Author Topic: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?  (Read 10093 times)

Tass

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 244
  • Age: 24
  • Location: Southern California
  • Working on a PhD and saving what I can!
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #100 on: October 11, 2017, 02:08:46 PM »
A long-distance romantic relationship sounds un-mustachian to me. There have GOT to be romantic partners who are 60%-80% as good within five miles of you. Collect about three or four of them instead :-)

I have to assume this was directed at me, in which case good news: he's working on moving. :)

Though if we define "mustachian" as "similar to MMM himself" then a temporary long-distance relationship absolutely qualifies.

Slow&Steady

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 261
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #101 on: October 11, 2017, 02:38:14 PM »
[pokes head up above rock to weigh in on house cleaner debate]

Yeah, so, the cleaners are another anti-mustachian habit that I am not willing to give up.  And this is a thread about which anti-mustachian choices people think are worth it.  So while I am completely with Anna in theory, I am with Mr. Different in practice.

The thing is, I'm not going to make any excuses for it.  I do have an actual legit reason for it (allergies = cleaning triggers my asthma).  But let's be straight:  I would have cleaners anyway.  Not because I'm too busy, or because it's a more cost-effective use of my time, or wah-wah-wah.  Just because I fucking hate cleaning.  I grew up spending the first half of every Saturday cleaning the house, and vowing that I would never do that again when I grew up and got a job and had my own money.  I don't get anything resembling zen when I am "in the moment" scrubbing a tub; I get no sense of achievement from seeing the floor dusted, nor do I take the slightest molecule of joy in seeing my space all pristine.  Nope:  cleaning is nothing more than sheer drudgery that is performed solely to comply with basic modern sanitation standards.

And, frankly, I grew up in an era in which the little woman was expected to stay home and cook and clean.  My entire life has been a giant "fuck you" to those expectations.  So at an emotional level, cleaning the house feels less like badassity than it does kowtowing to ancient gender stereotypes.  I earn my money, I take care of my family, and I am damned if I'm going to spend the weekend down on my knees instead of enjoying time with my kids.

So in the realm of anti-mustachian choices that are worth it, cleaners are right up there for me.  I have done the math, I know exactly how much more I need in my 'stache to cover cleaners until I die, and I am more than happy to work that extra couple of months to never have to clean my house again.

That is all.

I am also going to agree with this 100%!

I do not have a house cleaner YET, I live in the middle of nowhere and have not found one that doesn't want to charge me a ridiculous fee because I am in the middle of nowhere.  I absolutely hate to clean, I am willing to make other sacrifices in my life so that I can pay somebody else to vacuum/sweep.

I follow MMM because at the end of the day the message is to save enough money to not have to do something you don't like doing.  That usually falls under the "work/job" category but I don't see cleaning as any different!  Actually I generally will choose work/job over cleaning, that is a small part of the reason I am not a stay at home parent.

one piece at a time

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 41
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #102 on: October 11, 2017, 02:45:54 PM »
I have a motorbike that I haven't yet sold. It is a 250cc bike that was a great commuter for my last job but now I've got a company vehicle (and an 8 minute commute to the office) so it is only a toy...one more summer!

elaine amj

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2147
  • Location: Ontario
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #103 on: October 11, 2017, 03:57:04 PM »
I follow MMM because at the end of the day the message is to save enough money to not have to do something you don't like doing.  That usually falls under the "work/job" category but I don't see cleaning as any different!  Actually I generally will choose work/job over cleaning, that is a small part of the reason I am not a stay at home parent.

I well remember the days of being a SAHM where I said (and meant it) that I would be more than happy to work whatever job would pay enough to pay a cleaning lady. I hated it sooo much. I'm more accepting of it these days and am OK doing it myself although my house is far from sparkling clean.
My journal: http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/journals/realigning-spending-to-match-our-future-goals-a-canadian-journey/

Camp Mustache Canada 2017 was everything I dreamed of and more. Super excited that Camp Mustache Canada 2018 is now a thing!

talltexan

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1149
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #104 on: October 16, 2017, 10:01:19 AM »
A long-distance romantic relationship sounds un-mustachian to me. There have GOT to be romantic partners who are 60%-80% as good within five miles of you. Collect about three or four of them instead :-)

I have to assume this was directed at me, in which case good news: he's working on moving. :)

Though if we define "mustachian" as "similar to MMM himself" then a temporary long-distance relationship absolutely qualifies.

Tass- I hope my good-natured kidding came across clearly. Best of luck to you in your relationship!

Tass

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 244
  • Age: 24
  • Location: Southern California
  • Working on a PhD and saving what I can!
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #105 on: October 19, 2017, 03:09:11 PM »
A long-distance romantic relationship sounds un-mustachian to me. There have GOT to be romantic partners who are 60%-80% as good within five miles of you. Collect about three or four of them instead :-)

I have to assume this was directed at me, in which case good news: he's working on moving. :)

Though if we define "mustachian" as "similar to MMM himself" then a temporary long-distance relationship absolutely qualifies.

Tass- I hope my good-natured kidding came across clearly. Best of luck to you in your relationship!

Lol, yes, it did. I laughed. My response was fully bragging about a recent happy development in my life.

JLee

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4108
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #106 on: October 19, 2017, 06:15:14 PM »

rebel_quietude

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 18
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Colorado
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #107 on: December 03, 2017, 09:31:55 AM »
LOL - JLee, a picture is worth a thousand words. :D

JLee

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4108
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #108 on: December 03, 2017, 10:40:45 PM »
LOL - JLee, a picture is worth a thousand words. :D

haha yeah, I figured that would sum it up pretty well.

TheWifeHalf

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 56
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #109 on: December 04, 2017, 06:53:23 PM »
Scallops - I cook them, or eat out
I live in the midwest, I can't just go out and catch a scallop!

We turned our dining room into a sewing room - I sew way more than I dine

ACyclist

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 250
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #110 on: December 04, 2017, 08:03:34 PM »
Quality food, but I am cutting back some. 

The biggest problem in our home is the bikes.  We also have a trailer habit.  Although, our current trailer is a used pop up.  We do want a new one, and I imagine that we will buy another used one. 

For the most part, we live rather frugally.  We can afford a much larger home and newer car.   Our tiny home is just fine.

headwinds

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 239
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #111 on: December 04, 2017, 08:18:11 PM »
By far the biggest anti mustachian thing in my life is my home climbing wall.


Slow&Steady

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 261
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #112 on: December 05, 2017, 07:52:20 AM »
By far the biggest anti mustachian thing in my life is my home climbing wall.



This is in your house!!! It might not be MMM badass but it is it's own definition of badass.

Malkynn

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 45
Re: Anti mustachian habits that are worth it to you?
« Reply #113 on: December 05, 2017, 11:02:21 AM »
We live pretty frugally, to a point that it’s considered extreme by most people we know, but we do have a few traditionally non-mustachian lifestyle choices:

-we have a biweekly cleaner and it is absolutely worth it for me. I work a very physical job and I have injuries and illness that make cleaning not a good idea. Cutting the cleaning lady would equal only two hours less that I would need to work per month. My two hours at work are much more pleasant, and much less hard on me physically than the 6 hours per month of cleaning she does.

Also, yes, I do wander around my home luxuriating in its spotlessness and enjoying the wonderful smell of clean and not having dust bother my allergies. Also, since we rarely go out for entertainment, having our home be nice and lovely and clean, makes it nicer to entertain ourselves at home.

If I let my home get grimy or cluttered, I wouldn’t feel excited to spend a night in.

-Two cats, two dogs, but no kids, so they’re a much cheaper alternative even including all of the vet bills and premium food. Also see the above point about spending a lot of time at home, they really enrich the being at home experience.

-Botox, I spend very little on beauty and self care products, but I do get a small amount of Botox twice a year to calm the muscles between my eyebrows because they’re very hyper active, always make me look angry, and cause headaches. It costs me just under $600/year and since I started, I get comments constantly about how happy I look now, and my afternoon headaches have eased up significantly.

-Hair cuts, we both have tricky curly hair, we both have stylists that we trust to cut it in ways that minimize the effort needed to maintain it. It’s worth it to us to be able to wash it and let it air dry and not have to put effort in daily to style it.

-massage and physio, I get reimbursed somewhat through insurance, but with my injuries and work, this really isn’t a luxury, it’s necessary to keep working.

-Business class train trips. Once a year or so for courses, I will take a 4 hour train trip. Being flexible about travel time usually means only about a $40-50 upcharge for business class, which is drastically more comfortable (see spinal injury mentioned above), gives me much more room and multiple outlets to set up a laptop/iPad/phone, and provides a hot meal and plenty of wine. This is pure hedonic adaptation, I make no excuses for it, and thankfully, it’s pretty rare.

-Ridiculously expensive courses.
They rarely make my work more profitable, they often make me less profitable actually, but they allow me to work more ethically, more meaningfully, and make people’s lives better, which is critical in an industry plagued by depression, drug/alcohol abuse, and suicide.

Other than that, we only have 1 used fuel efficient car and my husband will actually run 7km to and from work in all weather including -40 degree Canadian winter. We eat primarily vegetarian at home to cut down on groceries (meat is expensive and nutritionally unnecessary for most), cooking almost all meals from scratch. I learned to sew and buy almost all of our clothes used and then I tailor them, which is cheaper than buying fabric and making clothes. We buy minimal beauty and self care products (ex: using a $2 hair bar instead of shampoo and conditioner). We own in the sketchiest LCOL neighbourhood in a small row house with a monthly mortgage that costs less than renting a shitty 1 bedroom apartment.

We have thought through and carefully considered all of our non-frugal lifestyle choices, and surgically excised all other wasteful spending that really isn’t worth it, which leaves me feeling very good about what we do choose to spend on.

The key for us is to constantly re-evaluate and always stay vigilant because “it’s worth it” thinking can easily create lifestyle creep. We frequently go without the things that we find “worth it” just to test if the discomfort really is that bad. For example, I’m changing my hairstyle to one that is less flattering but requires half the appointments to maintain. If I hate it, I can always go back to my more high maintenance style.