Author Topic: Plastic-free February  (Read 4021 times)

kaypinkHH

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #100 on: February 07, 2018, 05:15:27 AM »
PTF :).

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #101 on: February 07, 2018, 03:50:20 PM »
DAY 7 RESULTS!

I bought coffee beans in a paper bag with a lining. I have yet to investigate exactly what it's made off but there is probably plastic in there. Better than an all plastic bag?

Other than that, no plastic crossed our threshold!

I did a reccy of local shops to check out the bread situation as I forgot to set the breadmaker in the morning. I can't get anything plastic free at my very local shops but the village centre ten mins walk away has 2 shops that sell loaves in paper bags. Good to know.

My bicarb of soda (baking soda) deodorant seems to be going ok. No irritation and I don't seem that stinky compared to my normal deo that was a bit shit anyway.

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #102 on: February 09, 2018, 03:52:49 PM »
DAY 8 & 9 RESULTS!

I was unexpectedly called away for a few hours on Thursday morning. Five minutes down the road I must have  had a premonition about how long I'd be out because I turned around to go back and get my water bottle that I'd forgotten. Even though I was starving, I didn't stop for a prepackaged snack anywhere. I survived. If I'd seen a bakery I would have stopped and got a sausage roll in a paper bag :)

My food prep for our weekend away was non-existent as I had unexpected things come up on Friday morning as well! We ate at a bakery on the way down here and used keep cups for coffee. I asked at the bakery if they could sell me a loaf without plastic but they didn't have any left unpackaged, so no sale for them. To be fair they were almost totally sold out of everything.

We experimented with powdered milk. We got the full fat Coles one. It's kind of thin but also creamy, like sticking to your mouth creamy. I think it's ok for cereal but in a coffee it impacted the enjoyment. It heated up quicker than normal milk, probably because it's not as complex or something, and it did make a foam, so it looked the part. I don't think we'd buy it again. Hubby wants to try the skim version and I'll also get a bulk shop version to compare. When we get back I will try making kefir and yoghurt with it.


Other thoughts:
I was thinking about razors yesterday. I don't shave all that much so we are talking one plastic razor lasting months but it would be nice to have a reusable one. Does anyone have a no-plastic one? How does it go with underarms (ie heavy man sized razor, fiddly location, does it work logistically?)

I've also been thinking about public attitudes towards waste and whether they might be changing. I feel like they are but I might be living in a greenie echo chamber. A few years ago someone opened a plastic free shop in my suburb. It closed within a year, I assume from lack of business but I wonder if today it would get more support. The packaging-free co-op a bit further away survives because it's staffed by volunteers who get 20% off their shopping. Chains like The Source survive I don't know how.



In a while I will venture out and see how much packaging free food I can buy in this small town. My money's on there being maximum packaging because it's been transported some distance. I hope there's a bakery selling hot cross buns.


Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #103 on: February 09, 2018, 07:08:54 PM »
Well we brought along our own ground coffee on our holiday but I didn't think about tea...

CalBal

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #104 on: February 11, 2018, 09:43:26 AM »
DAY 8 & 9 RESULTS!

Other thoughts:
I was thinking about razors yesterday. I don't shave all that much so we are talking one plastic razor lasting months but it would be nice to have a reusable one. Does anyone have a no-plastic one? How does it go with underarms (ie heavy man sized razor, fiddly location, does it work logistically?)


Yes! I used to have a metal safety double edge razor (I really need to get a new one). Nowadays they are quite easy to find, which wasn't so true 10 years ago. I don't recall which brand I had, but they work really well, and there's no plastic involved*. You can get new ones or restored vintage ones. Here's a helpful article!

http://www.iconicshavers.com/best-safety-razors-for-women/

*Many of the blades you can buy are wrapped in paper too. You might need to use trial and error to find a brand you like and that come in paper.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 09:55:36 AM by CalBal »

Serendip

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #105 on: February 11, 2018, 10:02:59 AM »
Having a hard time finding certain items (fresh herbs) that aren't packed in plastic. Might have to investigate building a small hydroponic station so I can grow them inside during these winter months!

This year, have not used any disposable coffee cups and no plastic straws. We have reduced our garbage waste and now take out the bin only 1x/month. :)

Linda_Norway

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #106 on: February 12, 2018, 02:41:54 AM »
Yesterday I met a woman who had brought her own reusable tea bag to an event. I told her I only use loose tea at home, but she saw reasons to bring it along at other places as well. That was impressive.
I almost wanted to tell her about the concept of reusable menstrual pads, but thought that might be inappropriate in that setting... ;-)

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #107 on: February 12, 2018, 07:12:59 PM »
Having a hard time finding certain items (fresh herbs) that aren't packed in plastic. Might have to investigate building a small hydroponic station so I can grow them inside during these winter months!

This year, have not used any disposable coffee cups and no plastic straws. We have reduced our garbage waste and now take out the bin only 1x/month. :)

Congrats on the cups and straws! Hubby has managed to just use one coffee cup in Feb. Growing your own herbs sounds like a good idea. It's so much more cost effective too when you only need a few sprigs. Mint and oregano and particularly weed like and easy. Thyme I find a bit more prissy but it is at least a perennial. In our supermarkets we can normally buy herbs growing in a pot so at least if they are annuals you can keep them alive til you need them eg. basil.


DAY 10, 11, 12 RESULTS!

So we were away for a couple of days and we didn't do *too* badly, although it was mostly a cheat because we ate out all the lunches and dinners. Minus points - on the way home we of course were not organised, our planned plastic free dinner stop had closed for the day and we ended up with a servo sandwich in a plastic box. Ah well. I also didn't think to bring loose leaf tea so used teabags. On the plus side - the place we stayed had packaging free soap and the loose dishwasher powder etc looked like it was refilled from bulk containers.

Yesterday I avoided plastic by buying milk in a glass bottle and making up a batch of milk powder milk too. We had the milk powder milk on our cereal and I must say, it's not good. Such a weird taste. The milk was the same brand I had before but this time I was able to shake the bottle to mix through the cream instead of having lumps. Yay!

Overall, I am still all over the place and not planning things out very well!

I'm also trying out a new app called Y Waste where you buy food at cost that businesses are chucking out. This will inevitably lead to some plastics coming into the house as I can't pick what I take home, but the aim of the app is to reduce food waste. I think I will have to test it out to see where I *can* successfully use it plastic free. I am quite hopeful that I can get and freeze a bunch of fancy bread from a bakery that does not use plastic near-ish me at a fraction of the cost. We will see.

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #108 on: February 12, 2018, 07:14:32 PM »
DAY 8 & 9 RESULTS!

Other thoughts:
I was thinking about razors yesterday. I don't shave all that much so we are talking one plastic razor lasting months but it would be nice to have a reusable one. Does anyone have a no-plastic one? How does it go with underarms (ie heavy man sized razor, fiddly location, does it work logistically?)


Yes! I used to have a metal safety double edge razor (I really need to get a new one). Nowadays they are quite easy to find, which wasn't so true 10 years ago. I don't recall which brand I had, but they work really well, and there's no plastic involved*. You can get new ones or restored vintage ones. Here's a helpful article!

http://www.iconicshavers.com/best-safety-razors-for-women/

*Many of the blades you can buy are wrapped in paper too. You might need to use trial and error to find a brand you like and that come in paper.


Thanks, I will look at these options. Do you ever sharpen blades or just dispose of them?

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #109 on: February 12, 2018, 07:17:28 PM »
Yesterday I met a woman who had brought her own reusable tea bag to an event. I told her I only use loose tea at home, but she saw reasons to bring it along at other places as well. That was impressive.
I almost wanted to tell her about the concept of reusable menstrual pads, but thought that might be inappropriate in that setting... ;-)

Yeah, a bit much for a first meeting, unless it's a periods conference! Did she have a little baggy to carry the wet tea bag home again?

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #110 on: February 12, 2018, 11:48:51 PM »
CHEESE...

I buy my cheese in 1kg blocks because it's cheaper and requires less plastic packaging per gram of cheese. I'm still using the block I bought in January, but I saw this fancy cheese reduced to clear and thought I'd buy to see what the packaging is. I've also seen butter in this sort of foil.

Anyway - it scrunched like foil, so could well be recyclable (we can put a big ball of aluminium foil in our recycling) but it's got this sort of greaseproof paper on the inside. I reckon when the cheese is finished I could try and soak off the paper and see if the worms will eat it but it's probably plastic coated. Therefore this is not much different to buying cheese in normal plastic really, is it? Bummer.

 

Linda_Norway

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #111 on: February 13, 2018, 01:20:53 AM »
Yesterday I met a woman who had brought her own reusable tea bag to an event. I told her I only use loose tea at home, but she saw reasons to bring it along at other places as well. That was impressive.
I almost wanted to tell her about the concept of reusable menstrual pads, but thought that might be inappropriate in that setting... ;-)

Yeah, a bit much for a first meeting, unless it's a periods conference! Did she have a little baggy to carry the wet tea bag home again?

No, she let the reusable bag dry in her hand and put it right in the pocket of her vest. She said it was surprisingly dry.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2018, 04:14:10 AM by Linda_Norway »

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #112 on: February 13, 2018, 03:41:13 PM »
Spreading the message with humour...

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10156284619950712&id=287683225711

Plus a feel good article about glass milk bottles. I hope reusables return!

http://amp.abc.net.au/article/9442394

CalBal

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #113 on: February 13, 2018, 04:26:27 PM »
Thanks, I will look at these options. Do you ever sharpen blades or just dispose of them?

Hi @Fresh Bread, you dispose of them. They are very thin double edged blades (100% metal) but I don't think they are sharpen-able. I don't really think there is a way to recycle them as that would be dangerous, but when you think about it, the disposable blades have metal in them also and are not recyclable either. You can dispose of them in a sharps bin, if one is available somewhere nearby, but I usually save them up in an old plastic container until I have a whole bunch and tape them in some cardboard or something and throw that away. You don't want someone getting cut by them. I also use them for longer than you are "supposed" to, so they last a while.

(Straight blades are sharpen-able, those are the razors you see in old-timey movies (and some people still do use them today, some people say they are the best!), but I don't think you can use them on legs and armpits. Also they are crazy sharp, I would be a little afraid!)

I ended up ordering a new Merkur after all this talk! And a variety pack of blades to see what I like. From when I had the metal safety razor last time, there definitely are differences in the brands of blades. I don't remember what I liked best though. I'll report more when that stuff comes!

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #114 on: February 14, 2018, 06:57:15 PM »
Thanks, I will look at these options. Do you ever sharpen blades or just dispose of them?

Hi @Fresh Bread, you dispose of them. They are very thin double edged blades (100% metal) but I don't think they are sharpen-able. I don't really think there is a way to recycle them as that would be dangerous, but when you think about it, the disposable blades have metal in them also and are not recyclable either. You can dispose of them in a sharps bin, if one is available somewhere nearby, but I usually save them up in an old plastic container until I have a whole bunch and tape them in some cardboard or something and throw that away. You don't want someone getting cut by them. I also use them for longer than you are "supposed" to, so they last a while.

(Straight blades are sharpen-able, those are the razors you see in old-timey movies (and some people still do use them today, some people say they are the best!), but I don't think you can use them on legs and armpits. Also they are crazy sharp, I would be a little afraid!)

I ended up ordering a new Merkur after all this talk! And a variety pack of blades to see what I like. From when I had the metal safety razor last time, there definitely are differences in the brands of blades. I don't remember what I liked best though. I'll report more when that stuff comes!

Straight blades and underarms definitely would not mix. Thanks for the tips.

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #115 on: February 14, 2018, 07:27:07 PM »
DAY 13,14,15 RESULTS!

I avoided plastic by:
- shopping at the local packaging free co-op (finally!) using my own containers
- buying pasta in a box, although it does have a tiny tiny plastic window so you can see the shape.
- buying yoghurt in a jar - normally very, very expensive but I got lucky*

The co-op was good, but the range is quite limited so it's not somewhere you can buy everything and the prices are literally double the supermarket. They were out of black tea and they don't sell plain old white vinegar for cleaning or any milk powders. I forgot sultanas possibly because they don't stock them but I'm not 100%. The good news is that they may be getting some packaging free cheese in stock soon so I'd go back just for that.

The thing about buying boxed items like pasta is, you never know if they went with a plastic bag inside or not. It is trial and error I think finding the right products.

Plastic that sneaked in:
- Hubby is buying treats for at work in plastic still, like hot cross buns. I can't see him baking at the weekends and I don't really want to do it myself on top of all the from-scratch cooking and extra shopping :( He is keen to make other tasks 'his thing' though, like making up the milk powder.
- I bought 2 litres of vinegar for cleaning & weedkiller
- I bought another 3 litre milk - well, it was heavily discounted.
- one bread loaf in plastic*

* I downloaded an app that helps businesses offload their food waste at the end of the day, to avoid putting in the bin. The customer gets a huge discount on the food but you have to collect it in a specific time window (normally an hour just before they close). I collected a big box of organic groceries for just $10 this week, and the value of it is well over $20. There was yoghurt, bread, fruit and veg, and the only thing in plastic is the bread (sprouted wheat, it's a first for us!) I'm thinking of stopping by a bakery that's on the app today that I know avoids plastic bags if I have time, but I've got limited freezer space.

Also on my to-do list is to visit another packaging free store to get sultanas and coconut milk powder. And then on to the plastic free butchers. Just so many places. Tonight for dinner is plastic free tom ka gai - chicken, coconut milk, veggies, ginger, lemongrass (from the garden!), lime juice, fish sauce (ok, the bottle has a plastic cap but I nearly made it!).

ETA: I made it to the butchers and the packaging free shop but not the bakers. The packaging free shop  (The Source) did not have milk powder. Apparently it's on order. Boo. I'm really going to have to make some oat milk....


palebluedot

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #117 on: February 15, 2018, 08:22:27 PM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/15/world/europe/lent-plastic-church-of-england.html?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=cur

Awesome news! BBC itself will stop using single plastic use by 2020: https://futurism.com/plastic-ban-bbc-blue-planet-ii/

I've been doing research on sustainable toothbrushes. I might try Brush with Bamboo and see how it is. I'd like a one-time purchase though and indiegogo has some interesting projects. What do people think of the Amabrush or Be.?

https://www.indiegogo.com/explore/all?project_type=all&project_timing=all&sort=trending&q=toothbrush

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #118 on: February 15, 2018, 09:40:31 PM »
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/15/world/europe/lent-plastic-church-of-england.html?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=cur

Awesome!

BBC itself will stop using single plastic use by 2020: https://futurism.com/plastic-ban-bbc-blue-planet-ii/

I've been doing research on sustainable toothbrushes. I might try Brush with Bamboo and see how it is. I'd like a one-time purchase though and indiegogo has some interesting projects. What do people think of the Amabrush or Be.?

https://www.indiegogo.com/explore/all?project_type=all&project_timing=all&sort=trending&q=toothbrush

I had a look at Brush with Bamboo. I don't know why they need that annoying bit of corn starch packaging but I like how they have reuse ideas for the handle! Yep it would be good to buy something just once, I will look at those ones later.

I don't wear out bristles very quickly so maybe I should just boil my toothbrush for 10 mins every couple of months and keep it much longer.. Hubby gets through one in a month! (I have no idea what he's doing and his dentist has told him to go easy.)

Some people gargle with oil instead of brushing, I think someone mentions it upthread. That's a big leap tho. Maybe gargling but then eating an apple would work. I met someone once that ate an apple every morning instead of brushing.

palebluedot

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #119 on: February 18, 2018, 04:18:53 PM »
There's also the Environmental Toothbrush: https://environmentaltoothbrush.com.au/

Shipping cost would be high for me though since I'm in the states. Seems to be same quality as Brush with Bamboo. If you do find a one-time purchase let us know :-)

luciep

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #120 on: February 18, 2018, 05:51:20 PM »
They have some wooden toothbrushes on the Life Without Plastic website https://www.lifewithoutplastic.com/store/brush-with-bamboo-adult-toothbrush.html as well.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #121 on: February 18, 2018, 10:11:42 PM »
Freshie, there's also Toothcrush which is a subscription service for bamboo toothbrushes in Aus.

luciep

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #122 on: Today at 07:51:51 AM »
We went to Olive Garden last week (not my place of choice, but we were invited to a birthday party over there). We asked for no straws for everybody. But the birthday girl "needed" a straw for her chocolate milk (which had a lid) and her mom "needed" a straw as well to drink her diet coke. The waiter ended up bringing straws for everybody and throwing the extra ones in the trash. At least I tried...

A few days later, we had dinner at our favorite place (we eat there at least once a month). When I asked the lady for a water with no straw, she laughed. I wonder what was funny about that. But hopefully I started a new trend...

I showed the birthday girl a video of the turtle that had a straw stuck in a her nose. She was impressed. I hope she will start asking for "no straw" every time she eats out. We shall see.

AerynLee

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #123 on: Today at 08:05:26 AM »
I went to the movies last night and forgot to bring my water bottle (they've never had a problem with me bringing in a reusable one). I considered getting a water there, either a free tiny cup or pay for an Aquafina, but decided against both because of the plastic waste it would create.

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #124 on: Today at 03:41:11 PM »
Good work Luciep! Being the change and showing people that it's possible to be different to what's been the norm is really important. I think gradually it will sink in.

And Aerynlee! Yeah, I don't recall anyone ever dying from dehydration at the movies. It's probably just habit that we feel we need something to drink and snack on.

LONG OVERDUE UPDATE!

I can't remember where I got up to.. We both had a busy and tiring Saturday so I ordered UberEats for dinner. I chose I place that I know packages the food in a paper box. They've switched to recycled so that's cool.

I've continued to buy 3 litre bottles of milk in plastic but we are supplementing that with milk powder and milk in glass bottles so the number of bottles coming through is much lower. I haven't bought any non-dairy milks in tetra-pak cartons. None of the three packaging free shops in my area have milk powder but one has it on order but I have still not attempted to make my own non-dairy milk....!

I got another food waste box last night. Again there was one item in plastic so not too bad. It wasn't as good a haul as the previous one but ok. I'm trying to get to the bakers on the same app today.

The last news is that I've ordered a few more non-plastic things online. Being no plastic is not necessarily frugal! I'm trying a glass jar deodorant, hubby's getting a bamboo toothbrush and bamboo cotton buds. I've also ordered a variety of reusable menstrual things to try to go with the cloth pads.

I've also ordered a bread bag to shop & store no-plastic bread. It's obviously something I could have done without but it's made of recycled plastic so I've closed the loop a bit. Our largest chain of bakers (Baker's Delight) is no longer allowing people to use their own bags!! But they do have large paper bags if you ask.

I just went and bought a toothpaste in plastic because I couldn't find an easy alternative and there's too much going on right now to ask enough questions and get answers before we run out. Eg I'm keen to try a powder but need to find one in glass.

Attached is a pic of my plastics bin on bin day. It's normally at least 3/4 full and it's only a 1/4 full. Whoo!



HappierAtHome

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #125 on: Today at 04:18:43 PM »
Yay Freshie! That's awesome!

Milk - you've probably already looked into this, but cashew milk doesn't need to be strained, so that's a bit easier than almond milk if you're feeling overwhelmed.

I can't believe Baker's Delight doesn't allow you to use your own bag. Do they not understand that everything is moving in that direction now?!

Fresh Bread

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #126 on: Today at 04:38:24 PM »
Yay Freshie! That's awesome!

Milk - you've probably already looked into this, but cashew milk doesn't need to be strained, so that's a bit easier than almond milk if you're feeling overwhelmed.

I can't believe Baker's Delight doesn't allow you to use your own bag. Do they not understand that everything is moving in that direction now?!

I think technically if you keep your bag on your side of the counter and they hand you the bread it could be ok but people who get their bread sliced are struggling. It's to do with contamination risks but that's just a load of crap, there's pigeons and sparrows flying through most shopping centres ffs. It couldn't possibly be gluten / gluten free contamination risks as they don't even sell GF do they? I think they could redeem themselves by switching from plastic bags to only paper but that's a big cost increase for them.

Plastic is something I can't unsee now. Plus I am quietly judging people who have plastic bags now, I can't help myself. In fact, I already did but now it's worse.

ETA: I do have a few cashews left so maybe I can blend them up tonight.


katscratch

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Re: Plastic-free February
« Reply #127 on: Today at 06:00:00 PM »
I don't know if they are available in your area, but I've used sea sponges instead of tampons. I absolutely loved them. On really heavy or unpredictable days I also used a cloth pad as a backup but found the sponges to be perfect for my body.
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