Author Topic: 2018 FIRE cohort  (Read 376927 times)

PhilB

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2100 on: October 23, 2018, 07:04:00 AM »
It's getting real. Just over two weeks to go till I finish, I've had my last paycheck (though I'm owed the equivalent of another month's pay in lieu of annual leave I didn't have the opportunity to take), and I've put in my DB pension application. I don't plan to start drawing the pension until next April, when I'll be 55, but I don't want it to be delayed by any queries. It won't be a massive amount, but it will be enough to give me options, including the option of never doing any more paid work provided I don't mind a simple standard of living.

When people ask me what I'm going to do, I'm saying, "Nothing. I've never done nothing in my life and I want to know what it's like before I'm too old."
Dicey here, reporting from six years out that 54 was an awesome age to retire. Congratulations!
That sounds wonderful TT.  It's all feeling very real here too - all yesterday I was wandering around singing 'It's the final Thursday'.  Now I need to come up with a new song for today!

Emphasis is mine ... but sung to the tune of 'The Final Countdown' by Europe.
Correct.  Today I'm going with The Wild Rover:
And it's no, nay, never.
No, nay, never no more.
Will I work on a Friday.
No never, no more.
Tell me why - It's my last Monday
Tell me why - It's my last Monday
Tell me why - It's my last Monday
I'm gonna shoo-oo-oo-oo-oo-oot,
The whole day down.
Goodbye working Tuesdays
I have had enough of you
Tomorrow is my good news day
I'm not gonna miss you.

PhilB

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2101 on: October 24, 2018, 08:28:50 AM »
It's getting real. Just over two weeks to go till I finish, I've had my last paycheck (though I'm owed the equivalent of another month's pay in lieu of annual leave I didn't have the opportunity to take), and I've put in my DB pension application. I don't plan to start drawing the pension until next April, when I'll be 55, but I don't want it to be delayed by any queries. It won't be a massive amount, but it will be enough to give me options, including the option of never doing any more paid work provided I don't mind a simple standard of living.

When people ask me what I'm going to do, I'm saying, "Nothing. I've never done nothing in my life and I want to know what it's like before I'm too old."
Dicey here, reporting from six years out that 54 was an awesome age to retire. Congratulations!
That sounds wonderful TT.  It's all feeling very real here too - all yesterday I was wandering around singing 'It's the final Thursday'.  Now I need to come up with a new song for today!

Emphasis is mine ... but sung to the tune of 'The Final Countdown' by Europe.
Correct.  Today I'm going with The Wild Rover:
And it's no, nay, never.
No, nay, never no more.
Will I work on a Friday.
No never, no more.
Tell me why - It's my last Monday
Tell me why - It's my last Monday
Tell me why - It's my last Monday
I'm gonna shoo-oo-oo-oo-oo-oot,
The whole day down.
Goodbye working Tuesdays
I have had enough of you
Tomorrow is my good news day
I'm not gonna miss you.
And that's me done.  24 Oct confirmed please.  Good luck to all.

MaybeBabyMustache

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2102 on: October 24, 2018, 08:55:01 AM »
Woohoo, @PhilB ! How do you plan to celebrate? What comes next? Excited for you!

PhilB

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2103 on: October 24, 2018, 09:05:19 AM »
Woohoo, @PhilB ! How do you plan to celebrate? What comes next? Excited for you!
I'll probably have the lowest key FIRE celebration in history.  Mrs B is also FIREing today and has a retirement do at her work (1 hour commute) after which she will be stopping over with one of her work friends and coming home tomorrow morning.  I'm stuck home looking after the kids.  My works isn't doing anything for me until I finish my 1 day a week consulting gig sometime next year so I basically finish my day working from home, log off and feed the kids.  A drink or two may be consumed.
Next week we are off to South Wales for a week's holiday though.

SwissMiss

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2104 on: October 24, 2018, 10:30:20 AM »
Congrats PhilB and Mrs B! Well done! Wishing you a great time FIRIng and enjoy Wales! Hopefully the weather will be still be fine enough for hiking. And if not, you can always do it another time, that's the beauty of FIRE!

PhilB

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2105 on: October 24, 2018, 02:37:48 PM »
Woohoo, @PhilB ! How do you plan to celebrate? What comes next? Excited for you!
I'll probably have the lowest key FIRE celebration in history.  Mrs B is also FIREing today and has a retirement do at her work (1 hour commute) after which she will be stopping over with one of her work friends and coming home tomorrow morning.  I'm stuck home looking after the kids.  My works isn't doing anything for me until I finish my 1 day a week consulting gig sometime next year so I basically finish my day working from home, log off and feed the kids.  A drink or two may be consumed.
Next week we are off to South Wales for a week's holiday though.
As it turned out I had an excellent FIRE celebration.  The kids and I fired up the Wii Sing and we all had a brilliant time.  Now I remember why I'm retiring!

TartanTallulah

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2106 on: October 24, 2018, 02:46:48 PM »
It's getting real. Just over two weeks to go till I finish, I've had my last paycheck (though I'm owed the equivalent of another month's pay in lieu of annual leave I didn't have the opportunity to take), and I've put in my DB pension application. I don't plan to start drawing the pension until next April, when I'll be 55, but I don't want it to be delayed by any queries. It won't be a massive amount, but it will be enough to give me options, including the option of never doing any more paid work provided I don't mind a simple standard of living.

When people ask me what I'm going to do, I'm saying, "Nothing. I've never done nothing in my life and I want to know what it's like before I'm too old."
Dicey here, reporting from six years out that 54 was an awesome age to retire. Congratulations!
That sounds wonderful TT.  It's all feeling very real here too - all yesterday I was wandering around singing 'It's the final Thursday'.  Now I need to come up with a new song for today!

Emphasis is mine ... but sung to the tune of 'The Final Countdown' by Europe.
Correct.  Today I'm going with The Wild Rover:
And it's no, nay, never.
No, nay, never no more.
Will I work on a Friday.
No never, no more.
Tell me why - It's my last Monday
Tell me why - It's my last Monday
Tell me why - It's my last Monday
I'm gonna shoo-oo-oo-oo-oo-oot,
The whole day down.
Goodbye working Tuesdays
I have had enough of you
Tomorrow is my good news day
I'm not gonna miss you.
And that's me done.  24 Oct confirmed please.  Good luck to all.

Con-gra-tu-la-tions! And ce-le-bra-tions! How does it go again?
Enjoy the next phase of your life :-)

CowboyAndIndian

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2107 on: October 24, 2018, 03:32:23 PM »
Congratulations PhilB!

Fixed TartanTallulah's date to 11/2.

01/01/18  CowboyAndIndian (at 59) CONFIRMED
01/04/18  Gimesalot (at 33) CONFIRMED
01/06/18  Monkey Uncle (at 49) CONFIRMED
01/26/18  PizzaSteve (at 53) CONFIRMED
01/31/18  patches (at 33) CONFIRMED
01/31/18  Wintergreen78 CONFIRMED
01/31/18  MomCPA  CONFIRMED
02/01/18  DTaggart (at 40) CONFIRMED
02/05/18  Mrbeardedbigbucks CONFIRMED
02/09/18  JLTinVA (at 42) CONFIRMED
02/14/18  Gimesalot DH (at 40) CONFIRMED
02/28/18  Caoineag (at 36) CONFIRMED
03/01/18  Clean Shaven (at 45) CONFIRMED Part Time
03/02/18  brooklynguy (at 37) CONFIRMED
03/07/18  Aegishjalmur (at 35) CONFIRMED
03/16/18  Cherry Lane (at 43) CONFIRMED
03/27/18  Mrs. Honeyfill CONFIRMED
03/28/18  Target2018 CONFIRMED
03/28/18  homestead neohio (at 39) CONFIRMED
03/30/18  Moxie (at 58) CONFIRMED
03/31/18  msilenus (at 38) CONFIRMED
04/01/18  Mother Fussbudget (at 56) CONFIRMED
04/03/18  lostformars (at 38) CONFIRMED
04/04/18  OzBeach (at 54) CONFIRMED
04/20/18  moneytaichi CONFIRMED
04/25/18  Modernaimend DH (at 39) CONFIRMED
04/25/18  ZiziPB (at 50) CONFIRMED
04/26/18  NinetyFour (at 56) CONFIRMED
04/26/18  SwordGuy (at 60) CONFIRMED
04/27/18  poppydog and DW CONFIRMED
04/27/18  andkar (at 41) CONFIRMED
05/01/18  wordnerd and DH (at 30 and 36) CONFIRMED
05/03/18  Modernaimend (at 35) CONFIRMED
05/08/18  SwordGuy DW (SwordGuy isn't saying.   He wants to live.) CONFIRMED
05/11/18  Desert (at 52) CONFIRMED
05/25/18  CheapskateWife (at 42) and CheapskateHubs (at 49) CONFIRMED
05/25/18  Gyosho (at 55) CONFIRMED
06/01/18  CodeZed (at 40) CONFIRMED
06/01/18  Markbike528CBX (at 53.5) CONFIRMED
06/01/18  Will (at 53) CONFIRMED
06/08/18  SwissMister CONFIRMED (at 50)
06/13/18  Mr Mark (at 54) CONFIRMED
06/15/18  DavisGang90 (at 49) CONFIRMED
06/29/18  Acastus (at 56) CONFIRMED
06/29/18  aperture (at 56) CONFIRMED
06/30/18  HenryDavid CONFIRMED
07/06/18  Honeyfill  (at 60)  CONFIRMED
07/09/18  CHF (at 51) CONFIRMED
08/03/18  mjr (at 52) CONFIRMED
08/03/18  Mogadishu (at 40) CONFIRMED
08/09/18  cap396 (at 46) CONFIRMED
08/10/18  FernFree (at 49) CONFIRMED
08/17/18  sui generis (at 41) CONFIRMED
08/24/18  sol (at 41) CONFIRMED
08/31/18  RiverTop (at 55) CONFIRMED
09/01/18  Vegasgirl (at 49) CONFIRMED
09/28/18  Richmond2020 (at 43) CONFIRMED
09/30/18  SwissMiss (at 50) CONFIRMED
09/30/18  JerseyGrrrl (at 48) CONFIRMED
10/05/18  Jim2001 CONFIRMED
10/15/18  EnjoyIt  CONFIRMED Part Time.
10/24/18  PhilB (at 52)  CONFIRMED
10/31/18  Mr Griz CONFIRMED
10/??/18  Fire1018
10/??/18  Happy
10/31/18  Irishtache CONFIRMED
11/02/18  TartanTallulah
11/??/18  Kris
12/21/18  RunningWithScissors
12/31/18  DavidAnnArbor (at 53) (Won't renew my office lease)
12/??/18  yoda34

Date not confirmed
??/??/18  FLStache
??/??/18  MiserlyMiser
??/??/18  pecunia
??/??/18  Badblackgirl
??/??/18  PKate and DH
??/??/18  Calvin
??/??/18  step_away
??/??/18  Agent Rosenflower
??/??/18  dbtx
??/??/18  Omalley
??/??/18  AussieGirl
??/??/18  BackAndForth
??/??/18  cerat0n1a
??/??/18  Fresh Bread
??/??/18  SugarMountain In a holding pattern, debating between OMM/OMY.

MIA
??/??/18  randomgiraffe (Inactive since 2/2017)
??/??/18  Minnesota_mom (Inactive since 2/2017)
??/??/18  HappyMargo (Inactive since 6/2017)
??/??/18  NorCalistache (Inactive since 8/2017)
??/??/18  DeSteeg (Inactive since 12/2015)
??/??/18  Alim Nassor (Cannot find in members list)
??/??/18  SnidelyWhiplashStache (Cannot find in members list)
??/??/18  Sofa King (Cannot find in members list)
??/??/18  Michread (Cannot find in members list)

OMY/2MY/3MY etc.
03/19/19  ChasesFish  OMY
??/??/19  RetireAbroadAt35  05/??/18, now OMY.
??/??/19  JumboShrimp OMY
??/??/20  Gooki   2MY or 3MY
??/??/19  MaybeBabyMustache OMY
??/??/19  Blindsquirrel OMY
??/??/19  Ottawa OMY
??/??/19  LateStarter OMY
« Last Edit: October 25, 2018, 08:27:44 AM by CowboyAndIndian »

TartanTallulah

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2108 on: October 24, 2018, 04:05:32 PM »
I should change my ticker, because I'm not actually finishing till 2nd November and there's a big difference between seven days and nine days, especially when I'll be working all day on the extra two days.

A joint retirement "do" is being arranged for me and for the colleague who retired two months ago. I didn't want one. All I wanted was to be allowed to slip out quietly through the cat flap without a knife in my back. I'm not even sure that I'm retiring forever. But I'm not going to draw attention to myself by digging my heels in. I'll party wholeheartedly.

Four-and-a-half more days to work and then I'm done.

One member of staff is leaving a week after me, and another - a key member of the coal face team - asked me today if I'd give them a reference.

Mr Mark

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2109 on: October 25, 2018, 08:39:19 PM »
well hi there cohort!

I'm now about 3 months post FIRE. Finally got some time to visit on MMM forum. So figured I'd post a mini status report.

I'd have to say in general, FIRE is totally fucking awesome.

Pluses:
Walking our daughter to school every day (about 15 mins) with the dog.
Time to go to the gym for 90 mins a few times a week, mid morning, with the place essentially empty.
Time to meal plan and shop when the supermarket and other stores are relatively quiet.
Associated ability to cook (I love cooking) more complex and extended time dishes.
Having a coffee and reading a book at a local coffee spot in the time ordinary people are working.
Not worrying about bills. Everything so far is well within the budget, which is apparently ample.
Lots of time to do a gazillion maintenance tasks large and small in our obscenely large and non-MMM old house.
Time and increased patience to help kid with homework.
Cutting down trees and making firewood. Mowing my own lawn.
Losing belly weight and getting some cardio fitness improvements. Down 30 lbs so far.
Reading books.
Travelling.
Looking after kid full time while DW travels/works.
Not resenting the time spent at parent teacher group meetings.
Talking to friends and family. Spending time with friends when they drop by.
Plenty of time to keep on top of bills, portfolio, taxes, etc.
Weekends are a lot free-er. No rush to cram domestic chores into the time your kid is off school.
Learning and doing new things - last month I did some youtube research and replaced my car's spark plugs.

Negatives:
You've got to establish ways for you and your significant other to spend time apart. After many many years of being separated for about 9 hrs a day 5 days a week, being with each other 24/7 - while great to begin with - can be a little claustrophobic. You both need to establish independent lives/friends/activities.
Weirdly - less time to surf around online on a laptop. Have been on MMM forum about 2000% less than when I was supposedly super busy working...

I'm thinking there must be more negatives.... but can't come up with any. :-) I'm old enough that I don't get too much judgmental shit from people when they ask what you do and the answer is "well, I guess you could say I'm retired, now I'm a consultant..."

So congratulations to the names that keep being "confirmed". Its so heart warming to see other people successfully getting FIRE.

Time. The one thing you can't buy. It's hard to explain. I knew intellectually that that's what came with post-FIRE. "More time" - Sure. But after a lifetime of study and work... the reality is almost a religious experience.

OK. Gotta go. Things to do.








EnjoyIt

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2110 on: October 26, 2018, 07:12:08 AM »
@Mr Mark
Thanks for sharing. Please do come back and share again in a few months.

RunningWithScissors

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2111 on: October 26, 2018, 08:38:41 AM »
Great update Mr. Mark!

I'm drafting my resignation letter and will submit it at the end of next week. Still on track for FIRE on December 21, 2018.  Thirty-nine work days to go...!

sol

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2112 on: October 26, 2018, 10:05:55 AM »
Do you ever have a really great day?

Like a Friday where you wake up well rested two minutes before your alarm goes off, your morning coffee is just perfect, the weather is great and the house is clean and there's no traffic on the way to work and your coworkers all commend you?  A day where you just walk around thinking to yourself, "wow, this is pretty fucking awesome" and then feel super grateful for your life?

Since I retired I've been having that feeling at woefully inappropriate moments.  Like even when I'm tired and the house is a mess and I know I should probably be a little grumpy about things, I'm instead just been kind of serenely calm.  None of it bothers me anymore.  I never really understood how much of my stress in life was invisibly tied up with my 9-5 job.  Even when I actually liked that job and didn't think it was stressful, it still created obstacles and conflicts and problems that needed solving and I was unwittingly spending huge amounts of mental energy on it that I can now spend on my own life instead, and the result has been that my own life has sort of all fallen into place. 

I have time to reflect, and pursue a purpose beyond mere survival, and it feels great.  I used to read about MMM's enjoying drinking coffee on the deck on a Tuesday morning and think to myself, "yea, that sounds nice" but it didn't really click for me until after I retired that the coffee drinking on a Tuesday isn't the goal, it's just a symptom of the new lifestyle.  A life in which you get to choose how to spend each hour of each day, and only you are responsible for the consequences of those decisions, and I find that sort of autonomy almost exhilarating.  It gives me warm fuzzy feelings that I didn't know I was missing when someone else was telling me where to sit and what to do for 40+ hours per week.

So have a great day, people, and if you're still working then try to remember that every day can be great as soon as you're ready to pull the plug.  Having more money is nice, but you will never be able to spend it on anything as awesome as not having to earn more money.

PhilB

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2113 on: October 26, 2018, 10:10:09 AM »
Great post Sol, really makes me wish we hadn't timed our FIRE for 2 days before we go on holiday as I could really do without the stress associated with it!
« Last Edit: October 28, 2018, 02:09:19 AM by PhilB »

SwordGuy

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2114 on: October 26, 2018, 11:03:23 AM »
It's been about 6 months since we FIRED.   Maybe I should say "FIRD" since it wasn't particularly "early".

It's been great in a host of ways.

Our time is much more our own and that's been simply awesome.   

We've done very well except for health-related issues.   My wife and I were sick for much of May.   My teeth have needed a lot of work and that's blown the budget.   My wife fell and sprained her ankle so she's been on crutches and in a wheel chair.   And my daughter (who has Downs Syndrome) slipped on the stairs this weekend and broke her leg, so now she's on a wheelchair.   I'm getting a real workout helping her in and out of her wheelchair.   If my back survives this I'll be much stronger for it.

So, health issues have made much of the last six months suck.

I can only say, I can't imagine how truly horrible it would have been if we had to try to go to work or if we couldn't pay our bills because we weren't working.  That would have turned a bad situation into a horrific one.

Sometimes being FI means you can roll with life's punches and still end up standing afterwards.

So even if not all FIRE stories start off full of beaches and sunshine, they are still better than being stuck in the workplace.

My wife's ankle and my daughter's leg will heal, my back will stop aching, and we'll have more fun outings next year instead of this one.


On the plus side, I've been enjoying getting some rental properties fixed up.   I was really enjoying painting the outside of rental #4 last week.  The weather was great, the work was soothing and I could start or quit pretty much when I wanted.   I'll start back up on it next week now that things are settling into a routine with my daughter.

Aegishjalmur

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2115 on: October 26, 2018, 11:16:32 AM »
It's been about 6 months since we FIRED.   Maybe I should say "FIRD" since it wasn't particularly "early".

It's been great in a host of ways.

Our time is much more our own and that's been simply awesome.   

We've done very well except for health-related issues.   My wife and I were sick for much of May.   My teeth have needed a lot of work and that's blown the budget.   My wife fell and sprained her ankle so she's been on crutches and in a wheel chair.   And my daughter (who has Downs Syndrome) slipped on the stairs this weekend and broke her leg, so now she's on a wheelchair.   I'm getting a real workout helping her in and out of her wheelchair.   If my back survives this I'll be much stronger for it.

So, health issues have made much of the last six months suck.

I can only say, I can't imagine how truly horrible it would have been if we had to try to go to work or if we couldn't pay our bills because we weren't working.  That would have turned a bad situation into a horrific one.

Sometimes being FI means you can roll with life's punches and still end up standing afterwards.

So even if not all FIRE stories start off full of beaches and sunshine, they are still better than being stuck in the workplace.

My wife's ankle and my daughter's leg will heal, my back will stop aching, and we'll have more fun outings next year instead of this one.



Ouch, that is pretty rough. Just imagine trying to deal with the injuries/illness AND still be working. Yuck. It makes you appreciate being retired even more.

brooklynguy

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2116 on: October 26, 2018, 11:54:32 AM »
It gives me warm fuzzy feelings that I didn't know I was missing when someone else was telling me where to sit and what to do for 40+ hours per week.

Iíve spent the past couple of days no differently, in some respects, than in my working days:  holed up indoors, reading words on a page, sitting a few short blocks away from my old office (Iíve been coming to the main library in Manhattan to read a book available only at this branch and only for in-library use).  But Iím sitting here reading for pleasure, by my own autonomous choice, while my former colleagues remain chained to their desks by the invisible shackles of financial dependence.  The sense of freedom I now have, and tangibly feel every day, is priceless.  Youíre not alone in finding that retirement brings on a case of the warm fuzzies frequently and spontaneously.

PizzaSteve

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2117 on: October 26, 2018, 12:41:47 PM »
It gives me warm fuzzy feelings that I didn't know I was missing when someone else was telling me where to sit and what to do for 40+ hours per week.

Iíve spent the past couple of days no differently, in some respects, than in my working days:  holed up indoors, reading words on a page, sitting a few short blocks away from my old office (Iíve been coming to the main library in Manhattan to read a book available only at this branch and only for in-library use).  But Iím sitting here reading for pleasure, by my own autonomous choice, while my former colleagues remain chained to their desks by the invisible shackles of financial dependence.  The sense of freedom I now have, and tangibly feel every day, is priceless.  Youíre not alone in finding that retirement brings on a case of the warm fuzzies frequently and spontaneously.
Curiousity peaked...what are you reading?  My time is spent learning classical guitar these days.

brooklynguy

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2118 on: October 26, 2018, 04:46:30 PM »
Curiousity peaked...what are you reading?

Gone Bamboo, a novel by Anthony Bourdain.  About halfway through and seriously enjoying it so far.

Monkey Uncle

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2119 on: October 26, 2018, 05:37:04 PM »
I never really understood how much of my stress in life was invisibly tied up with my 9-5 job.  Even when I actually liked that job and didn't think it was stressful, it still created obstacles and conflicts and problems that needed solving and I was unwittingly spending huge amounts of mental energy on it that I can now spend on my own life instead, and the result has been that my own life has sort of all fallen into place. 

I had that same realization early on.  The relief manifested itself in an almost instantaneous improvement in my health.  Less back pain, better sleep, lost weight, and later on, lower blood pressure.  I never really connected those issues directly to the job, but after I left, it was abundantly clear just how much the stress was getting to me.

Monkey Uncle

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2120 on: October 26, 2018, 05:41:14 PM »
Curiousity peaked...what are you reading?

Gone Bamboo, a novel by Anthony Bourdain.  About halfway through and seriously enjoying it so far.

I think I've probably read more books this year than I did in the previous 30 years.  Today I started reading a college geology textbook.  As an ecologist by training, I've always known that the physical earth and the biosphere are intimately interrelated, but I've never had the opportunity to study geology formally.  Better late than never.  Nice to be able to do it for my own edification than to tick some qualification box on a job application.

MaybeBabyMustache

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2121 on: October 26, 2018, 06:20:28 PM »
Sending healthy thoughts to you & your family @SwordGuy .

For Sol & others. . . it sounds so very appealing! Home stretch!

happy

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2122 on: October 29, 2018, 05:22:31 AM »
OK I'm done. Off on 6months LSL....maybe forever.

CowboyAndIndian

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2123 on: October 29, 2018, 08:24:34 AM »
Congratulations Happy!

And we are down to the last 5.

01/01/18  CowboyAndIndian (at 59) CONFIRMED
01/04/18  Gimesalot (at 33) CONFIRMED
01/06/18  Monkey Uncle (at 49) CONFIRMED
01/26/18  PizzaSteve (at 53) CONFIRMED
01/31/18  patches (at 33) CONFIRMED
01/31/18  Wintergreen78 CONFIRMED
01/31/18  MomCPA  CONFIRMED
02/01/18  DTaggart (at 40) CONFIRMED
02/05/18  Mrbeardedbigbucks CONFIRMED
02/09/18  JLTinVA (at 42) CONFIRMED
02/14/18  Gimesalot DH (at 40) CONFIRMED
02/28/18  Caoineag (at 36) CONFIRMED
03/01/18  Clean Shaven (at 45) CONFIRMED Part Time
03/02/18  brooklynguy (at 37) CONFIRMED
03/07/18  Aegishjalmur (at 35) CONFIRMED
03/16/18  Cherry Lane (at 43) CONFIRMED
03/27/18  Mrs. Honeyfill CONFIRMED
03/28/18  Target2018 CONFIRMED
03/28/18  homestead neohio (at 39) CONFIRMED
03/30/18  Moxie (at 58) CONFIRMED
03/31/18  msilenus (at 38) CONFIRMED
04/01/18  Mother Fussbudget (at 56) CONFIRMED
04/03/18  lostformars (at 38) CONFIRMED
04/04/18  OzBeach (at 54) CONFIRMED
04/20/18  moneytaichi CONFIRMED
04/25/18  Modernaimend DH (at 39) CONFIRMED
04/25/18  ZiziPB (at 50) CONFIRMED
04/26/18  NinetyFour (at 56) CONFIRMED
04/26/18  SwordGuy (at 60) CONFIRMED
04/27/18  poppydog and DW CONFIRMED
04/27/18  andkar (at 41) CONFIRMED
05/01/18  wordnerd and DH (at 30 and 36) CONFIRMED
05/03/18  Modernaimend (at 35) CONFIRMED
05/08/18  SwordGuy DW (SwordGuy isn't saying.   He wants to live.) CONFIRMED
05/11/18  Desert (at 52) CONFIRMED
05/25/18  CheapskateWife (at 42) and CheapskateHubs (at 49) CONFIRMED
05/25/18  Gyosho (at 55) CONFIRMED
06/01/18  CodeZed (at 40) CONFIRMED
06/01/18  Markbike528CBX (at 53.5) CONFIRMED
06/01/18  Will (at 53) CONFIRMED
06/08/18  SwissMister CONFIRMED (at 50)
06/13/18  Mr Mark (at 54) CONFIRMED
06/15/18  DavisGang90 (at 49) CONFIRMED
06/29/18  Acastus (at 56) CONFIRMED
06/29/18  aperture (at 56) CONFIRMED
06/30/18  HenryDavid CONFIRMED
07/06/18  Honeyfill  (at 60)  CONFIRMED
07/09/18  CHF (at 51) CONFIRMED
08/03/18  mjr (at 52) CONFIRMED
08/03/18  Mogadishu (at 40) CONFIRMED
08/09/18  cap396 (at 46) CONFIRMED
08/10/18  FernFree (at 49) CONFIRMED
08/17/18  sui generis (at 41) CONFIRMED
08/24/18  sol (at 41) CONFIRMED
08/31/18  RiverTop (at 55) CONFIRMED
09/01/18  Vegasgirl (at 49) CONFIRMED
09/28/18  Richmond2020 (at 43) CONFIRMED
09/30/18  SwissMiss (at 50) CONFIRMED
09/30/18  JerseyGrrrl (at 48) CONFIRMED
10/05/18  Jim2001 CONFIRMED
10/15/18  EnjoyIt  CONFIRMED Part Time.
10/24/18  PhilB (at 52)  CONFIRMED
10/29/18  Happy CONFIRMED
10/31/18  Mr Griz CONFIRMED
10/31/18  Irishtache CONFIRMED
11/02/18  TartanTallulah
11/??/18  Kris
12/21/18  RunningWithScissors
12/31/18  DavidAnnArbor (at 53) (Won't renew my office lease)
12/??/18  yoda34

Date not confirmed
??/??/18  MiserlyMiser
??/??/18  pecunia
??/??/18  Badblackgirl
??/??/18  Calvin
??/??/18  step_away
??/??/18  Omalley
??/??/18  AussieGirl
??/??/18  BackAndForth
??/??/18  cerat0n1a
??/??/18  Fresh Bread
??/??/18  SugarMountain In a holding pattern, debating between OMM/OMY.

MIA
??/??/18  randomgiraffe (Inactive since 2/2017)
??/??/18  Minnesota_mom (Inactive since 2/2017)
??/??/18  HappyMargo (Inactive since 6/2017)
??/??/18  NorCalistache (Inactive since 8/2017)
??/??/18  DeSteeg (Inactive since 12/2015)
??/??/18  Fire1018 (Inactive since 9/2017)
??/??/18  Agent Rosenflower (Inactive since 2/2018)
??/??/18  FLStache (Inactive since 3/2018)
??/??/18  PKate and DH (Inactive since 5/2018)
??/??/18  dbtx (Inactive since 7/2018)
??/??/18  Alim Nassor (Cannot find in members list)
??/??/18  SnidelyWhiplashStache (Cannot find in members list)
??/??/18  Sofa King (Cannot find in members list)
??/??/18  Michread (Cannot find in members list)

OMY/2MY/3MY etc.
03/19/19  ChasesFish  OMY
??/??/19  RetireAbroadAt35  05/??/18, now OMY.
??/??/19  JumboShrimp OMY
??/??/20  Gooki   2MY or 3MY
??/??/19  MaybeBabyMustache OMY
??/??/19  Blindsquirrel OMY
??/??/19  Ottawa OMY
??/??/19  LateStarter OMY
« Last Edit: October 29, 2018, 08:44:26 AM by CowboyAndIndian »

CowboyAndIndian

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2124 on: October 29, 2018, 08:34:09 AM »
...
I think I've probably read more books this year than I did in the previous 30 years. 
...

Same here. Thanks to a great library system in my town, only a handful were ones I had to pay for ;-)

TartanTallulah

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2125 on: October 29, 2018, 03:46:42 PM »
Many thanks to all the FIREd for checking in to encourage those of us who are on the brink and to offer advice and insight.

Four more days, only three of them working days, and then I'll be done with commitment. I'll be side-gigging for a while, but very part time and on a no-strings basis. And if I hear of anyone taking bets on how long it will be before I'm back in work (for the best predictor of future behaviour is past behaviour, and I've never been out of work), I'll administer a resounding slap on the chops.

One longstanding and hardworking grassroots staff member has asked me for a reference. There are a couple of recent appointees I'm going to have a quiet word with. I won't come straight out and tell them I think they should move on, I'll just let them know that if the job turns out not to be what they'd hoped for they're welcome to put my name down as a referee.

I am SO ready to be done with the long working days.

frugalecon

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2126 on: October 29, 2018, 06:34:46 PM »
Do you ever have a really great day?

Like a Friday where you wake up well rested two minutes before your alarm goes off, your morning coffee is just perfect, the weather is great and the house is clean and there's no traffic on the way to work and your coworkers all commend you?  A day where you just walk around thinking to yourself, "wow, this is pretty fucking awesome" and then feel super grateful for your life?

Since I retired I've been having that feeling at woefully inappropriate moments.  Like even when I'm tired and the house is a mess and I know I should probably be a little grumpy about things, I'm instead just been kind of serenely calm.  None of it bothers me anymore.  I never really understood how much of my stress in life was invisibly tied up with my 9-5 job.  Even when I actually liked that job and didn't think it was stressful, it still created obstacles and conflicts and problems that needed solving and I was unwittingly spending huge amounts of mental energy on it that I can now spend on my own life instead, and the result has been that my own life has sort of all fallen into place. 

I have time to reflect, and pursue a purpose beyond mere survival, and it feels great.  I used to read about MMM's enjoying drinking coffee on the deck on a Tuesday morning and think to myself, "yea, that sounds nice" but it didn't really click for me until after I retired that the coffee drinking on a Tuesday isn't the goal, it's just a symptom of the new lifestyle.  A life in which you get to choose how to spend each hour of each day, and only you are responsible for the consequences of those decisions, and I find that sort of autonomy almost exhilarating.  It gives me warm fuzzy feelings that I didn't know I was missing when someone else was telling me where to sit and what to do for 40+ hours per week.

So have a great day, people, and if you're still working then try to remember that every day can be great as soon as you're ready to pull the plug.  Having more money is nice, but you will never be able to spend it on anything as awesome as not having to earn more money.

Thanks, @sol, for the great testimonial. It sounds like you are living the dream. I wonder if the memory of your last months has already faded to the point that they seem like a dream.

sol

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2127 on: October 29, 2018, 10:02:23 PM »
I wonder if the memory of your last months has already faded to the point that they seem like a dream.

Definitely not.  Just today I was internet-talking with someone from my old life, who suggested I might consider part-timing a little side gig action back in my former area of expertise, and I literally laughed out loud at the suggestion.  Why the fuck would I ruin my life like that?  I told him I'd rather punch myself in the balls for eight hours per day.

No, the memory of my last months is still vivid.  I can still mentally recreate the internal layout of buildings, the contents of my old desk drawers, and the pervasive feeling of dread whenever I contemplated doing the same thing for another twenty years. 

I have no regrets about retiring at age 41, but there's still a fresh wound from making the break.  It's like finally escaping a bad relationship.  I know I'm better off, but I definitely haven't forgotten what it was like.  I can still conjure up all of those old feelings, good and bad, every time I think about my old gig.  And then I celebrate in the explosive sense of relief I get by just mentally letting it all go, knowing I never have to return to any of it.  It just about gives me shivers, and then I smile so big I almost laugh.

EnjoyIt

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2128 on: October 30, 2018, 03:12:32 AM »
Many people on this thread retired right at the peak of this current market. Can anyone shed some light on how they feel sine the market receded recently and if anyone made any changes in spending during this time.  Maybe worthwhile talking about our AA (asset allocation) as well.

Our AA is 70/30. We were at 25x before the correction and now I assume a decent bit lower.  I have not calculated yet, but plan to tax loss harvest in a couple of days so should find out soon enough. In my mind I realize that historically a 4% withdrawal rate should easily tolerate a 10% correction, but it still does not change the feeling of concern behind it.

PhilB

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2129 on: October 30, 2018, 04:10:22 AM »
Many people on this thread retired right at the peak of this current market. Can anyone shed some light on how they feel sine the market receded recently and if anyone made any changes in spending during this time.  Maybe worthwhile talking about our AA (asset allocation) as well.

Our AA is 70/30. We were at 25x before the correction and now I assume a decent bit lower.  I have not calculated yet, but plan to tax loss harvest in a couple of days so should find out soon enough. In my mind I realize that historically a 4% withdrawal rate should easily tolerate a 10% correction, but it still does not change the feeling of concern behind it.
How do I feel about it?  "Typical."
Not making any changes to AA, probably less likely to make major expenditure until there's more clarity over Brexit and Trump's trade war, but otherwise steady as she goes.  Wishing I could bring myself to adopt a low information diet!

Monkey Uncle

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2130 on: October 30, 2018, 04:59:53 AM »
I wonder if the memory of your last months has already faded to the point that they seem like a dream.

Definitely not.  Just today I was internet-talking with someone from my old life, who suggested I might consider part-timing a little side gig action back in my former area of expertise, and I literally laughed out loud at the suggestion.  Why the fuck would I ruin my life like that?  I told him I'd rather punch myself in the balls for eight hours per day.

No, the memory of my last months is still vivid.  I can still mentally recreate the internal layout of buildings, the contents of my old desk drawers, and the pervasive feeling of dread whenever I contemplated doing the same thing for another twenty years. 

I have no regrets about retiring at age 41, but there's still a fresh wound from making the break.  It's like finally escaping a bad relationship.  I know I'm better off, but I definitely haven't forgotten what it was like.  I can still conjure up all of those old feelings, good and bad, every time I think about my old gig.  And then I celebrate in the explosive sense of relief I get by just mentally letting it all go, knowing I never have to return to any of it.  It just about gives me shivers, and then I smile so big I almost laugh.

Last night I had one of the very few dreams I've had about work since I left.  I was hanging out in the restroom with several former colleagues (both male and female, even though we were in the men's room - hey, it was a dream).  I don't really remember most of what we were talking about, but I remember that one of the toilets was clogged to the point of overflowing.  I told my colleagues that I was tired of always being the one who had to plunge the toilets, and that I wasn't going to do it any more.  So I just ignored it as it continued overflowing.  Wonder if that's a metaphor for something...

davisgang90

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2131 on: October 30, 2018, 05:00:12 AM »
Many people on this thread retired right at the peak of this current market. Can anyone shed some light on how they feel sine the market receded recently and if anyone made any changes in spending during this time.  Maybe worthwhile talking about our AA (asset allocation) as well.

Our AA is 70/30. We were at 25x before the correction and now I assume a decent bit lower.  I have not calculated yet, but plan to tax loss harvest in a couple of days so should find out soon enough. In my mind I realize that historically a 4% withdrawal rate should easily tolerate a 10% correction, but it still does not change the feeling of concern behind it.
Thanks to military pension and VA disability, I don't really need to touch investments. That being said, I've started a Traditional IRA to Roth pipeline of about 2.5% of my stache.  Gives us a little extra cushion and ensures the market fluctuations are not even mildly interesting.  I've also got the first 2 years of the Roth out of the market to minimize impact even more.

chasesfish

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2132 on: October 30, 2018, 05:21:26 AM »
Many people on this thread retired right at the peak of this current market. Can anyone shed some light on how they feel sine the market receded recently and if anyone made any changes in spending during this time.  Maybe worthwhile talking about our AA (asset allocation) as well.

Our AA is 70/30. We were at 25x before the correction and now I assume a decent bit lower.  I have not calculated yet, but plan to tax loss harvest in a couple of days so should find out soon enough. In my mind I realize that historically a 4% withdrawal rate should easily tolerate a 10% correction, but it still does not change the feeling of concern behind it.

I'm still a few months out but picked out my asset allocation almost two years ago to help reduce volatility going into early retirement.  I trailed the market pretty badly in 2017 but have made up some of that ground and not dealing with the same level of pain in this drop.   The academics would call it a "lower beta" portfolio, I just call it accepting lower returns for lower volatility early on.

I am 60% index funds, all the favorites on this site.  The other 40% I mix between cash, REITs, and a basket of "lower risk" individual stocks   The latter of having some individual stocks isn't for everyone, I analyze private company's financial statements in my day job and choose to own companies that should perform like bonds.  Lots of equity, minimal debt, and pay their shareholders their earnings in dividends.

I found it tougher to stick to this allocation last year when I earned 13% and the market did 21%.  Drops like Jan/Feb and this one make me appreciate the capital protection it provides.

tooqk4u22

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2133 on: October 30, 2018, 09:02:17 AM »
Many people on this thread retired right at the peak of this current market. Can anyone shed some light on how they feel sine the market receded recently and if anyone made any changes in spending during this time.  Maybe worthwhile talking about our AA (asset allocation) as well.

Our AA is 70/30. We were at 25x before the correction and now I assume a decent bit lower.  I have not calculated yet, but plan to tax loss harvest in a couple of days so should find out soon enough. In my mind I realize that historically a 4% withdrawal rate should easily tolerate a 10% correction, but it still does not change the feeling of concern behind it.

With that AA and 10% you should be at 4.3%+/-. 

RunningWithScissors

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2134 on: October 30, 2018, 10:23:18 AM »
So far, the market downturn has been a bonus - a buying opportunity.  RunningBoy and I  timed the sale of our big house in September perfectly, paid off all debt with the proceeds (a HELOC on our retirement home, and a couple of small bills related to the house sale) and still had a good chunk to put into index funds and our cash stash. 

He's downshifted into part-time work while I'll be completely FIREd at the end of the year, so we don't anticipate needing to tap our stash for at least a couple of years.  With the big house and its bills gone, we're slowly adjusting to a much lower cost of living (almost half of what it was), so we have no concerns about the recent market adjustment. 

SugarMountain

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2135 on: October 30, 2018, 10:38:20 AM »
Many people on this thread retired right at the peak of this current market. Can anyone shed some light on how they feel sine the market receded recently and if anyone made any changes in spending during this time.  Maybe worthwhile talking about our AA (asset allocation) as well.

Our AA is 70/30. We were at 25x before the correction and now I assume a decent bit lower.  I have not calculated yet, but plan to tax loss harvest in a couple of days so should find out soon enough. In my mind I realize that historically a 4% withdrawal rate should easily tolerate a 10% correction, but it still does not change the feeling of concern behind it.

I haven't actually retired yet.  After I turned in my notice they countered with a change in role so I've been OMM'ing it and suspect I'll slide into 2019 depending on how this goes.  But, my original quit day was 9/14, the day before the market peak on the 17th.  Not sure how I'd have felt about it, as I have enough cash that I wouldn't touch my investments for at least a year if the market continues to correct. 

We're below 4% spending as well, but it would be closer now with our stache down about 6% since the peak.  So would I attempt to cut our baseline spending further if I retired today?  Interesting mental gymnastics. 

dude

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2136 on: October 30, 2018, 11:36:37 AM »
LOVE hearing from the posters above like sol, et al., talking about the immense freedom being FIRE'd provides. I realized recently I've inflated the lifestyle a tad this year on account of a raise I didn't really need, and when I looked at my expected FIRE income/spending compared to current income/spending, I was a little concerned. But then I really thought about it and realized that I'm a fucking wanker if I can't adapt to my FIRE income, since it's pretty fucking obscene as far as non-working incomes go (pension + 401k + eventual high-level SS), and reading the above-mentioned posts makes me realize that even if I have to tighten up spending a little bit, it's so fucking worth it. Thanks for the reminder. May 2019 . . .

Cycling Stache

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2137 on: October 30, 2018, 11:55:07 AM »
Do you ever have a really great day?

Like a Friday where you wake up well rested two minutes before your alarm goes off, your morning coffee is just perfect, the weather is great and the house is clean and there's no traffic on the way to work and your coworkers all commend you?  A day where you just walk around thinking to yourself, "wow, this is pretty fucking awesome" and then feel super grateful for your life?

Since I retired I've been having that feeling at woefully inappropriate moments.  Like even when I'm tired and the house is a mess and I know I should probably be a little grumpy about things, I'm instead just been kind of serenely calm.  None of it bothers me anymore.  I never really understood how much of my stress in life was invisibly tied up with my 9-5 job.  Even when I actually liked that job and didn't think it was stressful, it still created obstacles and conflicts and problems that needed solving and I was unwittingly spending huge amounts of mental energy on it that I can now spend on my own life instead, and the result has been that my own life has sort of all fallen into place. 

I have time to reflect, and pursue a purpose beyond mere survival, and it feels great.  I used to read about MMM's enjoying drinking coffee on the deck on a Tuesday morning and think to myself, "yea, that sounds nice" but it didn't really click for me until after I retired that the coffee drinking on a Tuesday isn't the goal, it's just a symptom of the new lifestyle.  A life in which you get to choose how to spend each hour of each day, and only you are responsible for the consequences of those decisions, and I find that sort of autonomy almost exhilarating.  It gives me warm fuzzy feelings that I didn't know I was missing when someone else was telling me where to sit and what to do for 40+ hours per week.

So have a great day, people, and if you're still working then try to remember that every day can be great as soon as you're ready to pull the plug.  Having more money is nice, but you will never be able to spend it on anything as awesome as not having to earn more money.

This is a quality post, and the feeling I'm hoping for FIRE.  I've been a little concerned that I'm retiring away from something, rather than to something, which is a common issue that's raised.  The fact is that I'm not that motivated, and never really have been, although I've accomplished some stuff at time in my life when it made sense to me to do so.  I keep waiting to find the "something" that I want to do, but really, I enjoy my daily routine outside of work, and the bigger issue is that my lack of interest/frustration in being at work is spilling over into my personal life, interactions with family, etc.  That's the part I don't like.  So when I think that I can keep doing this job without too much effort, keep pulling in good money just in case, the answer I believe is that it's costing me personally.  I'm also hopeful that without feeling like there's anything I have to do, it might free up to find the things that interest me knowing that I'm not required to do them.

Thanks for the post!

ozbeach

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2138 on: October 30, 2018, 08:43:58 PM »
Many people on this thread retired right at the peak of this current market. Can anyone shed some light on how they feel sine the market receded recently and if anyone made any changes in spending during this time.  Maybe worthwhile talking about our AA (asset allocation) as well.

Our AA is 70/30. We were at 25x before the correction and now I assume a decent bit lower.  I have not calculated yet, but plan to tax loss harvest in a couple of days so should find out soon enough. In my mind I realize that historically a 4% withdrawal rate should easily tolerate a 10% correction, but it still does not change the feeling of concern behind it.


I FIREd properly in April (had been on long service leave prior to that for 14 months). I have three stashes - savings, money in a LIC (essentialy oz market index) and my superannuation which I can't access till I am 60.


If I continue for the next six years on a 2% WR (which is more than I have been living on for the last five or so years while accumulating) I can survive on savings without touching the sharemarket funds and then have access to my superannuation. If I want to go more fat FIRE and spend closer to 4% WR I can spend down the savings faster and draw down on the sharemarket funds prior to reaching 60.


To answer your question, I have been trying to not pay too much attention and am not stressing. I update my NW monthly so will do so tomorrow and expect that it will drop noticeably. It was nice that in the first six months of FIRE my NW kept increasing while I was drawing down, but never realistic to expect that would continue.


If, in five years time, the market has dropped precipitously and my stash requires a 5 or 10% WR, then I will start worrying.

sol

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2139 on: October 30, 2018, 09:01:55 PM »
If, in five years time, the market has dropped precipitously and my stash requires a 5 or 10% WR, then I will start worrying.

I think most people don't appreciate this option.  If the market truly crashes catastrophically, like 50% or more, and your WR correspondingly rises to 10%, you still have 10 years of income saved up.  That's ten years you have to formulate a new plan, while waiting to see if the market recovers or stays at zero percent returns.  Ten years to figure out how to reduce your spending, or or earn some side income.  Can you put together a plan in ten years?  With that kind of time, I'm pretty sure I could train for an entirely new career and still come out okay at the end.

Most of the time we're telling people to have a six month emergency fund on hand, but an early retiree has a 25 year emergency fund on hand and even after a 50% drop would have ten years or more.  You almost can't lose.

The person who has saved up 25x expenses is in such an incredible position of strength that it just baffles me how many of them are afraid to actually leave their jobs.  You've won the game!  Stop playing, and go live your life instead!  Even in the worse case scenario of being 100% stocks during the worst market crash ever, you're still safe for years and years and years. 

And the skills that got you to 25x will get you back there again, because your real achievement isn't the savings it's the mindset and the skillset that got you to 25x in the first place.  You could recreate all of that, if you had to, and this time you've got a 10 year head start.

TartanTallulah

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2140 on: October 31, 2018, 02:00:24 AM »
I wonder if the memory of your last months has already faded to the point that they seem like a dream.

Definitely not.  Just today I was internet-talking with someone from my old life, who suggested I might consider part-timing a little side gig action back in my former area of expertise, and I literally laughed out loud at the suggestion.  Why the fuck would I ruin my life like that?  I told him I'd rather punch myself in the balls for eight hours per day.

No, the memory of my last months is still vivid.  I can still mentally recreate the internal layout of buildings, the contents of my old desk drawers, and the pervasive feeling of dread whenever I contemplated doing the same thing for another twenty years. 

I have no regrets about retiring at age 41, but there's still a fresh wound from making the break.  It's like finally escaping a bad relationship.  I know I'm better off, but I definitely haven't forgotten what it was like.  I can still conjure up all of those old feelings, good and bad, every time I think about my old gig.  And then I celebrate in the explosive sense of relief I get by just mentally letting it all go, knowing I never have to return to any of it.  It just about gives me shivers, and then I smile so big I almost laugh.

In the last two weeks, many people, including my husband, have said to me, "THAT'S come round quickly." Maybe it looks that way from the outside, but it SO hasn't. I've felt every minute of every long working day and every ounce of hostility from those who have been inconvenienced by my decision and every tedious box-ticking task and every stifling hour spent indoors during a glorious heatwave, and it feels as if forever has gone by since I handed in my notice in July. It doesn't take much to ping me back emotionally to the "trapped" feelings. In case I need reminding after I've gone, I have them recorded, popcorn-fashion, in a private diary.

Today is the last day of my notice period. My last actual working day is Friday and it's mitigated by neither of the colleagues I'm leaving behind being in work that day. My room is nearly empty of my belongings. I have just the right amount of side gig work booked for November. All is well.

dude

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2141 on: October 31, 2018, 08:46:01 AM »
If, in five years time, the market has dropped precipitously and my stash requires a 5 or 10% WR, then I will start worrying.

I think most people don't appreciate this option.  If the market truly crashes catastrophically, like 50% or more, and your WR correspondingly rises to 10%, you still have 10 years of income saved up.  That's ten years you have to formulate a new plan, while waiting to see if the market recovers or stays at zero percent returns.  Ten years to figure out how to reduce your spending, or or earn some side income.  Can you put together a plan in ten years?  With that kind of time, I'm pretty sure I could train for an entirely new career and still come out okay at the end.

Most of the time we're telling people to have a six month emergency fund on hand, but an early retiree has a 25 year emergency fund on hand and even after a 50% drop would have ten years or more.  You almost can't lose.

The person who has saved up 25x expenses is in such an incredible position of strength that it just baffles me how many of them are afraid to actually leave their jobs.  You've won the game!  Stop playing, and go live your life instead!  Even in the worse case scenario of being 100% stocks during the worst market crash ever, you're still safe for years and years and years. 

And the skills that got you to 25x will get you back there again, because your real achievement isn't the savings it's the mindset and the skillset that got you to 25x in the first place.  You could recreate all of that, if you had to, and this time you've got a 10 year head start.

And yet, even with a pension that will adequately cover all essential expenses, I'm reluctant/scared to take a 4% withdrawal! Fortunately, I don't have to (and frankly, if I did, I'd have more disposable income in retirement than I did while working), because a 1.5%-2% withdrawal should allow me to maintain my pre-retirement level of disposable income. And again, I'm even reluctant to take that! I guess it's that psychological barrier to switching from saver to spender mode.

chasesfish

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2142 on: October 31, 2018, 10:11:14 AM »
Do you ever have a really great day?

Like a Friday where you wake up well rested two minutes before your alarm goes off, your morning coffee is just perfect, the weather is great and the house is clean and there's no traffic on the way to work and your coworkers all commend you?  A day where you just walk around thinking to yourself, "wow, this is pretty fucking awesome" and then feel super grateful for your life?

Since I retired I've been having that feeling at woefully inappropriate moments.  Like even when I'm tired and the house is a mess and I know I should probably be a little grumpy about things, I'm instead just been kind of serenely calm.  None of it bothers me anymore.  I never really understood how much of my stress in life was invisibly tied up with my 9-5 job.  Even when I actually liked that job and didn't think it was stressful, it still created obstacles and conflicts and problems that needed solving and I was unwittingly spending huge amounts of mental energy on it that I can now spend on my own life instead, and the result has been that my own life has sort of all fallen into place. 

I have time to reflect, and pursue a purpose beyond mere survival, and it feels great.  I used to read about MMM's enjoying drinking coffee on the deck on a Tuesday morning and think to myself, "yea, that sounds nice" but it didn't really click for me until after I retired that the coffee drinking on a Tuesday isn't the goal, it's just a symptom of the new lifestyle.  A life in which you get to choose how to spend each hour of each day, and only you are responsible for the consequences of those decisions, and I find that sort of autonomy almost exhilarating.  It gives me warm fuzzy feelings that I didn't know I was missing when someone else was telling me where to sit and what to do for 40+ hours per week.

So have a great day, people, and if you're still working then try to remember that every day can be great as soon as you're ready to pull the plug.  Having more money is nice, but you will never be able to spend it on anything as awesome as not having to earn more money.

I needed to quote this again - amazing post, especially since I've followed Sol posting since 2013

sol

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2143 on: October 31, 2018, 11:49:36 AM »
especially since I've followed Sol posting since 2013

It turns out this whole FIRE thing actually works.  Invest 50% or more of your income, control your expenses, plug away diligently through a decade of great market returns, and Bob's your uncle you get to retire.  Who knew?

PhilB

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2144 on: October 31, 2018, 12:14:11 PM »
I wonder if the memory of your last months has already faded to the point that they seem like a dream.

Definitely not.  Just today I was internet-talking with someone from my old life, who suggested I might consider part-timing a little side gig action back in my former area of expertise, and I literally laughed out loud at the suggestion.  Why the fuck would I ruin my life like that?  I told him I'd rather punch myself in the balls for eight hours per day.

No, the memory of my last months is still vivid.  I can still mentally recreate the internal layout of buildings, the contents of my old desk drawers, and the pervasive feeling of dread whenever I contemplated doing the same thing for another twenty years. 

I have no regrets about retiring at age 41, but there's still a fresh wound from making the break.  It's like finally escaping a bad relationship.  I know I'm better off, but I definitely haven't forgotten what it was like.  I can still conjure up all of those old feelings, good and bad, every time I think about my old gig.  And then I celebrate in the explosive sense of relief I get by just mentally letting it all go, knowing I never have to return to any of it.  It just about gives me shivers, and then I smile so big I almost laugh.

In the last two weeks, many people, including my husband, have said to me, "THAT'S come round quickly." Maybe it looks that way from the outside, but it SO hasn't. I've felt every minute of every long working day and every ounce of hostility from those who have been inconvenienced by my decision and every tedious box-ticking task and every stifling hour spent indoors during a glorious heatwave, and it feels as if forever has gone by since I handed in my notice in July. It doesn't take much to ping me back emotionally to the "trapped" feelings. In case I need reminding after I've gone, I have them recorded, popcorn-fashion, in a private diary.

Today is the last day of my notice period. My last actual working day is Friday and it's mitigated by neither of the colleagues I'm leaving behind being in work that day. My room is nearly empty of my belongings. I have just the right amount of side gig work booked for November. All is well.
Sorry you've had such an awful time with your coworkers TT.  Nearly there.  I'm sure that you will rise above it all and not be tempted into any petty acts of revenge - such as unscrewing the back of someone's printer or computer and inserting a raw prawn - but that doesn't stop you from having fun imaging it!

TartanTallulah

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2145 on: October 31, 2018, 03:52:44 PM »
I wonder if the memory of your last months has already faded to the point that they seem like a dream.

Definitely not.  Just today I was internet-talking with someone from my old life, who suggested I might consider part-timing a little side gig action back in my former area of expertise, and I literally laughed out loud at the suggestion.  Why the fuck would I ruin my life like that?  I told him I'd rather punch myself in the balls for eight hours per day.

No, the memory of my last months is still vivid.  I can still mentally recreate the internal layout of buildings, the contents of my old desk drawers, and the pervasive feeling of dread whenever I contemplated doing the same thing for another twenty years. 

I have no regrets about retiring at age 41, but there's still a fresh wound from making the break.  It's like finally escaping a bad relationship.  I know I'm better off, but I definitely haven't forgotten what it was like.  I can still conjure up all of those old feelings, good and bad, every time I think about my old gig.  And then I celebrate in the explosive sense of relief I get by just mentally letting it all go, knowing I never have to return to any of it.  It just about gives me shivers, and then I smile so big I almost laugh.

In the last two weeks, many people, including my husband, have said to me, "THAT'S come round quickly." Maybe it looks that way from the outside, but it SO hasn't. I've felt every minute of every long working day and every ounce of hostility from those who have been inconvenienced by my decision and every tedious box-ticking task and every stifling hour spent indoors during a glorious heatwave, and it feels as if forever has gone by since I handed in my notice in July. It doesn't take much to ping me back emotionally to the "trapped" feelings. In case I need reminding after I've gone, I have them recorded, popcorn-fashion, in a private diary.

Today is the last day of my notice period. My last actual working day is Friday and it's mitigated by neither of the colleagues I'm leaving behind being in work that day. My room is nearly empty of my belongings. I have just the right amount of side gig work booked for November. All is well.
Sorry you've had such an awful time with your coworkers TT.  Nearly there.  I'm sure that you will rise above it all and not be tempted into any petty acts of revenge - such as unscrewing the back of someone's printer or computer and inserting a raw prawn - but that doesn't stop you from having fun imaging it!

Oh, you are BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAD! I was only thinking of popping in over the weekend on the pretext of tidying up some loose ends and turning my soon-to-be-ex-coworkers' computer screens sideways or setting their keyboards to Cyrillic (I'd bet on neither of them knowing how to put it right). The prawn trick had never occurred to me.

I shall stride out on the moral high ground, leaving nothing in my wake apart from sufficient biscuits and chocolate to keep the staff sweet until the Christmas confectionery starts pouring in.

Irishtache

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2146 on: October 31, 2018, 06:00:01 PM »
Update: reached my anniversary of 40 yrs service today. Two more days tidying up in the office and out Friday evening. I start my freelance gig next week. Although I am retiring early, l haven't built up much of a stache as l have an occupational pension but all good.

Best wishes and regards to all in the 2018 cohort! Let's roll!
Irishtache.

TartanTallulah

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2147 on: November 01, 2018, 04:19:56 PM »
Update: reached my anniversary of 40 yrs service today. Two more days tidying up in the office and out Friday evening. I start my freelance gig next week. Although I am retiring early, l haven't built up much of a stache as l have an occupational pension but all good.

Best wishes and regards to all in the 2018 cohort! Let's roll!
Irishtache.

YAY! My FIRE-and-freelancing twin!

I don't expect clearing my office to take more than an hour. In seven and a half years, I didn't move in any personal stuff apart from consumables, a set of spare clothing, and some pictures that management disposed of prior to the last CQC visit because they weren't laminated.

One more day. Just one more day :-)

Irishtache

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2148 on: November 01, 2018, 04:46:34 PM »
Update: reached my anniversary of 40 yrs service today. Two more days tidying up in the office and out Friday evening. I start my freelance gig next week. Although I am retiring early, l haven't built up much of a stache as l have an occupational pension but all good.

Best wishes and regards to all in the 2018 cohort! Let's roll!
Irishtache.

YAY! My FIRE-and-freelancing twin!

I don't expect clearing my office to take more than an hour. In seven and a half years, I didn't move in any personal stuff apart from consumables, a set of spare clothing, and some pictures that management disposed of prior to the last CQC visit because they weren't laminated.

One more day. Just one more day :-)

Unfortunately, l filled my office with personal stuff, tax returns, health insurance claims etc going back 15 years! Best of luck, hen!

cerat0n1a

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Re: 2018 FIRE cohort
« Reply #2149 on: November 02, 2018, 05:16:26 AM »
Just realised I owe this thread an update. I'd originally brought my end date forward from May 2019 to May 2018. For various reasons (mainly the fact that I needed to drive to my old office every day to take my son to work over the summer), I pushed out my end date to October 5th (which also triggered a small retention bonus.) It's more of a petering out than a hard stop, because I'll do 3 days work this month and 1 in December.