Author Topic: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020  (Read 24898 times)

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #450 on: May 21, 2020, 05:49:11 AM »
Does anyone here dig and bury veg scraps to compost?  I’m looking for a super simple way to compost waste.

@Trudie, yes my dad did it this way sometimes.  He would dig a shallow trench where he planned to plant the following spring, and bury the raw compost.  For this to work you have to  be able to wait awhile (maybe 3-6 months) because it's risky to plant on top of raw compost that hasn't broken down enough yet.  Might make the plants unhappy or worse.

I do this. It breaks down in a couple weeks here (the worms really go to town), and it makes beautiful rich soil.

I did it with my first ever raised bed this spring - put down cardboard over my regular soil (in this part of the garden it is actually semi-decent soil) then added some garden soil maybe five inches, then spread compost which had been in my new, first ever compost bin.
... - aka just a big old pot that I used for veggie scraps, coffee grounds, egg shells and weed free clippings.
Every few days I'd add a layer of leaves from the garden, sometimes even sprinkle in a bit of leftover potting soil, tried to remember to keep it moist and turned:).
It never stank (I suspect the leave layers helped with that).
Anyway - I added about three more inches of garden soil and voila well composted raised bed.

It was a hit with everything I planted there.
I am about to repeat that process in another section of my garden since it worked so well.

PS -
1. I also threw some four-week-old compost on the ground in a (at that time) shaded area and just topped it off with a layer of leaves. I wasn't sure whether this might be a bad idea and attract rats, but since it was mostly in the back forty:) I went ahead with it and just made sure it stayed moist for a while longer.
Some critters did root around there but it wasn't a big nuisance since I didn't plant anything right away - I just wanted to improve the soil for planting later, may have been birds looking for worms too.
2. Added some four-week-old compost at the bottom of a plant hole for a tomato that self-seeded itself in said compost area - it took the move and only semi-composted "fertilizer" in stride and is now producing well - waiting for them to turn red any day now.

We have a large composting bin, full of veggy scraps and worms. The worms have multiplied to great numbers. The compos5 is breaking down. But last time, it hadn't turned to earth yet. Then we mixed it with purchased earth, which becomes a nice, rich soil.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #451 on: May 22, 2020, 10:51:11 AM »
It has been so nice here.  I have started hardening off a number of the trays of seedlings.  Some of them are for the community pantry garden and some are for me. 

Squash and cukes and zukes are coming along.  There is a huge variation in the number of days germination takes. 

I harvested asparagus, kales, green onion, lettuce and rhubarb.

Off the Wheel

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #452 on: May 22, 2020, 03:33:42 PM »
Does anyone have any idea what's wrong with my cucumber and solutions for saving them? I google and all I find is powdery mildew, but it doesn't look like that IMO. I first noticed it on a couple leaves when they were still seedlings, but I was hoping being in the ground for a few days would help. It has not.


MudPuppy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #453 on: May 22, 2020, 04:23:14 PM »
Looks a big like sunburn

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #454 on: May 23, 2020, 04:16:39 AM »
I have given up direct sowing pumpkins and squash and now germinate test them on a wet paper towel in a zip lock on the heat mat.  The variation in germination is astonishing.

I do this for tomatoes (in the oven with the light on for warmth) and it is so efficient.  I hadn't thought of it for cucurbits, I thought they don't like transplanting.  Do you sow them directly in the garden once a root is showing?  I have only a few seeds left for some varieties I really like, and want good germination.

Thanks, this trick worked for my zucchini seed. After one day, it had a 1 cm long sprout.
Than I placed it in a big pot, but put the pit on the heat mat. It looks like the sprout has grow and has started to stick up.
The other seeds that I tried didn't function at all.

Raenia

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #455 on: May 23, 2020, 07:12:52 AM »
I thinned my chard and beet seedlings yesterday - doubled as my first harvest!  Almost a third of a pound of greens between them.  I whipped up a red wine vinaigrette and we had a big salad for dinner.

FireAnt

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #456 on: May 23, 2020, 08:04:02 AM »
Need some input! I split this basil last week, and they look really sad to be apart from each other. I left them in my 3 season porch because Michigan weather has been a bit up and down. I put it outside 2 days ago as the weather is more consistent and warm. Still droopy. Are they salvageable? Is it a good idea to plant them in my garden bed?

MudPuppy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #457 on: May 23, 2020, 08:38:28 AM »
I wonder if they’re too chilly?

FireAnt

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #458 on: May 23, 2020, 08:49:06 AM »
That's what I initially thought, but they should have been fine in my 3 season porch. It's been in the 70's here since I put them outside.

MudPuppy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #459 on: May 23, 2020, 09:04:49 AM »
Thirsty? They do look sad to be apart.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #460 on: May 23, 2020, 09:54:40 AM »
Fireant, I would try to salvage them by cutting them, leaving a long stem and cutting off some leaves where new roots will grow and place in water. I just rerooted some myself and just replanted in potting mix. Look on youtube for a tutorial, that's what I did. My plants were from the grocery store and I cut some off to get more plantings.

horsepoor

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #461 on: May 23, 2020, 10:21:01 AM »
Argh.  38F last night, it's been cold and rainy.  I have the ONE work trip in eons scheduled for next week, and temps are supposed to be up to 99 when I get back on Friday.  I guess I'll plant out the rest of my seedlings this weekend and just water the heck out of them before I leave and hope for the best.  They'll be in several different areas, so I can't just set up shade cloth over them.

FireAnt

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #462 on: May 23, 2020, 04:11:51 PM »
Fireant, I would try to salvage them by cutting them, leaving a long stem and cutting off some leaves where new roots will grow and place in water. I just rerooted some myself and just replanted in potting mix. Look on youtube for a tutorial, that's what I did. My plants were from the grocery store and I cut some off to get more plantings.

I am going to have to look this up because I can't envision what you're saying. I'll look it up on YouTube. Thanks!

Thirsty? They do look sad to be apart.

I don't think so. I've been watering it every other day.

Dee_

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #463 on: May 23, 2020, 07:15:09 PM »
@FireAnt I'd move them out of the heat, put them somewhere where they'll get light but not heat. A bright window inside or under some shade outside. When you split them they lost a lot of root mass, so they're struggling to support the leaf canopy and can't utilize the light and heat you're giving them. They'll look sad until they rebuild root mass again, which is invisible work. Once they perk up a little move them back into full sun.

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #464 on: May 24, 2020, 03:40:34 AM »
@FireAnt I'd move them out of the heat, put them somewhere where they'll get light but not heat. A bright window inside or under some shade outside. When you split them they lost a lot of root mass, so they're struggling to support the leaf canopy and can't utilize the light and heat you're giving them. They'll look sad until they rebuild root mass again, which is invisible work. Once they perk up a little move them back into full sun.

+1.  This happened to me when I dug up and potted an elderberry sucker (baby plant) recently.  It drooped alarmingly and it looked like it was going to die.  I put it in a mostly shade location and watered it gently, and now three weeks later it is finally turning the corner.  It just needed time to grow roots. 

@FireAnt, I would try to move them somewhere out of full sun and heat for a while and water them, try to nurse them through it.

Roadrunner53

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #465 on: May 24, 2020, 05:33:29 AM »
Fireant

Vid on rooting basil:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VyLuuE7XpFk

FireAnt

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #466 on: May 24, 2020, 03:49:53 PM »
@FireAnt I'd move them out of the heat, put them somewhere where they'll get light but not heat. A bright window inside or under some shade outside. When you split them they lost a lot of root mass, so they're struggling to support the leaf canopy and can't utilize the light and heat you're giving them. They'll look sad until they rebuild root mass again, which is invisible work. Once they perk up a little move them back into full sun.

Thanks guys! I will try this. Crossing my fingers.

Dee_

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #467 on: May 25, 2020, 08:30:01 AM »
Anybody familiar with plant breeding, snow/snap peas specifically? I have a super early variety that I don't enjoy the taste of, and a more standard length that I like eating. The goal is an earlier, tasty landrace of some sort. I'll probably hand pollinate to mix genetics as much as possible for F1, but how do I select for earliness? If I let the plant finish maturing a pod it'll be done for the season right? Does taking early season fruit get me the same genetics as later season fruit?

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #468 on: May 25, 2020, 09:21:36 AM »
Anybody familiar with plant breeding, snow/snap peas specifically? I have a super early variety that I don't enjoy the taste of, and a more standard length that I like eating. The goal is an earlier, tasty landrace of some sort. I'll probably hand pollinate to mix genetics as much as possible for F1, but how do I select for earliness? If I let the plant finish maturing a pod it'll be done for the season right? Does taking early season fruit get me the same genetics as later season fruit?

Hey @Dee_  -- check out this paper, which looked at the genetics/heritability of pea earliness:  https://www.researchgate.net/publication/292932596_Genetic_Analysis_For_Earliness_And_Yield_Traits_in_Garden_pea_Pisum_sativum_L.   This paper studied garden peas specifically, but you may find something useful for snows/snaps.

It looks like they measured "earliness" several different ways -- first flower, 50% flowering, and first harvest.  Interesting!  I assume they were working in a greenhouse (?), so it may be different working outside, with weather variations.  I would think the genes of the fruited legume will be the same (from the same plant) whether you pick it early from the plant or late, as long as the plant was mated the same way.   
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 09:26:11 AM by Trifele »

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #469 on: May 25, 2020, 11:47:46 AM »
I worked very hard on my garden all weekend.  We went from damned cold to brutal heat.  I have been struggling to get everything hardened off in time to plant out.  And some seedlings have gotten a little too big before I had the chance to get them out.  And it is really difficult to get them hardened off when the heat is unbelievable.  I think it is going to hit 30C today.  May 6th it got down to minus 6 overnight.  I need to walk over to the green house and water everything again - it is so hot the trays that are outside hardening off will be dried out again.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #470 on: May 25, 2020, 01:07:01 PM »
I worked very hard on my garden all weekend.  We went from damned cold to brutal heat.  I have been struggling to get everything hardened off in time to plant out.  And some seedlings have gotten a little too big before I had the chance to get them out.  And it is really difficult to get them hardened off when the heat is unbelievable.  I think it is going to hit 30C today.  May 6th it got down to minus 6 overnight.  I need to walk over to the green house and water everything again - it is so hot the trays that are outside hardening off will be dried out again.

When I went to Lowes for gardening equipment I also bought some herbs.  All the plants were drying out so fast, there was one employee doing nothing but watering, and he wasn't able to keep up!  The ones I bought were not wilting, but they still soaked up an incredible amount of water when I got them home!

My baby plants would normally stay inside a good while longer, but at this rate I will start hardening them off on the balcony and then plant them in a week or so.

Raenia

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #471 on: May 25, 2020, 03:22:40 PM »
Anybody familiar with plant breeding, snow/snap peas specifically? I have a super early variety that I don't enjoy the taste of, and a more standard length that I like eating. The goal is an earlier, tasty landrace of some sort. I'll probably hand pollinate to mix genetics as much as possible for F1, but how do I select for earliness? If I let the plant finish maturing a pod it'll be done for the season right? Does taking early season fruit get me the same genetics as later season fruit?

What I would do is hand-pollinate F1 to ensure self-pollination, so that the seeds/peas will have the same(ish) genetics as the parent plant. Keep track of when flowers appear, when they are ready for harvest, etc.  Then take the seeds from the plants you were most satisfied with to plant next year (can be the later seed pods, as they should all have similar genetics if self-pollinated), and cross pollinate those.  Rinse and repeat.

If you don't self-pollinate the F1's, you may find a plant you like, but the seeds you plant the next year could be quite different if they have half their genes from a different plant that was less favorable. There is some risk of this even with self pollination, as any traits the parent is heterozygous for could go either way in the seeds.  Expect a long process, with occasional setbacks.

Or search around for other early varietals already on the market :)
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 03:25:07 PM by Raenia »

coffeefueled

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #472 on: May 26, 2020, 12:40:48 PM »
I bought a hoe this weekend and I don't know how I ever lived without one. I weeded all the raised beds and the patio flower borders in about 15 minutes.

Time to start eating the lettuce. I think I'm going to do head lettuce next year since my leaf lettuce rows get a bit it of hand. I think it'd be easier to harvest a while head at once.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #473 on: May 26, 2020, 02:24:39 PM »
I bought a hoe this weekend and I don't know how I ever lived without one. I weeded all the raised beds and the patio flower borders in about 15 minutes.

Time to start eating the lettuce. I think I'm going to do head lettuce next year since my leaf lettuce rows get a bit it of hand. I think it'd be easier to harvest a while head at once.

Hoes are wonderful. Which kind did you get?

FireAnt

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #474 on: May 26, 2020, 07:24:20 PM »
@FireAnt I'd move them out of the heat, put them somewhere where they'll get light but not heat. A bright window inside or under some shade outside. When you split them they lost a lot of root mass, so they're struggling to support the leaf canopy and can't utilize the light and heat you're giving them. They'll look sad until they rebuild root mass again, which is invisible work. Once they perk up a little move them back into full sun.

Thanks guys! I will try this. Crossing my fingers.

UPDATE: I put them in my 3 season porch, but didn't notice much of a change. We've had some real humidity so last night I put them in my house, although not as much direct sun. 24 hours later and one has completely recovered and the other is working towards it. Thanks! :)

Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #475 on: May 28, 2020, 11:42:10 AM »
Just reporting in on some of my tropical plant and fruit results since I planted them in Feb/Mar/April.

BANANAS - doing fantastic!:)
1. The vanilla ice cream banana - mature size 10 ft plus ... from a 2-inch plantling to currently almost five feet. Fat and happy - surprisingly wind hardy, no slashed leaves yet. It seems to like a lot more shade than they said - thankfully the sun pattern is such that it does receive a few hours of shade from a huge old Paper Bark Maple about fifteen feet away.
I always assumed bananas would like full sun, but a visit to the local Botanical garden showed me that they prefer shade - tag said sun/part shade.
Guess I lucked out by planting it where I did:).
2. The dwarf banana - mature size about six feet - from a 2-inch plantling to now two and a half feet. I planted it behind some intensely orange Cosmos which grew five feet tall and three feet wide and is providing enough shade to keep it happy.
It is looking fat and happy too.

PAPAYAS - three freebies from the neighbor were about ten-twelve inches, looking a bit straggly with slightly yellowed leaves, except for one.
1. The best-looking one is in the front yard in well-composted soil planted in mid-March is going on five feet with a fat trunk and a good size canopy of leaves already.
It is in full sun with only a couple of hours of shade which it seems to love. The roots are shaded by zinnias and cosmos - it seems to like the company in the flower bed.
2. The one in the backyard is just beginning to look really fat and happy and super healthy - it has reached three feet.
Not sure about the soil - more sandy, but not too bad. Surrounded by green onions, and a ton of different flowers.

3. I decided to put one of the papayas in a big pot with good soil in case the other two didn't make it - ha ha - it is the smallest by far. Only about 20 inches tall but beginning to gain strength and a bit thicker trunk - still a very small canopy.

SOIL ..... If you put a spade in the ground in our yard - you'll find it is pure sand like at the beach then you reach limestone rock after about a foot or so with plenty of seashells and embedded encrusted sea critters.
I used the mammoth rock we excavated when I first started gardening as a landscape feature:) - we still laugh about that never-ending rock:).

TROPICAL - BLACKBERRY JAM BUSH/TREE - a huge disappointment so far. Supposed to do well in zone 10 and 11 - it can take the heat, but it is barely growing. Google says it is a slow grower - the understatement of the year - at this rate it will reach one foot in a year - maybe:).
These are not blackberries - but a bush that produces a fruit which when cut open you scoop out - ready to eat blackberry jam:).

I experimented with sun - shade - pots - in the ground.
Result: it is OK with the heat, doesn't droop but seems to prefer growing in the shade of another plant. Doesn't care for good moisture soil in a pot - prefers to be in the ground.
The only truly happy one has actually grown two inches and has added more leaves since the cosmos that it is surrounded by have grown taller and are providing lots of shade - it doesn't mind the heat.

I ordered two plants online when they arrived each 2-inch pot had about five thin seedlings. So it is possible they just need a whole lot more time.
We'll see maybe it just needs a full growing season to take off - slowly.

GUAVA - grew from a 4-inch plantling to two feet since March and is now branching out another foot. It is a winner in my garden book:).
A truly lovely small-leaved evergreen bush. It is supposed to have fragrant white flowers and may produce fruit within a year.
It seems to like its spot, hasn't drooped from the heat - so I'm happy - wish I'd ordered two, but they are sold out of this particular variety from Chile.

APPLE - Boo:) - these were transplanted in February from a pot into my new garden area. Not working out too well so far, although they have leaves.
I will give them some extra compost and hope for the best - if they don't come around by next Feb I'll rip them out.

FENNEL - I tried for the first time and it is doing so great that I will plant more next year.
So I guess I'll need to find some recipe inspiration - I've never had or fixed fennel. All I know about fennel is that makes a great tea for colicky babies.
Do you sautee the stems? like for a Mediterranean dish?

DILL - huge success - the Mammoth Dill seed packet was the only one that survived and thrived. I have dried some dill, used plenty fresh and I'm saving the dill seeds both for seasoning and some for next year.
Looked positively lovely - a small forest of giant lacy dills, now turning coppery with all the huge seed heads.

LETTUCE - finally found the perfect lettuce. Planted in the late fall - six months to maturity and now there are only three heads left, still hanging in there at 88 degrees each day. Will harvest Saturday and call it done.

PEPPERS - tried some new heirloom seeds - planted in March. Sweet red peppers, long twisty shape - just turning red - looking forward to our first taste.
Pepper harvest overall has been steady since the last week in April.

I plant mine in pots after about five years of trying to grow them in the ground I gave up. I now give each pepper a 16-inch pot and they produce fine until August.

BASIL - managed to kill the two Italian basil I bought at the nursery. Tried seeding my own - not one came up:(.
African Blue Basil - is doing wonderful. It has a peppery, slightly spicy great flavor and grows into a 3-4 ft bush covered in bees.
The leaves go from green to purplish and in bloom it looks like a landscape plant - awesome scent.
All six cuttings that I took from the mother plant are slowly taking off - they can deal with the heat and don't seem to mind poor soil as long as they get water. Almost a foot tall and branching out now despite the heat.

Oh and the PASSION FRUIT - looks like I killed one and the other is doing OK so far - training it along the fence. We'll see how it goes.

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #476 on: May 29, 2020, 07:48:14 AM »
Love the tropical update @Rosy

Here's the PERMACULTURE/PERENNIAL news from our place in mountainous Zone 7a.  I'll do a vegetable/herb update another time.

Apples.  We have 15 trees, 10 of which I grafted three years ago.  All doing very well except for the seedling we brought with us from up north which is now 9 years old and still not flowering.  I think that one may be too far south for its (unknown) variety and I'm going to try field grafting a local variety onto it this year to see if we can get it to fruit next year.

Pears.  4 fruit-bearing, different varieties, all doing extremely well.  It'll be a huge bumper crop of fruit this year.  We also have 4 large Bradford ornamental pears which the pollinators love.

Cherries.  4 sweet cherries, all doing well.  Three of them are now 4 year olds and this will hopefully be their first year bearing any significant fruit.  We also have ~10 wild black cherry trees which the pollinators love, and 3 Kwanzan ornamental cherries which they ignore.

Paw Paws.  Rough year.  Despite the mild winter it looks like one of my two remaining trees may be dying.  The site is not ideal (possibly too sunny).  :(

Figs.  We have three figs, and it looks like the two smaller/younger ones did not make it through the winter, which is very weird.  They were four years old and should have been past the danger point, plus our winter was extremely mild.  I'm scratching my head over this one. 

Elderberries.  These guys are inside the deer fence-protected garden and are doing fantastic!  They have formed a thick hedge about 8 feet tall and are making tons of babies.  Their flowers are nearly open, and then it'll be pollinator party time.  I've yet to see another plant or tree that gets so many different insects excited.  I also made some super-delicious elderberry syrup last year from their fruit.  Go elderberries!

Raspberries.  What can you say?  They're impossible to kill -- even by our deer -- and are doing great outside the deer fence.  Yum.

Blueberries.  Doing so-so inside the deer fence.  We have 10 plants, and they look a little peaky this spring.  Not as much fruit as last year.  i fertilized and applied ph-reducer as usual, so not sure what's going on.

Persimmons.  Not good.  It looks like I lost 2 of our 4 trees.  Very strange, given that we had such a mild winter.

We also did quite a few new perennial/self-seeding plantings this spring.  Most of them I bought, but a few I grew.  The stay-at-home order has been great for our gardens, but a bit hard on the pocketbook! 

Sourwood tree
2 Serviceberry trees
Rhubarb
Spearmint
Peppermint
Chamomile
Beebalm
Borage
Calendula
Echinacea
Rue
Yarrow
Anise Hyssop

And finally, the bees are doing great!  It's a steep learning curve and not cheap to start, but I'm loving it.  We have two hives which have completely different personalities; I never get tired of watching them.  Very addictive! 


Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #477 on: May 29, 2020, 08:14:46 AM »
Man - Am I ever jealous of the tropical (to my zone) plants.  My garden is doing great but it is going to go down to just above freezing overnight this weekend.

My plan is to keep hardening off the tender seedlings that are getting a bit leggy during the day - being out of the greenhouse really slows them down.
Eggplants, squash and peppers are just going to stay in the greenhouse for a whole week longer.  If they start to get a little leggy, I will put them out in the shade.  I douse them liberally with my organic red hen fertilizer. I have discovered that the squirrels and chipmunks do not like it.  It does stink way too much to use in my planter pots near the dining table.  However since it is effective as a fertilizer and repels squirrels as well, I use it just after doing some transplanting and don't water before we eat - water makes it even more stinky!

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #478 on: May 29, 2020, 09:51:23 AM »
All my babies are on the balcony so most have been outside since germination.  They grow fast these hot days.  They get sun all morning, shade in the afternoon.   And breezes, which means theoretically they should have strong stems.

Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #479 on: May 29, 2020, 11:10:00 AM »
@Trifele - I really envy you the apples and cherries - I may try one more time to find a cherry that might survive our climate - zone 10.
When I was on vacation in Turkey years ago there were cherry trees that did well - the sweet dark kind that I love so I keep thinking there has to be a variety that will work here.

Elderberries - I planted four and one died - poor thing - everyone kept stepping on it and the lawn guy razed it to the ground twice thinking it was a weed.
The three remaining ones are doing very well. Their wild brethren in the big ditch behind them are blooming pretty, but I can't reach the berries, although there are two suckers that I'll try transplanting.
The cardinal and the bluejays think they have first dibs on the one I transplanted into the yard years ago - but this year I am determined to dip a few blooms to fry up. 
I plan on making elderberry liquor this year - got a very old recipe that I've always wanted to try.

Mystery plant - got something coming up that looks like a melon or squash. A garden gift from the birds?:)
I'll water it and see what happens.
The leaves are fuzzy underneath and rather thick and have white veins on a medium-sized, medium-dark green leaf.

Rue - since I snipped off the flower head it has started to fill in on all sides. I've always thought that it makes a cool looking landscape plant.
I bought one on a whim, surprised to see that it is happy and thriving.
Another useful herb for my herbal apothecary.

Feverfew - ordered a plant online and it is doing fantastic. Beautiful white flowers - perfect for a bouquet.
I plan to use it medicinally in my herbal apothecary.

Aloe - finally potted a Medusa leaf Aloe my son got me last year. Gave it an Aztec sun - Kokopelli pot and a spot of honor.
Looks good at already about two feet tall.

Next project - cutting the Bougainvillea - that will take up a whole weekend maybe more, thankfully it is only once a year.

The front yard - new garden area - is an epic failure. Not at all what I had in mind, but the bones aka the perennials I planted are all doing well.
So it will be just a matter of some serious cleanup and removing weeds and grass.
It is all one hot mess - the Cosmos has taken over ...
It is already so hot, I may let it all be and just keep it all alive throughout the summer then tackle a redo in the fall.

Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #480 on: May 29, 2020, 11:13:17 AM »
Man - Am I ever jealous of the tropical (to my zone) plants.  My garden is doing great but it is going to go down to just above freezing overnight this weekend.

My plan is to keep hardening off the tender seedlings that are getting a bit leggy during the day - being out of the greenhouse really slows them down.
Eggplants, squash and peppers are just going to stay in the greenhouse for a whole week longer.  If they start to get a little leggy, I will put them out in the shade.  I douse them liberally with my organic red hen fertilizer. I have discovered that the squirrels and chipmunks do not like it.  It does stink way too much to use in my planter pots near the dining table.  However since it is effective as a fertilizer and repels squirrels as well, I use it just after doing some transplanting and don't water before we eat - water makes it even more stinky!

@Frugal Lizard - there's gotta be something else the squirrels hate.

https://www.offthegridnews.com/survival-gardening-2/7-garden-plants-that-really-do-repel-squirrels/
Here is a list of plants that repel squirrels which should do well in your area - I'd love to grow daffodils and hyacinths but no dice, it doesn't get cold enough for the bulbs in the winter. Don't believe the one about planting geraniums - those pesky critters have dug holes in my geranium planters.

At the end of the article they mention sprinkling cayenne pepper and hot chili pepper powder - I have heard that it is supposed to work quite well.
Google says so anyway - it may well be the ingredient in the fertilizer that they hate.

I think I may try the peppermint oil spray method - smells good and I happen to have a bottle.