Author Topic: Australian Gardening Thread  (Read 20026 times)

PDM

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #100 on: August 01, 2016, 04:51:19 PM »
They'll still be tasty and cute as tiny broccoli.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #101 on: August 01, 2016, 05:51:25 PM »
They'll still be tasty and cute as tiny broccoli.

:) . I spy some heads starting on a couple of others that are in the sun, so we'll see.
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HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #102 on: August 01, 2016, 07:28:14 PM »
I need to dig some blood and bone into my garden beds in preparation for spring planting, but I can't find the blood and bone. I know I had some! Gah.

Seeds from Diggers Club should arrive any day now for me to start germinating. Can't wait.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #103 on: August 01, 2016, 07:35:43 PM »
Maybe there should be a colder-parts-of-Australia gardening thread. All these people who can plant tomatoes before November are making me jealous, especially as the tomatoes in the shops are not very nice!

Astatine

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #104 on: August 01, 2016, 08:52:52 PM »
Maybe there should be a colder-parts-of-Australia gardening thread. All these people who can plant tomatoes before November are making me jealous, especially as the tomatoes in the shops are not very nice!

+1 My kale is going bananas (not literally) but that's it. Growing zucchini and cherry tomatoes are my favouritest things to grow, and that will have to wait til November.

englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #105 on: August 01, 2016, 10:43:20 PM »
I have tiny-teeny little leaf-pairs of kale, kailan, beetroot and lettuce popping up, none of them bigger than a grain of rice yet. Cute.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #106 on: August 03, 2016, 04:04:10 AM »
Maybe there should be a colder-parts-of-Australia gardening thread. All these people who can plant tomatoes before November are making me jealous, especially as the tomatoes in the shops are not very nice!

Well, we're all jealous of your ability to grow berries and stonefruit, so there.

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #107 on: August 03, 2016, 05:48:24 PM »
Maybe there should be a colder-parts-of-Australia gardening thread. All these people who can plant tomatoes before November are making me jealous, especially as the tomatoes in the shops are not very nice!

Well, we're all jealous of your ability to grow berries and stonefruit, so there.
Ha ha! So we can all be jealous of one another together!

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #108 on: August 04, 2016, 05:47:31 AM »
Yes and your cherries.
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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #109 on: August 06, 2016, 08:11:54 AM »
My garlic is putting up flower spikes already.
I planted it in late March early April and it had nice fat juicy stems but now some are flowering. I have cut them off but does this mean I will not get heads forming?
Seems early spring here - the black mulberry has so much fruit and the peach is covered in blossom. Luckily no frost so no risk to the baby fruit. Fighting the black furry caterpillars. They are everywhere and if I don't watch they eat the new apple buds depriving me of fruit. Anyone got any ideas to control these other than picking them off. I have bird netted my brocollis and kale for cabbage whites - so far so good. But those furry things are everywhere.

PDM

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #110 on: August 06, 2016, 06:27:16 PM »
Cherry tomato update: 1.3kg total harvest so far. :) estimating a 2kg total harvest.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #111 on: August 06, 2016, 10:31:00 PM »
Cherry tomato update: 1.3kg total harvest so far. :) estimating a 2kg total harvest.
I hope that's just for today, not for the entire season. My father once gave me a book "How to Grow World Record Tomatoes" by C. H. Wilber. He grows cherry tomatoes in the US, and has grown them up to 28' 7" (8.8m) high, with yields of up to 324 pounds per plant (147kg). I've never got that much from a plant.

Primm

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #112 on: August 06, 2016, 10:59:19 PM »
Cherry tomato update from me: 2.

Tomatoes, that is.

Not a good return.

marty998

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #113 on: August 07, 2016, 04:09:52 AM »
I got some plants over the weekend... photos attached. Plants were cheap enough... the pots were $70 each!

Tomatos will be a future challenge.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2016, 04:11:51 AM by marty998 »

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #114 on: August 07, 2016, 05:48:56 AM »
My overwintering tomato has a couple of pockmarked green tomatoes...its still going, so I hope it might come good and flower/bear some more now that spring is coming.

Wallaby has eaten all the new shoots of the mulberry. Looks like it will have to be netted urgently or the poor thing will die. Gah.

Progress though, have part repaired the damaged nets to one area. I think I'll have to lengthen them though to stop whatever it is getting underneath. Then, maybe I'll finally get a crop of snow/sugarsnap peas.

Started reconstruction on the other netted area where all the nets fell down. This time its star pickets with polytube screwed on.

Harvesting: corlander, sllverbeet, tatsoi, mint, and small lettuce.

« Last Edit: August 08, 2016, 05:18:23 AM by happy »
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PDM

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #115 on: August 07, 2016, 04:02:14 PM »
Cherry tomato update: 1.3kg total harvest so far. :) estimating a 2kg total harvest.
I hope that's just for today, not for the entire season. My father once gave me a book "How to Grow World Record Tomatoes" by C. H. Wilber. He grows cherry tomatoes in the US, and has grown them up to 28' 7" (8.8m) high, with yields of up to 324 pounds per plant (147kg). I've never got that much from a plant.

Total harvest so far. I'm stoked with my weekly 400gram harvest. Very difficult to compare success of harvests based purely on weight. Different climate, different varieties, different pests etc. But hey I'll just console myself with my delicious juicy organic tomatoes - even if I only get a few kilograms of them.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #116 on: August 15, 2016, 06:10:24 AM »
Ah, Brisbane and winter tomatoes.
The first two stalks of asparagus are up, and they are nice fat ones, as thick as I've ever had. The crown is about 3 years old.
The tiny broccoli is still growing..its as big as broccolini now.
Harvesting..the odd lettuce, black kale,corlander, sllverbeet, tatsoi, mint.
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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #117 on: August 15, 2016, 08:12:31 AM »
I got a free baby lettuce from a co-worker last week! Planted it in my garden, hope it survives. I'm swapping for a succulent in a jar for their desk.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #118 on: August 15, 2016, 06:47:07 PM »
I'm swapping for a succulent in a jar for their desk.

This comment has reminded me - you know how to create new succulents from little bits of old ones, right? Do you think you'd be willing to show me how to do it? I want to create little clusters of potted succulents in a few shady spots around the house - if I bought a couple of succulents could you teach me how to make more from those? :D :D :D

(I'm sure there are guides all over the internet, but I'm the kind of person who learns much, much better from a real person who I can ask questions).

englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #119 on: August 15, 2016, 07:19:47 PM »
I rescued a handful of volunteer seedlings from the compost tumbler and planted them, I think they're pumpkin. Something has eaten all but one of them :( and left my rows of tasty tiny lettuces and things completely alone?

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #120 on: August 15, 2016, 11:17:23 PM »
I'm swapping for a succulent in a jar for their desk.

This comment has reminded me - you know how to create new succulents from little bits of old ones, right? Do you think you'd be willing to show me how to do it? I want to create little clusters of potted succulents in a few shady spots around the house - if I bought a couple of succulents could you teach me how to make more from those? :D :D :D

(I'm sure there are guides all over the internet, but I'm the kind of person who learns much, much better from a real person who I can ask questions).
I can do that. I'm also attempting much larger succulent varieties at the moment, which is interesting because there's not as obvious a place to cut them and I wont know for weeks or months if they worked, because they are so long-lasting.

Astatine

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #121 on: August 15, 2016, 11:46:15 PM »
My nectarine tree has its first flower of the season! I planted it a couple of winters ago (bought it bare-rooted) and it's already >2m tall.

Nothing else to report. Kale is still growing madly.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #122 on: August 16, 2016, 12:03:31 AM »
My nectarine tree has its first flower of the season! I planted it a couple of winters ago (bought it bare-rooted) and it's already >2m tall.

Is that the super-dwarf nectarine, or a different one? Am I even right in thinking you have a super-dwarf nectarine?

Astatine

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #123 on: August 16, 2016, 01:26:22 AM »
My nectarine tree has its first flower of the season! I planted it a couple of winters ago (bought it bare-rooted) and it's already >2m tall.

Is that the super-dwarf nectarine, or a different one? Am I even right in thinking you have a super-dwarf nectarine?

Wow, you have an amazing memory :D

Yes, I do have a teeny tiny dwarf nectarine. It's about 60cm high after about 4 years (I forget exactly how long ago I planted it). The nectarine I posted about is a different, newer tree :) I planted it partly for fruit, partly for shade on the north facing side of the house.

stripey

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #124 on: August 16, 2016, 02:26:57 AM »
I'm swapping for a succulent in a jar for their desk.

This comment has reminded me - you know how to create new succulents from little bits of old ones, right? Do you think you'd be willing to show me how to do it? I want to create little clusters of potted succulents in a few shady spots around the house - if I bought a couple of succulents could you teach me how to make more from those? :D :D :D

(I'm sure there are guides all over the internet, but I'm the kind of person who learns much, much better from a real person who I can ask questions).
I can do that. I'm also attempting much larger succulent varieties at the moment, which is interesting because there's not as obvious a place to cut them and I wont know for weeks or months if they worked, because they are so long-lasting.

Also, I have a 'DIY succulents' book I was given for Christmas I'm happy to lend out to all and sundry in the Perth group.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #125 on: August 21, 2016, 02:05:55 AM »
I'm swapping for a succulent in a jar for their desk.

This comment has reminded me - you know how to create new succulents from little bits of old ones, right? Do you think you'd be willing to show me how to do it? I want to create little clusters of potted succulents in a few shady spots around the house - if I bought a couple of succulents could you teach me how to make more from those? :D :D :D

(I'm sure there are guides all over the internet, but I'm the kind of person who learns much, much better from a real person who I can ask questions).
I can do that. I'm also attempting much larger succulent varieties at the moment, which is interesting because there's not as obvious a place to cut them and I wont know for weeks or months if they worked, because they are so long-lasting.

Also, I have a 'DIY succulents' book I was given for Christmas I'm happy to lend out to all and sundry in the Perth group.
 

I would love to read that!

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #126 on: August 21, 2016, 02:09:43 AM »
Anyone get into the garden this weekend?

I started seeds for zucchini, eggplant and four kinds of tomato. They're in a seed raising tray with a clear plastic cover, will be interested to see how that works out.

Gave some blood and bone to my citrus, apple and nectarine. Nectarine has absolutely zero leaves - I really hope it's alive. Lemon and lime both have what I think are the start of flower buds which is super exciting :-)

Also did a little weeding and other boring stuff.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #127 on: August 21, 2016, 02:15:32 AM »
@ Happier: Propagating succulents is pretty easy, so hopefully you won't take long to fill your spots.

Small amount of time in the garden only :(
My "tiny" broccoli got to roughly 3inches in diameter before it looked like the florets were getting too developed, so thats better than I thought. It was delicious. some of the others are coming along now also.
Separated out and planted some tiny lettuce. Harvesting tatsoi regularly now since its threatening to start to go to seed. Sowed some broccoli (? if this will work but it says spring as well as autumn on the pack) anda few tomato seeds.
Lots of leaves but still no signs of flowers on the lemon. Have not had a yield from this yet and its 2 or 3 years old now. When I google it, advice is just feed it more, so maybe I'll have another go at that.
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missbee

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #128 on: August 21, 2016, 03:40:44 AM »
I got raspberry canes from ikea (two for $4.95) and planted those.
Two weeks ago I sowed some Everlasting seeds, last weekend I had little shoots, this weekend they have disappeared. Do everlastings have natural enemies?

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #129 on: August 21, 2016, 06:03:27 AM »
We're on holiday, but I bought a mix pot of succulents from the markets :) best kind of souvenir.

PDM

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #130 on: August 21, 2016, 06:49:32 AM »
We're in Italy so no. 

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #131 on: August 21, 2016, 05:40:06 PM »
This weekend I got caught up with other stuff plus daydreaming about granny flats so not much got done. Bit of a shame since it was great weather and the cold and rain is supposed to be back shortly.

We were a bit spendy at bunnings because I couldn't wait any longer hoping some fine wire mesh would appear for free so I spent $15 on a roll of that to top up what I've collected from the street! Bird net would be cheaper but the rats chew through (still have not brought myself to lay bait).

We also bought the bits to collect rainwater. Were holding out to get a proper rainwater tank and plumb it to the laundry but that's not going to happen soon -it's too exxy as we'll have to pay for help. The second hand ones at the tip aren't even that cheap. We've got a bit of free drip hose from a downsizing friend, the one with the holes along it, so I think we can attach that? Also the mini tank brand we got has connector pipes for sale so you can add as many tanks as you want in a row. As I find other barrels for free I can add them on, it will look funny all mismatched but cool!

Our two capsicums are getting bigger but the leaves on the plant have suddenly turned a sickly yellow with green veins. They've been getting worm wee but have we been doing too much/ do they need something else? I'm constantly googling but never really get a straight answer. The fruit still seems to be growing. Our chilli plants look the same which makes sense as they're the same family aren't they? The chillis look v ill and didn't fruit recently.

I'm watching a bird collect dog hair and shedded bits of our outdoor mat for its nest, v cute.


AusLady

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #132 on: August 21, 2016, 06:01:16 PM »
On the Gold Coast I planted Blue Lake bean seeds, carrots, beetroot, spinach and some companion flowers all as seeds.  I planted potatoes from Diggers. 
I've been doing a lot of reading about Permaculture and it seems to fit in with Mustachianism very well!  I just recently make a seedling shade house out of an old shelving rack, a piece of shade cloth and cable ties, as for productivity, it helps to grow seedlings to a decent size before them taking up my precious small gardening space.
I would argue, that if you are able to grow fruits of veggies of any kind, they're worth it!  Even for "cheap" veggies.  The ones you grow yourself are organic (there was an article on permaculturenews.org from 2015 about pesticide levels in human blood and urine samples that I found quite disturbing).  Also home grown veggies that are eaten right after harvest suffer none of the nutrient degradation that occurs during storage!

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #133 on: August 21, 2016, 07:31:06 PM »
We're on holiday, but I bought a mix pot of succulents from the markets :) best kind of souvenir.

Hmmm I bet that the markets near my house would have a plant stall. Note to self: wander down for a look this weekend.

Anatidae V

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #134 on: August 26, 2016, 07:49:12 AM »
We're on holiday, but I bought a mix pot of succulents from the markets :) best kind of souvenir.

Hmmm I bet that the markets near my house would have a plant stall. Note to self: wander down for a look this weekend.
Definitely worth a try, you have great markets.

I came back to one dead strawberry plant and everything else, including the free lettuce, looking very pleased with themselves. I think if I try strawberry again it will be in a hanging pot.

englyn

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #135 on: August 29, 2016, 12:35:42 AM »
I just recently make a seedling shade house out of an old shelving rack, a piece of shade cloth and cable ties, as for productivity, it helps to grow seedlings to a decent size before them taking up my precious small gardening space.

You have just given me the BEST idea. I have been meaning to put a shadecloth blind over the kitchen window because it lets too much light in. I could install a shelf outside, run shadecloth from top of window to outside of shelf , and grow seedlings on the shelf. Then I can water them through the window while I make my coffee!

Good news: emptied the compost, so I now have another square metre or so of veggie space to plant.
Bad news: something ate nearly all my lettuce seedlings. I found and squashed a slug or two, so hopefully the remaining few are safer.

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #136 on: August 29, 2016, 12:51:54 AM »
I googled my yellow leaved problem (capsicum, chillis, lemon, basically everything) and it is most like a magnesium shortage. Today I got epsom salts and fed them that, so we will see. I also googled the likely nutrient makeup of our worm leachate that goes (diluted) on everything and it might have a high potassium concentration which would explain a lack of magnesium uptake I think? Anyway, we are cutting back on the worm wee and maybe will use a proper fertiliser if we need it.

I tried to build possum proof box frame thingies this weekend - bit of a fail! I sawed one tiny thin piece of wood, hardwood from someone's old screen, and it hurt so much I stopped there. Hubby is going to see whether our multi function thing might have an suitable cutting attachment but it might be time to buy a circular saw. We need one anyway if we are to do various projects. We did figure out a good design and we will cut stick and nail it together next weekend.

Really need to get some tomato seeds in...

HappierAtHome

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #137 on: August 30, 2016, 03:49:39 AM »
Mint is looking much better since being moved into a less sunny spot and kept dark.

And here are the buds on my dwarf lemon. Can't wait for homegrown lemons!

Also, photos of things I have successfully kept alive: gorgeous lavendar and petunias.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #138 on: August 30, 2016, 05:25:10 AM »
The mini wombok I grew and have been successfully harvesting leaves from for couple of months, now look like they are going to make some sort of flower...guess I best harvest them entirely.  I don't need to seed save. Anyone know what these things do - should I harvest now?
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #139 on: September 01, 2016, 03:28:22 AM »
The mini wombok I grew and have been successfully harvesting leaves from for couple of months, now look like they are going to make some sort of flower...guess I best harvest them entirely.  I don't need to seed save. Anyone know what these things do - should I harvest now?
Yes

settlement

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #140 on: September 01, 2016, 04:25:07 AM »
Melburnian here. What are the most basic and easiest items to grow in a small garden?

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #141 on: September 01, 2016, 05:12:22 PM »
Weeds.

Or did you mean plants you want? Jasmine.

Or did you mean vegetables? Tomatoes.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #142 on: September 01, 2016, 08:52:13 PM »
The mini wombok I grew and have been successfully harvesting leaves from for couple of months, now look like they are going to make some sort of flower...guess I best harvest them entirely.  I don't need to seed save. Anyone know what these things do - should I harvest now?
Yes
Thank you. I am harvesting a couple a day: a few days later and the remaining ones are definitely going to seed.
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settlement

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #143 on: September 02, 2016, 06:17:59 AM »
Weeds.

Or did you mean plants you want? Jasmine.

Or did you mean vegetables? Tomatoes.

Herbs and vegetables.

I'm thinking of trying broccoli. Any thoughts?

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #144 on: September 02, 2016, 07:10:31 PM »
I can't grow broccoli or most of the brassicas (broccoli is a brassica as are cabbage, cauliflower... and radish - although just about anyone can grow radishes) - they just get sooty aphids. Zucchini are easy, as are tomatoes (both produce well for anyone and you only need a couple of plants). Climbing beans (I plant them a couple of centimetres apart and cover a trellis with them so they really take up no room). These are all annuals, that you start growing in November. For vegetables you can plant now, try spinach (it will be ready about when you want to grow the others). Rhubarb is a perennial you can plant now.

Herbs - basil (summer), mint (if you don't mind it running riot), parsley are all easy in Melbourne. Thyme. Bay tree (you prune it back a lot, or can grow it in a tub). Marjoram. Oregano. Most of these are perennials, so you can leave them in.

happy

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #145 on: September 02, 2016, 11:26:36 PM »
Cherry Tomatoes are the easiest tomatoes IMO - fewer pests.
Personally I would avoid broccoli first up - I have a lot of trouble with it with pests.
Rocket is fast and easy - therefore gratifying for a beginner.

Otherwise I second Deborah's suggestions.
Journalling at Happy Aussie Downshifter

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #146 on: September 02, 2016, 11:28:15 PM »
My mulberry tree has finally established itself, 4 years after it was originally planted. Lots of mulberries everywhere right now! The lychee tree is flowering again; I'll keep watering it more consistently and see if I get any fruit this year.

Other than that, I've got a spare raised bed now that the zucchinis have died back, so I might put some tomato seedlings in there and see if I can get some full-sized tomatoes this year. I've had enough of cherry tomatoes.

Grogounet

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #147 on: September 02, 2016, 11:52:08 PM »
What an awesome thread!!
Anyone is in a unit like I am? What grows best?
I have some light but not too much sunshine there (at least not in summer...)

settlement

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #148 on: September 03, 2016, 10:25:38 PM »
I can't grow broccoli or most of the brassicas (broccoli is a brassica as are cabbage, cauliflower... and radish - although just about anyone can grow radishes) - they just get sooty aphids. Zucchini are easy, as are tomatoes (both produce well for anyone and you only need a couple of plants). Climbing beans (I plant them a couple of centimetres apart and cover a trellis with them so they really take up no room). These are all annuals, that you start growing in November. For vegetables you can plant now, try spinach (it will be ready about when you want to grow the others). Rhubarb is a perennial you can plant now.

Herbs - basil (summer), mint (if you don't mind it running riot), parsley are all easy in Melbourne. Thyme. Bay tree (you prune it back a lot, or can grow it in a tub). Marjoram. Oregano. Most of these are perennials, so you can leave them in.

Thanks deborah and happy, great info

deborah

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Re: Australian Gardening Thread
« Reply #149 on: September 03, 2016, 11:30:33 PM »
What an awesome thread!!
Anyone is in a unit like I am? What grows best?
I have some light but not too much sunshine there (at least not in summer...)
When I lived in a flat, the person below me grew all sorts of things in polystyrene boxes. Mainly vegetables. The woman next door to her covered the stairway with succulents of various sorts. If you are after edibles, try things that don't have fruit (probably need more sun than you have) or much in the way of roots (you'll be growing them in shallow soil) - lettuce (try ones that you can pick leaves individually), other salad greens. Tomatoes do well in pots, but I think they need a bit of sunlight. Ditto chillis. A lot of herb gardens are sold for kitchens, so they should do well in a unit.

If you don't have much room, you really need to concentrate on things that you don't need much of (chillis, herbs), or that are quite prolific (tomatoes), or grow fast, and that you use a lot of the time.