Author Topic: Australian Gardening Thread  (Read 25170 times)

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #250 on: November 06, 2016, 01:44:47 AM »
Harvesting:
Lettuces, Grapefruit, Apple Mint, Asparagus, Lemon, Bay Leaves.

Weeding

Getting rid of junk, and tidying up under the oak.



HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #251 on: November 06, 2016, 05:46:49 AM »
My potted citrus trees have strawberries growing around the base of each tree.

Within the next six-ish months I'll be potting some new fruit trees - likely apple varieties - for a space that is not yet free. Suggestions for what else to grow around the base of a fruit tree in a half barrel? Preferably edible perennials. If the answer is ''more strawberries'' that will be okay too.

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #252 on: November 06, 2016, 10:16:26 AM »
Why not various herbs? Mint goes rampant in the garden, but confining it to a tub would work well (normal mint in one tub, Thai mint in another?). Oregano. Basil is an annual, so that might be a problem. Thyme. It also means they are up higher and easier to pick. How many barrels do you have? You could always have more than one herb in a barrel if you don't use it that much.



HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #253 on: November 06, 2016, 08:47:23 PM »
There'll be three or four barrels, so plenty of space. Herbs are a good idea, though I already have a herb garden - and I have to admit, the only fresh herb I use in any quantity is basil.

On a semi related note, I ordered my free seeds from Digger's Club last night (members get four free packets, chosen from a small selection, in autumn and spring). I picked basil, a gambler's pack of herbs, beetroot and flowers that look quite a lot like gerberas.

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #254 on: November 06, 2016, 09:11:00 PM »
I'm currently making Apple Mint (the type of mint) and Ginger Sparkling drink. But unless herbs are close to the house, I find I always forget about them.



Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #255 on: November 06, 2016, 09:43:07 PM »
One good thing about the perennial herbs is, they just keep on keeping on with little maintenance and even if you don't cook with them they smell good when you brush past all year round. Oregano grows like a weed like mint, even I can't kill it!

For me, if I bought fresh herbs every time I used them to cook, I'd be buying more than I needed, which is frustrating and $$$$ each time. I know there's dried herbs and you can freeze fresh ones but some things like rosemary are just soooo much better fresh. I make soup with oregano rarely but it's good to have the plant ready to go.

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #256 on: November 06, 2016, 10:05:41 PM »
I was sick the weekend before last and had too much on this weekend so still haven't got around to sorting out all the dead leaves and the rats. 

Found out today that our neighbours will be undergrounding our power lines this week as part of their house build, which sorts out the possum route to our solar panels/their nest. It's given us a kick up the bum to quickly build/ install a house for them elsewhere. I wonder if I can put one in a council owned tree out the front nearer their nest (and further from our veggies)? They are ringtails so we get to put up a smaller sized box at least. We have the ply ready to go, maybe tomorrow we can figure it out.

Our tomatoes are coming on great guns, even after removing blight. I have crowded them in way too much which is good to know for next year. I just didn't believe they would grow big I guess! The one roma plant seems to be more of a bush but it has about 6 fruit already even though I pinched some flowers off so all good.

Our green tomatoes are supposed to grown to beef tomato size then go soft and are then edible. However, they are growing to normal tomato size and then turning orange?? Maybe they cross pollinated or we have the wrong plant? It's not from seed and this is the one that's on it's second year (last year we were robbed of all the fruit).

Our capsicum and eggplant plants are also coming up well, who'd've thunk it from aldi seedlings bought on a whim. Also our zucchini sown from seed are leaving everything else for dead, I hope they flower. Will have to google to make sure they get what they need. Our kale seeds have finally come up.

I keep forgetting to look after spinach and lettuce planted in random gaps around the garden so I don't hold out much hope for those. A lot of it is in too shady a spot so got all leggy. The spinach near the back door is doing better. 

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #257 on: November 08, 2016, 03:35:57 AM »
We caught a rat! It was quite small with a head that seemed quite large, so much frantic googling followed to make sure it was not some native critter. I think it is just a juvenile one as it has the right teeth and a roundish face, not like the pointy faced antechinus or bandicoot. Before I saw it DH was worried I was going to be upset bc he thought we might have caught a mouse, ha ha, it is still about six times the size of a mouse. Citrus was what got it, random.

Today was all about ringtail possum research. We learnt that they can have a few nests (dreys) dotted around and they tend not to use hollows. You can build a nest by tying together two hanging baskets to make a ball shape and hanging it in a tree. It's got a bit quiet around our solar panels so we think they have moved to another nest. There's a drey in our backyard in the one suitable dense tree but I don't think they are there right now. Anyway, short story is I don't think we need to worry about it if they lose the solar panel home if they've got other options in their territory.

We have decided that our green tomato plant must actually be another plant from last year - Black Russian! We have one orange tomato so we are waiting to see if it turns purple!

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #258 on: November 08, 2016, 12:51:00 PM »
I thought Black Russians went from green to black, without an orange phase - at least that's what mine did.



Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #259 on: November 08, 2016, 08:16:46 PM »
I thought Black Russians went from green to black, without an orange phase - at least that's what mine did.

Then who knows what mutants we have created!

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #260 on: November 08, 2016, 08:20:50 PM »
I thought Black Russians went from green to black, without an orange phase - at least that's what mine did.

Then who knows what mutants we have created!

Are your climates similar? Maybe they do different things depending on temp? (Making this up as I go along).

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #261 on: November 08, 2016, 08:22:07 PM »
Should I, or should I not, pull the tiny little fruit that's set on my citrus trees off?

Some sources say this should be done so that the tree puts its energy into growing rather than producing tasty tasty fruit. Thoughts? Opinions? Anecdata?

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #262 on: November 09, 2016, 02:11:19 AM »
All I know is that, yes that's whats said. That being said my lemon, about 3 years old now is only producing LEAVES, so clearly I don't have an expert opinion. PS If I had lots of little fruits I might be tempted to pull them off just in case.
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

Primm

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #263 on: November 10, 2016, 02:42:39 AM »
The only Black Russian I know involves Kahlua, Tia Maria and Coke, so I'm not much help I'm afraid.

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #264 on: November 10, 2016, 02:44:43 AM »
The only Black Russian I know involves Kahlua, Tia Maria and Coke, so I'm not much help I'm afraid.
hmm. I'm not sure about the idea of coke with those liqueurs, but I'm willing to give it a try...

Primm

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #265 on: November 10, 2016, 02:47:35 AM »
Nonononono!!! Disclaimer (in big bold letters): I WAS 22 YEARS OLD THE LAST TIME I HAD ONE OF THESE!!!

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #266 on: November 10, 2016, 02:48:53 AM »
Nonononono!!! Disclaimer (in big bold letters): I WAS 22 YEARS OLD THE LAST TIME I HAD ONE OF THESE!!!
haha OK, I won't then! I feel maybe "and it was awful" disclaimer shouldve gone on that :D

Primm

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #267 on: November 10, 2016, 02:50:14 AM »
Nonononono!!! Disclaimer (in big bold letters): I WAS 22 YEARS OLD THE LAST TIME I HAD ONE OF THESE!!!
haha OK, I won't then! I feel maybe "and it was awful" disclaimer shouldve gone on that :D

I recall it as actually being quite good, but very strong and very sweet. Sickly even.

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #268 on: November 10, 2016, 03:03:05 AM »
Nonononono!!! Disclaimer (in big bold letters): I WAS 22 YEARS OLD THE LAST TIME I HAD ONE OF THESE!!!
haha OK, I won't then! I feel maybe "and it was awful" disclaimer shouldve gone on that :D

I recall it as actually being quite good, but very strong and very sweet. Sickly even.
eh that might be my kind of alcohol, though I've definitely noticed a trend away from sweetness as I've aged.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #269 on: November 15, 2016, 06:55:32 PM »
For those who grow blueberries:

In the hot weather we've been having (mid-thirties) the blueberries start to turn / go wrinkly pretty much as soon as they're ripe. The bushes are getting plenty of water.

Does anyone pick theirs just before they're ripe, and ripen them inside? Does it work? Is that the best solution here?

englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #270 on: November 15, 2016, 08:17:37 PM »
I didn't have that problem. My blueberries were under the patio and probably got a few hours of full sun a day then full shade.

I have covered my wicking bed with a little tent of 50% shadecloth. I haven't got the hang of filling it often enough, and everything except 1 zucchini died in the baking weather the last couple of days. I've just planted out some cucumber and squash seedlings that were ready, cross fingers.

I also planted out some shoots off the bamboo I dug up weekend before last, and they seem to be surviving.

Mulch collection after work today if all goes well.

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #271 on: November 15, 2016, 10:07:45 PM »
We're on holiday, but I bought a mix pot of succulents from the markets :) best kind of souvenir.

:)

That reminded me of something...

Quote
The cacti were a gift from the Mister. He went on a business trip to Arizona and, because he knows me, ignored the purses, jewelry, and clothing and went straight for the plants.

He forgot them at the airport and I was so upset that he called the airport on the off chance someone turned in his gift box o Cactaceae.

He figured he would end up going to Home Depot on the sly and buy me some more.

But as luck would have it, he is the only traveling salesman married to a woman who thinks a gift box of prickly plants is a good thing.

They were right where he left them hours later.

http://pancakesandfrenchfries.com/2011/04/the-toy-room-before/


:D

Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #272 on: November 15, 2016, 11:01:16 PM »
I have zucchini flowers! Now like pumpkin do they need help pollinating or do I just leave them?

Had a chat to the possums last night while they were munching away on blossoms in a magnolia (?) tree (something pink). The mystery tomatoes are doing well, tasted one and it seems fine, not floury. Those massive old plants are too big to try to possum/rat proof effectively but the possums don't seem to realise they are there on the other side of the house. We were late getting back and it was already dark, so they watched us replacing our huge possum proof wire box on the new tomato bed.

Astatine

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #273 on: November 16, 2016, 12:29:31 AM »
I'm a bit apathetic about gardening this spring, partly because I am so very tired and partly cos my shoulder is damaged and still recovering.

But... we are in peak strawberry season. A glut, even. :D Despite having some on our breakfast every morning and a strawberry smoothie on the weekend, we have 4 litres (yes litres!) from the one monster plant out the front. It's just one plant that has spread and spread over the past 4 years and in spring, gets a gazillion flowers which turn into strawberries. Unfortunately they aren't great strawberries (very tart) so we can't give them away so we are having a strawberry smoothie for dinner.


Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #274 on: November 16, 2016, 01:52:55 AM »
Might they be ok in jam?

Astatine

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #275 on: November 16, 2016, 04:11:51 AM »
Might they be ok in jam?

Possibly. Not something we have energy to try this year (it's been a long, difficult year) but I'll keep it in mind for the future.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #276 on: November 16, 2016, 01:02:11 PM »
your strawberry plant sounds amazeballs. I haven't tried to grow strawberries yet. Still so many things to have a go at.
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #277 on: November 16, 2016, 07:36:33 PM »
your strawberry plant sounds amazeballs. I haven't tried to grow strawberries yet. Still so many things to have a go at.

One of the best parts of gardening: there's always a new plant or technique to try out!

But... we are in peak strawberry season. A glut, even. :D Despite having some on our breakfast every morning and a strawberry smoothie on the weekend, we have 4 litres (yes litres!) from the one monster plant out the front. It's just one plant that has spread and spread over the past 4 years and in spring, gets a gazillion flowers which turn into strawberries. Unfortunately they aren't great strawberries (very tart) so we can't give them away so we are having a strawberry smoothie for dinner.

FOUR LITRES!

Not a very healthy idea, but: what about dipping them in sugar and then eating them? Mmmmm.

englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #278 on: November 16, 2016, 08:38:36 PM »
Some kind of coulis, or sauce for icecream? Might be easier than jam. Or perhaps you can make strawberry liqueur by throwing a bunch in a bottle of vodka or something, dunno, never tried.

I am envious of the zucc flowers. My one plant that survived is still only 5cm tall. Hurry up, dammit.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #279 on: November 17, 2016, 03:57:18 AM »
Or dip in chocolate...but wait, Astatine is diabetic so maybe  jam, sugar and chocolate are out.
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #280 on: November 17, 2016, 04:08:32 AM »
I will take those strawberries off your hands...

My lovely parents and in-laws helped us mow, weed and mulch our garden in time for our rent inspection. My kangaroo paw are looking very striking against the red woodchips.

We have a courtyard with a narrow garden bed around the edge, and two nasty spikey palm trees in it. The owners have given the OK for those to be removed, so I'm now looking forward to easier maintenance and a significant load of free mondo grass and golden cane palm from my mum to fill the beds. Very excited!

englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #281 on: November 17, 2016, 06:24:33 PM »
The seedlings in the wicking bed are still alive and moist even! And I collected mulch with help from partner and mulched the strip near the drive and the raised bed where I planted out bamboo shootlings. Yay, adulting.

MsRichLife

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #282 on: November 17, 2016, 08:58:06 PM »
Joining! I now have one acre to play with and lots of free time.

First job has been weeding and mulching the garden beds around trees. My lovely FIL, who has been caretaking the property for nearly two years, has been cutting the grass super short and spraying roundup with liberal abandon. It's time to rebuild the soil.

Our compost bin is set up and we are adding to it every few days. Only household green waste so far. We need a much bigger setup to deal with the green waste from the garden.

We have tiny strawberries galore. I planted a few dried up, donated strawberry plants last summer and since then they've multiplied to fill about 3 square metres. Unfortunately, it's been so dry that I probably can't continue to neglect them if we actually want a harvest this year.

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #283 on: November 19, 2016, 02:31:32 AM »
Should I, or should I not, pull the tiny little fruit that's set on my citrus trees off?

Some sources say this should be done so that the tree puts its energy into growing rather than producing tasty tasty fruit. Thoughts? Opinions? Anecdata?
It doesn't seem to matter. I did it with some plants, and not with others, and they have all grown. I really like to leave SOMETHING on so I can taste the fruit as soon as possible.



HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #284 on: November 19, 2016, 03:21:27 AM »
Caught up on some weeding and mulching today. Mulching was just in the nick of time: strawberries are going great guns with one almost ready to pick and many a few weeks off.

The bad news is that it looks like the blueberries are almost done for the season.

Tomato seedlings are still growing well but it doesn't look like I've had much luck with eggplant seeds germinating. Wondering whether to just buy some seedlings (I LOVE eggplant).

Should I, or should I not, pull the tiny little fruit that's set on my citrus trees off?

Some sources say this should be done so that the tree puts its energy into growing rather than producing tasty tasty fruit. Thoughts? Opinions? Anecdata?
It doesn't seem to matter. I did it with some plants, and not with others, and they have all grown. I really like to leave SOMETHING on so I can taste the fruit as soon as possible.

Thanks deborah. I think I'll take the same approach: it seems a shame to not get a single fruit from the trees!

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #285 on: November 19, 2016, 07:49:42 PM »
Ate my first homegrown strawberry this morning. It was a bit bland and watery, not exactly the taste sensation I was hoping for.

But in better news, an eggplant seed has finally germinated!!

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #286 on: November 25, 2016, 08:57:42 PM »
The peas are looking good, with lots of pods (still unripe). I planted three packets of herbs in a pathway - coriander, parsley and something else. Something else didn't come up, but there are a satisfactory number of the other plants. Planted bean seeds today, and some tomatoes earlier in the week. One has died.

I have a number of wire mesh cylinders (6 inch mesh), which I plant the tomato plants inside, and push them in whenever they try to escape. No ties. Very simple. Anyway, I usually grow climbing beans up the wire mesh (one at the bottom of each vertical wire), and have a bean crop as well. I'm only planting them on one side this year, because in the past when I planted them all around the cylinders, the beans grew above the tomatoes and formed a blanket above the tomatoes, so they needed pruning for the tomatoes to get some sunlight.



deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #287 on: November 25, 2016, 09:06:27 PM »
I think I picked the last of the asparagus this morning. It's been a great season. I have also been eating artichoke hearts for the first time from my garden. I bought some very decrepit globe artichoke plants last year (they were so decrepit that the shop gave me two and the other three were half price - so actually quarter price as the shop was closing down and everything was half price). Anyway SO kept them alive. I read recently that you should buy slips, rather than seedlings, because seedlings are not true to form, so I decided to taste them all and if they didn't pass the taste test, I was going to ditch them, but they were delicious.



HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #288 on: November 26, 2016, 11:48:54 PM »
Tried to plant fruit trees this morning but it was so hot that I could feel myself burning within five minutes and I had to give up. Will try again this evening when it cools down.

When grapefruit are available again (this season's stock has been delayed due to the cool start to Spring here) I'll pick up some seedlings at the same time as my grapefruit tree. I want basil, eggplant and maybe some tomatoes. All of these have now sprouted but are growing soooo slowly. In future years I'll need to either rely on seedlings as well as starting some from seeds myself, or find a way to get seeds germinating and growing much earlier in the season. Contemplating some kind of miniature greenhouse setup.

Blueberries are now done for the season. We've had five or six edible strawberries so far; some plants are producing like mad while others are producing tiny, diseased-looking fruit (must get my Dad to look at those for me). Zucchini plant is bigger each time I look at it. Apple trees took forever to 'wake up' after Winter and the cold start to spring but are now green and lovely again.

Anyone have a favourite method for deterring grasshoppers? They latch on to my fruit trees and eat the fresh leaves :-/

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #289 on: November 27, 2016, 12:30:59 AM »
No idea on grasshoppers :( Maybe try the old chilli & garlic spray?

My zucchini got big but I'm not sure they're happy as a lot of flowers have fallen, including some females.

Every so often Aldi do this greenhouse thing which is wire shelves with a cover. I thought about doing what was common in the UK for me growing up - get a free window or four and create an A-frame structure with opening panes for access. You can also just put a window on top of box I guess.

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #290 on: December 08, 2016, 02:24:25 PM »
My garden is a slave driver!

IT IS CHERRY SEASON!!! My favourite fruit has ripened (on consideration, maybe it is my third or fourth favourite fruit). And most of the tree has been picked. And it is delicious! Unfortunately, there aren't as many cherries as last year, but this is a poor season, and many farmers got almost nothing.

IT IS RASPBERRY SEASON!!! My very favourite fruit is ripening each day, and you need to look carefully to find it and pick it. But, unlike cherries, it doesn't need any processing.

My sour cherries have ripened! They need picking NOW.

The mulch and mushroom compost has been delivered, so I need to spread it all, and I need to weed the front before I spread the mulch.



englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #291 on: December 08, 2016, 07:05:17 PM »
I'm starting to use Linda Woodrow's method of saving space in the garden by planting out more advanced seedlings. I've nearly finished a shade blind to put over the kitchen window and the brick raised bed below it which will be my shadehouse.
http://witcheskitchen.com.au/advanced_seedlings/
http://witcheskitchen.com.au/leafy-planting-in-late-winter/
I love her blog, it always makes me feel so calm and grounded.

I scavenged 4 deep plastic trays from a bar freezer that was on the verge rubbish collection and I'm using them to hold milk bottle pots at germination/seedling stage. They keep all the dirt in, are easy to carry around, and on hot days I can overwater the seedlings so that there's a pool of water in the bottom of the tray that the pots wick up during the day. I had a batch of seeds that were taking forever to germinate until Happier mentioned that maybe hers weren't warm enough, so I brought the tray inside and put it in the bath for a week. Poof, germination! I think they were the squash, one of which is now happily living in my raised bed, about a foot across, and has a flower!

The squash and the beans that I grew from seed and the capsicum and cucumber seedlings I bought all seem to have grown roots far enough down in the wicking bed that they've hit the wet spot (I made the bed too deep, so it's not wicking all the way to the top). All looking happy. YAAAY!


happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #292 on: December 09, 2016, 03:14:39 AM »
I'm starting to use Linda Woodrow's method of saving space in the garden by planting out more advanced seedlings. I've nearly finished a shade blind to put over the kitchen window and the brick raised bed below it which will be my shadehouse.
http://witcheskitchen.com.au/advanced_seedlings/
http://witcheskitchen.com.au/leafy-planting-in-late-winter/
I love her blog, it always makes me feel so calm and grounded.

Me too, I've learnt a lot from it
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #293 on: December 09, 2016, 05:30:19 AM »
The only thing we're harvesting right now is strawberries :-/

Tomato seedlings are growing sooooo slooowly. Next year I'm definitely buying some large seedlings at the same time I start germinating seeds.

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #294 on: December 09, 2016, 05:43:21 AM »
It doesn't really matter what size your tomato seedlings are now. I planted mine a week ago, and they were tiny. My neighbour's are enormous - and even have some tiny tomatoes on them. However, this happens EVERY year. I look over the fence, and see how much bigger theirs are than mine. However, mine always last longer and I usually get a better harvest from mine than they do from theirs!

Sweet cherries are picked - thank goodness, as the tree has cherry slug, so it can be sprayed with pyethrum. Most of the sour cherries are picked. Mushroom compost has been used on the raised garden bed to top it up. I now have lines of mushroom compost alternating with lines of what was already in the bed, so I could plant immediately, and 34 capsicums seedlings (from seed) and 6 eggplant seedlings (from the shop) are in.



Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #295 on: December 09, 2016, 03:08:06 PM »
My zucchini are not pollinating, according to google. There are many small fruit but they get to the size of a cherry tom then fall off. I'll see what I can do re hand pollination but I think I need more bees, I hardly see them. Maybe we should concentrate on flowering perennials for a bit before we try again with the squash type veg.


Freshwater

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #297 on: December 09, 2016, 04:47:45 PM »
Yep, I won't have space near the veg but have a plan to put it out the front. I will try some borage or something else blue out the back. The zucchini is in a bed with mustard (lots of yellow flowers) and near an orange flowering ornamental plant but there's nothing buzzing round either of them either. I reckon blue might be the answer. Lots of my neighbours grow veggies so I will ask them how they go.

All the fruit fell off my lemon tree. Maybe I should just grow toms, mustard, lettuce and spinach. We have got a little eggplant tho so fx!

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #298 on: December 11, 2016, 02:51:59 AM »
Finally planted out the avocados and the second mandarin. Really hope that the avocados do okay - everything I read makes it clear how fussy they are!

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #299 on: December 12, 2016, 05:57:28 AM »
OOOOh, I've grown 4 carrots! Only 4 out of many germinated initially, and I had a poke around the soil at the top and I've got carrots - about 1.5cm in diameter roughly. I orange and 3 purple ones ( they were mixed heirloom seeds). I think I'll let them grow a little bigger.

I scattered tons of seed around a wicking bed, and nothing happened, but now I've got maybe half a dozen more very little carrots (at least I think thats what they are). How exciting. First time for everything. I still get this absolute buzz when I grow a new vegetable from seed for the first time. Just the fact that you plant a speck, and they turn into these amazing foods that look just like they are supposed to ( well mostly :))
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter