Author Topic: 2019 fire cohort  (Read 32067 times)

Bateaux

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #150 on: March 28, 2017, 10:20:54 PM »
Time is racing by.  Sorry I  haven't provided dates and age.  Make it June 2019 at age 50.  Stash is growing quick.  Pretty much up to what goes on with health-care now.  I've saved plenty enough (1.5M) to cover voluntary spending.  For the next two years I'm building an additional health care stash of (500k).  We have about 300k to go and we are building at a rate of $500 daily now.
“Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.”
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Class of 2019

Livingthedream55

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #151 on: March 29, 2017, 08:15:28 AM »
Some days I feel like I'm just coasting and 2019 will be here before I know it. Others, I feel like I can't stand to spend one more day sitting in my office staring at my computer. Every morning I get immersed in something I really want to finish, only to have to drop it to get to work on time. I wish I could find a way to extract more hours from a day, somehow. My problem isn't so much that I have to go to work, it's just that there isn't enough time for both work AND life. Right now my life just feels like it is always in various stages of incomplete. All of my good ideas and projects are just waiting for some later date when I'll actually have the time to finish them. Because no matter how engaged I am in something, when the clock hits a certain time I have to stop and head to work.

I've been vacillating between quitting now to take a year off, and sticking it out. When I do the math and look at how much taking a year off would set me back, the obvious choice is to stay. But when I have a long, exhausting day at work like I did today, where even once I'm free I can't do much except relax and fall asleep early, it just feels like too much wasted life.

Zinnie,

How about taking some time off now (soon)?



VoteCthulu

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #152 on: March 29, 2017, 04:45:19 PM »
I feel much the same, zinnie, but I'm pretty sure that if I took a year off there's no way I'd ever go back to an office job, so I'm going to stick it out. Others might take a year off and be energized and refreshed by it, so you'll have to do what's right for you.

zinnie

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #153 on: March 29, 2017, 06:41:03 PM »

Some days I feel like I'm just coasting and 2019 will be here before I know it. Others, I feel like I can't stand to spend one more day sitting in my office staring at my computer. Every morning I get immersed in something I really want to finish, only to have to drop it to get to work on time. I wish I could find a way to extract more hours from a day, somehow. My problem isn't so much that I have to go to work, it's just that there isn't enough time for both work AND life. Right now my life just feels like it is always in various stages of incomplete. All of my good ideas and projects are just waiting for some later date when I'll actually have the time to finish them. Because no matter how engaged I am in something, when the clock hits a certain time I have to stop and head to work.

I've been vacillating between quitting now to take a year off, and sticking it out. When I do the math and look at how much taking a year off would set me back, the obvious choice is to stay. But when I have a long, exhausting day at work like I did today, where even once I'm free I can't do much except relax and fall asleep early, it just feels like too much wasted life.

Zinnie,

How about taking some time off now (soon)?

A year or just vacation? I've been taking time off when I can, lots of long weekends, and we have a big trip coming up in April. I actually quit a few months ago and then panicked and changed my mind, which only confirmed that I have an awesome boss. (He was understanding about everything when I told him, kept it between us until it was two weeks out, and then when I changed my mind before that he became extra accommodating to try to keep me. Now he's actually told me to try working seven hour days, and take lots of vacation. So it just makes me feel like a whiney a-hole to still consider leaving.)

I feel much the same, zinnie, but I'm pretty sure that if I took a year off there's no way I'd ever go back to an office job, so I'm going to stick it out. Others might take a year off and be energized and refreshed by it, so you'll have to do what's right for you.

That's what I'm worried about too! Better to get it over with. And also just that I don't know how hard it will be to find something comparable, especially salary-wise. It could take at least a couple years to get back to where I am, and by then I could have been done! But then I worry I'm focused too much on money. If having all of this money buys me anything, it should be the right to take a year off when I really want to. But that's still just a scary prospect, because we will probably have to move when I need to find new work, and the timing works better for my husband, and being able to travel without worrying about dog care, if I wait a couple of years.

Thanks for letting me talk this out! Anyone else taken a year off, or have any thoughts on the pros/ cons?

zinnie

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #154 on: March 29, 2017, 06:43:17 PM »
Time is racing by.  Sorry I  haven't provided dates and age.  Make it June 2019 at age 50.  Stash is growing quick.  Pretty much up to what goes on with health-care now.  I've saved plenty enough (1.5M) to cover voluntary spending.  For the next two years I'm building an additional health care stash of (500k).  We have about 300k to go and we are building at a rate of $500 daily now.

Congrats that you're already covering your spending! 50 is a nice round number, as is $500/day, wow! :)

Trifele

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #155 on: March 30, 2017, 03:54:29 AM »
I feel much the same, zinnie, but I'm pretty sure that if I took a year off there's no way I'd ever go back to an office job, so I'm going to stick it out. Others might take a year off and be energized and refreshed by it, so you'll have to do what's right for you.

+2.  I feel the same as Zinnie.  I too have a fantastic job, great boss, great co-workers. And yet I am really struggling. 2019 feels soooo far away when you feel like this.  But I am with you VoteCthulu -- I feel like if I stopped now I would never go back.  So like Dory in Finding Nemo, I repeat to myself "Just keep swimming.  Just keep swimming."
« Last Edit: April 01, 2017, 06:08:31 AM by Trifele »

zinnie

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #156 on: March 30, 2017, 10:31:56 AM »
I feel much the same, zinnie, but I'm pretty sure that if I took a year off there's no way I'd ever go back to an office job, so I'm going to stick it out. Others might take a year off and be energized and refreshed by it, so you'll have to do what's right for you.

+2.  I feel the same as Zinnie.  I too have a fantastic job, great job, great co-workers. And yet I am really struggling. 2019 feels soooo far away when you feel like this.  But I am with you VoteCthulu -- I feel like if I stopped now I would never go back.  So like Dory in Finding Nemo, I repeat to myself "Just keep swimming.  Just keep swimming,"

Glad I'm not the only one. And I love your motto--thanks! I'll use it today :)

RetirementDreaming

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #157 on: March 30, 2017, 10:39:03 AM »
I feel much the same, zinnie, but I'm pretty sure that if I took a year off there's no way I'd ever go back to an office job, so I'm going to stick it out. Others might take a year off and be energized and refreshed by it, so you'll have to do what's right for you.

+2.  I feel the same as Zinnie.  I too have a fantastic job, great job, great co-workers. And yet I am really struggling. 2019 feels soooo far away when you feel like this.  But I am with you VoteCthulu -- I feel like if I stopped now I would never go back.  So like Dory in Finding Nemo, I repeat to myself "Just keep swimming.  Just keep swimming,"

Glad I'm not the only one. And I love your motto--thanks! I'll use it today :)

I'm using it today too. 

Itchyfeet

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #158 on: March 31, 2017, 04:29:29 PM »
I also keep having the internal debate on whether I could take a year off and then get back to saving whatever else I still need to save, but like others the thought of taking a big pay cut is keeping me trucking on for now.

Chairman

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #159 on: April 03, 2017, 08:31:12 AM »
Not sure if I belong in this cohort, but anyway, here's the plan:

  • Current assets: about 740k liquid/invested/cash + home equity
  • Current debt: about 200k left on mortgage
  • By end of 2018: want to have saved up enough new money in safe investments to pay off mortgage
  • By some time in 2019: semi-FIRE (quit current high-paying, high-stress job; switch to something low-pressure, for fun).
  • 2024 to 2027: will have mortgage paid off around here, maybe sooner.

My thinking is to not literally retire in 2019, but rather to have enough money that we won't have to work in order to live frugally (for our family — me, DW and small children — that's about $2k/month). So from that point on, it's all gravy.

zinnie

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #160 on: April 03, 2017, 08:35:48 PM »
Welcome, Chairman! I like your approach to semi-FIRE--I've been tossing around trying that myself.

Can you explain more about your plan with the mortgage and "safe investments"? I'm not sure I follow--is the idea just to have enough that you could pay off the mortgage if you wanted to, but you won't actually pay it off?

Here's to 2019!

Chairman

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #161 on: April 04, 2017, 12:44:37 AM »
Can you explain more about your plan with the mortgage and "safe investments"? I'm not sure I follow--is the idea just to have enough that you could pay off the mortgage if you wanted to, but you won't actually pay it off?
Yes, that's exactly the idea. For peace of mind, have it earning modest returns but not 100% stock market where half of it could disappear from one month to the next.

Itchyfeet

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #162 on: April 06, 2017, 01:07:21 PM »
Just checking in from the Seychelles. Good times, but back to work next week.

March was yet another bumper month for us, despite our travels. 2017 has started off incredibly well.

We are now at 21x our spending target. At 25x we press the eject button and parachute into a new life.

Looking very good for late 2018 or early 2019.

VoteCthulu

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #163 on: April 11, 2017, 11:03:35 AM »
I'd never heard of Seychelles before, but it looks like a tropical paradise! I wish my work brought me there instead of the polluted industrial cities I normally spend most of my trips in.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2017, 07:07:04 PM by VoteCthulu »

Itchyfeet

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #164 on: April 11, 2017, 11:42:55 AM »
I'd never heard of Seychelles before, but it looks like a tropical paradise! I wish my work brought me there instead of the poluted industrial cities I normally spend most of my trips in.

Indeed it was a tropical paradise, but don't feel alone as I also spend more than enough time in polluted industrial cities in KSA and the like. I can't imagine my employer ever funding a trip to the Seychelles.

MoMan

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #165 on: April 20, 2017, 08:14:10 PM »
Today marks a mini milestone for me: 900 days to FIRE! (early Oct. 2019 for those who don't want to do math).

Yes, it feels like a long ways to go right now, but acknowledging these milestones helps me visualize progress. In January, I still had 1,000 days to go. In July, it will be 800 days. PLUS: that 900 figure represents CALENDAR days. Actual work days (subtracting weekends, holidays, paid time off) drops it in the neighborhood of 600.

My job is usually pretty easy: I'm a creative copy writer. I'm well respected and very appreciated; well compensated for what I do. Never work overtime/weekends. The people I work with, including my bosses, are nice. And yet, I hate it. Can't help it. Which makes me feel a little guilty.

I actually have enough saved/invested to support myself now but I'm holding out for another 30 months because of what I believe will be a lucrative benefit: Lifetime company health care. I still have to pay the premiums, but since it's a ginormous international company, I'm guessing it will be more affordable than either COBRA or getting added to my wife's plan (and who knows what the hell to expect from the ACA). I can also add beneficiaries later. Once I turn 65, it resorts to secondary insurance to supplement Medicare.

I checked today and I do indeed need to be 55 or older (as opposed to retiring earlier in the calendar year when I turn 55). I can't get an estimate of premiums until I'm 180 days from retirement. Oh well. The best part is, if the shit hits the fan and I decide I can't stand it, I can pull the plug tomorrow and be fine.

Man, the waiting is hard.

"He is richest who is contented, for content is the wealth of nature."

Trifele

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #166 on: April 21, 2017, 04:22:21 AM »
That health insurance benefit is really great, MoMan.  That is my biggest uncertainty about FIRE,, and you will have it taken care of.  Awesome!

Just did my counts and I am at 833 days total, 535 work days until August 1, 2019.  I have a great job too, but this run-up period is hard.  I may pull the plug early.   I definitely have to work until January 1, 2019 to become fully vested in the 401k employer contributions, but after that I would probably be ok to FIRE . . .   

albireo13

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #167 on: April 21, 2017, 02:07:27 PM »
OK, am 61 and I am planning on May 1, 2019.    This gives me time to pay off debt, dial down the lifestyle and get my things in order.
That plus, I wouldn't mind growing the stash a bit more.


If things get too nutty at work, I may pull the plug earlier.



Bateaux

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #168 on: April 21, 2017, 04:24:53 PM »
Looks to be about 770 days till June 1, 2019.  Going to take plenty of vacation time early in the year as well.
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PhilB

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #169 on: April 22, 2017, 11:28:59 AM »
799 days to go!
It feels like 2 years is going to be the big milestone, then at 1 year I open negotiations with the boss to see if they are interested in me doing a couple of days a week working from home, school terms only.  If they say no, I just give them 12 months notice then retire completely.  If they say yes then I'll try it for a few years while the kids are still in high school.  I hope this won't get me thrown out by the internet retirement police!

albireo13

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #170 on: April 26, 2017, 04:54:38 AM »
799 days to go!
It feels like 2 years is going to be the big milestone, then at 1 year I open negotiations with the boss to see if they are interested in me doing a couple of days a week working from home, school terms only.  If they say no, I just give them 12 months notice then retire completely.  If they say yes then I'll try it for a few years while the kids are still in high school.  I hope this won't get me thrown out by the internet retirement police!

Good point.   My current plan is to next year ask for partial work at home hours.   Even one day from home would help.  I commute 1 hr each way 5 days a week and these old bones just don't handle it as well as they used to.   If I am refused, I may just accelerate my retirement schedule.    : )



Itchyfeet

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #171 on: April 26, 2017, 12:02:32 PM »
With FIRE so close, I find the anticipation escalating higher and higher as each month end approaches to see what progress I have made in the past month.

How much did we save? How much did our investments return?

The last 3 months have been incredibly good to us. Our net worth increased by nearly 10% in only 3 months. The power of leverage, when returns are in your favour!!!!

 I rolled the dice by taking on a lot of debt and it has worked out great. However, I am certainly not blind to the risks, and now want to de-leverage ASAP.

Unfortunately, I fear April will see a bit of a correction to our real estate assets, which may mean our net worth will decrease over April despite good savings for the month, and some ok share market gains.

I won't know until around 3 May the property indexes for the cities I have places in, but I am eagerly waiting the info.

I am not sure how I will feel if our NW decreases at this point.

In some way I am finding comfort that if the heat comes out of our assets a little, even though I lose money on paper, maybe my FIRE will have a marginally higher chance of success as I will work a few extra months to offset any shortfall, and get to my number.

Bring on month end!! Show me what ya got!!!

MoMan

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #172 on: April 26, 2017, 08:01:30 PM »
Yes, I feel your anxiety. My investable assets are on the brink of the $1M mark after the incredible run up this past year. And I know that the markets are due for a correction of some sorts. I have to remind (convince?) myself that when it inevitably happens, regardless, my portfolio will eventually recover. But for the time being, I'm feeling a little smug ... especially because I ignored a financial advisor who told me my portfolio is pretty aggressive for my retirement goal.
"He is richest who is contented, for content is the wealth of nature."

EscapeVelocity2020

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #173 on: April 26, 2017, 08:42:14 PM »
Yes, I feel your anxiety. My investable assets are on the brink of the $1M mark after the incredible run up this past year. And I know that the markets are due for a correction of some sorts. I have to remind (convince?) myself that when it inevitably happens, regardless, my portfolio will eventually recover. But for the time being, I'm feeling a little smug ... especially because I ignored a financial advisor who told me my portfolio is pretty aggressive for my retirement goal.

I first crossed the million mark mid-2008.  I thought it was too good to be true and really just wanted everything to slow down, so I sold off heavily in my most risky assets.  Not long after, the markets began to plummet.  I ultimately lost 250k when the S&P hit 667, mostly because I bought back in after a 20% decline, then 30%, and then as much as I could although I was all-in.  I also continued to dollar cost average in since my job was secure and I was an expat with a little extra income.  That whole strategy, ultimately, worked out very nicely and I could've confidently retired with 80k/yr, 4% SWR at 37 (2011).  Maybe I should've started a blog :)  But international business travel and carefree FI isn't such a bad alternative.

I also wouldn't mind one more good downturn that I can buy into to while I'm still working, as opposed to going out only to find out shortly thereafter that I was buying high for the last several years...
Transitioning to FIRE'd albeit somewhat cautiously...

Itchyfeet

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #174 on: April 26, 2017, 09:19:59 PM »
I am an expat too, but jaded with work travel.

Looking forward to slow travel as opposed to flying into a country in the morning and flying back home on the red eye that same day/ night. Urgh!

Well done on the timing in 2008-9. I certainly wasn't a millionaire back then, so my losses and gains were small.

I am also working towards a fairly spendy retirement. I'll sleep better at night.

markbike528CBX

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #175 on: April 29, 2017, 12:18:57 AM »
Updated table


Most Righteous
Alias
Age at
FIRE
Target
Date
Date Confirmed


2Birds1StoneJan-19
zinnie35Feb-19
MissNancyPryor50Mar-19
Roboturner30Mar-19
Luck1241Apr-19
albireo1361May-1-19
Livingthedream5559May-19
cerat0n1aMay-19
dude54May-19
SamIAm3829May-19
oldtoyotaJun-19
Itchyfeet47Jun-19
PhilB53Jun-19
Bateaux50Jun-19
CryingInThePool44Jun-19
powersuitrecall47Jul-19
Enigma39Jul-19
Thedividebyzero45Jul-19
Trifele52Aug-19
RetirementDreamingSep-19
VoteCthulu39Oct-19
trix7643Oct-19
MoMan55Oct-19
markbike528CBX55Dec-19
HBFI38Dec-19
luckyme1345Dec-19
ParizadeTBD
madamwitty36TBD
Lowerbills40TBD
Chrissy42TBD
GerardTBD
getoutsoon52TBD
ysette938late-19TBD
elaine amj40TBD
IplawyerTBD
ChairmanTBD-SemiFire

Edit to add confirm date in case someone graduates early.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2017, 09:11:59 AM by markbike528CBX »

Bateaux

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #176 on: April 29, 2017, 08:41:50 AM »
Thank you for the update.
“Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.”
 ― Antoine de Saint-

Class of 2019

HBFI

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #177 on: April 29, 2017, 08:47:06 AM »
I'm not sure if I'm the only one feeling this way, but I feel like I'm more in cruise control of a marathon heading into the last couple miles.  Yes, I'm pretty over work and looking forward to the race being over, but there is also this calming recognition that it's almost complete.  In past years I've struggled more with the immense amount of time I felt like I had to go and how much more $$ I still needed.  Now I feel like I've shifted into the early part of a phase where I'm beginning to think about how to wrap things up.  My official date is Dec-19, but I'm strongly considering March or April 2019.  When I think that way, less than 2 years, it feels so close now.  I don't know why two years feels different to me, it just does.  I mean the stache is so padded at this point that very little could change that trajectory. 

Even if a huge crash happens soon I would see it more as a benefit as I could pour that final 2 years of income straight into equities.  But if the market keeps rising, I'm in the position now of allocating a substantial proportion of new cash flows to short-term bonds (VBIRX) as I've been 100% equities my entire investing life and want to have a few years income in liquid, lower volatility securities (I also plan to keep 1 year expenses in a money market).

At work yesterday one of the guys I work for was screaming at someone on the phone (totally unnecessary btw) and I could see the younger associates visibly uncomfortable.  I, on the other hand, was relaxed to the point of a zen-like state even after he walked into my office angrily ranting about the phone person and pounding on the wall.  In the past I probably would have felt uncomfortable as well.  One of the young associates remarked about how relaxed I looked through the whole thing and said that I was smiling.  I responded to him "eh, whatever man" and put my headphones back in.  It's an awesome feeling wearing this protective coating that comes from FI.  Fear of unemployment, company bankruptcy, unreasonable personalities, etc. is kind of removed from my equation at this point.  This mental shift has really just happened for me in the last couple months.  I'm rather enjoying it :)

Bateaux

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #178 on: April 29, 2017, 07:12:34 PM »
^^^Ditto HBFI.  It's kinda done already.  I'm trying to put away another 15%.  It's not required however and most of that will be done by investments.  So we could beat 2019 most likely.   That's really to keep our grown kids under our health care.
“Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.”
 ― Antoine de Saint-

Class of 2019

Itchyfeet

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #179 on: April 29, 2017, 09:41:55 PM »
^^^ 15% to go for us too. But I really want that 15% for the choices it will give us, so we will push hard until the end .

...... a further 5-10% Above that would be great too, but I am going to do my best to resist OMY in the expectation that we will pick up a little extra at some future point (social security, inheritance, casual work etc).

albireo13

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #180 on: April 30, 2017, 05:24:09 AM »
Hey, I just notice I'm the oldest guy on the list!
I'm working on FI but, won't make the RE part.   



Trifele

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #181 on: April 30, 2017, 06:04:09 AM »
Hey, I just notice I'm the oldest guy on the list!
I'm working on FI but, won't make the RE part.

I think you'll be RE Albireo.  Under 65 = earlier than 'normal'.  Plus you will be in a great place financially, which definitely cannot be said of all 'normal age' retirees. 

Keep on trucking, everyone!

Itchyfeet

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #182 on: May 01, 2017, 07:01:34 AM »
So April financial results are in.

Better than I feared.

 - Sydney property flat lined, but did not decline (yet).
 - Small increase on Brisbane property, getting it back in the black for the year.
 - Very decent return from share market investments.
 - Good savings again from salary and rental income.

This has all resulted in our stash now being 21.3x desired annual retirement budget, or a withdrawal rate of 4.7% if I stopped work today.

85.3% of the way to the finish line!!!

dude

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #183 on: May 01, 2017, 07:22:12 AM »
Updated table


Most Righteous
Alias
Age at
FIRE
Target
Date
Date Confirmed


2Birds1StoneJan-19
zinnie35Feb-19
MissNancyPryor50Mar-19
Roboturner30Mar-19
Luck1241Apr-19
albireo1361May-1-19
Livingthedream5559May-19
cerat0n1aMay-19
dude54May-19
SamIAm3829May-19
oldtoyotaJun-19
Itchyfeet47Jun-19
PhilB53Jun-19
Bateaux50Jun-19
CryingInThePool44Jun-19
powersuitrecall47Jul-19
Enigma39Jul-19
Thedividebyzero45Jul-19
Trifele52Aug-19
RetirementDreamingSep-19
VoteCthulu39Oct-19
trix7643Oct-19
MoMan55Oct-19
markbike528CBX55Dec-19
HBFI38Dec-19
luckyme1345Dec-19
ParizadeTBD
madamwitty36TBD
Lowerbills40TBD
Chrissy42TBD
GerardTBD
getoutsoon52TBD
ysette938late-19TBD
elaine amj40TBD
IplawyerTBD
ChairmanTBD-SemiFire

Edit to add confirm date in case someone graduates early.

Oh man, yep, there I am.  This coming Sunday, May 7, I will go under the 2-year mark and thus will be able to say I've got "one and change" to go. As I've stated in other parts of this forum, my FIRE plans are a little complicated by the fact that I'll retire 5-7 years before my wife as there's a 7-year difference in age between us, and she was very slow to get on the ball (back before we were married) and start saving. Currently, we've got $966k saved/invested, with a NW @ $1.5M. May 7, 2019 is the date I become eligible to start collecting my pension, and is the date I will officially go. I'll be able to cover my share of household expenses with pension + 401k withdrawals (@1.5% burn rate), but plan to work part-time at a hobby/passion job to supplement savings (probably into a Roth IRA). When the wife calls it quits, I'll have to bump up withdrawals to 3-4% until SS kicks in at 70, at which point we'll likely have more money than we'll know what to do with.

Each work day is becoming more and more of a grind. It's not hard or unpleasant or stressful, it's just that I have to be HERE and not somewhere else of my choosing every damn week day. I feel a bit like a prisoner, but with only two years to go to shed those golden handcuffs, I'll do my bid with all the grace I can muster. The last few years flew by so fast, I can't imagine these next two won't go by even faster.

MoMan

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #184 on: May 01, 2017, 11:59:14 AM »
Each work day is becoming more and more of a grind. It's not hard or unpleasant or stressful, it's just that I have to be HERE and not somewhere else of my choosing every damn week day. I feel a bit like a prisoner ...

Exactly how I feel. I'm kind of grateful that I didn't realize until a couple of years ago how attainable RE would be for me. Having more than 4 or 5 years to slog thru would just about do me in. Right now, it's 29 months and 1 week.

Not sure if I feel more like a prisoner or more like The Corporation is stealing beautiful days from my limited life. Either way, I resent it.

Well, time to get back to kicking that anvil through the swamp.
"He is richest who is contented, for content is the wealth of nature."

CryingInThePool

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #185 on: May 01, 2017, 12:22:21 PM »
I share the excitement about getting under the 2 year mark which for me is coming up in June.  I've heard there is relief in hitting/saying this is the last time I'll do X but maybe because it's closer I'm also fairly stoked to be hitting the 'I only have to do that once more stage'.  There's something about REing at the half year mark that gives me a little thrill around the idea that 2018 is the last full calendar year of employment. 

So from June on when I complete a seasonal deliverable I'll get to say I only have to do X or be around for Y once more! Because H2 2018 will be the last time since I won't be around for H2 2019.  A small victory that mentally feels bigger :)

powersuitrecall

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #186 on: May 02, 2017, 08:55:38 AM »
A brief history of us and our FIRE journey
==========================

Mr. PowerSuitRecall - 40s
Ms. Awesome - 30s
Kid 1 - 5yo
Kid 2 - 3yo

We started our FIRE journey in earnest in early 2014.  Our kids were 6 months and 2.5 years - our lives were busy!  We were about to renew our mortgage and had been throwing everything extra we had at it.  Our modest investment portfolio grew with the market but remained somewhat neglected.  Retirement seemed a distant thought. I assumed that we both would work another 15 years.  I hadn't worked out the numbers though, and in doing so I happened across MMM's site.  I quickly discovered that we could retire sooner.  Much sooner!  But it required action!

We moved our investments from our active commission-based FA to DIY/diverse/passive, started tracking expenses, stopped extra mortgage payments, and started piling money into our neglected investment accounts.  We started being more conscious of spending and held off on big expenses like cars and renovations.

Three years later our resolve towards FIRE has only strengthened.  We are on track for retirement in 2019 for myself, while Ms. Awesome follows in 1 or 2 years (she loves her job and is great at it).  As we hit the upcoming 2-years-to-go mark in July, we will make the final payments to both our mortgage and our youngest's daycare.  Our savings rate will then be in the 70% range.

I echo the sentiments of the last couple of posts regarding work.  I'm fortunate enough to have a pretty fun and low stress job that pays well.  Unfortunately at times it can be unbearably boring.  I Recently made a lateral move into a more exciting project, and it's given me a bit of a second wind.  Even still, while I don't dread work, I feel uncomfortable with the idea of being forced to sit here while I could be at home with the kids, or working my to-do list.

I'm looking forward to following everyone here through the next couple of years.  Thanks for your posts and inspiration.

Cornbread OMalley

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #187 on: May 04, 2017, 07:05:14 PM »
Most Righteous
Alias
Age at
FIRE
Target
Date
Date Confirmed


2Birds1StoneJan-19
zinnie35Feb-19
MissNancyPryor50Mar-19
Roboturner30Mar-19
Luck1241Apr-19
albireo1361May-1-19
Livingthedream5559May-19
cerat0n1aMay-19
dude54May-19
SamIAm3829May-19
oldtoyotaJun-19
Itchyfeet47Jun-19
PhilB53Jun-19
Bateaux50Jun-19
CryingInThePool44Jun-19
powersuitrecall47Jul-19
Enigma39Jul-19
Thedividebyzero45Jul-19
Trifele52Aug-19
RetirementDreamingSep-19
VoteCthulu39Oct-19
trix7643Oct-19
MoMan55Oct-19
markbike528CBX55Dec-19
HBFI38Dec-19
luckyme1345Dec-19
ParizadeTBD
madamwitty36TBD
Lowerbills40TBD
Chrissy42TBD
GerardTBD
getoutsoon52TBD
ysette938late-19TBD
elaine amj40TBD
IplawyerTBD
ChairmanTBD-SemiFire

Edit to add confirm date in case someone graduates early.
Looks like my kind of crowd!  I'm joining in!  Here's my info:  Cornbread OMalley/42/August 2019

zinnie

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #188 on: May 05, 2017, 05:29:54 PM »
Welcome, Cornbread!

This morning I was finally allowed to sell some stock options after a long blackout period, and bumped myself up into January 2019. It was also the first day back after a three-week vacation, and I had 381 unread emails, which just reinforced how ready I am to be on vacation full-time.

Just over 20 months left.

Cornbread OMalley

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #189 on: May 05, 2017, 08:21:47 PM »
Welcome, Cornbread!

This morning I was finally allowed to sell some stock options after a long blackout period, and bumped myself up into January 2019. It was also the first day back after a three-week vacation, and I had 381 unread emails, which just reinforced how ready I am to be on vacation full-time.

Just over 20 months left.
Thanks!  I hear you on that full-time vacation!  The last 24 months have seen me go through a transformation from learning about this FI stuff.  The education combined with a declining office environment has got my mindset similar to yours in regards to working.  The good news is the next two years will go by fast.

zinnie

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #190 on: May 08, 2017, 10:24:53 AM »
Welcome, Cornbread!

This morning I was finally allowed to sell some stock options after a long blackout period, and bumped myself up into January 2019. It was also the first day back after a three-week vacation, and I had 381 unread emails, which just reinforced how ready I am to be on vacation full-time.

Just over 20 months left.
Thanks!  I hear you on that full-time vacation!  The last 24 months have seen me go through a transformation from learning about this FI stuff.  The education combined with a declining office environment has got my mindset similar to yours in regards to working.  The good news is the next two years will go by fast.

I sure hope it goes by fast :)

VoteCthulu

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #191 on: May 08, 2017, 11:50:10 AM »
890 days... It feels very slow to me right now, but I know looking back it will seem fast.

On the plus side, I'm ahead of schedule for hitting my number. Unfortunately the high p/e and medical insurance changes may warrant raising my number a bit. We'll see how it goes.

Trifele

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #192 on: May 09, 2017, 05:05:28 AM »
814 days/520 work days

116 weeks/~104 work weeks

Feels like it is going so slowly . . . I have a challenging summer project that hopefully will take my mind off the FIRE clock.  At our house (just moved in last year) there is an old human-made pond with a rock streambed/waterfall combo above it.  It must have been very beautiful once, but it hasn't been used in years.   The kids and I are going to try to rehab it on the cheap.   Curious to see what we find living in the pond.  I know the tree frogs are using it to lay their eggs in the spring.  Hopefully once we rehab it and get the water flowing again the frogs will still be able to do that.   I'll have to dive deep (ha!) into the world of garden ponds and learn about it.  It will be quite a project.   

celticblue

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #193 on: May 09, 2017, 09:09:29 AM »
Mainly posting to follow.

But hoping that I am RE  by 5 November 2019. Am now just FI based on current lifestyle but have ambitions to change that lifestyle significantly and am planning the funding accordingly. Regardless of whether I achieve the lifestyle change I still want to have Nov 2019  as my cut off date.

Has anyone else noticed how quickly the stash grows towards the end? I can now grow it more in a year than I did in my first 10 years. That is very sobering and now I more completely understand OMY syndrome. I feel like I owe it my very hard working younger self. I look back at how much I sacrificed in the beginning. It kind of makes me sad. And endlessly grateful to my former self. Wish I could go back and give a hug.


Itchyfeet

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #194 on: May 09, 2017, 12:17:22 PM »
Yes, my NW chart looks exponential as well.

Contrary to the thinking in the Early Retirement blogosphere I am glad I didn't spend my 20s worrying about money when I had so little. I was being paid chicken feed compared to my 30s. In my 30s I started to have real money to worry about.

The backpacking, partying, study etc that I did in my early 20s was a far better use of my meagre funds for me, than it being invested somewhere given it was not much anyways..... but yes, it's true I am still working at 45 when others have already FIRED.  Good for them. I enjoyed my 20s.

Of course, I am equally glad I did not accumulate any consumer debt in my 20s, otherwise the outcome would have been very different.

I also have to thank my luck in my 20s, because I did make one investment early in my working career that was a big winner.

At 24 I got a job that came with a car, so I took the opportunity to sell my car and used the cash from the sale as a down payment on a cheap apartment as a rental investment.

I bought the apartment for $95K and sold it 3 years later for $180K. A great kick start to my savings.

(Note: not all luck given the fact that I had paid cash for my car originally and not borrowed, so obviously had saved a little money at some point early in my career between bar nights.)


Cornbread OMalley

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #195 on: May 09, 2017, 04:08:20 PM »
Has anyone else noticed how quickly the stash grows towards the end? I can now grow it more in a year than I did in my first 10 years. That is very sobering and now I more completely understand OMY syndrome. I feel like I owe it my very hard working younger self. I look back at how much I sacrificed in the beginning. It kind of makes me sad. And endlessly grateful to my former self. Wish I could go back and give a hug.

Yes, my NW chart looks exponential as well.

Contrary to the thinking in the Early Retirement blogosphere I am glad I didn't spend my 20s worrying about money when I had so little. I was being paid chicken feed compared to my 30s. In my 30s I started to have real money to worry about.
Same here.  The rate at which the stash now grows is astounding.  The amount that I invested while I was in my 20s was a pittance compared to how much I invest now.  But money I invested during my 20s is now doing all the work.  I definitely had the mindset of traditional retirement and had my fun up to age 36 when the idea of FIRE crept into my mind, became full blown at age 38, and changed how I thought about retirement.  Changed my life.

MoMan

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #196 on: May 10, 2017, 10:04:05 AM »
Yes, the growth rate recently has been astounding. Combine a good-sized 'stache with some big market days and it can grow $10k overnight!!

I too feel grateful about how I spent my time and money in my 20s and 30s. I graduated college with a small student loan balance (felt enormous at the time) and found a low-paying job at a nonprofit. That forced me to live cheap, but I was still having fun going camping and backpacking with friends. Fortunately, I maintained much of that frugal lifestyle so I could ramp up my savings to buy a house. I also took a job in the financial industry to get an education in personal finance. The whole thing has really paid off and I'm now pretty set for FIRE.
"He is richest who is contented, for content is the wealth of nature."

Cornbread OMalley

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #197 on: May 11, 2017, 09:41:51 AM »
My situation is a wee different.  I guess I should be cohort 2017, but I'm in the military and have a service obligation until 2019, which means I cannot truly add the 'RE' part to the 'FI' part until 2019.  Basically I just have to suck it up in the office environs for another two years before I'm done and free.  But it's not all bad as I have the advantage of taking my steady paycheck and over the next two years aggressively padding my stash.  And the big prize at 20 years of service is the annual pension of roughly $40K paid out for the rest of my life.

zinnie

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #198 on: May 11, 2017, 01:26:29 PM »
Yes, the growth rate recently has been astounding. Combine a good-sized 'stache with some big market days and it can grow $10k overnight!!

I too feel grateful about how I spent my time and money in my 20s and 30s. I graduated college with a small student loan balance (felt enormous at the time) and found a low-paying job at a nonprofit. That forced me to live cheap, but I was still having fun going camping and backpacking with friends. Fortunately, I maintained much of that frugal lifestyle so I could ramp up my savings to buy a house. I also took a job in the financial industry to get an education in personal finance. The whole thing has really paid off and I'm now pretty set for FIRE.

To your point, I don't even understand how I got so much in so little time. I've never tried to go through my records to try to figure it out but in 2010 I bought a house with a down payment that depleted the majority of my savings, and now I am somehow 20 months from my FI number.

I have a similar story to you. Always lived way below my means and always saved. At some point in my early working life I realized that I was really, really happy when I was in college and living off $13k-18k a year—so why should I need to increase my spending close to my income the way others did? At my first job I lived in the SF Bay area and made $14/hour. Some months I only saved $50 or $100, and I was only contributing the minimum to my 401K, but I was always able to save something.

My situation is a wee different.  I guess I should be cohort 2017, but I'm in the military and have a service obligation until 2019, which means I cannot truly add the 'RE' part to the 'FI' part until 2019.  Basically I just have to suck it up in the office environs for another two years before I'm done and free.  But it's not all bad as I have the advantage of taking my steady paycheck and over the next two years aggressively padding my stash.  And the big prize at 20 years of service is the annual pension of roughly $40K paid out for the rest of my life.

That's an amazing deal to wait for, though. And health benefits too, right? Congrats on being FI, anyway. And it’s not the worst thing that you’re forced into adding to the stash!

MoMan

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Re: 2019 fire cohort
« Reply #199 on: May 11, 2017, 03:26:28 PM »
Always lived way below my means and always saved.

Well, I wish I could say "always"! The truth is, about a dozen years ago I started telling myself, "I deserve this"; "I'm making $XX so I can afford it" etc. for my car, ski trips, tools, etc.  Then I had an epiphany while sitting in traffic in my Infinity SUV:

"Wait a minute. I'm really hating my job, and instead of making me happier, this $38,000 SUV is making me more miserable because now I have to stay at the job I hate to pay for this SUV. And even worse, the SUV doesn't solve one of the worst aspects of my job: sitting in 2 mph bumper-to-bumper traffic." Within the year I sold the SUV and bought a new (facepunch) Subaru Outback for about $23k (still driving it). Paid it off in3 years. In the meantime, I took a 25% paycut for a job that made me much happier (thanks FU money!!). And that, ironically, is when the 'stache really started to grow. That was around 2005-2008. I work in the financial industry, so fortunately I knew enough not to panic in 2009 but instead, keep on keeping on.

Discovering MMM was like discovering my own species! It has really helped me fine tune what I was already doing and adjust my perspective on spending and happiness.
"He is richest who is contented, for content is the wealth of nature."