree but eek ficus. They usually have very invasive, large roots that crack walls and raised beds and even houses if too close. It's possible that some varieties don't and you've got one of them, but... unless the nursery has told you this is the case and you're very confident they're right (many nursery staff are not really very knowledgeable, I had a guy at Better Pets the other day trying to tell me that manure did the same thing as trace elements) , I'd be trying to swap it.

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #405 on: March 23, 2017, 08:43:41 PM »
Mmmm ficus... Our ficus benjamina was probably planted as a small shrub or grew from a seed dropped by a bird. It's doubled in size in 4 years that we've been here, the roots take all the nutrients and moisture and have torn up our yard. If it's a benjamina you have, don't plant it! Our tree guy said he cuts down ones and finds remnants of the tiny pots they came in - they just bust out!

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #406 on: March 23, 2017, 08:58:02 PM »
Dang, and I was pleased with myself. I'll leave it in it's pot and stew over it a bit.

It was this one (but the tag said full sun was fine..?)
https://www.bunnings.com.au/170mm-ficus-bushy-prince-benjamin-fig-bushy-prince_p3757185

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #407 on: March 23, 2017, 09:00:54 PM »
I can't upload a photo, but trust me if you saw mine... They are great for a patio pot or indoors.

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #408 on: March 23, 2017, 09:13:22 PM »
Would one of these work? We've got camellias along the patio, and a neighbour has a magnolia (a bit of branch sticks over the fence).

https://www.bunnings.com.au/5l-fairy-magnolia-blush_p3723852

englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #409 on: March 23, 2017, 09:43:07 PM »
yep, benjamina = benjamin, by the looks of it. Avoid. Sorry.

I have no experience with magnolias but don't see any problem with that idea, other than that the soggy petals are a bit of a pain to sweep up off paths and things. Watercorp says they are waterwise, which is a good sign for likely future health of plant: https://www.watercorporation.com.au/save-water/waterwise-plants-search/plants-details/figo

After the third attempt to plant marigold seeds, I now finally have one (1) flower. It is quite pretty.
On the other hand, I have pumpkin vines EVERYWHERE. I picked my first pumpkin today, not sure whether it's fully ripe but going to eat it anyway.

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #410 on: March 23, 2017, 09:47:09 PM »
yep, benjamina = benjamin, by the looks of it. Avoid. Sorry.

I have no experience with magnolias but don't see any problem with that idea, other than that the soggy petals are a bit of a pain to sweep up off paths and things. Watercorp says they are waterwise, which is a good sign for likely future health of plant: https://www.watercorporation.com.au/save-water/waterwise-plants-search/plants-details/figo

After the third attempt to plant marigold seeds, I now finally have one (1) flower. It is quite pretty.
On the other hand, I have pumpkin vines EVERYWHERE. I picked my first pumpkin today, not sure whether it's fully ripe but going to eat it anyway.
Ooh, yum! My mum had a bumper crop of pumpkins this year so we'll be getting free ones in a few weeks.

Bugger about my plant-purchasing attempt, but I'll either return it or stick it in a pot because the mister is a fan of them. Glad that a magnolia should work. Learning is good for me :D

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #411 on: March 23, 2017, 10:18:10 PM »
I think we have two camellias and they are v dense so great screening. Plus! We have a possum nest in one. Although I hate them for their thieving, I can see them while they are sleeping and it's very cute :)

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #412 on: March 23, 2017, 10:27:23 PM »
https://www.dropbox.com/pri/get/image.jpeg?_subject_uid=366559273&w=AAChtfzvCg_XsBqJIOywuT4VHVH8xNx180PoeDDi7mByvg

Hoping this link to my ficus image works.

ETA: for scale, I think the raised bed in front is about 1.4m wide.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2017, 10:30:51 PM by Freshwater »

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #413 on: March 25, 2017, 04:31:07 AM »


On the other hand, I have pumpkin vines EVERYWHERE. I picked my first pumpkin today, not sure whether it's fully ripe but going to eat it anyway.

Leave the pumpkin to cure for a few weeks before eating,  in a well ventilated area out of the sun.
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #414 on: March 25, 2017, 04:35:07 AM »
Still raining :(....garden becoming buried in moist green stuff and I can't get out to weed.

I've had no luck with marigolds. I bought some seedlings and planted them to deter pests, but the pests ate them.  I sowed  a whole pack seeds another time, got 1 scraggy plant, that put out 1 sad flower and died.  One time soon I'll have another go!
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #415 on: March 25, 2017, 05:23:08 AM »
Planted the red grapefruit, dug in the in-ground worm farms and mulched the bed. That's two garden beds redone now; two to go.

Had a rough week and did not water at all. Some of the half-dead tomatoes out the back are now looking even more dead. Everything else is fine. Zucchini needs more milk spray for powdery mildew.

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #416 on: March 25, 2017, 01:38:23 PM »
Pumpkins are an amazing vegetable in that they are quite edible no matter what stage of development they are at (similar to zucchinis), so your pumpkin is edible.

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #417 on: March 25, 2017, 05:19:14 PM »
Short version of story: our avocado tree has been cut down and we have 13 avos of various sizes. A few will probably ripen ok but has anyone ever picked a too small avo and have it ripen / be edible? And do you think avo / guac would freeze :)? I could try to swap these for something on FB but they are quite stringy and watery (plus they fell into a muddy pool before we could retrieve them!)

deborah

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englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #419 on: March 26, 2017, 08:48:40 PM »
I don't usually get full cream milk, which is what you're supposed to use for powdery mildew.
However it just occurred to me yesterday that full cream milk made up from powdered milk is probably the same thing. And it is cheap and will keep in the cupboard until I need it and we already had some.
I have now sprayed All The Things.

I did a couple of garden tasks yesterday that I had been putting off for ages, soldered and waterproofed the retic wires, fitted the box to cover the valves, and chopped the tops of the IBCs I'm going to use as wicking beds. More garden space, here I come. Maybe I can get them finished over Easter.