Author Topic: America 2020 the survival blueprint book  (Read 90744 times)

SONKEV

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America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« on: January 15, 2015, 11:24:57 AM »
Hi my name is Kevin, long time follower here.

http://newamerica2020.com/

I just registered so I could jump in the mix with you guys. I have a problem here; this book looks honestly like a scam. But a lot of the points he brings up in the video touch base with me and I was wondering if any of you have looked into this any further!

Please enlighten me, I would love all your wisdom.

Thank you!

arebelspy

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2015, 11:33:03 AM »
Most of us around here don't believe in the doomers' fear-mongering.

The world is not going to end, despite the calls that it will for the last few years decades centuries millenia.
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MustachianAccountant

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2015, 11:38:20 AM »
In other words, yes, it is a scam.

SONKEV

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2015, 07:57:55 PM »
Most of us around here don't believe in the doomers' fear-mongering.

The world is not going to end, despite the calls that it will for the last few years decades centuries millenia.

Oh I completely agree with you. I'm very much against the end of the world, stock everything you can in your basement types. But I'm more interested about the diamonds in the rough. Say I might salvage 2-5% of what this man is saying.. I mean he does have a 100 million dollar business started himself in the last 16 years growing it, and I know a lot of his work he is scamming off to it now. But it still is a fact our country has been going a-wire and crazy in the last 8-50 years compared the the hundreds before it.

I'm just wondering if anyone has read his book and been able to get any bit of wisdom from it?

Btw, honestly thank you guys for responding!! Very much appreciated and pleased to meet and write you fellas :)



...




*EDIT* And btw, I don't believe he is so much end of the world as to as how he is preparing how to keep the personal financial ship above sinking waters in the next crash (and there will be one, there always is!) Just listening to his little selling clip he has on the link for his book; Thanks again!

« Last Edit: January 15, 2015, 08:24:12 PM by SONKEV »

StacheEngineer

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2015, 10:31:52 PM »
it still is a fact our country has been going a-wire and crazy in the last 8-50 years compared the the hundreds before it.


[citation needed]. Snark aside, I would say crises like WWII, Panic of 1873, the Napoleonic Wars, WWI (for Europe), etc. are on a similar scale to crises in the past 50 years and while they caused great damage to economies, nations, families, the Western civilization has continued and survived. It seems presumptuous to say that our crises are worse in some way than previous generations'.

I have not read his book.

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2015, 12:16:26 AM »
For a good time, google Porter Stansberry's name and "SEC". It would probably be more fruitful to invest the $49.95 cost of his book in lottery tickets.

Hey It's Me

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2015, 12:38:54 AM »
For a good time, google Porter Stansberry's name and "SEC". It would probably be more fruitful to invest the $49.95 cost of his book in lottery tickets.

LOL.

Honestly, any website that begins with an auto-play video, just assume it's spam or trying to scam you. Legit sites don't need to resort to those charades.

surfhb

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2015, 12:47:32 AM »
it still is a fact our country has been going a-wire and crazy in the last 8-50 years compared the the hundreds before it.


[citation needed]. Snark aside, I would say crises like WWII, Panic of 1873, the Napoleonic Wars, WWI (for Europe), etc. are on a similar scale to crises in the past 50 years and while they caused great damage to economies, nations, families, the Western civilization has continued and survived. It seems presumptuous to say that our crises are worse in some way than previous generations'.

I have not read his book.

Dont forget the Flu epidemic of 1918 which killed 3-5% of the world population and almost 700,000 Americans.   Not to mention we were within a hair's breadth of total nuclear annihilation in 1963.

Relax OP....You're gonna be ok....just take a deep breath and stop watching so much TV.   Cool?  :)

How do you come out of the next "crash"?    You keep saving, investing at regular intervals,  keep a good asset allocation youre comfy with and dont try to time the market.   Thats it my friend.   

Even with all the above mentioned crisis and economic panics, the market as still managed to return over 7%.    Put that in your pipe and smoke it. ;)
« Last Edit: January 16, 2015, 01:27:26 AM by surfhb »

MsRichLife

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2015, 01:51:02 AM »

[citation needed]. Snark aside, I would say crises like WWII, Panic of 1873, the Napoleonic Wars, WWI (for Europe), etc. are on a similar scale to crises in the past 50 years and while they caused great damage to economies, nations, families, the Western civilization has continued and survived. It seems presumptuous to say that our crises are worse in some way than previous generations'.


I don't really understand this logic. Yes, crises have occurred and people have come out the other side ok. But not all people. Some people suffered very badly.

I don't think it's doomerish to learn a bit from history about what could happen and prepare so that you increase your personal chances of coming out the other side with your family and wealth somewhat intact. To my mind, it's presumptuous to think that we are going to be so lucky that in lifetimes we will not experience hard times, deep depressions, currency collapse, war on home soil and other atrocities. So much of the world, past and present, live this every day.

I get that this forum is all about optimism, but I dislike the tone taken whenever anyone remotely questions the never-ending upwards growth trajectory of the current system we have in place.

Sorry, StacheEngineer to call you out in this....It's not just you....it's a theme I see regularly on this forum.

surfhb

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2015, 05:16:39 AM »

[citation needed]. Snark aside, I would say crises like WWII, Panic of 1873, the Napoleonic Wars, WWI (for Europe), etc. are on a similar scale to crises in the past 50 years and while they caused great damage to economies, nations, families, the Western civilization has continued and survived. It seems presumptuous to say that our crises are worse in some way than previous generations'.


I don't really understand this logic. Yes, crises have occurred and people have come out the other side ok. But not all people. Some people suffered very badly.

I don't think it's doomerish to learn a bit from history about what could happen and prepare so that you increase your personal chances of coming out the other side with your family and wealth somewhat intact. To my mind, it's presumptuous to think that we are going to be so lucky that in lifetimes we will not experience hard times, deep depressions, currency collapse, war on home soil and other atrocities. So much of the world, past and present, live this every day.

I get that this forum is all about optimism, but I dislike the tone taken whenever anyone remotely questions the never-ending upwards growth trajectory of the current system we have in place.

Sorry, StacheEngineer to call you out in this....It's not just you....it's a theme I see regularly on this forum.

What else is there to do?   Bitch about how shitty life is when times get tough?   

The point of the thread is how to prepare for a future economic crisis.   Bottom line is that the folks who suffered greatly the last decade and suffered financial loss is because they were not smart about their savings, spending and investing.... That's a cold hard fact. 

We are living in golden times.   Embrace it.    Sure, people will suffer in the future and have suffered in the past.   Why bother with the things you have no control over?   To say it's important to prepare for complete economic collapse, depression or war is ludicrous..... It's impossible.   

Live in The Now
« Last Edit: January 16, 2015, 05:30:21 AM by surfhb »

partgypsy

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2015, 08:31:57 AM »
I don't think there is a way to discount black swan effects that do a number on the global economy and depress it for years/decades. If you have all your money in stocks and something like that happens, yes you would be definitely affected, both retirement accounts and possibly employment depending on what exactly happened.

To me the only way to really protect yourself, is to basically go off the grid/own your own homestead, grow your own food, use very little electricity. Some people are doing this. Many people are not in a position to do that (live in cities, etc).

The next best thing is what people on this forum are doing; learning how to live on less than they earn, so they are resourceful on a number of fronts and have emergency funds. In general mustachians are better prepared to ride out negative events than the average American.

To me biggest issue is climate change and environmental degradation. But the way mustachians live aligns with those concerns in that in general they are minimalists and not big consumers of either material things or fuel.

However if this person is telling you to put all your money in X (concrete bunkers, gold, guns) to protect yourself then I would walk away.

electriceagle

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2015, 09:55:42 AM »
In other words, yes, it is a scam.

I don't know... I enjoyed the tips on using the walking undead to plow fields and and move heavy machinery. Gasoline is sure to be in short supply once the zombies come, but my fields will be tilled by those in search of braaaiins.

partgypsy

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2015, 10:47:22 AM »
aw now I want to read it. but I hate pop ups.

Annamal

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2015, 01:23:34 PM »
To me the only way to really protect yourself, is to basically go off the grid/own your own homestead, grow your own food, use very little electricity. Some people are doing this. Many people are not in a position to do that (live in cities, etc).

There are also the transition towns projects or city resilience projects which are mostly aimed at surviving peak oil. At the moment their predictions of rising oil prices aren't accurate but their aims (low energy use, interconnected resilient communities, clothing swaps) are all things mustachians can get behind (just avoid the anti-vax/anti-western medicine contingent).

My gut feeling is that there can be a lot of strength in communities (and more kindness than we think).

StacheEngineer

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2015, 01:36:03 PM »

[citation needed]. Snark aside, I would say crises like WWII, Panic of 1873, the Napoleonic Wars, WWI (for Europe), etc. are on a similar scale to crises in the past 50 years and while they caused great damage to economies, nations, families, the Western civilization has continued and survived. It seems presumptuous to say that our crises are worse in some way than previous generations'.


I don't really understand this logic. Yes, crises have occurred and people have come out the other side ok. But not all people. Some people suffered very badly.

I don't think it's doomerish to learn a bit from history about what could happen and prepare so that you increase your personal chances of coming out the other side with your family and wealth somewhat intact. To my mind, it's presumptuous to think that we are going to be so lucky that in lifetimes we will not experience hard times, deep depressions, currency collapse, war on home soil and other atrocities. So much of the world, past and present, live this every day.

I get that this forum is all about optimism, but I dislike the tone taken whenever anyone remotely questions the never-ending upwards growth trajectory of the current system we have in place.

Sorry, StacheEngineer to call you out in this....It's not just you....it's a theme I see regularly on this forum.

I thought the question more referred to the Total Collapse of Western Civilization as We Know It (tm) which has not happened yet. No doubt global events can dramatically affect individuals.

The question is how should an individual prepare for and respond potential global crises and this very much depends on your personal beliefs about the state of the world. I personally cannot leave the modern world behind and live off-grid to prepare for all possible crises. Therefore, I need to decide which crises are likely and how to prepare for them. For example, I don't believe the U.S. dollar will collapse in value over my lifetime (hyperinflation could be possible but not money becoming worthless) and so I won't buy lots of personal gold to hoard. I do believe that a large economic depression is guaranteed in my lifetime and so I should 1) have sufficient liquid assets on hand to pay for my living expenses for a significant length of time even if they decline 40% in value, 2) be prepared and expect job loss, and 3) keep living expenses low so that even if only low-paying jobs are available, I can continue to enjoy my current standard of living.

It's all about resilience in the face of change and what sacrifices in efficiency you are willing to make to increase your resilience.

MsRichLife, what do you do to prepare for black swan events?

arebelspy

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2015, 01:49:25 PM »
Well said, StacheEngineer.  Welcome to the forums!
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, spent some time traveling the world full time and are now settled with two kids.
If you want to know more about us, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (rarely) blog at AdventuringAlong.com. Check out our Now page to see what we're up to currently.

MsRichLife

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2015, 02:56:36 PM »

I thought the question more referred to the Total Collapse of Western Civilization as We Know It (tm) which has not happened yet. No doubt global events can dramatically affect individuals.

The question is how should an individual prepare for and respond potential global crises and this very much depends on your personal beliefs about the state of the world. I personally cannot leave the modern world behind and live off-grid to prepare for all possible crises. Therefore, I need to decide which crises are likely and how to prepare for them. For example, I don't believe the U.S. dollar will collapse in value over my lifetime (hyperinflation could be possible but not money becoming worthless) and so I won't buy lots of personal gold to hoard. I do believe that a large economic depression is guaranteed in my lifetime and so I should 1) have sufficient liquid assets on hand to pay for my living expenses for a significant length of time even if they decline 40% in value, 2) be prepared and expect job loss, and 3) keep living expenses low so that even if only low-paying jobs are available, I can continue to enjoy my current standard of living.

It's all about resilience in the face of change and what sacrifices in efficiency you are willing to make to increase your resilience.

MsRichLife, what do you do to prepare for black swan events?

We are probably more aligned in our thinking than it first seemed. I'm an Aerospace Engineer and can't but help seeing the world in terms of risk.

To be honest, I haven't looked at the OPs link above, so was not commenting on the likelihood of the specific prediction contained in the link or ways to prepare for it.  Rather, I was reacting to the general dismissive tone on this forum when it comes to taking prudent steps towards mitigating potential risks that exist.

Yes, the probability of collapse of the monetary system we currently enjoy is low, but it's not zero. The Bretton Woods System has only been around since WWII and has undergone quite the transformation over the decades since. The Nixon shock in in 1971 fundamentally changed the system in ways most people don't seem to recognise. The financial world is awash with an obscene amounts of derivatives that vastly exceed the underlying real wealth. If some event triggers an avalanche in that area, then I bet much of our paper wealth will be 'transferred' in short order. I don't trust that everything will be ok with blind faith. I invest in the stock market because it's the game that needs to be played for now, but I certainly keep a close eye on events and if I think the risks begin to outweigh the rewards, I will pull my money out of the game and wait.

When it comes to preparing for Black Swan events, the only thing I can really do is to increase my resilience and adaptability. I don't know what I don't know, and therefore it's not prudent for me to try and cover off on any eventuality. But... I can stay informed, recognise change when it's occurring and respond appropriately. This sits better with me than having blind faith that everything will be ok.

In order to increase our resilience, we are setting up our post-FIRE life to be quite different to our current one. We have just bought a small acreage in a small community surrounded by some of the richest farming land in the country. The rainfall there is excellent with no chance of being immediately impacted by floods. The risk of bushfire there is low and zero for cyclones. These are important factors in a country as prone to serious natural disasters as Australia is.

We also plan to strengthen our ties with the local community, which we find we can't do as effectively in the city. We plan to get involved with some local initiatives to relocalise the economy and increase the communities energy self-sufficiency. This ensures that we aren't totally reliant on the global supply system to provide for our needs. As an aside, my current thesis is looking at risks to Australia's fuel security. We are becoming increasingly reliant on fuel imports (now near 90%)! I would not feel confident that society will cope well with even a two week shortage of fuel.

As for optimism: I don't bitch about how shitty things are. I recognise areas for improvement and then try to take action in those areas where possible. The suggestion to just 'live in the now' is a strange one coming from this forum. We are all here (I think) to plan for the future by taking action now. Yes, live in the now... but learn from the past and plan for the future.


Miss Prim

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2015, 06:15:30 AM »
It's funny, but I have kind of had this in the back of my mind for years.  We bought 4.5 acres 20 years ago and we are trying to grow most of our food and raise chickens for eggs and meat.  We have a fairly decent size house with a walk-out basement apartment which we currently rent out.  All of our adult children live nearby.  If things got really ugly, we could consolidate households and grow all our own food.  My son has 3 acres of woods, so heating would not be a problem either. 

I don't think it would get that bad in the future, but just knowing you can survive on very little money, which most of us here could, is comforting.

                                                            Miss Prim

Greystache

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #18 on: January 19, 2015, 08:14:57 AM »
This is nothing more than a clever attempt to get you to invest in precious metals.  This has been going around the internet in slightly different forms for years.  Check to see who is sponsoring these adds.  I bet that if you dig deep enough you will find someone who has an interest in selling gold. According to these adds, there is always an urgent need to protect yourself by investing in gold to survive the impending financial crisis.  They ran the same sales pitch last year and the year before.  I guess if they run it long enough they will eventually be right.  I have not been keeping tabs on gold prices lately, but last time I checked they it was over priced and falling rapidly.  I guess they need to whip up a little panic to make gold look like a reasonable investment.

MsRichLife

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2015, 02:52:28 AM »
I have not been keeping tabs on gold prices lately, but last time I checked they it was over priced and falling rapidly.

My gold holding is up 15% in the last three months.

JCfire

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2015, 06:32:26 AM »
I have not been keeping tabs on gold prices lately, but last time I checked they it was over priced and falling rapidly.

My gold holding is up 15% in the last three months.

Gold is up 14.25%... if you cherrypick lowest daily close of the last four years, which was two months ago in early November.  From 3 months ago it is up only 4.3%.  From 6 months ago it's up 0.25%.  From two years ago it's down -22.65%.

2lazy2retire

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2015, 08:36:07 AM »
It's funny, but I have kind of had this in the back of my mind for years.  We bought 4.5 acres 20 years ago and we are trying to grow most of our food and raise chickens for eggs and meat.  We have a fairly decent size house with a walk-out basement apartment which we currently rent out.  All of our adult children live nearby.  If things got really ugly, we could consolidate households and grow all our own food.  My son has 3 acres of woods, so heating would not be a problem either. 

I don't think it would get that bad in the future, but just knowing you can survive on very little money, which most of us here could, is comforting.

                                                            Miss Prim
I always wonder about these type of plans, my concern would be this - if the economy has faulted to the extent that you are forced with your family to live on a parcel of land and grow your own food and supply your own fuel ( commendable things indeed in normal circumstances) how long until everyone else who is less prepared comes asking.

caliq

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #22 on: January 21, 2015, 09:18:01 AM »
It's funny, but I have kind of had this in the back of my mind for years.  We bought 4.5 acres 20 years ago and we are trying to grow most of our food and raise chickens for eggs and meat.  We have a fairly decent size house with a walk-out basement apartment which we currently rent out.  All of our adult children live nearby.  If things got really ugly, we could consolidate households and grow all our own food.  My son has 3 acres of woods, so heating would not be a problem either. 

I don't think it would get that bad in the future, but just knowing you can survive on very little money, which most of us here could, is comforting.

                                                            Miss Prim
I always wonder about these type of plans, my concern would be this - if the economy has faulted to the extent that you are forced with your family to live on a parcel of land and grow your own food and supply your own fuel ( commendable things indeed in normal circumstances) how long until everyone else who is less prepared comes asking.

That's why the vast majority of people with plans like that also stock up on weapons? 

2lazy2retire

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #23 on: January 21, 2015, 09:59:53 AM »
It's funny, but I have kind of had this in the back of my mind for years.  We bought 4.5 acres 20 years ago and we are trying to grow most of our food and raise chickens for eggs and meat.  We have a fairly decent size house with a walk-out basement apartment which we currently rent out.  All of our adult children live nearby.  If things got really ugly, we could consolidate households and grow all our own food.  My son has 3 acres of woods, so heating would not be a problem either. 

I don't think it would get that bad in the future, but just knowing you can survive on very little money, which most of us here could, is comforting.

                                                            Miss Prim
I always wonder about these type of plans, my concern would be this - if the economy has faulted to the extent that you are forced with your family to live on a parcel of land and grow your own food and supply your own fuel ( commendable things indeed in normal circumstances) how long until everyone else who is less prepared comes asking.

That's why the vast majority of people with plans like that also stock up on weapons?

And the hungry hordes of course will have none?, I'm not against the idea of been self sufficient but if you think its anything more than a week or two stop gap from the inevitable  in a societal break down scenario you might be a little deluded. I've seen how people act when little more than a snow storm is forecast FFS.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2015, 10:01:44 AM by 2lazy2retire »

caliq

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #24 on: January 21, 2015, 10:16:46 AM »
It's funny, but I have kind of had this in the back of my mind for years.  We bought 4.5 acres 20 years ago and we are trying to grow most of our food and raise chickens for eggs and meat.  We have a fairly decent size house with a walk-out basement apartment which we currently rent out.  All of our adult children live nearby.  If things got really ugly, we could consolidate households and grow all our own food.  My son has 3 acres of woods, so heating would not be a problem either. 

I don't think it would get that bad in the future, but just knowing you can survive on very little money, which most of us here could, is comforting.

                                                            Miss Prim
I always wonder about these type of plans, my concern would be this - if the economy has faulted to the extent that you are forced with your family to live on a parcel of land and grow your own food and supply your own fuel ( commendable things indeed in normal circumstances) how long until everyone else who is less prepared comes asking.

That's why the vast majority of people with plans like that also stock up on weapons?

And the hungry hordes of course will have none?, I'm not against the idea of been self sufficient but if you think its anything more than a week or two stop gap from the inevitable  in a societal break down scenario you might be a little deluded. I've seen how people act when little more than a snow storm is forecast FFS.

Oh I don't really agree with the survivalist way of thinking -- someday I will have land but only for horses and maybe a small garden :)  I guess in a dire situation it could prove useful for other stuff but I won't really be planning for it (despite having half baked secret zombie apocalypse plans).  I was just pointing out that the typical survivalist is pretty into arming themselves, and would most likely be better armed than the 'hungry hordes.' 

MsRichLife

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #25 on: January 21, 2015, 02:01:42 PM »
I have not been keeping tabs on gold prices lately, but last time I checked they it was over priced and falling rapidly.

My gold holding is up 15% in the last three months.

Gold is up 14.25%... if you cherrypick lowest daily close of the last four years, which was two months ago in early November.  From 3 months ago it is up only 4.3%.  From 6 months ago it's up 0.25%.  From two years ago it's down -22.65%.

Depends on your currency.

arebelspy

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Re: America 2020 the survival blueprint book
« Reply #26 on: January 21, 2015, 02:10:01 PM »
I have not been keeping tabs on gold prices lately, but last time I checked they it was over priced and falling rapidly.

My gold holding is up 15% in the last three months.

Gold is up 14.25%... if you cherrypick lowest daily close of the last four years, which was two months ago in early November.  From 3 months ago it is up only 4.3%.  From 6 months ago it's up 0.25%.  From two years ago it's down -22.65%.

Depends on your currency.

My candybar has more than doubled in value in a year then!  I should stock up.
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, spent some time traveling the world full time and are now settled with two kids.
If you want to know more about us, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (rarely) blog at AdventuringAlong.com. Check out our Now page to see what we're up to currently.