Author Topic: 2019 fire cohort  (Read 180479 times)

MaybeBabyMustache

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1350 on: November 07, 2018, 08:25:00 PM »
@Cycling Stache - really like your idea for the "Treating" fund!

Cornbread OMalley

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1351 on: November 07, 2018, 08:35:10 PM »
Since this is where I posted about my termination last week, this is where I'll share this story. The corporate announcement of my departure came out yesterday. Nice and vague that I will be leaving to "pursue other opportunities". So in the lunch room today I got asked where I am going next. 
My response was "Skiing".
Awkward pause and lack of comprehension
"No where is your next position?"
"Chairlift."
"No where are you going to work next."
"Well I have a season pass at Alta, so that is where I will be working on my turns. Enjoy your lunch." mic drop and exit. 7 more days.
I love awkward conversations and relish the long pause.
hahaha!  I love it!

Linda_Norway

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1352 on: November 08, 2018, 01:22:38 AM »
Since this is where I posted about my termination last week, this is where I'll share this story. The corporate announcement of my departure came out yesterday. Nice and vague that I will be leaving to "pursue other opportunities". So in the lunch room today I got asked where I am going next. 
My response was "Skiing".
Awkward pause and lack of comprehension
"No where is your next position?"
"Chairlift."
"No where are you going to work next."
"Well I have a season pass at Alta, so that is where I will be working on my turns. Enjoy your lunch." mic drop and exit. 7 more days.
I love awkward conversations and relish the long pause.

Great conversation. At least your answer was very specific and therefore easy to give: gone skiing.

We others who will (hopefully) be in a similar situation next year will have to find some suitable answer to the "what's next" question. I am not sure what my answer will be, other then "moving to xx (out into the country)". DH wants to say we will take a year sabbatical. But I have already told a few of my (frugal) colleagues about my saving for FIRE. When asked about when, I have answered: within 5 years.

Loren Ver

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1353 on: November 08, 2018, 04:50:39 AM »
...
"No where is your next position?"
"Chairlift."
...

My favorite part :).

I'm a little nervous seeing my name first on the list!

I have to admit that I started to hesitate when I look at my finances and wonder if I really have enough money.  It's not so much the amount as the sense that, from working, way more money comes in than goes out, so it feels like if anything were to happen, I'd be immediately covered.  I kind of got over this by thinking about how much more money would make me feel better.  $100k?  Probably no impact (we dropped $150k last month from investments before some of the recent recovery).  $500k?  Not in any kind of definite sense, and that's 5 more years working.  A million sounds good, but that's another 10 years, and I'm not working 10 more years just to feel a little more secure.
...


I'm glad you are thinking through the issue instead of just throwing more work on the pile.  Changing from saver to spender is a massive transition (started by changed your account auto-invests!!)  and it really should feel hard, uh different, uh something.  Right?  Fundamental change to what you have been doing.  But you know this and you know you, so you can work through it.

I know me, so I know our first few years are going to be extra lean.  Not because they need to be, but because I will need to see the stash grow.  I know it will grow over time, but the first few years can be game changers, so i want the numbers up.  I'm not willing to work for the up though!

LV


Linda_Norway

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1354 on: November 08, 2018, 06:45:48 AM »

I'm glad you are thinking through the issue instead of just throwing more work on the pile.  Changing from saver to spender is a massive transition (started by changed your account auto-invests!!)  and it really should feel hard, uh different, uh something.  Right?  Fundamental change to what you have been doing.  But you know this and you know you, so you can work through it.

I know me, so I know our first few years are going to be extra lean.  Not because they need to be, but because I will need to see the stash grow.  I know it will grow over time, but the first few years can be game changers, so i want the numbers up.  I'm not willing to work for the up though!

LV

And if it doesn't work out financially, there will always be the option to sidegig (occasionally) during FIRE, which will be very different from working fulltime in your current job.
We are thinking in the same way. I made a FIRE calculation and we have now idea how this will work out exactly in the future. Tax rules might be changed. The COL could change. We cannot predict the future. We will just give it a go and improvise if it doesn't work out.

Livingthedream55

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1355 on: November 08, 2018, 07:24:35 AM »
I'm a little nervous seeing my name first on the list!

I have to admit that I started to hesitate when I look at my finances and wonder if I really have enough money.  It's not so much the amount as the sense that, from working, way more money comes in than goes out, so it feels like if anything were to happen, I'd be immediately covered.  I kind of got over this by thinking about how much more money would make me feel better.  $100k?  Probably no impact (we dropped $150k last month from investments before some of the recent recovery).  $500k?  Not in any kind of definite sense, and that's 5 more years working.  A million sounds good, but that's another 10 years, and I'm not working 10 more years just to feel a little more secure.

Also, I wonder whether I've worked up a fantasy of early retirement that really isn't any different than the housewife (husband) of yore.  My wife is going to keep working, the kids are in school, and I'm going to be helping around the house.  That's not that original or revolutionary, quite frankly.  But I think I've moved past this one as well on the basis that I simply don't have any interest in the work I'm doing any more, and if being a house husband while potentially discovering other interests (that could, at least potentially, involve work) is not that exciting, it's also more in line with what I want to be doing now.  And I've "earned" the right to do it now.

In any event, on Monday I turned off the auto investing in Vanguard and the auto reinvestment of dividends.  It was the first concrete step to making this happen.

I'm still giving myself the out of seeing if I want to recommit to work after the holiday break, but I know deep down that I don't want to do that.  I've been living my arbitrary OMY, and even that has proven difficult because I know the money I'm making right now doesn't really matter.

Unrelated note: my parents recently gave me a $2,000 gift because they felt they had been too controlling with money when we were younger.  I decided to set it up as a "treating" budget to treat people to lunch, drinks, etc., both because it will increase my number of social outings, which is important to me, and because it is one of the things I don't tend to do--I'm a here's my fair share kind of guy.  What I did find funny about the experience so far is the fallacy of mental accounting that really does affect my thinking.  That $2k has no meaningful impact on my net worth, but it feels amazingly luxurious to just pick up the check and enjoy the feeling of doing so!  Probably I can extend this after the $2k runs out without affecting my costs, given that we're talking a couple drinks or a lunch once or twice a month.  Something I'll consider!

This is very, very powerful! If you get jittery as the day approaches (I'm betting that you will) please keep repeating this to yourself. My numbers are different but I, too, am feeling a little anxiety as this shit gets real so I appreciate the post!

tooqk4u22

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1356 on: November 08, 2018, 11:32:48 AM »
I'm a little nervous seeing my name first on the list!

I have to admit that I started to hesitate when I look at my finances and wonder if I really have enough money.  It's not so much the amount as the sense that, from working, way more money comes in than goes out, so it feels like if anything were to happen, I'd be immediately covered.  I kind of got over this by thinking about how much more money would make me feel better.  $100k?  Probably no impact (we dropped $150k last month from investments before some of the recent recovery).  $500k?  Not in any kind of definite sense, and that's 5 more years working.  A million sounds good, but that's another 10 years, and I'm not working 10 more years just to feel a little more secure.

I completely feel this way too.   I have a number that would make me feel better, but I also know that is not worth the pain.  The  big drop last month (not so much now as some has been recovered) didn't really bother me...I guess that is due in part to I am still working and in part to a targeted 3.25-3.5% WR (allows some cushion for portfolio to drop before I get to the 4% rule).   But still it stresses me - the firehose of cash is a powerful thing.

Eric

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1357 on: November 08, 2018, 05:19:02 PM »
I'm a little nervous seeing my name first on the list!

I have to admit that I started to hesitate when I look at my finances and wonder if I really have enough money.  It's not so much the amount as the sense that, from working, way more money comes in than goes out, so it feels like if anything were to happen, I'd be immediately covered.  I kind of got over this by thinking about how much more money would make me feel better.  $100k?  Probably no impact (we dropped $150k last month from investments before some of the recent recovery).  $500k?  Not in any kind of definite sense, and that's 5 more years working.  A million sounds good, but that's another 10 years, and I'm not working 10 more years just to feel a little more secure.

I completely feel this way too.   I have a number that would make me feel better, but I also know that is not worth the pain.  The  big drop last month (not so much now as some has been recovered) didn't really bother me...I guess that is due in part to I am still working and in part to a targeted 3.25-3.5% WR (allows some cushion for portfolio to drop before I get to the 4% rule).   But still it stresses me - the firehose of cash is a powerful thing.

I'm in the same boat too.  I figure the nerves are there mostly because this is a major life event.  If I'm not nervous about it, there's probably something wrong with me.  I'm willing to bet that all of us would still be nervous even with twice as much money, simply because of the fact that this is a HUGE DEAL!!  It's like the first day of school or getting married.  You've never done it before and while you can read about it all you want, it's hard to actually know what to expect until afterwards.  It's completely normal to be nervous. 

Plus, it doesn't have to be permanent.  In the early retirement community we talk a lot about failure, whether that's portfolio failure or retirement failure.  And within that context, it's basically assumed that if you don't execute a plan that includes never working again that you failed.  But you only get one life.  Did I really fail if I took a decade off work to travel around the world before I went back to work part time?  Technically, sure, the IRP knows that my retirement "failed", but removing the word retirement, nearly everyone else would consider taking a decade off work during your prime living years as a win.  So I try to view it through that lens where even the failure scenario seems like a pretty good option.

Lews Therin

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1358 on: November 08, 2018, 05:40:54 PM »
Worst case scenario: Have to fill up my retirement accounts. Still never have to do full-time again. Would take very little.

itchyfeet

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1359 on: November 09, 2018, 01:07:29 AM »
I also definitely empathise  with the above posts.

I have a fair sized stash to FIRE on. It is extremely unlikely that We will ever have to spend less than the median Australian household spends.

However, I still question whether maybe I should shoot higher. I enjoy the freedom of jetting all over the place today, and will have to travel very differently post FIRE to reduce spending.

But like cyclestash says, one or 2 years of extra work wonít really make a fundamental difference. 5 years would make a difference, but 5 years is a massive chunk of time.

Sure, OMY or 2MY would give a little more certainty to my current spending plans as we will be drawing abut 4.5% most likely,, but DW still plans on working casually in the future so this will get us well below 4%, and there is always the chance I might do a short contract or 2 as well. That extra cashflow will also plug any small gaps that need/want plugging.

My body is getting old. I want to get off my ass, and out of the office before it is totally rotted.

Trifele

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1360 on: November 09, 2018, 04:44:36 AM »
I'm right there with all of you -- extremely nervous.  It's a scary thing to us because it's a huge deal that goes against the grain of the typical working career.  Plus we are all excellent planners, so the unknowns make us nervous.  I agree 100% with Eric that it's not a "failure" in the big scheme if I quit, spend a few years getting my heath and fitness back in order, spend time with my teen age kids before they leave the nest, and then go back to working PT if I need to.  I'd take that deal anytime.   

On the work front, no dice on the severance.  :)  MegaCorp offered me a better job this week, which (when I turn it down) will disqualify me.  I'll just be a straight-up voluntary resignation for me.  Ah well.  Severance was a long shot anyway and would have been just icing on the cake.

I believe I'm going to pull my date forward into January, so as soon as I confirm that you won't be in the lonely spot at the top of the list @Cycling Stache !   

itchyfeet

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1361 on: November 09, 2018, 06:04:44 AM »
I love that it is now mid November.

Here in the Middle East the weather is perfect this time of year and friends and families are visiting from all corners of the world. Christmas is just weeks away and Iíll have a short vacation back in Oz to visit everyone.

Before I blink it will be mid Jan and Iíll have just 5 months in front of me.

Or will it be......

Probability of getting a severance:  5%
Probability of resignation and FIRE: 80%
Probability of Employer proposing new assignment which I accept: 5% (FIRE plans on hold indefinitely)
Probability of OMY: 5%
Probability of 2MY: 5%

MaybeBabyMustache

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1362 on: November 09, 2018, 07:30:41 AM »
@Trifele - exciting on the potential date change!
@itchyfeet - I have a similar possibility matrix, but mine looks more like this:


Possibility of taking a sabbatical - 99%
Possibility of coming back part-time/reduced afters hours after said sabbatical - 60%
Possibility of turning in my badge after sabbatical & outright quitting - 40%

dude

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1363 on: November 09, 2018, 07:54:35 AM »
I'm a little nervous seeing my name first on the list!

I have to admit that I started to hesitate when I look at my finances and wonder if I really have enough money.  It's not so much the amount as the sense that, from working, way more money comes in than goes out, so it feels like if anything were to happen, I'd be immediately covered.  I kind of got over this by thinking about how much more money would make me feel better.  $100k?  Probably no impact (we dropped $150k last month from investments before some of the recent recovery).  $500k?  Not in any kind of definite sense, and that's 5 more years working.  A million sounds good, but that's another 10 years, and I'm not working 10 more years just to feel a little more secure.

I completely feel this way too.   I have a number that would make me feel better, but I also know that is not worth the pain.  The  big drop last month (not so much now as some has been recovered) didn't really bother me...I guess that is due in part to I am still working and in part to a targeted 3.25-3.5% WR (allows some cushion for portfolio to drop before I get to the 4% rule).   But still it stresses me - the firehose of cash is a powerful thing.

I'm in the same boat too.  I figure the nerves are there mostly because this is a major life event.  If I'm not nervous about it, there's probably something wrong with me.  I'm willing to bet that all of us would still be nervous even with twice as much money, simply because of the fact that this is a HUGE DEAL!!  It's like the first day of school or getting married.  You've never done it before and while you can read about it all you want, it's hard to actually know what to expect until afterwards.  It's completely normal to be nervous. 

Plus, it doesn't have to be permanent.  In the early retirement community we talk a lot about failure, whether that's portfolio failure or retirement failure.  And within that context, it's basically assumed that if you don't execute a plan that includes never working again that you failed.  But you only get one life.  Did I really fail if I took a decade off work to travel around the world before I went back to work part time?  Technically, sure, the IRP knows that my retirement "failed", but removing the word retirement, nearly everyone else would consider taking a decade off work during your prime living years as a win.  So I try to view it through that lens where even the failure scenario seems like a pretty good option.

Ditto on the nervousness thing. I've been a little spendy lately because between my pension and savings (and subsidized health insurance), I figured I've got more than enough. On the other hand, I'm a little nervous that the withdrawal of losing the Big Paycheck will be psychologically tough to handle. The reality is, I'm planning to keep a check on things by taking a mere 2% (or less) withdrawal anyway, so I should be just fine. But a part of me wants that security of having my account grow fatter and fatter every year -- I'm enamored with the idea of ending up with multi-millions in my account at the end of the road, so I can do good things with the money when I no longer need it. Bottom line for me though is I have to get out of this job; I'm not longer able to be sufficiently productive or caring enough to stick around. So no matter what the market does, I'm going (and unlike younger folks here, at 54, I have to be more realistic about the prospects of employment after I leave . . .).

dude

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1364 on: November 09, 2018, 08:02:38 AM »
I also definitely empathise  with the above posts.

I have a fair sized stash to FIRE on. It is extremely unlikely that We will ever have to spend less than the median Australian household spends.

However, I still question whether maybe I should shoot higher. I enjoy the freedom of jetting all over the place today, and will have to travel very differently post FIRE to reduce spending.

But like cyclestash says, one or 2 years of extra work wonít really make a fundamental difference. 5 years would make a difference, but 5 years is a massive chunk of time.

Sure, OMY or 2MY would give a little more certainty to my current spending plans as we will be drawing abut 4.5% most likely,, but DW still plans on working casually in the future so this will get us well below 4%, and there is always the chance I might do a short contract or 2 as well. That extra cashflow will also plug any small gaps that need/want plugging.

My body is getting old. I want to get off my ass, and out of the office before it is totally rotted.

Same situation here. My damn pension alone will net me more than the median income for a family of 4 in this country (which causes me to have a slight degree of guilt, but then again that money is deferred compensation, i.e., money that's been paid by my agency out of current operating budgets year after year and placed in our pension account). And shit, I just calculated that we have @$350k of equity in our house, so we could easily sell and move to a LCOL area and buy something outright and eliminate our $1,800/mo. mortgage). So why am I still nervous?? Probably that whole thing about waiting for the other shoe to drop when life is going so swimmingly, you know?  Lyle Lovett sings, in his song "Lucky":

I've had an excellent time so far
There's only one thing that I fear
I've been up so long on this lucky star
It could be all downhill from here
It could be all downhill from here

Loren Ver

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1365 on: November 09, 2018, 08:17:11 AM »


Same situation here. My damn pension alone will net me more than the median income for a family of 4 in this country (which causes me to have a slight degree of guilt, but then again that money is deferred compensation, i.e., money that's been paid by my agency out of current operating budgets year after year and placed in our pension account). And shit, I just calculated that we have @$350k of equity in our house, so we could easily sell and move to a LCOL area and buy something outright and eliminate our $1,800/mo. mortgage). So why am I still nervous?? Probably that whole thing about waiting for the other shoe to drop when life is going so swimmingly, you know?  Lyle Lovett sings, in his song "Lucky":


Hehe- you have more home equity than my family had in net worth at the end of 2016....  That made me giggle. 

dude

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1366 on: November 09, 2018, 08:23:17 AM »


Same situation here. My damn pension alone will net me more than the median income for a family of 4 in this country (which causes me to have a slight degree of guilt, but then again that money is deferred compensation, i.e., money that's been paid by my agency out of current operating budgets year after year and placed in our pension account). And shit, I just calculated that we have @$350k of equity in our house, so we could easily sell and move to a LCOL area and buy something outright and eliminate our $1,800/mo. mortgage). So why am I still nervous?? Probably that whole thing about waiting for the other shoe to drop when life is going so swimmingly, you know?  Lyle Lovett sings, in his song "Lucky":


Hehe- you have more home equity than my family had in net worth at the end of 2016....  That made me giggle.

Courtesy of significant property value appreciation in our HCOL east coast city! We've only contributed about $83k of that.  :-)

Loren Ver

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1367 on: November 09, 2018, 10:07:57 AM »


Same situation here. My damn pension alone will net me more than the median income for a family of 4 in this country (which causes me to have a slight degree of guilt, but then again that money is deferred compensation, i.e., money that's been paid by my agency out of current operating budgets year after year and placed in our pension account). And shit, I just calculated that we have @$350k of equity in our house, so we could easily sell and move to a LCOL area and buy something outright and eliminate our $1,800/mo. mortgage). So why am I still nervous?? Probably that whole thing about waiting for the other shoe to drop when life is going so swimmingly, you know?  Lyle Lovett sings, in his song "Lucky":


Hehe- you have more home equity than my family had in net worth at the end of 2016....  That made me giggle.

Courtesy of significant property value appreciation in our HCOL east coast city! We've only contributed about $83k of that.  :-)

That is even more awesome and giggly!

chasesfish

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1368 on: November 09, 2018, 04:19:23 PM »
18 weeks to go until my notice

dude

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1369 on: November 13, 2018, 08:07:44 AM »
18 weeks to go until my notice

More or less 7 weeks to go until I likely give mine, but that will be 5 months' notice! On the other hand, the Nervous Nellie in me thinks I may hold off until @60 days before retirement to give notice, just in case I change my mind (once I announce, it will set a series of things in motion, including announcing the vacancy of my position for a new hire/promotion -- hard to unring that bell once it happens). Which is why part of me and  thinking just fucking do it on the first of the new year, to avoid any hemming and hawing and OMY'ing.

itchyfeet

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1370 on: November 13, 2018, 11:34:43 AM »
Ditto here. I need to give 3 months notice, but thinking I might give 5 so that I can just move forward with plans with 100% confidence that I am actually not,going to be working post June.

chasesfish

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1371 on: November 13, 2018, 06:38:45 PM »
Wow to these 2-3 months notices.

I am supposed to give 30 days.  Its excruciating to wait.  If I give notice any earlier the predators would descend on the bonus pool immediately

Linda_Norway

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1372 on: November 14, 2018, 12:42:37 AM »
Ditto here. I need to give 3 months notice, but thinking I might give 5 so that I can just move forward with plans with 100% confidence that I am actually not,going to be working post June.

I think 3 months notice is long enough for your employer to prepare for your leave. You might find 5 months very long if they start treating you differently.

I need to give 3 full calendar months notice. But as I plan to leave the first of October, my leave can include my whole summer vacation, which could be 5 weeks, depending on how many days I use up earlier next year.

Linda_Norway

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1373 on: November 14, 2018, 02:28:59 AM »
I really need to stop working soon. Recently I had a health check at work where it was discovered that I have very high blood pressure. This is after I downshifting to working 80% from September. I feel so much less stress than last year (from autumn 2017 to summer 2018). And still my blood pressure is so high. I am going to check it out with my GP next week. Maybe I'll get a machine that measures blood pressure for 24 hours. I am convinced that FIRE would be much better for my health.

The evidence linking chronic high blood pressure to stress is pretty weak/non-existent.  It feels like there should be a link, but several studies seem to sure there isn't one. Home blood pressure monitor is quite useful/interesting though. I would never have guessed that licorice raises my blood pressure by so much, for example.

I had been eating licorice the day before... Let's hope it was only that.
But I do feel stressed and anxious about a lot of things most of the time. For example today at work, where I have responsibility for so many problems that I cannot solve myself. Technical limitations, depending on colleagues who are difficult to reach, depending on a supplier that had several weeks delay. I was pretty relaxed at the start of the day, but my anxiety and feelings of being inadequate are really high now.

Just back at work from a visit to my GP. He also measured very high blood pressure. He thought I might have been affected by the circumstances (being stressed by the test itself). But at the end of the month I will get a 24 hour measuring machine installed on me, on a thursday, which is a working day for me. The machine has a busy agenda and that is why we can't do it earlier. But we'll take it from there. Then I will be measured several times an hour during the whole day. I am very curious about what that will show.

Lews Therin

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1374 on: November 14, 2018, 05:37:15 AM »
Ditto here. I need to give 3 months notice, but thinking I might give 5 so that I can just move forward with plans with 100% confidence that I am actually not,going to be working post June.

I think 3 months notice is long enough for your employer to prepare for your leave. You might find 5 months very long if they start treating you differently.

I need to give 3 full calendar months notice. But as I plan to leave the first of October, my leave can include my whole summer vacation, which could be 5 weeks, depending on how many days I use up earlier next year.

I had to give 6 months (CAN military) and the difference is pretty extensive. Lost my office, got added a bunch of administrative tasks, and generally no longer get put up for anything. Plus, now everything is seen in the light "because he's leaving". Oh he arrived 5min late today? He must be phoning in his last 6 months. Didn't comb his hair, lack of motivation... etc.

I gave in the minimum amount of heads up, and would have much preferred 2-4 weeks.

Loren Ver

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1375 on: November 14, 2018, 05:55:00 AM »
I really need to stop working soon. Recently I had a health check at work where it was discovered that I have very high blood pressure. This is after I downshifting to working 80% from September. I feel so much less stress than last year (from autumn 2017 to summer 2018). And still my blood pressure is so high. I am going to check it out with my GP next week. Maybe I'll get a machine that measures blood pressure for 24 hours. I am convinced that FIRE would be much better for my health.

The evidence linking chronic high blood pressure to stress is pretty weak/non-existent.  It feels like there should be a link, but several studies seem to sure there isn't one. Home blood pressure monitor is quite useful/interesting though. I would never have guessed that licorice raises my blood pressure by so much, for example.

I had been eating licorice the day before... Let's hope it was only that.
But I do feel stressed and anxious about a lot of things most of the time. For example today at work, where I have responsibility for so many problems that I cannot solve myself. Technical limitations, depending on colleagues who are difficult to reach, depending on a supplier that had several weeks delay. I was pretty relaxed at the start of the day, but my anxiety and feelings of being inadequate are really high now.

Just back at work from a visit to my GP. He also measured very high blood pressure. He thought I might have been affected by the circumstances (being stressed by the test itself). But at the end of the month I will get a 24 hour measuring machine installed on me, on a thursday, which is a working day for me. The machine has a busy agenda and that is why we can't do it earlier. But we'll take it from there. Then I will be measured several times an hour during the whole day. I am very curious about what that will show.

That's good Linda.  I hope you are able to get some actionable information from the tests.   

dude

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1376 on: November 14, 2018, 06:41:29 AM »
Wow to these 2-3 months notices.

I am supposed to give 30 days.  Its excruciating to wait.  If I give notice any earlier the predators would descend on the bonus pool immediately

In my case, it's fed government job, so there is a shitload of paperwork processing that happens with retirements. And backfilling my position will take at least a couple months again because of the red tape (and whoever is selected usually is allowed several pay periods to report, especially if a geographic move involved), so I don't want to leave my colleagues hanging for too long. A friend of mine just filed his paperwork -- SIX MONTHS in advance! (that's the soonest you can file)

chasesfish

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1377 on: November 14, 2018, 12:00:38 PM »
Wow to these 2-3 months notices.

I am supposed to give 30 days.  Its excruciating to wait.  If I give notice any earlier the predators would descend on the bonus pool immediately

In my case, it's fed government job, so there is a shitload of paperwork processing that happens with retirements. And backfilling my position will take at least a couple months again because of the red tape (and whoever is selected usually is allowed several pay periods to report, especially if a geographic move involved), so I don't want to leave my colleagues hanging for too long. A friend of mine just filed his paperwork -- SIX MONTHS in advance! (that's the soonest you can file)

That's a nice advantage of your federal job.  They've been known to terminate people at my company for suggesting they need to relocate and leave.

The arrogance is astounding

Trifele

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1378 on: November 18, 2018, 03:21:38 AM »
Updating the roster.  @elaine amj has decided to pull the plug this year.  Congrats elaine!

How is everyone doing?  I am slogging it out and hoping to turn in my resignation next month.  Right around the corner!

2019 FIRE Cohort:

02/01/19     Cycling Stache (44)
02/01/19     Trifele (51)
02/08/19     Socmonkey (37)
02/25/19     MaybeBabyMustache
02/??/19     zinnie  (35)
03/15/19     exit2019  (40)
03/19/19     ChasesFish (36)
03/??/19     MissNancyPryor  (50)     
03/??/19     Roboturner  (30)
03/??/19     Edgema
03/29/19     JumboShrimp
03/31/19     BlindSquirrel
03/31/19     Mr. Ver (39)
03/31/19     Loren Ver (36)
04/01/19     HalfStached  (41)
04/01/19     Gerardc  (35)
04/01/19     JoJo (45)
04/01/19     Ryder (39)
04/19/19     Eric
04/23/19     Canadian Ben (29)
04/??/19     Luck12  (41)
04/??/19     PowerStache (43)
05/01/19     Albireo13  (61)                   
05/??/19     SamIAm38  (29)
05/??/19     FIRE 20/20  (42)
05/31/19     Pylortes  (42)
05/31/19     Odiedog8590  (62)
05/31/19     Livingthedream55  (59)
05/31/19     dude   
06/01/19     Prairie Stash
06/07/19     DreamFire
06/21/19     Parizade  (62)
06/22/19     Waffles  (52)
06/??/19     Oldtoyota
06/??/19     Itchyfeet  (47)
06/??/19     Bateaux  (50)
06/??/19     CryingInThePool  (44)
07/??/19     powersuitrecall  (47)
07/??/19     Enigma  (39)
07/??/19     Thedividebyzero  (45)
07/01/19     Freedomin5 (38)
07/03/19     Gerard
07/03/19     Miss Piggy
09/02/19     Cornbread OMalley  (42)  Date Confirmed
09/??/19     RetirementDreaming
10/01/19     2Birds1Stone  (32)
10/01/19     Linda_Norway
10/??/19     VoteCthulu  (39)
10/??/19     Trix76  (43)
10/??/19     MoMan  (55)
10/??/19     Dreamer
12/??/19     HBFI  (38)
12/??/19     luckyme13  (45)
12/27/19     moxie
12/31/19     texxan1  (47)

2019 Cohort with date TBD:
Lowerbills (40)
getoutsoon (52)
IPlawyer

OLY FIRE-ees:
markbike528cbx  (55)      OLY -- CONFIRMED 6/1/18; checking in as OP
MoneyStacher  (50)         OLY -- CONFIRMED 2018
PhilB  (52)                      OLY -- CONFIRMED 10/24/18
sui generis  (41)              OLY -- CONFIRMED 8/17/18
TartanTallulah  (55)          OLY -- CONFIRMED 10/2018
cerat0n1a                       OLY -- CONFIRMED 2018 
Chairman                        OLY -- CONFIRMED 2018
Bognish (43)                   OLY -- CONFIRMED 11/16/18
Elaine amj (40)               OLY -- CONFIRMED 11/30/18
« Last Edit: November 19, 2018, 04:04:08 AM by Trifele »

chasesfish

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1379 on: November 18, 2018, 06:10:56 AM »
Love the roster.  Do I get to count 36 for the retirement age since I'll be 36 on my notice date?  Company "requests" a 1 month notice period, which they tend to pay for but not really ask me to work.  I'll flip over to 37 before the paycheck drops.

17 weeks to go

Loren Ver

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1380 on: November 18, 2018, 04:29:24 PM »
Love the roster.  Do I get to count 36 for the retirement age since I'll be 36 on my notice date?  Company "requests" a 1 month notice period, which they tend to pay for but not really ask me to work.  I'll flip over to 37 before the paycheck drops.

17 weeks to go

Funny you should ask that. I don't have an answer, but DH and I decided to move our date to the end of March since i turn 37 in mid- April.  This way two things happen :1) I get to retire at 36, which is much less prime, but otherwise a very neat number.  DH still gets out at 39, as was the original agreement from many many years ago. 2)  Our first retired day will by April 1st.  We both find that amusing. 

Exciting times!
Loren

chasesfish

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1381 on: November 18, 2018, 05:09:05 PM »
Love the roster.  Do I get to count 36 for the retirement age since I'll be 36 on my notice date?  Company "requests" a 1 month notice period, which they tend to pay for but not really ask me to work.  I'll flip over to 37 before the paycheck drops.

17 weeks to go

Funny you should ask that. I don't have an answer, but DH and I decided to move our date to the end of March since i turn 37 in mid- April.  This way two things happen :1) I get to retire at 36, which is much less prime, but otherwise a very neat number.  DH still gets out at 39, as was the original agreement from many many years ago. 2)  Our first retired day will by April 1st.  We both find that amusing. 

Exciting times!
Loren

Congrats!

Trifele

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1382 on: November 18, 2018, 05:17:56 PM »
@Loren Ver and @chasesfish -- got you both updated.  That year really does make a difference, doesn't it?  I remember it felt wonderful when I rolled back my FIRE date over my birthday . . . almost like I got a whole 'nother year of life. 

Exciting times indeed!!

Linda_Norway

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1383 on: November 19, 2018, 01:24:42 AM »
@Loren Ver and @chasesfish -- got you both updated.  That year really does make a difference, doesn't it?  I remember it felt wonderful when I rolled back my FIRE date over my birthday . . . almost like I got a whole 'nother year of life. 

Exciting times indeed!!

At the next update you may add the 1rst of October to my date.

PhilB

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1384 on: November 19, 2018, 01:37:40 AM »
I can't tell you how excited I am at the thought that the class of 2019 will soon start to graduate.  Despite having defected to the 2018 cohort, who are also a great bunch of people, I still feel more emotionally invested in you lot and will be cheering from the sidelines over the next year.  Come on in, the water's lovely!

Linda_Norway

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1385 on: November 19, 2018, 01:40:03 AM »
I can't tell you how excited I am at the thought that the class of 2019 will soon start to graduate.  Despite having defected to the 2018 cohort, who are also a great bunch of people, I still feel more emotionally invested in you lot and will be cheering from the sidelines over the next year.  Come on in, the water's lovely!

I am also really excited about it. Less than a year to work for me (if everything works out). And a very short time left to work for most other people in this thread.

Loren Ver

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1386 on: November 19, 2018, 04:48:08 AM »
I can't tell you how excited I am at the thought that the class of 2019 will soon start to graduate.  Despite having defected to the 2018 cohort, who are also a great bunch of people, I still feel more emotionally invested in you lot and will be cheering from the sidelines over the next year.  Come on in, the water's lovely!

I am also really excited about it. Less than a year to work for me (if everything works out). And a very short time left to work for most other people in this thread.

Thanks PhilB.  Finding a cohort is like family.  Even if you move around, we're still family ;).

Linda, are you feeling more confident?  I am really cheering for you and your husband!!

LV

Linda_Norway

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1387 on: November 19, 2018, 05:45:18 AM »
I can't tell you how excited I am at the thought that the class of 2019 will soon start to graduate.  Despite having defected to the 2018 cohort, who are also a great bunch of people, I still feel more emotionally invested in you lot and will be cheering from the sidelines over the next year.  Come on in, the water's lovely!

I am also really excited about it. Less than a year to work for me (if everything works out). And a very short time left to work for most other people in this thread.

Thanks PhilB.  Finding a cohort is like family.  Even if you move around, we're still family ;).

Linda, are you feeling more confident?  I am really cheering for you and your husband!!

LV

Confident? According to my blood pressure values, I am not.
We have had a sales estimate from 2 brokers with the same price estimate for the house. That is comforting. If the local housing market doesn't crash in the next half year, we might get that price. Then we can FIRE. Also, it would be very nice of the stock market got back up again. I am still on 8% less growth than earlier this year. But I have bought so many stocks that my stock is still equally much worth as before the crash. We would have saved up our remaining FIRE stash by the end of the year, if it hadn't been for those 8% less growth. Now we need to save more the next year.

I am confident that we will work it out somehow. But I am a bit anxious about the whole process: Selling the house, hiring the right broker and get the moving out date aligned with our last working day. Moving out into the country, how much of our furniture to move and how much fuss to get replacement furniture if we don't, hiring a moving company (expensive) or not? Making new friends/acquaintances after moving.

Also, we plan to FIRE on 25x our 2017 expenses. I don't yet know what our 2018 total expenses will be, as DH doesn't track his expenses. But for our FIRE budget we have calculated almost twice that much to count also for big expenses. If I calculate with a safe withdrawal rate of PI instead of 4, then our stash will not be enough and we need to generate some additional income. I don't think that will be very difficult, but it is something I think about. I just really hope that I personally don't have to go back to working a boring office job.

I guess I am just quite vulnerable to stress for the moment and there is still quite a bit to get stressed about.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2018, 06:05:30 AM by Linda_Norway »

2Birds1Stone

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1388 on: November 19, 2018, 07:14:31 AM »
Yesterday, I found out that my "golden handcuffs" (stock options) aren't worth nearly as much as my company had led me to believe when I accepted my offer. I initially picked 10/1 because that was when I could exercise the first chunk (25%) of options. Now my date will be dictated by works bullshit vs. how close to 4% WR rate I am =D

Lews Therin

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #1389 on: November 19, 2018, 07:24:25 AM »
I've heard good things about the month of April, right after Easter. 2019.