Author Topic: Plastic-free February  (Read 7906 times)

chaskavitch

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #50 on: January 30, 2018, 06:21:55 AM »
@Fresh Bread , the bulk bins at Sprouts grocery store, at least, are filled from giant plastic bags.  I've seen employees refilling them occasionally.  The're a semi-national chain, though, so I imagine a local bulk co-op would be more proactive about being sustainable.  On the other hand, Sprouts now has a rack of reusable bags made by the local Girl Scouts, with a sign that says "forgot your reusable bag?  Take one of ours!  Just bring it back next time for someone else to use!"  I'm really hoping it works out well and they don't lose all their bags.

I figure, even if they do use plastic, if you're using your own cloth bags to shop, you're 1) not putting additional plastic in your own trash and 2) setting a good example for other people.  I've definitely had people in line ask where I bought my mesh or canvas bags because they think they're cool.

ulzxhi

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #51 on: January 30, 2018, 09:59:41 AM »
I bookmarked this thread in my journal weeks ago, and am just now getting around to reading it. Glad I finally did! I always recycle, but have never thought of cutting out the source of the waste. I love how supportive everyone here is of taking care of our earth (unlike where I live, which just breaks my heart...)



Can I offer up one of my favorite "recipes"
https://www.hy-vee.com/recipes-ideas/recipes/fit-for-you-bars

I really want to learn how to start making more of my own food bars etc, and this seems a fantastic place to start. Never thought of the positive eco impact of being more resourceful, which now gives me more motivation to start. Saved and added to my bucket list!



- plasters (bandaids). What did people do before plasters? Just not use anything or use a bandage or clean rag I guess?

- ibuprofen. Home remedies for pain are laughable when you're doubled up or can't see for the pain. I think the best idea here is to buy 50-100 pills in a plastic bottle. I only use about 4-8 a month but it's better than multiple blister packs of 24.

- Codeine - it's prescription only here from Feb so I'm going to buy some while I can, just in case. It costs me $25 to see a doctor!

Has anyone ever bought loose pain relief pills i.e. had a bottle refilled?

apparently superglue was originally created by the military (forgot from which country, but I'm just assuming US since that's where I'm from) as a liquid bandage. For minor cuts, there is also OTC "liquid skin" bandages (comes in a glass bottle). My rommmate and partner both use superglue for nasty lacerations and nothing bad has happened so far... And I personally never use bandages, I just let my cuts heal themselves naturally. As for the pills, I know that in the US pharmacies cannot dispense medication into a patient's brought-from-home-bottle (or at least in California---however we also have more stringent protocol than other states). I think asking your local pharmacy would be a good place to start. Have you thought of preventative health measures like tai chi, accupuncture, meditation? Good for your mind as well as your body. Another really interesting one is water crystals. Masaru Emoto's book, The Hidden Messages in Water, really lays it down in easy-to-undersand terms. Hopefully you can pick up a copy at your library. It is a pocket-sized book, and also a quick read with few words and lots of pictures (just my kind of introductory book! ;D)
masaru's site
I dont know how much I believe in it, but definitely an intriguing concept.



So my facewash has run out and instead of buying a new plastic bottle so close to February, I've cracked open a pack of face cloths that I got from IKEA* that I'll be using with water only.

Day 1: Hmmmm my face did not feel very clean in the shower after washing with the cloth. It's sort of ok now but the jury is out I'd say. I also used it to clean my ears instead of using a plastic cotton bud.

*Black mark to IKEA for adding a massive unnecessary label to every cloth. Did not see that when I bought them.

Have you heard of oil cleansing? It feels great! I'm not sure of how wells it works since I usually do not wear makeup, but in theory it makes sense: like-dissolves-like. I'm guilty of buying mine from cosmetic counters and they come in plastic jars (EEK! Moving forward, I do plan to reduce my plastic consumption as well...) but I'm sure natural oils like coconut, olive, saffola would work great as well, and are probably easier to find in eco-friendly packaging. Coconut oil is solid at room temperature, so just slab some on your face and rinse off in the shower. No plastic or washcloth needed. DONE. And, if you're a child-at-heart like me, playing with the mess and pretending to be an oil-monster is always a win.



I might try that with the meat, although I think they need to use something to pick it up and put it in the tub at my ones, so they'll still use a plastic bag or glove. There's no bare hands touching meat at butchers here!

I just joined a local zero waste group and the rumour is that Harris Farm Markets not only sell milk in glass bottles at certain locations but at one place they have milk station (like a drinks dispenser) and resuable bottles!

Not that it makes you feel better, but either way they'd still be using plastic gloves, right? So while the plastic waste is not completely eliminated, at least you are doing the best you can on your end by eliminating part of it. Would it be possible to forgo meat completely? Also, how did you find the zero waste group? You've inspired me to join one.



Couple two said "you know you can buy those containers at Woolies" Me: "yeah but we already paid for these ones" Couple 2: "I don't do second hand" Me: "you just ate from them?". I always wondered who buys crappy takeaway containers new and now I know!

We're a little bit down in the mouth about that whole interaction today because it's a reminder about what the majority of people are doing.

Interestingly, when we introduced the concept of MMM at a get together a while ago, it was the eco people that seemed to 'get' the concept of living beneath your means. That and treading lightly on the earth are so very closely related concepts.

Man I definitely feel ya. I bike to work and at first my coworkers all made fun of me. It's a short ride (just 12km or so. Honestly, too short a commute for me!). It's good for me, our earth, and my wallet. Now my colleagues are starting to get it and even somewhat envious. One of my coworkers who lives nearby is now motivated to start biking in the spring. Score! Keep your head up, and just remember that even though they may scoff, that you (and our earth) are the ones getting ahead. I agree that people who are more mindful in general are the ones who will care about the bigger picture.



Groceries are indeed a challenge. In my local shops every salad, pepper and zucchini are wrapped in plastic.

This. It blows my mind that loose vegetables come wrapped in plastic. Why?! Rinse and eat. People have become too fearful of food, I feel. And then they fill their bodies with pink slime, HFCs, hydrogenated oil, and processed, mechanically separated food. Oh, and the chemicals on the GMO vegetables to make them "safe". smh.



I figure, even if they do use plastic, if you're using your own cloth bags to shop, you're 1) not putting additional plastic in your own trash and 2) setting a good example for other people.  I've definitely had people in line ask where I bought my mesh or canvas bags because they think they're cool.

Also, if you think of the ratio of volume:plastic (for bulk goods that you fill yourself), you're still making a positive impact, and it's still less plastic than if the bulk were individually packaged for resale.



Phew, I didn't think I had so much to say! Again, thank you for the inspiration and I wish you the best!
hi friend! feel free to check out my journal ;D

chaskavitch

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #52 on: January 30, 2018, 10:55:57 AM »

So my facewash has run out and instead of buying a new plastic bottle so close to February, I've cracked open a pack of face cloths that I got from IKEA* that I'll be using with water only.

Day 1: Hmmmm my face did not feel very clean in the shower after washing with the cloth. It's sort of ok now but the jury is out I'd say. I also used it to clean my ears instead of using a plastic cotton bud.

*Black mark to IKEA for adding a massive unnecessary label to every cloth. Did not see that when I bought them.

Have you heard of oil cleansing? It feels great! I'm not sure of how wells it works since I usually do not wear makeup, but in theory it makes sense: like-dissolves-like. I'm guilty of buying mine from cosmetic counters and they come in plastic jars (EEK! Moving forward, I do plan to reduce my plastic consumption as well...) but I'm sure natural oils like coconut, olive, saffola would work great as well, and are probably easier to find in eco-friendly packaging. Coconut oil is solid at room temperature, so just slab some on your face and rinse off in the shower. No plastic or washcloth needed. DONE. And, if you're a child-at-heart like me, playing with the mess and pretending to be an oil-monster is always a win.


Coconut oil is great for cleaning your face of cosmetics!  I used to use it as an oil wash for my whole face (slather in coconut oil, rub it in, put a hot wet washcloth over your face, then scrub it off after the washcloth cools off), but I ran out of coconut oil and it's expensive.  It does work VERY well for removing eye makeup, though, and bonus - then your face is moisturized!

ETA - I buy coconut oil in the largest jars I can find, usually from Costco, but they're plastic :(  I dole it out into smaller glass jelly jars for use up in my bathroom for washing my face so I don't have a gallon jug of oil taking up all my space.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #53 on: January 30, 2018, 11:26:20 AM »
  On the other hand, Sprouts now has a rack of reusable bags made by the local Girl Scouts, with a sign that says "forgot your reusable bag?  Take one of ours!  Just bring it back next time for someone else to use!"  I'm really hoping it works out well and they don't lose all their bags.


OMG! This is an amazing idea for a girl scout project! Even if they have to refresh the bags every once in awhile. Fwding to our council!

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #54 on: January 30, 2018, 02:45:03 PM »
  On the other hand, Sprouts now has a rack of reusable bags made by the local Girl Scouts, with a sign that says "forgot your reusable bag?  Take one of ours!  Just bring it back next time for someone else to use!"  I'm really hoping it works out well and they don't lose all their bags.


OMG! This is an amazing idea for a girl scout project! Even if they have to refresh the bags every once in awhile. Fwding to our council!

Here in Oz we have Boomerang Bags, which are sewn by local volunteer groups. The idea is you take one when you forget your bag and then return it next shop or take to another shop or pass on to someone else. http://boomerangbags.org
I hope one day we'll see them in larger shops.

It's 31 Jan here already, so I went at sparrow's fart to do my last shop before Feb.

Cheats: I got 6 litres of milk and some panic yoghurt.

Suspect items: A box of tacos - I suspect there could be an inner plastic bag in there but I haven't bought them in ages. How do I make tacos, seems like it would be hard? Dishwasher powder - it's in a cardboard box but I can't really recycle it or give it to the worms so it may as well be plastic. I will need to buy this unpackaged next time.

Substitutions: I bought a jar of pasta sauce for emergency dinners instead of a plastic tub, at less than half the cost because it was half price. And a glass bottle of blackcurrant cordial instead of plastic at double the cost! The jar can be reused but the bottle idk. It's a nice bottle so there must be a craft project for it.

Genuinely packaging free: Yay vegetables for coming in their own wrapping! I got a lime to use as deodorant - I'm dubious but I'm told it works. Will test that later!

I'm going to have to visit at least 3 shops to get weekly groceries so I'll shop twice more this week. On top of extra food prep time I may find that a bit painful.

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #55 on: January 30, 2018, 03:41:57 PM »
Hi Ulzxhi, thanks for all your thoughts!

I'll look into oil cleansing. I don't really wear makeup so I'm just removing grime, sweat and sunscreen. I think I'm doing ok with warm water and massaging with a cloth. I don't seem spottier than usual, if anything I may have better skin. It's just weird not having that squeaky oil free feeling after washing, but that probably isn't something that's good for your skin anyway.

I could try things like acupuncture. I've got endometriosis and crazy hormones that give me a headache twice a month when they change. Magnesium helps a lot.

About bulk stores and their original packaging... I'm thinking I should buy my own 20 litre vat of vinegar rather than pay inflated prices. Likewise I've ordered 5kg each of flour and oats which will come in paper. For everything else I need in small quantities I can use the no- packaging shops.

ETA: forgot you also asked about meat.. We've cut down but hubby would be reluctant to do without and we both enjoy eating it (sorry animals but you taste too good). We eat chicken or beef about 3 main meals a week, fish 1 or 2 meals and veggo 2 or 3. Veggo is normally lentil or rice based as chickpeas and beans make my guts balloon.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #56 on: January 30, 2018, 04:14:28 PM »
Taco shells are fiddly to make at home, but tortillas are pretty easy so you could have soft tacos?

Doing three different shops: this is part of what holds me back with going plastic free. I honestly just don't have the spoons to shop at multiple shops on a regular basis, especially if any of them are more than a five minute drive away.

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #57 on: January 30, 2018, 04:33:56 PM »
Taco shells are fiddly to make at home, but tortillas are pretty easy so you could have soft tacos?

Doing three different shops: this is part of what holds me back with going plastic free. I honestly just don't have the spoons to shop at multiple shops on a regular basis, especially if any of them are more than a five minute drive away.

I think I can do it if I had a routine and where it required no mental load. Establishing that will be hard though.

I think the best way for me to do it is to get delivery of a few staples in bulk, go to the supermarket in the week for a basket of things and then make shopping for the other time consuming fiddly things into a morning out with hubby at the weekend with coffee and/or lunch out, followed up by a session together making something for the freezer from scratch like a pasta sauce.

Things like yoghurt and cheese are just so easy and not exhausting for me once I get the practice in so that it's just muscle memory. At one point I made muffins or banana bread at 6am before work because I could do it in my sleep, I need to get back to that. Another one is putting the bread machine on. So easy but if I have to check weights and measurements it makes it tiring.

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #58 on: January 30, 2018, 11:28:57 PM »
It's a good moment in time to do a plastics challenge. China are no longer accepting recycling from overseas and this is creating backlogs in countries like Australia. There just isn't the demand from manufacturers for recycled plastic domestically. This might change but it's not going to happen overnight. You know what could happen overnight? Me not buying plastic :)

https://amp.theage.com.au/victoria/council-tells-ratepayers-to-minimise-recycling-as-chinese-ban-bites-20180130-p4yz3v.html

We don't have the market in Au for the plastics but we do have it for recycled glass - can't remember the source for that, I think I heard it on the War on Waste series on ABC. Demand at one particular recycled glass factory is greater than supply anyway.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #59 on: January 31, 2018, 12:56:56 AM »
It's a good moment in time to do a plastics challenge. China are no longer accepting recycling from overseas and this is creating backlogs in countries like Australia. There just isn't the demand from manufacturers for recycled plastic domestically. This might change but it's not going to happen overnight. You know what could happen overnight? Me not buying plastic :)

https://amp.theage.com.au/victoria/council-tells-ratepayers-to-minimise-recycling-as-chinese-ban-bites-20180130-p4yz3v.html

We don't have the market in Au for the plastics but we do have it for recycled glass - can't remember the source for that, I think I heard it on the War on Waste series on ABC. Demand at one particular recycled glass factory is greater than supply anyway.

Sounds very good that China doesn't accept our waste. Maybe because China has a lot of reducing their CO2 emissions. And burning plastic releases a lot of CO2. This might finally force the western countries to produce less plastic, because it is totally ridiculous which products that are wrapped in plastic. And we would so easily look at other countries. Like in Norway, all milk is sold in milk cartons and oats and grains are sold in paper bags. I'm sure other countries have other good solutions. If only plastic had been expensive or if the public had demanded products without plastic, then the shops would have been forced to change their products.

CalBal

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #60 on: January 31, 2018, 10:14:14 AM »

Things like yoghurt and cheese are just so easy and not exhausting for me once I get the practice in so that it's just muscle memory.

I was going to suggest trying your own yogurt (and some cheeses are very easy too). ;) Yogurt especially is very easy. I have a little machine to hold mine at temp (my oven apparently isn't well insulated enough and I failed when I tried to do it using just the oven light). Using store bought as a starter created/uses thermophilic cultures. But there are also mesophilic cultures that you can culture at room temperature! :)  And if you always are sure to take out a bit to make a fresh mother each time, you don't even have to buy starter at the store (or rarely, if yours becomes too weak).

Linda_Norway

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #61 on: January 31, 2018, 12:42:12 PM »

Things like yoghurt and cheese are just so easy and not exhausting for me once I get the practice in so that it's just muscle memory.

I was going to suggest trying your own yogurt (and some cheeses are very easy too). ;) Yogurt especially is very easy. I have a little machine to hold mine at temp (my oven apparently isn't well insulated enough and I failed when I tried to do it using just the oven light). Using store bought as a starter created/uses thermophilic cultures. But there are also mesophilic cultures that you can culture at room temperature! :)  And if you always are sure to take out a bit to make a fresh mother each time, you don't even have to buy starter at the store (or rarely, if yours becomes too weak).

I managed to make perfect thick yogurt this weekend. I warmed it up in a pan on the induction stove on really low warmth to pasteurizing temperature. Then cooled in down to 42C and added some yogurt. I left it overnight in a thick towel on the warm (20C) bathroom floor. Thick yogurt was the result the next day and I let it leak out a bit through a tea towel. This time I didn't stir and that helped.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2018, 12:33:59 AM by Linda_Norway »

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #62 on: January 31, 2018, 03:59:01 PM »
Linda your yoghurt sounds like the bomb. I have an induction stovetop too but milk is a hard thing to control on it. Did you say you used a low low temp, is that the trick?

I use an Easi-Yo thermos thing. You put yoghurt and milk in, hot water in the thermos part and leave for 8 hrs. The milk should be UHT or boiled but I'm going to be trying milk powder. I assume that is totally pasteurised on account of how it's processed & dry.

I took a pic of my plastics recycling. The hard stuff is a mix of glass, plastic and metal but is just a week's worth! The soft plastics for redcycle, I don't know, maybe it's 3 week's worth. Anyway, it's too much! I will start a new bag today and we'll see how we go.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #63 on: February 01, 2018, 12:33:39 AM »
Linda your yoghurt sounds like the bomb. I have an induction stovetop too but milk is a hard thing to control on it. Did you say you used a low low temp, is that the trick?

Yes, the temperature on the stove was 3 out of 9. I have a thermometer that goes to 100C and I checked regularly. When It started sticking a bit to the bottom (without burning), it was ready (at 82C). Then we let it cool down in the kitchen to 43C. Stirred in the bit of yogurt en kept the pan warmish. After the initial stirring, I didn't stir again. You can then see that the yogurt bacteria make very long chains. Those get broken if you stir, so just don't.
The yogurt even became thicker after it was in the storage box in the fridge.

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #64 on: February 01, 2018, 04:10:00 AM »
DAY 1 RESULTS!

Changes made:
- Registered for online water bills - four less plastic windows coming in the house each year
- My reusable damp packs arrived. These replace a big plastic tub of damp rid crystals. The packs change colour when used up and are recharged in the sun or microwave. Unfortunately there was a fair bit of plastic packaging around them including some unnecessary padding but at least this is a one off purchase.

Things to deal with at some point:
- Toothbrush - could buy a bamboo one
- Drinking coffee - the beans come in a non-recyclable bag...need to find a better source (must also be good beans!)

Avoided waste by:
- Drinking loose leaf tea
- Washing with bar soap instead of shower gel from a plastic bottle
- Using a face cloth & water instead of buying a new face wash in a plastic bottle
- Using a lime slice as deodorant instead of buying a new roll on*
- Bought bread in a paper bag (but only a roll - loaves were only available in plastic) I'm going to have to make my own or go to yet another shop...

* The jury is still out on this one. Today was quite cool so I'm not sure if this is effective or not. I got lime pulp all over my pits so it may not be all that practical. Will continue and see what happens.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #65 on: February 01, 2018, 06:30:49 AM »
ETA: forgot you also asked about meat.. We've cut down but hubby would be reluctant to do without and we both enjoy eating it (sorry animals but you taste too good). We eat chicken or beef about 3 main meals a week, fish 1 or 2 meals and veggo 2 or 3. Veggo is normally lentil or rice based as chickpeas and beans make my guts balloon.

Have you considered quinoa? One of my favorite meals is quinoa with pico de gallo. Yum! Also, do you consider eggs meat? One of my favorite quick meals is to beat an egg or two, mix in some chopped cheese, veggies, and / or mushrooms, then fry it into a "pancake". Similar to a fritatta, but cooked stovetop instead of the oven. Ooey gooey and YUM. My favorite shroom to use for this is oyster. Meaty and snappy with a delicious spicy flavor. I eat a lot of nuts, eggs, cheese, and mushrooms. Avocado makes for a fantastic veggie sandwich. Couscous with roasted pine nuts, minced garlic and cubed parmesian is also yum (though in the US, a lot of cheese comes wrapped in plastic...)



Things to deal with at some point:
- Toothbrush - could buy a bamboo one
- Drinking coffee - the beans come in a non-recyclable bag...need to find a better source (must also be good beans!)

Avoided waste by:
- Drinking loose leaf tea
- Using a lime slice as deodorant instead of buying a new roll on*

* The jury is still out on this one. Today was quite cool so I'm not sure if this is effective or not. I got lime pulp all over my pits so it may not be all that practical. Will continue and see what happens.

Sounds like DAY1 is off to a fantastic start! I've been interested in trying a bamboo toothbrush too, if you try it I'd love to know how it goes! I also read that they're naturally anti-bacterial? Great for a germophobe like me. As for the coffee, have you tried getting some from Costa Rica? I'm not a coffee drinker, yet I'm even tempted by their coffee -- it smells like candy! When I was in Costa Rica, that was the only time I ever seriously considered trying it (though I didn't which I regret, even years later!). I vacationed in Costa Rica without knowing anything about their country -- it's one of the greenest countries, has no military, and is very eco-friendly. The people are incredibly accepting and laid back. I didn't want to leave! Also, one of the coffee capitals of the world.

Also, have you heard of lotion bars? Maybe you could modge-podge the formula into a deodorant bar? Or, how about squeezing the lime juice onto a face towel, or wrapping the lime in a face towel (like a soap bar)?

lotion bar recipe

It'll be interesting to see how recycling goes with the China-plastic ban:

          "It leaves recyclers such as Visy with nowhere to send waste, even as homeowners keep doing the right thing and filling up their yellow bins."

You've provided great insight and changed my view on recycling. IMHO, the right thing do is to become more aware and mindful, and reduce at the source. You couldn't have had more perfect timing. Good luck as we press on with February!
hi friend! feel free to check out my journal ;D

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #66 on: February 01, 2018, 06:59:39 AM »
Thank goodness yesterday wasn't february!  We got new furniture and the number of plastic bags was insane.  I'm using them for diaper bin trashbags now (usualy use grocery bags but we rarely get grocery bags anymore).  Husband thinks i'm crazy, but a bag is a bag, and there were like 20 of them.

I don't think I'll be totally plastic free this month, but I'm going to think about it.

I need to cut my hair if I want to go back to bar shampoo and no conditioner; but I think it is within the spirit of the challenge to finish the shampoo I have first.  (I already use bar soap instead of body wash because of the waste.)

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #67 on: February 01, 2018, 07:43:14 AM »

- Drinking coffee - the beans come in a non-recyclable bag...need to find a better source (must also be good beans!)


I get my coffee beans at Wholefoods and use a mason jar instead of the bags they provide. Is there a place near you that sells coffee beans in bulk?

CalBal

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #68 on: February 01, 2018, 09:55:19 AM »

Yes, the temperature on the stove was 3 out of 9. I have a thermometer that goes to 100C and I checked regularly. When It started sticking a bit to the bottom (without burning), it was ready (at 82C). Then we let it cool down in the kitchen to 43C. Stirred in the bit of yogurt en kept the pan warmish. After the initial stirring, I didn't stir again. You can then see that the yogurt bacteria make very long chains. Those get broken if you stir, so just don't.

I'll add this - the reason you bring it up to just below the boiling point is you want to kill any unwanted bacteria in the milk before you add your desired cultures (from the starter), but you don't want to scald the milk. :) I've heard if you use pasturized milk that isn't strictly necessary usually. However, warming it also breaks the cassein bonds in the milk. If you warm it slowly (rather than quickly) apparently more of the cassein bonds are broken and you will get a thicker yogurt as a result. Then you let it cool down to around 100-110(F) before adding your starter (or you will kill your cultures) and hold it at about that temperature. I take a small amount out of the pot, add the starter, stir it up good, the add that back to the pot. People culture anywhere from 6-12 hours, the longer you culture the thicker it will get and the more sugars will be consumed by the cultures so the yogurt will become more tart. Play with it until you find the taste and consistency you like. If you like it less tart, culture for less long and then drain for a while. Overnight is perfect, IMO. :)
« Last Edit: February 01, 2018, 09:58:23 AM by CalBal »

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #69 on: February 01, 2018, 10:15:23 PM »
DAY 2 RESULTS!
(It's only 4pm but hey)

Avoided waste by:
- Refilling our beer growler - not plastic but 6 glass bottles is a lot of waste on a weekly basis!
- Making bread in the breadmaker
- Taking the soft plastics recycling from the last few weeks to Coles and buying a loose apple and onion for braised cabbage (didn't want to dump and run!).
- Walking past some tempting marked down stuff at Coles that was covered in plastic.
- Trying out baking soda as deodorant.*

Whoopsies:

- Did a crop swap for different produce - she handed me her produce in a plastic bag and I didn't even think to leave it with her. Oh well, it can be a bin bag.
- Drove to about a million places to do all these and other errands. There's no convenient way to visit all these places as they are all within 2-3km but in different directions, but at least I combined the car trip. I should get an electric car or e-bike. On a regular bike it would have taken all day.
- Hubby received a parcel that was wrapped in plastic. Recyclable but kind of unnecessary. I guess we could let them know that, it's a small repair company.

I also took 5 glass and plastic bottles into return and earn - hopefully that's the last time for a month (or more!)

Forgot to say yesterday that I bought meat which was wrapped in a sort of greaseproof paper. I'm going to test it and see what happens when it's soaked and fed to the worms.

* Seems ok so far. I just dusted some on. I guess you're meant to make a paste but that would go flakey, right? Yesterday's lime option, I dunno if it did anything at all. I think my natural odour might be slightly citrusy so hard to know.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #70 on: February 01, 2018, 10:20:40 PM »
Thank goodness yesterday wasn't february!  We got new furniture and the number of plastic bags was insane.  I'm using them for diaper bin trashbags now (usualy use grocery bags but we rarely get grocery bags anymore).  Husband thinks i'm crazy, but a bag is a bag, and there were like 20 of them.

I don't think I'll be totally plastic free this month, but I'm going to think about it.

I need to cut my hair if I want to go back to bar shampoo and no conditioner; but I think it is within the spirit of the challenge to finish the shampoo I have first.  (I already use bar soap instead of body wash because of the waste.)

Yes I'm still using things in plastic that I have already. I'm open to shampoo bars but I'm very into my current shampoo. It costs $1.75 when it's on special and lasts months and months because I only use a little. Conditioner, I dunno, my hair is long and dry. I've used cider vinegar before but my hair smelt of vinegar after. I'd try a bar but I'm dubious!

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #71 on: February 01, 2018, 10:22:01 PM »

- Drinking coffee - the beans come in a non-recyclable bag...need to find a better source (must also be good beans!)


I get my coffee beans at Wholefoods and use a mason jar instead of the bags they provide. Is there a place near you that sells coffee beans in bulk?

Yes there will be... But do they meet hubby's standards, that's the question. He's quite fancy.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #72 on: February 01, 2018, 11:06:06 PM »
Oh I forgot to talk about the washing (laundry).

Yesterday I did a load of washing and threw in the soapnuts that I'd bought (to avoid a plastic bottle of laundry liquid). Well, they didn't work too well. It was a dirty load with muddy patches and they didn't come out. My normal detergent would have managed.

The internet said the soapiness comes out in hot water so today I soaked the nuts in a cup of kettle boiled water first. Today's load included hubby's exercise gear which fucking reeks and it seems to have done ok.

I'll do the same again with the white wash tomorrow.

Realistically, I need something that's ultra convenient to fit in with my day (I run in the house, put on a load and run out) so if it's going to work I think I'll need a few lots pre-soaked and ready to go!

I might also make up some homemade detergent. I bought borax ages ago but never got round to it.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #73 on: February 02, 2018, 03:51:01 AM »
Oh I forgot to talk about the washing (laundry).

Yesterday I did a load of washing and threw in the soapnuts that I'd bought (to avoid a plastic bottle of laundry liquid). Well, they didn't work too well. It was a dirty load with muddy patches and they didn't come out. My normal detergent would have managed.

The internet said the soapiness comes out in hot water so today I soaked the nuts in a cup of kettle boiled water first. Today's load included hubby's exercise gear which fucking reeks and it seems to have done ok.

I'll do the same again with the white wash tomorrow.

Realistically, I need something that's ultra convenient to fit in with my day (I run in the house, put on a load and run out) so if it's going to work I think I'll need a few lots pre-soaked and ready to go!

I might also make up some homemade detergent. I bought borax ages ago but never got round to it.

Why don't you just buy a carton box of washing detergent in powder form? That is what I have always used and I get everything clean with it. I also use universal detergent (for colour) and use that for the white wash as well. Even woolen outdoor shirts (that tolerate machine wash) are washed in the same stuff.

'But I wash traditional woolen sweaters with fluid wool detergent (in a plastic container), if I need to wash them at all. I always try first to hang them outside to get fresh.

Here in Norway I need to buy the big cartons in another shop than the grocery store. We have a chain of stores that sells household articles and they have washing detergent in large containers, while the grocery store only has tiny containers and fluid stuff.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #74 on: February 02, 2018, 04:05:24 AM »
To meet my goals of no plastic I can buy a big box of powder but then I'm stuck with that waste. Do you put the box in the paper recycling? I feel like it would be too dirty. I guess if I buy the eco one the box could go in the compost.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #75 on: February 02, 2018, 05:36:10 AM »
To meet my goals of no plastic I can buy a big box of powder but then I'm stuck with that waste. Do you put the box in the paper recycling? I feel like it would be too dirty. I guess if I buy the eco one the box could go in the compost.

Yes, I shake out the box as good as I can (take out the folds) and put it in the paper recycling.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #76 on: February 02, 2018, 07:44:35 AM »
We can recycle that type of box here, too. I use a combination of borax and washing soda for the 'dirtier' clothing. It doesn't dissolve as well in cold water but I've definitely just thrown it in the bottom of the machine and ran a cold cycle anyway. I like using soap nuts on my normal clothing but I agree they don't work well in cold water.
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Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #77 on: February 03, 2018, 02:05:13 PM »
DAY 3 RESULTS!

Avoided waste by:

- buying loose veg at the supermarket
- doing washing with soap nuts*
- used bicarb of soda again as deodorant**
- we made pesto using foraged nuts (bunya for the Australians), basil from our garden, garlic sans wrapping, oil in a glass bottle. Only the cheese was bought originally in plastic and we used tasty cheese that we already have instead of buying plastic wrapped parmesan.

Whoopsies:

- Plastic came into the house because hubby brought litter back from the beach! So a positive whoopsie.
- Didn't get around to going to the package free store but hope to do that today. We are out of milk so it is an imperative!

Other things:

- I put a bit of the butcher meat wrapping paper in water to see if it disintegrated. It doesn't so it is greasproof/ waxed paper of some sort, but I guess whether it composts successfully depends on what the coating is. Google says you can get parrafin based ones and soy based ones and they both compost eventually but obviously the soy one is not made from oil. The butcher is plastic free and their website says they had to source this paper from Norway to meet their criteria. Since there are plenty of greaseproof options here I'm assuming the butcher thought it is the 'best' option environmentally, whatever that is. I might message them and find out.

*Ok, this was use number 3 of the soap nuts and they are now very disintegrated in the bag. I get how they only last 5 washes now, but I'm not sure we'll even get that far. Hubbies running top came out with a slight odour still so I think they are already losing their effectiveness? I definitely won't get any more, I don't think they can deal with our levels of revolting.

** I used a little more than the day before. It might do something, it's at least as good as a mild shop bought deo. However, I googled it and some people get bad burns from the low pH, so use at your own risk! I think I might try out a bought alternative as I don't have the ingredients to hand for a homemade one (including shea butter & arrowroot) so I really wouldn't be saving any packaging by making my own. I've seen some in glass jars that look interesting.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #78 on: February 03, 2018, 07:22:58 PM »
Did you know tea bags have plastic in them?! I still need to work on that one. Will go loose leaf when I am done with my bags.

I have done without my keurig cups and now use keurig refill cup or my filter basket. That hasn't been too bad.

But now that grocery bags are not sold anymore (or 10c a piece at some stores), I know longer have bags for my waste bin. And I bought them in the beginning but have now gone without. I Have not gotten use to that one. Still going at it. Taking it out every few days as usual. Small kitchen can (office can). I don't want to buy a bigger one both due to full can mobility and will stink up longer it sits. Anyway still getting use to that.

Now I feel like I use more water. Because of consumption levels - washing the kitchen can or the coffee from the filter. Hmmm...

But if anything, plastic straws need to be banned for good. Did a beach clean up last summer. I could not believe how many straws badly wash up on our shores!




halftimer

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #79 on: February 03, 2018, 09:33:02 PM »
Great challenge - I'm working on cutting down too!  More of 'progress to zero waste' for me, since I know we will not get to 100% plastic free just yet.

For inspiration and ideas, I have been following @wastelandrebel (and of course Bea Johnson) on Instagram plus the hashtag #zerowaste.  Some great ideas about cutting out plastic and waste in the kitchen, bathroom, and while travelling, etc. Yesterday I saw someone boiling their pineapple skins and learned about making pineapple tea. I haven't bought one for awhile, but I'm filing that info for future.

So far this month
Progress
- used my mesh produce bags and grocery bags for the first shop
- leftovers wrapped in waxed cloth in fridge, and lettuce in tea towel
- my office and I were featured in a short sustainability story about a current initiative we have on a University site (humble brag, plus yay for increased awareness to others!)
-bought brand new boots from a local sustainable brand - and the only packaging was a string I'll reuse and a small sticker (they said I was the only one to bring my own bag and they really appreciated it)

Whoopsies
-granola bar wrapper from me using up current supplies - and straw plus disposable plate by family who are not in the same reduction mode
-gum - I know it's just plastic (but have only reduced to a pack every about 2 months, but not eliminated yet)
-using up project supplies, peeled off lots of tape backing yesterday

Doesn't sound bad so far, but I know our grocery shop is still waaay off of plastic free since we are practically addicted to certain granola bars, crackers, and cereal

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #80 on: February 04, 2018, 01:08:19 AM »
Did you know tea bags have plastic in them?! I still need to work on that one. Will go loose leaf when I am done with my bags.

I have done without my keurig cups and now use keurig refill cup or my filter basket. That hasn't been too bad.

But now that grocery bags are not sold anymore (or 10c a piece at some stores), I know longer have bags for my waste bin. And I bought them in the beginning but have now gone without. I Have not gotten use to that one. Still going at it. Taking it out every few days as usual. Small kitchen can (office can). I don't want to buy a bigger one both due to full can mobility and will stink up longer it sits. Anyway still getting use to that.

Now I feel like I use more water. Because of consumption levels - washing the kitchen can or the coffee from the filter. Hmmm...

But if anything, plastic straws need to be banned for good. Did a beach clean up last summer. I could not believe how many straws badly wash up on our shores!

I did know that about tea bags. We've been on loose leaf for a while now as a result but jeez it's a pain when people come over. I've got one teapot and it doesn't make 5-6 cups of tea. With bags you just line 'em up. Last time I was stood in the kitchen for ages making endless pots.

I had to look up Keurig. Our big brand here like that is Nespresso and I've seen the refillable pods, they are such a great idea.

Bin bags - I tend to end up with them even though we don't get them with the shopping, because other people bring things etc. I guess that will change when our ban eventually starts. There are tutorials online for bin bags made of newspaper which I'm going to get on to eventually (we get a free almost daily newspaper so have the resources). I would definitely line your bin with newspaper as a start to make it easier to clean.

Water use - yes! Recycling and reusables increase water use. It's definitely a trade off. If I was being really good I'd rinse recycling in our rainwater tank water. Hopefully this challenge will = less things to wash before they are recycled. And anything reusable - I reckon I am saving enough energy and water that I won't worry about it. 

Single use straws - yep, ban 'em. If cafes must have them, give customers paper ones ffs.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #81 on: February 04, 2018, 01:23:49 AM »
Great challenge - I'm working on cutting down too!  More of 'progress to zero waste' for me, since I know we will not get to 100% plastic free just yet.

For inspiration and ideas, I have been following @wastelandrebel (and of course Bea Johnson) on Instagram plus the hashtag #zerowaste.  Some great ideas about cutting out plastic and waste in the kitchen, bathroom, and while travelling, etc. Yesterday I saw someone boiling their pineapple skins and learned about making pineapple tea. I haven't bought one for awhile, but I'm filing that info for future.

So far this month
Progress
- used my mesh produce bags and grocery bags for the first shop
- leftovers wrapped in waxed cloth in fridge, and lettuce in tea towel
- my office and I were featured in a short sustainability story about a current initiative we have on a University site (humble brag, plus yay for increased awareness to others!)
-bought brand new boots from a local sustainable brand - and the only packaging was a string I'll reuse and a small sticker (they said I was the only one to bring my own bag and they really appreciated it)

Whoopsies
-granola bar wrapper from me using up current supplies - and straw plus disposable plate by family who are not in the same reduction mode
-gum - I know it's just plastic (but have only reduced to a pack every about 2 months, but not eliminated yet)
-using up project supplies, peeled off lots of tape backing yesterday

Doesn't sound bad so far, but I know our grocery shop is still waaay off of plastic free since we are practically addicted to certain granola bars, crackers, and cereal


Hello halftimer! Well done on the changes and your moment of fame. Realistically reducing waste is a thing that can only be done slowly if it's going to lead to permanent change. I'm just going hard this month on the plastics so that we consider every little thing and just stop and think. Zero waste is a massive lifestyle change for most people I reckon, even if they were already pretty mindful about the environment.

I'm following a couple of facebook pages but I might follow those two on insta.

Granola bars....don't tempt me. My favourite brand was half price this week. Normally I'd buy five boxes and I have bought none. For me they are a convenience thing which I can remove by getting up 10 mins earlier so it's not an essential but still... And crackers! God knows what I'll do when we do our next hosting. I know it's possible to make them but I think my enjoyment of an event might be slightly marred if I am cooking every little last thing from scratch. Hopefully there is something in the health food aisle that comes in paper only packaging.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #82 on: February 04, 2018, 03:59:54 AM »
what do you do for tooth brushes?

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #83 on: February 04, 2018, 04:07:57 AM »
Hi fresh bread, what do you recommend for paper goods (tisuue, toilet paper, etc)? It's getting close to allergy season and I go through 1+ box of tissue a day (eek!). I should take medication, but I'm stubborn... Sometimes I can find tissue boxes without the plastic window, but I've yet to find a place where the boxes and rolls of paper goods do not come wrapped in plastic. I even went to my local organic store and they were still wrapped in plastic :( They actually had a lot of groceries and other products sealed in plastic, I guess that store is just organic and not eco... Any better luck where you are?
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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #84 on: February 04, 2018, 04:46:46 AM »
what do you do for tooth brushes?

Hi! I've got an ordinary plastic one right now but I could switch to a bamboo one. I think the bristles may still be plastic but at least the handle could composted?

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #85 on: February 04, 2018, 04:53:10 AM »
Hi fresh bread, what do you recommend for paper goods (tisuue, toilet paper, etc)? It's getting close to allergy season and I go through 1+ box of tissue a day (eek!). I should take medication, but I'm stubborn... Sometimes I can find tissue boxes without the plastic window, but I've yet to find a place where the boxes and rolls of paper goods do not come wrapped in plastic. I even went to my local organic store and they were still wrapped in plastic :( They actually had a lot of groceries and other products sealed in plastic, I guess that store is just organic and not eco... Any better luck where you are?

For toilet paper we have a great company here called Who Gives A Crap. It's mail order so you buy in bulk and it comes wrapped in paper. There used to be a company that sold paper wrapped toilet rolls at the supermarket I don't know if they still exist here. These are all made from recycled paper.

For tissues, you might consider cloth hankies? I'm going to make the switch at some point... Sounds like you'd need to buy 20 tho :)

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #86 on: February 04, 2018, 06:46:40 AM »
Hi fresh bread, what do you recommend for paper goods (tisuue, toilet paper, etc)? It's getting close to allergy season and I go through 1+ box of tissue a day (eek!). I should take medication, but I'm stubborn... Sometimes I can find tissue boxes without the plastic window, but I've yet to find a place where the boxes and rolls of paper goods do not come wrapped in plastic. I even went to my local organic store and they were still wrapped in plastic :( They actually had a lot of groceries and other products sealed in plastic, I guess that store is just organic and not eco... Any better luck where you are?

I heard a doctor on TV say that allergy medisin is a medicin that you safely can take, already some weeks before the pollen season. It has very few side effects compared to many other medicins.

DH uses the medicin all summer half year. And uses cloth hankies.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #87 on: February 04, 2018, 01:25:51 PM »
DAY 4 RESULTS!

Plastics avoided:

- Bought loose sunflower seeds at the market and had them use my fine mesh produce bag.
- Made bread and pizza
- Used reusable coffee cups
- Bought a litre of milk in a glass bottle*

Whoopsies:

- I bulk ordered oats thinking they came in a sack but they are in a big plastic bag like dog food. Ah well. Will change supplier next time or buy the organic ones which I think do come in paper. But are a lot more $$$.
- A guy at the market handed me a shot of juice to try in a plastic cup. I just took it because it looked tasty!
- Still didn't get to the packaging free shop. We're going to have to buy regular milk.
- Used glad wrap to store spare pizza dough in the freezer. Maybe I do need to buy those ultra thin reusable wraps.

* It's not homogenised so there was a big lump of clotted cream on top. When I was young I remember we just shook it but this was too thick. I used the lumpy cream in an omelette. I'm not a fan of lumps in my milk so may not buy this one again.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #88 on: February 04, 2018, 04:13:20 PM »
I don't get bad hayfever, but do tend to have a runny nose and hankies are great. As a bonus, they're much softer on the nose than tissues are.

@Fresh Bread do you have a freezer safe plastic container you could stuff the pizza dough into? It needs to be just barely big enough.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #89 on: February 04, 2018, 04:46:43 PM »
I don't get bad hayfever, but do tend to have a runny nose and hankies are great. As a bonus, they're much softer on the nose than tissues are.

@Fresh Bread do you have a freezer safe plastic container you could stuff the pizza dough into? It needs to be just barely big enough.

Yes, I just need to find something that's just the right size. I make the dough in the bread machine, cut it into thirds and one portion goes to the freezer. This is a weekly thing so it would be worth buying just the right tub. Or I can reuse the same ziplock over and over. Glad wrap's just so good at keeping dough in good condition.

A problem I have in life is lack of freezer space. I posted a pic earlier in the thread, it's two shelves above our small size fridge. If everything was in proper freezer safe boxes and stacked neatly it would be a hell of a lot easier to get things in and out. Our dog used to run from the kitchen when we opened the freezer because he knew that's when the bombs started falling and mummy got cross.

Frozen veg is often quite cheap (I guess since it's the in season price all year round and you don't pay for the skin, stalks etc?) so that would be a negative of, for example, buying a head of brocolli and chopping it up and storing in a box.

Also - shelling peas - who has time for that? I'm already spending a lot more time in the kitchen and some point I'm going to hit a low spoons day. I need to figure out how the zero waste people are just getting shit done in life without convenience goods. Even with lots of spoons there's only so many hours in the day, you know? It feels like my entire weekend was spent shopping or prepping food or cleaning up.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #90 on: February 04, 2018, 05:17:59 PM »
Most of the zero waste stories I've followed that seem to keep it going have access to fresh food markets close by their homes. I know when I lived across the street from a food co-op I almost never had packaging of any type used for food, and I shopped every couple of days instead of weekly as I do now.

Frozen vegetables especially are a tricky one - they tend to taste better and have more nutrients than trucked-from-afar 'fresh' vegetables in my area this time of year. I think this summer I'm going to experiment with freezing veggies in jars with a vacuum sealer to hopefully prevent freezer burn (I have a handheld sealer).
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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #91 on: February 04, 2018, 06:38:23 PM »

For toilet paper we have a great company here called Who Gives A Crap. It's mail order so you buy in bulk and it comes wrapped in paper. There used to be a company that sold paper wrapped toilet rolls at the supermarket I don't know if they still exist here. These are all made from recycled paper.

For tissues, you might consider cloth hankies? I'm going to make the switch at some point... Sounds like you'd need to buy 20 tho :)

I am am using who gives a crap bamboo rolls. Please join us in asking them to stop using the middle cardboard roll if you do buy. So unnecessary! They send 48 rolls at a time in a box = no plastic. - lasts us about 6 months.

I am using bamboo toothbrushes - I am enjoying the brand wowee. There was no plastic wrapping. Still have to throw the bristles though. My toothpaste I make with with 2 tablespoons baking soda, 2 tablespoons coconut oil, and 15 drops food grade peppermint essential oils.

Everyone is doing so awesome!

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #92 on: February 04, 2018, 06:57:28 PM »

For toilet paper we have a great company here called Who Gives A Crap. It's mail order so you buy in bulk and it comes wrapped in paper. There used to be a company that sold paper wrapped toilet rolls at the supermarket I don't know if they still exist here. These are all made from recycled paper.

For tissues, you might consider cloth hankies? I'm going to make the switch at some point... Sounds like you'd need to buy 20 tho :)

I am am using who gives a crap bamboo rolls. Please join us in asking them to stop using the middle cardboard roll if you do buy. So unnecessary! They send 48 rolls at a time in a box = no plastic. - lasts us about 6 months.

I am using bamboo toothbrushes - I am enjoying the brand wowee. There was no plastic wrapping. Still have to throw the bristles though. My toothpaste I make with with 2 tablespoons baking soda, 2 tablespoons coconut oil, and 15 drops food grade peppermint essential oils.

Everyone is doing so awesome!

The inner cardboard tubes make excellent dog toys though!

I'm not a massive fan of mint so I had this idea: what if I use baking soda & salt, then chew on a sprig of parsley that we could keep in the bathroom. Parsley is a great breath freshener, should you ever accidentally eat too much garlic or fish sauce.

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #93 on: February 05, 2018, 03:56:13 AM »
DAY 5 RESULTS!

Avoided plastic by:
- Being just about organised enough (by the skin of my teeth) to make lunch instead of buying it.
- Hubby used his keep cup for coffee

Whoopsies:
- Had to buy milk in a plastic bottle because I haven't yet been to the no-packaging store to buy milk powder. I'm thinking that to make it easier on myself I may just buy a big thing of milk powder in a plastic bag to start off with. The supermarket is just so much easier to get to as I can pop in on my way somewhere. One bag is so much less plastic than multiple bottles, and at least I can be fairly confident it will get recycled domestically. A step towards no plastic we shall call it.


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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #94 on: February 06, 2018, 06:21:50 PM »
DAY 6 RESULTS!

Avoided plastic by
:

- Getting a gift of a shitload of cherry tomatoes that were from a farm stall that were about to go off. No punnet, although they did come in a plastic shopping bag as some were split and leaky. I made gallons of pasta sauce so that's a few plastic tubs and glass jars avoided.
- Buying 1kg of milk powder in a plastic bag that replaces 7 litres of milk in plastic bottles, so a trade off. The ingredients contain soy as an additive, which is a bit of a bummer but I'll see how it tastes.
- Buying more meat with just paper wrapping.

Whoopsies:
- Also bought a 3 litre bottle of milk in plastic. Hey, I was already busy making gallons of tomato sauce without figuring out how to reconstitute the milk too.
- I drove to the packaging free shop again and the nearest car park and on street parking was full so I gave up! There is a chain place in a shopping centre so I'm just going to go there. I think you have to use paper bags for your stuff but it's still better I suppose.

We are going away at the weekend so that creates a whole nother set of challenges. I'll bring plastic free breakfast stuff, and I can buy or make bread rolls plastic free before we leave to take for sandwiches, and we will probably eat out both evenings. It's a 6 hr road trip so I'm not overly keen on bringing much that needs to stay cold but will bring a bit of cheese and yoghurt to avoid buying plastic. We'll take our keep cups for coffees. Am I forgetting anything?


Other thoughts today:
https://www.facebook.com/anita.the.writer/posts/1791555574252218
I hope this link works. Anti-plastic blogger, Anita Horan, does not shop at packaging free stores because she says they fill the bins from plastic containers anyway. I don't really agree with her as surely the use of one big bag or container is better than multiple little ones - won't there be in total a lower square metre of plastic created? I think if I use large volumes of something and can store it (flour, oats, vinegar?) then I'm better off buying in bulk, regardless of the packaging, both to save money and packaging. For little quantities of things (tea, seeds, nuts) I can shop at the packaging free store.

ETA: I useful thing I found out on the FB post above is that Nerada loose leaf tea may come with no plastic inner. Something to try.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #95 on: February 06, 2018, 06:23:45 PM »
Where does she buy her bulk goods if not from packaging free shops, then?!

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #96 on: February 06, 2018, 06:33:04 PM »
Where does she buy her bulk goods if not from packaging free shops, then?!

She just buys her grains etc in plastic bags from the supermarket. I don't think she's really thought this through, I think it's just a bit too hard - which is fair enough, I'm finding it a right ball ache getting round the different shops and having to have containers ready if you're just nearby and want to pop in etc etc. But still, plastic free is her whole thing.

ETA: I went and had another look at her page. I think her mission is to convince companies not to wrap things in plastic e.g. bread, fruit and veg. To make it standard practice so the average person is not buying lots of plastic. It's not like it's her mission to rid her own life entirely of plastic as such.

palebluedot

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #97 on: February 06, 2018, 06:53:58 PM »
Great job everyone. This is something I'm starting to tackle and realized it's going to be a year (life) long challenge but I think it's worth it. I've been reading Beth Terry's blog the last few days. Hope it helps people pick up more tips!

https://myplasticfreelife.com/plasticfreeguide/

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #98 on: February 06, 2018, 08:12:23 PM »
Great job everyone. This is something I'm starting to tackle and realized it's going to be a year (life) long challenge but I think it's worth it. I've been reading Beth Terry's blog the last few days. Hope it helps people pick up more tips!

https://myplasticfreelife.com/plasticfreeguide/

Hello and thanks for the link. 100 ideas to reduce plastic is great - I've already seen one or two I should do and I haven't read the whole thing.

Taking a container to get takeaway I can definitely do - it assumes you're not phoning the order in ahead so will take a little bit more time while you wait. Also, if you're getting chips, don't they use their box as a sort of measure of how much to give you? I'm wondering if it might be a big ask on a busy Friday... Can but try. Two out of three of my local fish and chip / burger places I *think* from memory use card boxes for the chips not foam so can use this tip to reduce all my waste not just plastic.

mountain mustache

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #99 on: February 06, 2018, 09:04:17 PM »
I saw someone mention deodorant options that do not come in plastic, and I love love love Schmidt's natural deodorant that comes in a glass jar. It does have a hard plastic screw top lid, BUT I reuse the jars forever for other things once I finish one so I consider it somewhat of a win. Also it is the only natural deodorant I've found that doesn't burn my skin, and also actually WORKS, and doesn't leave me feeling gross and smelly like so many other kinds